Mew

Synchronize
When afflicted with status, the enemy is afflicted also. Can pass nature to wild Pokemon.
Type Tier
Psychic UU
Level 5 Statistics (see level 5, 50, 100)
Min- Min Max Max+
HP
100
- 26 29 -
Atk
100
14 16 19 20
Def
100
14 16 19 20
SpA
100
14 16 19 20
SpD
100
14 16 19 20
Spe
100
14 16 19 20

Overview

With its balanced stats, solid level-up movepool, and access to literally every tutor move and TM in the game, it's no surprise that Mew is an easy contender for the title of "most versatile Pokemon." Access to some of the most sought-after support moves, including Will-O-Wisp and Taunt, makes Mew one of the most impressive support Pokemon. However, it's not just the threat of top-notch support that makes Mew so difficult to deal with. Mew's versatility gives it so many different and viable sets to choose from—ranging from support to Baton Pass user, sweeper, and even lead—that Mew has plenty of viable sets, each of which requires the correct answer to prevent it from just taking over the game. Mew is a Pokemon that tests your opponent's reactions first and foremost, and if they react poorly, there will be hell to pay.

However, where it shines in versatility it lacks in focus. Its mediocre Speed stat puts it at the mercy of several notable Pokemon, including Keldeo and Latias, and its rather average offensive stats make it difficult to sweep. Still, the threat of these options means that even just seeing Mew puts the opponent on the back foot, and with the right followup, it's easy to ride that advantage to victory.

Name Item Nature

Support

Leftovers Bold
Moveset EVs
~ Taunt
~ Will-O-Wisp
~ Softboiled
~ Ice Beam / Psychic
252 HP / 148 Def / 108 Spe

Support Mew functions as a top-notch supporting Pokemon with access to effective tools to help it in almost any given scenario. Taunt puts slower defensive Pokemon in an unfavorable position by forcing them to attack, and it can occasionally prevent faster Pokemon from setting up. Will-O-Wisp can burn foes, which constantly saps them of their health and utterly cripples physical attackers. Both moves have wonderful synergy with each other, as the combination of Taunt and burn typically renders a slower Pokemon completely useless. Ice Beam targets a large proportion of OU Pokemon for super effective damage. It's particularly effective against the likes of Garchomp, Dragonite, Landorus-T, and Thundurus-T, who number among the best setup sweepers in the tier. On the other hand, Psychic is more effective against Substitute users and is stronger against the likes of Terrakion, Toxicroak, and Conkeldurr. That said, Ice Beam is usually the better choice, as it's useful for dealing with a wider range of threats. You'll want to maximize Mew's effectiveness by bringing it on the field as quickly and efficiently as possible. Keeping it near max HP at all times is imperative to succeeding with Mew, as it is usually only capable of checking powerful threats when it's healthy.

Team Options & Additional Comments >>>
Name Item Nature

Lead

Normal Gem Jolly
Moveset EVs
~ Stealth Rock
~ Taunt / Magic Coat
~ Explosion
~ Tailwind
108 HP / 252 Atk / 148 Spe

Mew's near-limitless movepool and balanced stats make it an effective lead, especially on hyper offensive teams that cannot afford to make room for a Ghost-type Pokemon. With access to Taunt and Magic Coat, Mew beats nearly every other lead in the game and has the advantage of bulk over lead Azelf, whose frailty mandates use of a Focus Sash. Mew's solid bulk allows it to carry a Normal Gem, which secures more significant KOs, such as the near-guaranteed OHKO on defensive Xatu.

Taunt shuts down slower opponents, preventing them from setting up their own entry hazards or boosting their stats. Magic Coat, on the other hand, bounces back Stealth Rock and Taunt from faster leads such as Terrakion, Aerodactyl, Azelf, Infernape, and opposing Mew. Taunt gets priority over Magic Coat because it doesn't necessarily stop hazards from being set up; it merely blocks them for a turn. This means that an opponent can continuously use Stealth Rock until Mew runs out of Magic Coat PP. In addition, Taunt is invaluable for completely shutting down opposing suicide leads, such as Forretress and Skarmory. Tailwind is handy for momentum, particularly if Mew is used as a suicide lead. It can set up Stealth Rock quickly, use Tailwind to increase its Speed, and follow up with an Explosion to clear the way for your next switch-in to use the remaining two-turn Speed boost.

Team Options & Additional Comments >>>
Name Item Nature

Nasty Plot

Leftovers / Lum Berry Timid
Moveset EVs
~ Nasty Plot
~ Psyshock / Psychic
~ Aura Sphere
~ Fire Blast / Dark Pulse
4 HP / 252 SpA / 252 Spe

Mew is capable of taking the offensive with Nasty Plot, and it is difficult for opponents to outright counter due to its excellent coverage and high power. Nasty Plot boosts Mew's Special Attack to 598, which gives Mew enough power to OHKO or 2HKO most of the metagame. Psyshock allows Mew to take out special walls such as Chansey and Blissey, as well as other Pokemon that invest in Special Defense. Keep in mind, however, that because it targets Defense, physically defensive Pokemon such as Landorus-T and physically defensive Hippowdon are capable of surviving a boosted Psyshock. Psychic, on the other hand, OHKOes both the aforementioned defensive Grounds, and its higher Base Power allows it to score more OHKOs in general. Aura Sphere provides Mew with good coverage, as very few Pokemon resist both Psychic and Fighting. In particular, Aura Sphere allows Mew to beat Tyranitar, one of the most common and prominent special tanks in the metagame.

The final slot is up to you and mainly dependent on what your team can handle. Dark Pulse lets Mew take down opposing Psychic-types, such as Latias, Latios, Starmie, and Reuniclus, while Fire Blast lets Mew KO Steel-types neutral to Fighting-type moves. Jirachi, Forretress, Scizor, and Skarmory are all OHKOed by +2 Fire Blast. Fire Blast also lets Mew OHKO standard Landorus-T after Stealth Rock and deal heavy damage to physically defensive Hippowdon after a boost, which effectively eliminates Psyshock's weakness. The biggest advantage to using Nasty Plot Mew over any other special sweeper is its unpredictability. Its counters are mainly based on its final coverage move. For example, Latias and Starmie can check Mew if it's using Fire Blast, while bulky Steel-types, particularly Scizor and Jirachi, can just as easily counter Mew if it's using Dark Pulse.

Team Options & Additional Comments >>>
Name Item Nature

Baton Pass

Mental Herb / Lum Berry Bold
Moveset EVs
~ Baton Pass
~ Rock Polish
~ Swords Dance / Nasty Plot
~ Taunt / Substitute
252 HP / 148 Def / 108 Spe

Mew is a Baton Pass user that uses its durability, Speed, and access to Taunt to gain tremendous momentum with its boosting moves while simultaneously keeping potential enemies at bay with Taunt. If you can manage to get the ball rolling with Mew's boosts, you can possibly decide the match in an instant, as a fully powered-up Baton Pass recipient is nearly unstoppable. While Mew faces some competition as a Baton Passer from other standalone Baton Pass users such as Gorebyss and Smeargle, it still has a few perks over them, specifically its access to Taunt over the former and significantly more bulk over the latter. Rock Polish is mandatory as it lets Mew outspeed most of the metagame, giving Mew the ability to Baton Pass in the face of Pokemon who are normally faster. The choice between Swords Dance and Nasty Plot is naturally team-dependent. Strong physical attackers, particularly Garchomp, Landorus-T, and Terrakion, will appreciate Swords Dance, while special attackers such as Latios and Hydreigon are bolstered by Nasty Plot. Finally, Taunt allows Mew to shut down Pokemon who might attempt to hit it or its Baton Pass recipients with status or phaze them out with Whirlwind or Roar.

Team Options & Additional Comments >>>

Other Options

Mew is the king of other options. Seriously, it's not an exaggeration to suggest that Mew can pull off just about any moveset. It has one of the largest movepools in the entire game, second only to Smeargle; however, unlike Smeargle, it has the stats to back them up. Even so, it can be difficult to find sets outside of the ones that are listed that Mew can run without being outclassed or just flat-out mediocre at. A stand-alone Swords Dance set is possible with a moveset consisting of Flame Charge, Drain Punch, and Baton Pass. This unconventional moveset gives Mew the ability to set up Swords Dances and bypass Tyranitar, Scizor, Heatran, and other Steel-types, as well as pass along the boosts to another physical attacker. The support set can utilize either Roar or Dragon Tail for phazing or Hypnosis to temporarily incapacitate a foe. Mew can also use a Transform set, which can be handy when dealing with an opposing boosting sweeper. To sum it up, Mew gets nearly everything, so go nuts, pick four moves, and see what works for you. If you can imagine it, Mew can probably make it happen.

Checks and Counters

Countering Mew can be a difficult task due to its staggering versatility. Scouting out its moveset instead of blindly switching in is recommended. Heatran hard-counters support sets, as it resists Psychic-type attacks and is immune to Will-O-Wisp. In fact, if Heatran switches into a Will-O-Wisp, it can retaliate against Mew and its teammates with its boosted Fire-type moves. Strong special attackers are generally suited to taking on Mew. Both Latias and Latios can switch in with little to no trouble and fire off their powerful STAB attacks; however, Mew can actually stall out Choice variants with Softboiled and Special Defense investment. Calm Mind Latios and Latias, on the other hand, can use Mew as setup fodder. Thundurus-T is capable of overpowering Mew with its powerful Electric-type moves or even potentially set up with Nasty Plot or Agility, as Mew cannot OHKO it with Ice Beam. Hydreigon can switch into Mew without worry and fire off its powerful Dark- or Dragon-type STAB moves. Rain sweepers such as Keldeo and Tornadus can similarly overwhelm Mew with their rain-boosted attacks.

Lead sets can be dealt with by Tyranitar, who can switch into Mew and OHKO it through its Focus Sash because of Sand Stream. Scizor, Heatran, and assorted Steel-types can also switch in and handle it. That said, knocking Mew out and preventing Mew from setting up Stealth Rock are two very different things. Because of Mew's access to Magic Coat and Focus Sash, it is pretty much guaranteed to set up Stealth Rock. Magic Bounce users, such as Espeon and Xatu, are the best stops to Mew, but both of them need to carry a strong attack to actually damage it. Otherwise, Magic Bounce users can be used to break Mew's Focus Sash and switch into a Pokemon that can OHKO it afterwards. The opponent can always predict this, however.

Nasty Plot Mew's counters are separated into two groups: those who can counter it if it lacks Fire Blast, and those who can counter it if it lacks Dark Pulse. Specially defensive Jirachi, for example, is a hard counter to the former Mew, as it can switch in, cripple Mew with Body Slam, and stall out Mew with a combination of Iron Head and Wish. Bulky Swords Dance Scizor can switch into Mew and hit it with a STAB Bug Bite, which easily brings Mew into Bullet Punch's KO range. On the other hand, Mew that lack Dark Pulse can be beaten by Latias, Latios, and Starmie.

For the Baton Pass set, there are several precautions you can take to guarantee that Mew doesn't pull off a Baton Pass. Team Preview allows you to scan your opponent's team, determine who Mew's dual screens user is, and devise a way to stop it. A fast Taunt user, such as Azelf or Sableye, can put a stop to most dual screens users. Unfortunately, Azelf itself is a common dual screens user, and relying on a Speed tie to stop it isn't exactly recommended. It's also possible to directly Taunt Mew, but Mew that carry Mental Herb can bypass this. Strong Choice Scarf users will only allow Azelf to set up one screen, giving you an easier time when dealing with Mew. Powerful Fire-types can similarly prevent Metagross from setting up more than one screen. Keep in mind that if you fail to stop screens, it's almost impossible to stop Mew from Baton Passing due to its incredible bulk. Fortunately, unlike Gorebyss and Smeargle, Mew typically takes three turns to set up its Baton Pass recipient, so keep that in mind and find a way to stop it before it Baton Passes.