Hydreigon

Levitate
The wielder is immune to Ground-type moves.
Type Tier
Dark / Dragon OU
Level 50 Statistics (see level 5, 50, 100)
Min- Min Max Max+
HP
92
- 167 199 -
Atk
105
112 125 157 172
Def
90
99 110 142 156
SpA
125
130 145 177 194
SpD
90
99 110 142 156
Spe
98
106 118 150 165

Overview

Hydreigon belongs to the special group of Pokemon that can boast they possess no true counters: they potentially carry a move that can OHKO or 2HKO any Pokemon in the game, and as such are virtually impossible to switch into. Its peers include such wrecking balls as Deoxys-A, Excadrill, and Salamence. He also has Levitate, garnering many of the benefits his Flying-type brethren possess with nearly none of the drawbacks. Hydreigon is even gifted with excellent attacking and defensive stats as well as a movepool to make any Pokemon leaf-green with envy, so why does he struggle in OU? The answer is simple: Hydreigon's base 98 Speed. While very far from bad, he falls just short of the myriad of faster Pokemon. Hydreigon's secondary Dark typing only makes things worse, giving it weaknesses to Fighting- and Bug-type attacks while doing nothing to improve its STAB coverage or alleviate its Dragon and Ice weaknesses. Hydreigon is not an easy Dragon to use, and isn't always the right one, with many of his peers being faster, more powerful, or both, but don't be afraid to give it a try; this ferocious hydra just might surprise you.

Name Item Nature

Mixed Attacker

Life Orb / Expert Belt Mild / Rash
Moveset EVs
~ Draco Meteor
~ Fire Blast
~ Superpower
~ Roost / Earthquake / Dark Pulse
4 HP / 252 SpA / 252 Spe

This set takes advantage of Hydreigon's superb offensive stats and incredible coverage to break through common walls and deal heavy damage to the opponent's team. The beauty of this set is that even if your opponent switches into a resisted attacking move, Hydreigon typically has a coverage move that is powerful enough to 2HKO said switch in. Draco Meteor is Hydreigon's strongest move, and is an incredible move when used effectively. Its effects are immediate; either the opposing Pokemon is flat out OHKOed by the sheer power of Draco Meteor, or weakened enough to break through at later points in the match. One important thing to consider is that the mere threat of Draco Meteor is an advantage, as it also allows for much more liberty in prediction. For example, your opponent isn't likely to leave a Pokemon that takes neutral damage from Draco Meteor in on Hydreigon (unless they're specially defensive), and are far more likely to switch into a Steel-type. From there, your choice of appropriate coverage move can pick them off and secure yourself an early game advantage. Fire Blast is an essential coverage move as it synergizes semi-perfectly with Draco Meteor by hitting nearly every Steel-type for super effective damage. Common Steel-types such as Jirachi, Ferrothorn, Forretress, and Skarmory are beaten with relative ease.

Superpower is an awesome tool for Hydreigon, as it allows it to overpower several of its checks. Tyranitar, Heatran, and Blissey are all capable of tanking Draco Meteor, and aren't fazed by Fire Blast in the slightest, but they cower in the face of Superpower. Tyranitar is always OHKOed by Superpower, while Heatran and Blissey both face 2HKOs from it. Blissey and Heatran are actually 2HKOed by the combination of Draco Meteor and Superpower if Stealth Rock is in play, so you don't actually have to predict with Superpower to defeat them. The final move choice is a tossup and largely based on the player. Roost significantly increases Hydreigon's durability, and it offsets the recoil from Life Orb. Additionally, it has some utility against stall teams that rely on passive damage to wear down attackers. Earthquake jacks up Hydreigon's offensive power by destroying would-be checks such as Heatran and Jirachi under certain conditions. With Earthquake as an attacking option, you can play it safe and use Draco Meteor, regardless of Heatran's presence since Earthquake will always crush it to pieces. It's especially effective against Jirachi in the rain, too, as Hydreigon no longer has to rely on neutral Fire Blast to get consistent damage on it. Finally, we have Dark Pulse which rounds out Hydreigon's final moveslot and provides it with an effective, albeit situational, secondary STAB move that is useful against the likes of Reuniclus and Jellicent.

Team Options & Additional Comments >>>
Name Item Nature

Substitute

Leftovers / Life Orb Modest
Moveset EVs
~ Substitute
~ Dragon Pulse
~ Focus Blast
~ Fire Blast / Roost
4 HP / 252 SpA / 252 Spe

Substitute goes hand-in-hand with Hydreigon's excellent coverage and ability to force switches. Instead of viciously attempting to tear its opponents apart, this set adopts the tried and true method of whittling down its foes into KO range. Substitute lets Hydreigon scout its checks, protects it from status effects, and most important of all, protects Hydreigon from taking hits. Hydreigon's mere presence forces Pokemon out, so you will have no trouble setting up Substitutes on forced switches. In other cases, its typing allows it to set up Substitutes on Pokemon that can't really damage it, such as Rotom-W and Celebi. Dragon Pulse is a step down from Draco Meteor, and its disappointing Base Power leaves a lot to be desired; however, it's a reliable STAB move that generally deals sufficient damage. Focus Blast and Fire Blast are awesome coverage moves that ensure that Hydreigon hits everything in OU for at least neutral damage. Hydreigon is still capable of beating its most common checks, such as Tyranitar and Heatran, but dedicated special walls such as Blissey and Chansey are out of Hydreigon's reach. Roost is a decent alternative to Fire Blast, as it helps stave off Substitute recoil, and is a flat out requirement if you're planning on using Life Orb, as Substitute and Life Orb recoil (and other forms of passive damage) eventually take their toll on Hydreigon.

Team Options & Additional Comments >>>
Name Item Nature

Choice Specs

Choice Specs Modest
Moveset EVs
~ Draco Meteor
~ Focus Blast
~ Fire Blast / Flamethrower
~ U-turn / Dark Pulse
4 HP / 252 SpA / 252 Spe

Choice Specs promotes a different way of playing with Hydreigon, which focuses on a more extreme hit and run playstyle, therefore overriding Hydreigon's standard role of wallbreaking. Choice Specs-boosted Draco Meteor pretty much steamrolls anything that isn't a dedicated special wall or a Steel-type, and even then most Steel-types take heavy damage from Draco Meteor. Focus Blast is the most important coverage move on this set, and knowing when to use Focus Blast is the key to being effective with it; it lets Hydreigon power its way through most of the Steel-types in OU in addition to OHKOing all variants of Tyranitar and Heatran, as well as 2HKOing Blissey most of the time after Stealth Rock damage. Fire Blast targets Jirachi and hits Ferrothorn even harder, though you should avoid using this move in general because it's very easy for the opponent to capitalize on. Tyranitar, Politoed, Heatran, and Dragon-types can switch in and put your team at a massive disadvantage. Only use Fire Blast when you absolutely need to remove Jirachi or Ferrothorn.

U-turn is a useful move to scout its checks and gain momentum, and is useful when paired with a Dugtrio; though, on average, Hydreigon is usually better off attacking. Dark Pulse is a fairly strong and consistent STAB move, though it's similar to Fire Blast in that it's too easy for the opponent to abuse; however, Dark Pulse is particularly effective against Reuniclus and Jellicent. This set is easier to use than the other Hydreigon sets, but therein lies the problem; the mixed attacker set is more effective at netting KOs because of its ability to switch moves. Choice Specs is easier to use in general, as you can spam Draco Meteor to get meaningful damage on most of the OU metagame, but don't be tricked into thinking that this is acceptable, because you're better off using the mixed attacker set if you want to simply KO things. If you're going to use the Choice Specs set, it's for its 20% boost in power and lack of recoil in comparison to the mixed attacker set.

Team Options & Additional Comments >>>

Other Options

Hydreigon's offensive movepool is enormous; it has access to nearly every single respectable attacking move in the game, which gives it a myriad of options to choose from. On the physical side, Hydreigon has access to Acrobatics, Crunch, Dragon Tail, Outrage, and Head Smash. One can choose to use a Choice Band set mostly consisting of these moves, however, it's mostly outclassed by other Choice Band using Dragon-types. Hydreigon has access to Thunder Wave and can use it on any given set to cripple attackers; however, it's not that useful, as most of its common switch-ins are barely impeded by Thunder Wave. Hydreigon can use a defensive set consisting of Taunt / Thunder Wave / Dragon Tail / Roost, and act as sort of defensive tank that spreads paralysis strikingly similar to the parashuffle set that Dragonite employs. Truthfully, Taunt is a fairly large reason to use Hydreigon over Dragonite, as Taunt prevents opposing Pokemon from setting up entry hazards on it, though usually you're much better off using Dragonite or any of Hydreigon's other sets. Make no mistake: these moves and sets are in Other Options for a reason. It's not because the moves themselves are poor, but because a large number of of these moves are significantly outclassed by the ones already listed in the above sets.

Checks and Counters

There aren't any! The closest thing to a concrete counter now is Chansey, but even then it's easily 2HKOed by Superpower with some prior damage (a common reality when you consider that Chansey doesn't use Leftovers). Nothing else can touch Hydreigon on a good day. Tyranitar is always OHKOed by Superpower, and Ferrothorn and Jirachi are scorched by Fire Blast. Heatran is OHKOed by Earthquake and it takes a ton of damage from Superpower and everything else is at best 2HKOed by Draco Meteor. Fortunately, Hydreigon is fairly easy to check in the current BW metagame. Breloom and Keldeo are common and every single one of them can destroy Hydreigon with their powerful Fighting-type moves. The ever-popular Terrakion exists at every corner, waiting to turn Hydreigon into a liability since it is forced to switch out from its powerful Close Combats. It's also naturally outsped and KOed by Latios and Latias. Outside of fast offensive checks, you can rely on good old fashioned priority to take it down. Breloom, Mamoswine and Scizor are decent choices, though they should only bother trying to take on Hydreigon when it has been weakened as Hydreigon's 92 / 90 physical defense is nothing to sneeze at.