Snorlax

Immunity
The wielder cannot be poisoned.
Thick Fat
Fire- and Ice-type damage is reduced by 50%.
Gluttony
Consumes pinch Berries at 50% HP or less.
Type Tier
Normal UU
Level 100 Statistics (see level 5, 50, 100)
Min- Min Max Max+
HP
160
- 461 524 -
Atk
110
230 256 319 350
Def
65
149 166 229 251
SpA
65
149 166 229 251
SpD
110
230 256 319 350
Spe
30
86 96 159 174

Overview

Once the King of GSC OU, Snorlax took quite a few hits with each subsequent generation, finally dropping to UU along with long-time fellow OU Pokemon, Zapdos, in BW. With the rising popularity of Fighting-types, it struggles to maintain a big presence on the battlefield. Furthermore, lack of reliable recovery really hurts its durability—especially with the BW sleep mechanics. However, its amazing HP stat and great special bulk make it one of the few able to reliably check a complete offensive spectrum, taking on special powerhouses such as Nidoking or Zapdos. Snorlax is also the most trustworthy answer to Chandelure, one of the biggest threats in the metagame. With its good base 110 Attack stat, it can keep offensive pressure with ease, be it with a Choice Band or by setting up with its old Curse set.

Taking everything previously stated into account, Snorlax continues to be a great addition to any team, countering specific prominent threats, such as Offensive Trick Room Cofagrigus or Substitute+Calm Mind Raikou, very aptly. Even though it's much less metagame-defining than it once was, it can take credit for being a staple of the Underused metagame and one of the most used Pokemon overall.

Name Item Ability Nature

Offensive

Choice Band / Leftovers Thick Fat Adamant
Moveset EVs
~ Return / Body Slam
~ Pursuit
~ Earthquake
~ Crunch / Fire Punch
252 Atk / 52 Def / 200 SpD / 4 Spe

Offensive Snorlax is very useful on offensive teams, being able to switch into many special attackers and hit back hard thanks to its fully invested base 110 Attack stat. Return is the main option for a STAB move, being able to hit Pokemon such as Shaymin and Zapdos hard; Body Slam is an alternative due to the added paralysis chance, but its damage output makes it the lesser choice. Pursuit is arguably the draw of the set, allowing Snorlax to remove the Ghost- and Psychic-type Pokemon—Chandelure being the most notable target, since it fears Earthquake—that it forces out, possibly opening up a path for a partner to sweep. Earthquake lets Snorlax hit Rhyperior and Cobalion, both of which would otherwise get in nearly unscathed to set up on it. For the last slot, the best options are Crunch and Fire Punch, the former hitting Cofagrigus hard—allowing Snorlax to counter the Offensive Trick Room version—and dealing more to Slowbro and Mew than the other three moves, and the latter allowing Snorlax to get past Bronzong and Escavalier, while beating Abomasnow more easily. Fire Punch is also good against Shaymin if Snorlax runs Body Slam over Return.

Team Options & Additional Comments >>>
Name Item Ability Nature

Offensive CurseLax

Leftovers Thick Fat Adamant
Moveset EVs
~ Curse
~ Return
~ Crunch
~ Earthquake / Fire Punch
80 HP / 176 Atk / 96 Def / 156 SpD

A staple of the GSC era of Snorlax dominance, Curse Snorlax continues to be a threat. Taking a more offensive approach to the classic set, this set forfeits Rest in order to get three-move coverage. As such, it shouldn't be seen as a last-Pokemon sweeper but as an early wallbreaker by setting up on the special attackers it easily checks, mainly Chandelure, Zapdos, and Raikou. Curse boosts Snorlax's great Attack and passable Defense stats at the cost of its already low Speed stat. Return is the STAB move of choice, with Crunch to hit Ghost-types, Mew, and Slowbro harder. The last move is for specific Pokemon: Earthquake hits Cobalion and Rhyperior harder, while Fire Punch helps against Bronzong and Escavalier, still hitting Cobalion super-effectively.

Team Options & Additional Comments >>>
Name Item Ability Nature

Classic CurseLax

Leftovers Thick Fat Careful
Moveset EVs
~ Curse
~ Body Slam
~ Earthquake / Crunch
~ Rest
144 HP / 188 Def / 176 SpD

This acts as the old Curse Snorlax that dominated a huge part of GSC OU, taking a more defensive approach. This Snorlax has been renowned as one of the most resilient last-Pokemon sweepers, since its sole weakness makes it harder to KO on the special side while it boosts its physical defense. While it isn't as good as it once was, considering the offensive nature of the metagame, it can still prove to be a threat. Body Slam is the STAB of choice for the paralysis chance, helping Snorlax boost more reliably. Earthquake and Crunch are the options for coverage, the former hitting Rhyperior and Cobalion, and the latter helping against Cofagrigus and Slowbro. Rest allows Snorlax to set up without fear on Zapdos and Raikou, since Snorlax can survive three hits before having to use Rest.

Team Options & Additional Comments >>>
Name Item Ability Nature

RestTalk

Leftovers Thick Fat Careful
Moveset EVs
~ Rest
~ Sleep Talk
~ Body Slam
~ Whirlwind
144 HP / 188 Def / 176 SpD

This was at one point the premier special wall of the Underused metagame, and continues to be useful. Even with the revised sleep mechanics, Snorlax is a viable Rest + Sleep Talk user due to its great natural bulk and access to Whirlwind to phaze away things trying to set up on it. Body Slam is the only attacking move needed, possibly spreading paralysis even while asleep. Whirlwind forces Pokemon out to rack up hazard damage; it works great alongside Body Slam and Sleep Talk, since the latter bypasses Whirlwind's negative priority when Snorlax is up against a paralyzed opponent. Rest gives it a form of recovery, while Sleep Talk means it won't be a sitting duck while asleep.

Team Options & Additional Comments >>>

Other Options

Outside of the moves listed, Snorlax has other options it can run. It can use Rest + three attacks with Chesto Berry for instant recovery, or Belly Drum to mimic its old offensive set from GSC with two attacking moves and Rest, although neither option help it much, and the huge boost isn't worth losing half its health—especially considering Snorlax usually takes two hits before moving. Every set can run either one of Double-Edge, Return, or Body Slam as a STAB move, but each has one that goes better with Snorlax's purpose. As coverage options, it learns Seed Bomb, Zen Headbutt, Ice Punch, Wild Charge, and Superpower, each nailing a different Pokemon. Snorlax also has a good special movepool, with Fire Blast, Thunderbolt, and Blizzard, for example, but its low Special Attack means it's unable to put them to good use. Finally, it has borderline-viable support moves in Toxic, Counter, Yawn, and Stockpile to aid its teammates.

Checks and Counters

While straight-out countering Snorlax isn't an easy task, Rhyperior is the closest to that position as long as Snorlax isn't running Seed Bomb, since Rhyperior doesn't mind the paralysis and doesn't take much from unboosted Earthquakes, hitting back hard with its own STAB Earthquakes. Rhyperior can also phaze Curse variants, although that isn't as reliable in the lategame. Fighting-types such as Cobalion and Heracross can switch in on some sets, but neither enjoy being paralyzed and they are hit hard by Snorlax's offensive sets. Shed Skin Scrafty doesn't mind paralysis and can set up on Snorlax, but it doesn't enjoy taking STAB Returns and it can't beat Snorlax if Scrafty switched in while it used Curse. Bulky Intimidate Scrafty, on the other hand, can even switch into Choice Band-boosted Returns and force Snorlax out, though it won't enjoy getting paralyzed by Body Slam variants. Cofagrigus needs to avoid Crunch, but can otherwise set up alongside it with Nasty Plot or Calm Mind and hit it with Hidden Power Fighting, moving first if Snorlax uses Curse. Defensive Cofagrigus can't directly harm it, but it can beat Curse variants with a combination of Will-O-Wisp and Haze, disrupting a possible sweep.

Tricking a Choice Specs or a Choice Scarf is generally a good way of dealing with Snorlax, since only the offensive sets don't mind being locked into a move. Rotom-H and Chandelure are good lures for it, though the latter needs to worry about Pursuit on the way out. Those two can also lure Snorlax and use Will-O-Wisp, which can mean the end for Snorlax if it doesn't have Rest. Stallbreakers such as Mew, Crobat, and Mismagius can make short work of non-Offensive Snorlax with Taunt, preventing it from using Rest and Curse. However, they can't directly switch in without knowing the sets, since Return and Crunch, respectively, hit them hard.

Finally, submitting Snorlax to much offensive pressure is generally a good option, since non-Rest variants become unable to stop Zapdos and Raikou, and Rest variants can be taken advantage of while asleep. Strong special attackers like Nidoking or Choice Specs Yanmega usually do a great job of wearing Snorlax down. Incoming switches need to be wary of Sleep Talk, though.