5th Gen Guide to Trick Room--Ubers

Discussion in 'Locked / Outdated Analyses' started by V0x, Apr 20, 2011.

  1. V0x

    V0x ah
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    Trick Room in the Fifth Generation

    Trick Room may seem like the perfect anti-metagame style, as it reverses the speed oriented standard play. However, theorymon is often dashed in practice. The powerful threats, both new and old, can plow through Trick Roomers and leave them unable to twist the dimensions. One must play Trick Room strategically for it to be a truly potent anti-metagame threat.

    Facts First:
    -5 PP, with a maximum of 8
    This is rarely an issue for Trick Room teams, as using Trick Room more than 8 times is nearly impossible.

    -lowest priority at -7
    This is a huge part of why Trick Room is hard to pull off. With Trick Room going after every move in existence, even Roar and Whirlwind, Trick Room users must be sturdy enough to take a few hits.

    -speed inverted for 5 turns
    This is the reason to use Trick Room, turning the fast paced metagame on its head and rendering many offensive threats dead weight for 5 turns. However, 5 turns is another reason it is so hard to pull off; you have to constantly switch and subject your setters to wear and tear. Furthermore, no items can boosts the effects to 8 turns, like Damp Rock and Heat Rock do for Rain Dance and Sunny Day.

    -priority unchanged
    Another issue to the success of Trick Room, priority remaining the same means certain sweepers can still be revenge killed.

    -any Pokemon with 1809 speed or higher goes first, even under Trick Room
    This is an interesting glitch discovered by our researchers, and no one knows why this is the number. Just watch out for the Choice Scarf Ninjask!

    Pokemon:
    Arceus
    -versatile, Extremekiller doesn't care about speed
    Deoxys some forme
    -probably D
    Dialga

    Dialga is perhaps the best user and abuser of Trick Room in the Uber tier. Base 90 Speed means that with a negative nature and 0 IVs, Dialga can "outspeed" most of the tier under Trick Room. Those that are slower, such as Ferrothorn, can do little to hurt this steel dragon. It has stellar bulk and decent typing (weakness to Ground-type moves is the most problematic), meaning it has plenty of opportunities to sponge hits aimed at your other members: Grass Knot aimed at Kyogre, for example. It can then proceed to set up Trick Room and fire off powerful attacks from its base 150 Special Attack. Because of its threatening presence with a variety of coverage moves such as Fire Blast, Thunder, Earth Power, and Draco Meteor, Dialga can force switches, giving it an essentially free turn to set up Trick Room or throw up Stealth Rock. So long as you watch out for powerful Earthquakes and Fighting-type moves, Dialga can stick around and function effectively both in and out of Trick Room.

    Kyogre

    Possessing perhaps the largest damage output in the game, Kyogre is no stranger to Trick Room teams. The main problems of that insanely powerful Water Spout are Kyogre's lack of Speed and two Water Absorb Pokemon, Gastrodon and Quagsire. The latter two are not issues, and Trick Room essentially fixes the former. Without needing to worry about annoying Choice Scarf Zekrom, Kyogre can safely spew its Water Spouts to eliminate tough walls, paving the way for others to sweep. That isn't all, however. Kyogre has great coverage in two other moves, Thunder and Ice Beam, and has reliable back-up Water-type moves in Surf and Hydro Pump. Furthermore, its special bulk means it isn't out of the water when Trick Room is down. Without the need for Speed, Kyogre isn't forced to run Choice Scarf to outpace Arceus formes, other Choice Scarf users, Deoxys, and Mewtwo, among others. The item can then further power up Kyogre's moves; Choice Specs is great for raw power, while a Water-type boosting item can feign a Choice and catch the opponent off guard. If you're fishing for a Trick Room abuser with immediate raw power, great coverage, and little drawback, reel when a huge shadow presents itself beneath the surface.

    Reshiram

    With celestial dual-STAB in Dragon and Fire and Turboblaze, which leaves its coverage unresisted, it's a shame Reshiram doesn't have base 150 Attack to annihilate Chansey and Blissey. Base 150 Special Attack is by no means bad, however, even if the two pink nurses sponge such hits. Combine this with a signature attack, Blue Flare, and Draco Meteor, and you have one dragon that has virtually no problems sweeping under Trick Room. With Groudon as a partner, Reshiram receives not only a boost to its Fire-type moves, but also a partner to take down specially defensive walls and vice versa. Reshiram's base 120 Attack is not horrible either, meaning a mixed set is viable if special walls are really a problem. While a weakness to Stealth Rock takes away from its par-Uber bulk, Reshiram doesn't need many turns or many switches to raze the fields.

    Palkia

    Palkia is an odd choice for Trick Room given its base 100 Speed. However, being that "slow" does not hold it back noticeably: with 0 IVs and a negative nature, Palkia will not be "outsped" but anything of importance. With great dual STAB and a base 150 Attack, Palkia's average damage output will end up being higher than that of Dialga's if simply because Hydro Pump has great coverage with Draco Meteor or Spacial Rend. Palkia also has an array of coverage moves as well, its coverage complemented by Thunder. With base 120 Attack, moves such as Outrage don't look bad either. Because this legendary beast's defenses are not horrible, and because Water / Dragon is has decent resistances, Palkia isn't necessarily reliant on Trick Room, and can pull a "quick" KO in a tight spot. So while Dialga can fill your hard hitting hazard supporter, Palkia can be the one attempting the sweep.

    Excadrill

    Excadrill is the last Pokemon you would expect to be on a Trick Room team. After all, a large part of its banishment was its overwhelming Speed under sandstorm. However, remember that Sand Rush is not Excadrill's only ability; Sand Force, base 135 Attack, and that base 88 Speed (two points slower than the numerous base 90s!) mean Excadrill can dish out scary amounts of damage without speed, especially in the presence of sandstorm. This mole also possess Rapid Spin and decent bulk, helping massive Trick Room threats such as Water Spout Kyogre and Reshiram switch in unharmed. Furthermore, Excadrill can be the fast, insurance Pokemon on your Trick Room team, outspeeding all the common Choice Scarf users when Trick Room is not active—should you be in this situation at all. Otherwise, it can act as a clean up sweeper, using powerful Earthquakes to destroy weakened beasts.

    Giratina-O

    While its other forme is more focused around defense, Giratina-O possesses great bulk, with resistances to Grass-, Water-, and Fire-type moves, as well as an immunity to Ground-type attacks thanks to Levitate, and awesome mixed attacking capabilities. It's Ghost typing allows it to spinblock, should your team require that trait. Furthermore, its Ghost-type STAB moves allow it to defeat the Psychic-types roaming Ubers. It even has Shadow Sneak, nailing the frail Deoxys formes among others; priority is very useful on Trick Room teams to recover from a pinch. With command over Draco Meteor and other powerful Dragon-type moves, Giratina-O is stopped by only the sturdiest of walls. Griesious Orb even boosts the Base Power of its moves by 20%! However, nuisances such as Lugia, Dark Arceus, or Ho-Oh under the right conditions can still stop Giratina-O, so it is best to leave it for after one of its teammates has left its mark.

    Groudon

    Groudon is really given a chance to shine under Trick Room, no longer needed to rely on Rock Polish or paralysis support to sweep. Trick Room makes two notable changes to Groudon's playing: one turn, which would have been used to set up Rock Polish or use Thunder Wave, is freed up, as is one moveslot. Thus, Groudon has both more chances to deal damage and a better degree of coverage, using some Fire-type move along side EdgeQuake coverage in the case of a Swords Dance set, or the Speed advantage on a Choice Band set. Alternatively, you can choose to run support moves such as Stealth Rock with attacking moves, giving you another team supporter. Groudon even doubles as a physical wall with stellar base 100 HP and base 140 Defense, and it brings in sunlight for other monsters such as Reshiram and Ho-Oh. Do not overlook Groudon when selecting member, as it can easily pull its own weight.

    Ho-Oh

    Ho-Oh is known for its lack of Speed—most of its sets hinge around boosting said Speed before attempting to sweep. Therefore, this phoenix is a prime option for Trick Room, especially considering its great dual STAB—not to mention its STAB moves in Sacred Fire and Brave Bird. Furthermore, since Ho-Oh does not need that Speed boosting move anymore, it has a free slot to augment its coverage. With Roost and great bulk, there is little to fear if Trick Room is down, as Ho-Oh will likely be able to pull out of trouble. If unboosted special attacks are flying around, it is likely Ho-Oh will be able to come in with relative safely and begin its destruction. However, there is a rather poignant issue: Stealth Rock. Stripping away 50% of Ho-Oh's health, this entry hazard can cut short Ho-Oh's offense—especially when stacked atop Brave Bird recoil. There is really only one way to prevent this, since a fast Taunt user is an oddity, and that is Rapid Spin. That is the dilemma with using Ho-Oh: provide a Rapid Spin user, which requires a rare "free" turn where the momentum will not shift against you, or deal with the recoil.

    Rayquaza

    Rayquaza's devastating dual base 150 offensive stats allow for amazing mixed capability, especially under Trick Room, where the EVs can be fully distributed into each stat. [this is not a long sentence, it's two. Stupid Word.] Base 95 Speed is still slow enough that Rayquaza can always "outrun" most threats under twisted dimensions, especially its usual Dragon Dancer checks, namely Choice Scarf Palkia, Terrakion, and other revenge killers. From there, it can proceed to tear holes in the opponent's team, taking down physical and special walls alike. For example, 252 Attack and Special Attack EVs ensures both Groudon and Blissey will be 2HKOed with Draco Meteor and Outrage, respectively. While a Stealth Rock weakness is sad, it is not troubling since Rayquaza's wallbreaking prowess means it doesn't need to switch. So long as you don't try to get fancy with Rayquaza's bulk, it will relinquish its awesome power to you.

    Zekrom

    The other legendary of BW, Zekrom may not have the awesome coverage of Reshiram, the sleekness found in a snow-white design, nor the fire-breathing powers of the archetypal Dragon. However, it does have great and powerful STAB moves such as Bolt Strike and Outrage. The raw power alone allows Zekrom to defeat—hardly with any problems—Kyogre, a Pokemon used on almost 50% of all Ubers teams. Furthermore, Electric STAB means Zekrom can tear through Lugia and Ho-Oh, two Pokemon that might leave you wishing walls didn't exist. Zekrom also adds a balance of physical and special attackers—this is important since some of the most appealing attackers are specially based, and you wouldn't want your team walled by Chansey or Blissey. So long as you don't try to Bolt Strike Groudon, all should be well with Zekrom.

    Bronzong

    Already known in OU for providing Trick Room support, Bronzong is no less viable in Ubers. With a Steel typing and either Levitate or Heatproof (and sometimes even rain), the coveted Dragon / Ground or Dragon / Fire coverage is hardly threatening. Sometime considering rain, Bronzong can stop a Mewtwo, Palkia, Arceus, or Groudon rampage and turn the tables. Having a defensive pivot like Bronzong gives you a reliable option to set up Trick Room, best case scenario even forcing the opponent out to twist the dimensions unscathed. Access to Stealth Rock and decent attacking options such as Gyro Ball mean it is not completely set up fodder, though having another Stealth Rock user can be redundant. Bronzong is also somewhat prone to find itself in sitting contests with opposing walls, and a wrong switch could spell trouble. Just don't expect Bronzong to do any sweeping and you won't be let down.

    Heatran

    Heatran has an unfortunate case of Freak Disease—an illness that has spread slowly but surely—where Game Freak decides to throw the player-base a juicy upgrade to a Pokemon, only to have attached said upgrade with a virus. In this case, the upgrade is Eruption, and the virus is a required Quiet nature. Obviously, no one was going to try to attach a Choice Scarf, so Eruption was left, locked away. Luckily, Trick Room is perfect for a Quiet nature, and with base 77 Speed, Heatran can finally use its gift. Both Choice Specs and Life Orb are limiting options, so perhaps the most effective item is one that boosts Fire-type moves by 20%, namely Charcoal or Flame Plate(?). Similarly to Water Spout Kyogre, Heatran probably only needs Eruption to decimate opponents. This does not mean other moves are unavailable; Earth Power, Dragon Pulse, and various Hidden Powers provide supplementary coverage—useful in a tier where Dragon-types reign. For example, in unfavorable conditions Zekrom and Reshiram will have no problem stopping Heatran. However, a well placed Earth Power will leave these two weakened.

    Jirachi

    Though a bit on the fast side, Jirachi has many options for a supporting Trick Room role. Stealth Rock and Wish are the most notable; the former can provide crucial damage for OHKOes and 2HKOes, while the latter can heal certain whales that spam Water Spout—not to mention other Trick Room users without recovery such as Dialga and Palkia. A balanced stat spread and great typing, especially in rain, mean Jirachi has little to worry about, much like Bronzong. A specially defensive spread can shake off Draco Meteor from anything—Giratina formes, Reshiram, and Palkia, to name a few—while still leaving room to tank Outrages from the likes of Garchomp and Zekrom, locking them and giving a free opportunity to set up. Serene Grace graces Jirachi, as Iron Head flinching can not only immobilize opponents, but also stall out your Trick Room turns in case you need a fast Pokemon to dance. Just note that Jirachi isn't the best choice to center around offense, since it only has base 100 attacking stats.

    Magnezone

    It's all about the Dragon-types, and Magnezone, for all intents and purposes, is a Dragon. With and already low base 61 Speed, good 130(?) Special Attack, and Magnet Pull, this electromagnetic magnet provides perhaps the best support for monsters such as Dialga, Palkia, Reshiram, and Zekrom. Trapping Ferrothorn, and to a lesser extent Forretress, these Dragon-types can go all out—with no counters nor checks, and most revenge killers useless due to Trick Room, they will have no trouble cooking the opposition in Kirby's pot of soup. Having another Steel-type on your team is not bad either, acting as a nice pivot against the onslaught of Dragon-type attacks. Rain may prove a problem for Hidden Power Fire (if you don't want Spikes setting up as Magnezone Charge Beams), but the most important topics are 4x weak anyway.

    Victini

    Victini should have been a natural choice for Trick Room in OU. V-Create lowers Speed by one stage with each use, and Victini has great coverage (not to mention moves), leaving it walled by few. However, OU contains Pokemon of vastly different Speeds, some so slow that they will "outspeed" Victini—this is a problem since damage taken, on top of possible passive damage, shortens Victini's lifespan drastically. Luckily, the base Speeds in Ubers are a bit more regular: most are base 90 and faster, meaning a minimum Speed Victini can outspeed them. Then we come to V-Create. In the case that Victini is providing its own Trick Room support, it will not be able to indulge in a Choice Band, and will be slightly weaker. But not too much weaker—with Stealth Rock 200 HP / 44 Def Giratina-O is still 2HKOed by a Flame Plate, sun-boosted V-Create, meaning offensive versions don't stand a chance. <em>Fully physically defensive</em> Groudon is cleanly 2HKOed, no mean feat. And if you thought a certain whale would ruin your fun, Kyogre is helpless to Victini's Fusion Bolt (also why Choice Band is not recommended).

    Notable Mentions

    These Pokemon are not quite good enough to be considered usable on general teams, but they can fit in if you decide to construct your team so.

    Alakazam

    Alakazam is an odd option, and gimmicky. Because of Magic Guard, Alakazam with a Focus Sash guarantees Trick Room—provided it isn't Taunted. Essentially, you sacrifice Alakazam for one last run, which could be all you need to clean up. However, the fact that Alakazam is on your team to be fodder is why it is only a notable mention.

    Metagross

    Sure, Metagross doesn't need much Speed to function in Ubers, and can even set up Trick Room itself. However, it lacks a really stellar role since Steel-type STAB is not the best to work with in a limited amount of turns. Its coverage moves also lack power, namely the elemental punches. Hammer Arm is a nice power choice, but Fighting-type coverage doesn't have the greatest utility.

    Reuniclus

    The main issue with Reuniclus is lack of power; Focus Blast as a coverage move doesn't help either. Simply put, there are other Pokemon that could do more damage in 3 turns in the Uber tier, so they are generally better choices.

    Scizor

    Scizor is good without Speed, and has a powerful Bullet Punch to back it up. Furthermore, it can stop Normal Arceus that don't carry a Fire-type move. However, Steel / Bug coverage is not the greatest in Ubers, especially considering there really isn't time to use Swords Dance for more power—being walled is the least favorable thing in Uber Trick Room.

    Tyranitar

    Tyranitar provides sandstorm support, but really only one Pokemon, Excadrill, really uses it. Sandstorm usually interferes with the bolster in Fire- or Water-type moves sun or rain, respectively, brings, and therefore could cause problems on such teams. That isn't to say Tyranitar is bad in Trick Room—base 61 Speed and great Dark / Rock dual-STAB is great.

    Wobbuffet

    Wobbuffet is a bit of a gamble—though it has absolutely no offensive capability, and has the potential to be OHKOed, it offers unparalleled support for Pokemon to set up Trick Room. Like all Wobbuffet plays, you lock something with Encore and set up.

    Lower Tier Trick Room Sweepers

    These Pokemon form the offensive base of Trick Room in lower tiers. While usable in Ubers, they usually lack the bulk to work as well as some of the other options. Marowak is one of these Pokemon, with massive 568 Attack and great coverage. Its flaw is its low HP, holding back its decent base 110 Defense. Rampardos is another—Head Smash from base 165 Attack is one of the most devastating attacks in existence, but Rampardos absolutely cannot switch in.

    Level 1 Pokemon

    These Pokemon take advantage of their "blazing fast" Speed and Endeavor to KO themselves, an opponent, and leave a few turns of Trick Room left.

    Smeargle

    Essentially a FEAR, Trick Room, Spore, Endeavor, ExtremeSpeed Smeargle can knock a non-Ghost-type out of the game early, crippling another Pokemon with Sleep in optimal conditions. However, entry hazards breaking its Focus Sash, Ghost-types, multi-hit moves, and priority spell doom for this level 1.

    Duison

    With Magic Guard, Duison can come in at any time during the match for the strategy. Trick Room and Endeavor weaken the opponent, and an attack of choice finishes it off. It generally faces fewer problems than Smeargle, but is helpless to priority without a +2 priority ExtremeSpeed.

    Threats

    Threats fall under three main categories: walls, priority, and passive. Walls are opponents that take minimal damage from your sweepers' moves, priority is priority moves, and passive refers to Taunt, Roar, Whirlwind, and other non-damaging moves that go before Trick Room, as well as entry hazards.

    Walls

    Walls are the most common, and thus probably the most annoying. There is no real foolproof way to deal with them except prediction and power. Blissey and Chansey are perhaps the biggest problems, however, since many appealing Trick Room Pokemon are special attackers, and thus are completely walled. The simple fix is to run a powerful mixed attacker that can lure these two out and destroy them. However, you can opt to overpower them is rain boosted Water Spouts or sun boosted Blue Flares, though if you fail know that problems will be imminent. Packing a strong Fighting-type can work, but doing so only scares Blissey and Chansey off (though seeing Their Annoyance flee may be satisfying as well). Wobbuffet is an option to punish their sorry faces, turning them into set up fodder—just note that Wobbuffet is incapable of doing much attacking.

    Other major walls include Lugia, Ho-Oh, Arceus formes, and Giratina formes. However, a well-timed HADOKEN™ or repeated assaults will wear them down.

    Priority

    Priority moves are rather common in Ubers, but they are much easier to play around than walls are. The first thing to do is to identify what Pokemon could have priority moves and which of those would be threatening. For the moment, sweep Extreme Killer and ExtremeSpeed in general under the rug.

    The only other common move is Shadow Sneak, used by Giratina and its counterpart. Though it receives STAB, it is still rather weak and will only pose trouble to a weakened Victini since the majority of other Trick Room Pokemon are bulky enough or resist it.

    Bullet Punch sees its uses as well, mainly from Scizor and some Metagross. The latter is rather underwhelming, since, once again, very few Trick Room Pokemon are threatened. However, Scizor is another matter, with both Technician and Swords Dance. Since Scizor does not care about Speed like other set-up sweepers do, it can make use of the turn one of your Pokemon tries to set up Trick Room. From there, it can maim most switch ins—at neutral Speed, Scizor actually speed ties with minimum Speed base 90 such as Kyogre and Zekrom and outspeeds Palkia, so Scizor can use Bug Bite to take a chunk out of them. So ironically, Bullet Punch is not much of the problem.

    Now there is ExtremeSpeed, which is a problem. Swords Dance Rayquaza, though relatively rare, will undermine the precious dimension twist and hit most of your sweepers hard. It can do upwards of 90% to Reshiram, Zekrom, Kyogre, and Palkia, meaning they are in trouble if the game has progressed to its later stages. Luckily, Dialga resists ExtremeSpeed and can KO Rayquaza with Draco Meteor—the Steel- / Dragon-type is your best answer, and should not be too far out of reach since it is so good. Other options are using Bronzong as a setter, as it can tank Rayquaza's moves and retaliate with Hidden Power Ice. Giratina-O is another option since it is immune to ExtremeSpeed and has enough bulk to check an unboosted Rayquaza outside of Trick Room. The general method to keep Rayquaza in check, then, is to stop it from setting up in the first place, or tanking its ExtremeSpeed and hitting back: you don't need to worry about being hit by Outrage or coverage moves since Trick Room should cover that.

    More pressing is Extreme Killer Arceus, which has significantly more bulk and fewer weaknesses than Rayquaza. Thus, it is harder to OHKO, meaning your checks could be on the receiving end of one of its coverage moves. Furthermore, while Steel-types such as Bronzong can wall Arceus pretty well, they cannot damage it significantly, giving it the opportunity to Recover or set up even more. Such Steel-types can defeat it with Toxic, although it will take a few turns to fall, giving it time to crush the opposition. Regardless, Dialga can check the Extreme Killer, smacking it with Aura Sphere. This tactic crumbles if Trick Room is down, however, as Dialga will be outsped and KOed. Giratina-O also works decently, though it will be hard pressed to 2HKO Arceus, and once it's stalled out of its Trick Room turns, Arceus can KO with Shadow Claw.

    There are ways to play around the Extreme Killer, though. Perhaps hardest is to save one of your Pokemon to tank a +2 ExtremeSpeed and KO back. The reason this is hard is that for one entry hazards can bring your Pokemon into KO range, and second that it is very hard to not use a Pokemon until a later point in the game, especially for Trick Room teams. If conditions are optimal, Kyogre and Palkia can survive a +2 ExtremeSpeed (with less than 10%!), and KO Arceus with a powerful move. Another way to deal with the Extreme Killer is with Choice Scarf Terrakion—a lategame sweeper / revenge killer once Trick Room has run its course. Likewise, Scizor is an option, though it fails against any variant with a Fire-type move—the uncertainty makes it deadly since you could potentially lose a Pokemon. Ultimately, the best advice to give against the Extreme Killer is play diligently, and save the Pokemon that have a chance until it comes out.

    "Passive"

    It is quite unfortunate that Trick Room has –7 priority, meaning everything goes before it. Taunt, Whirlwind, Roar, and Dragon Tail all disrupt Trick Room 100%, making it hard against certain teams. Luckily, you can simply attack the Pokemon using Taunt or phazing, and Taunt is also somewhat uncommon. The Pokemon that do use it are generally frail and fast, making eliminating them not a problem. However, phazers are a bit trickier, since the nature of phazing requires them to be bulky. With continual pounding, though, the opponent will have the think twice about phazing when you are about to use Trick Room. This will eventually allow you to set up Trick Room without being phazed out, so you can quickly eliminate the phazer and continue to sweep.

    Building a Team

    The best team will have the perfect balance of offense and supporters. A common mistake to making teams is not having enough offense. This is worse than not having enough setters, since most Trick Room Pokemon can outspeed walls without Trick Room up. For a full team, a good guideline is to have three offensive Pokemon, two offensive supporters, and one primarily defensive supporter. The number of offensive supporters is variable depending on the synergy with the sweepers, of course, since it may be advantageous for your setter to attack when a sweeper is frail or of the same typing.

    Whether you select sweepers or setters first is up to you, just realize that some sweepers will want other sweepers: Reshiram and Groudon, for example.

    Checklist

    Don't fret if you don't have everything on here, as it is quite possible your team can function without all the components. The best way to assess your team is looks at this and your matches.

    -Do you have enough setters?
    ---Basically, this means is your sweep cut short, and you are left with only your attackers when the opponent has their offense still alive?

    -Do you have enough attackers?
    ---Alluded to above, this basically means are you left with you Trick Room setters at the end of the game, unable to significantly damage walls such as Blissey?

    -Do you have an Extreme Killer check?
    ---This is best to answer after playing, since you might be adept at playing around Normal Arceus and defeating it without a real check. In any case, it is best to start your team with some that at least resists ExtremeSpeed.

    Example

    http://www.smogon.com/forums/showthread.php?t=3454956
    by Enroyalle

    though idk if I can get permission he hasn't logged in for a while

    if I don't hear back I'll post one of my own (though I don't want to be like I made this it's the bestttt) And maybe a teambuilding process?

    Final Thoughts

    Trick Room is an uncommon playstyle, and can be tedious at times for the diligence required. However, it should not be dismissed as a gimmick, as it is a very potent strategy in an environment where everything is bulky and fast.
  2. trickroom

    trickroom
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    Not really. In Ubers, Dialga, Arceus, Palkia, Mewtwo, Deoxys-S, Deoxys learn it. Deoxys-S, Deoxys and Mewtwo obviously won't use it though but Dialga and Palkia are awesome Trick Roomers. Dialga is both bulky and hits immensely powerful, so it makes an excellent candidate to set up Trick Room and sweep at the same time. Palkia has respectable defenses and can abuse Kyogre to set up Trick Room. Unlike the usual Palkia, Trick Room allows Palkia to come in on Kyogre without fearing paralysis from Thunder too much. Arceus is probably too fast to abuse Trick Room but it can set it up.

    Cresselia is still works well in Ubers Trick Room. In Ubers, the base 90s are both slow and powerful so Trick Room gives them a chance to sweep without paralysis support. Some examples are Specs Kyogre, Swords Dance or Choice Band Groudon, Zekrom, Reshiram, Ho-Oh and Giratina-O. Ubers Trick Room falters against Uber Stall but totally wrecks offensive teams. Darkrai, Mewtwo and Shaymin-S are destroyed by Trick Room teams due to their lowish Defenses and blazing Speed.
  3. V0x

    V0x ah
    is an Artist Alumnusis a Forum Moderator Alumnusis a Contributor Alumnus

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    I was meaning that I wasn't going to write about ubers. Not yet, at least. But yes, I'll keep this stuff in mind when I go and play around with it.

    Show Hide

    Some Stuff
     PP: 5, maxed at 8
     Priority: -7
    Effects
     Speed is inverted for 5 turns. IE, slower Pokemon go before faster ones
     Priority is not changed. Extremespeed will still go before Mach Punch (and Prankster) will still go before 0 priority moves, etc.
     Nothing boosts the effects to 8 turns
    Using Trick Room under Trick Room twists the dimensions back to normal speed
    Note about Hidden Powers: Often, giving 2 or 3 points in speed can boost it back up to 70 base power, a noticeable difference (esp. when SE) from 64.

     Effects basically the same as last gen
     Benefited from environment change: more anti-metagameish than 4th gen
     Many fast sweepers can be dealt with now
     Sand Rush and Chlorophyll users are in for a surprise
     New boosting moves (Shell Smash, Quiver Dance, etc.) and old ones less deadly
     Don’t need to worry about speed: more EVs to use!
     Mixed sweepers get maxed offenses
     -Spe nature usually


    Trick Room Setters

    [​IMG]
    Slowbro
    Type: Water / Psychic
    Stats: 95 HP / 75 Atk / 110 Def / 100 SpA / 80 SpD / 30 Spe
    Abilities: Oblivious / Own Tempo / Regenerator

    Useful Moves: Trick Room, Yawn, Disable, Slack Off, Amnesia, Psychic, Psyshock, Calm Mind, Toxic, Hidden Power, Ice Beam, Light Screen, Shadow Ball, Flamethrower, Fire Blast, Focus Blast, Scald, Grass Knot, Substitute

    With the advent of Black and White, Slowbro gained an ability that spirited it from the depths of UU and brought it to the tumultuous waters of OU. This ability, Regenerator, enables the pink hermit crab to saunter in and out of battle with little expense. Couple this with decent 95/110/80 defenses, a balanced defensive typing, and a reliable recover move in Slack Off; such a fusion creates a sturdy Pokemon perfect for replenishing Trick Room a number of times. To aid in twisting the dimensions, Slowbro has support moves such as Yawn. Inducing drowsiness upon an opponent prompts the adversary to switch, and one can take this opportunity to set up Trick Room safe from the onslaught of the enemy. This is not all, however, as Slowbro commands various elemental moves such as Surf, Fire Blast, Flamethrower, Scald, Ice Beam, Psychic, Grass Knot, etc., which allow it to provide any needed coverage.

    The sea of OU still batters Slowbro, unfortunately. Its Psychic typing leaves it vulnerable to the Bug-, Dark-, and Ghost- type moves that other Trick Roomers are weak to. In this case, sharing is not caring; opponents will exploit a poorly supported team and leave the Trick Room sweepers without speed. Another issue facing Slowbro, although not as detrimental as it would be to other Pokemon, is passive damage. All entry hazards fall under this category, and although this damage is mitigated by Regenerator, Regenerator heals upon switching out, not in. Thus, Slowbro will never come in at full health, and this occurrence combined with repeatedly tanking hits can, after a few turns, leave it in easy OHKO range. Status will also chip away at Slowbro’s health. While Regenerator will heal Burn and Poison damage, the conditions themselves will whittle away at its hit points, thus making Slowbro think twice about sauntering in an out of the fray.



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    Exeggutor
    Type: Grass / Psychic
    Stats: 95 HP / 95 Atk / 85 Def / 125 SpA / 65 SpD / 55 Spe
    Abilities: Chlorophyll / Harvest
    Useful Moves: Trick Room, Seed Bomb, Psyshock, Wood Hammer, Leaf Storm, Toxic, Hidden Power, Light Screen, Protect, Psychic, Reflect, Rest, Energy Ball, Grass Knot, Substitute, Ingrain, Giga Drain, Block, Leech Seed, Sleep Powder, Low Kick
    Details (goods and bads separate into paragraphs, strategies, etc.):

    Exeggutor is an interesting option for a Trick Roomer. It's main selling point came around with Black and White: Harvest. This allows it to instantly recover all of its HP with Rest+Lum Berry, as Harvest brings back the berry every turn. Having decent defenses, Exeggutor can last quite a while and replenish Trick Room multiple times. In addition, Exeggutor has a great bast 125 Special Attack stat and a sufficient movepool. This means it can fill a team slot as an offensive Trick Roomer, along the lines of Reuniclus and Chandelure. Exeggutor's decent 95 base Attack stat allows some mixing, beneficial for taking out heavy special walls such as Blissey and Tyranitar.

    However, Exeggutor suffers greatly from some of the common Trick Roomer problems. First, it has a Grass / Psychic typing, which is extremely unfortunate. This combination leaves Exeggutor weak to Dark and Ghost and 4x weak to Bug, three weaknesses shared by many Trick Roomers. It also has many other weaknesses that will make it hard for sweepers to switch in. For example, its weakness to Fire-types means Escavalier will have a harder time coming in, while its Ice-type weakness will hinder Marowak's switching. In addition, Exeggutor lacks moveslots to attain good coverage. Trick Room and Rest leave only two options left; Leaf Storm, while STAB, is 4x resisted by a great deal of the metagame, and Psychic leaves it open for Dark-types to come in an KO it. Various Hidden Powers are overall to weak to dent common threats. Thus, Exeggutor is placed in a difficult position. It is not the most defensive Trick Roomer, and its offensive capability is generally outclassed. Therefore, one should only use Exeggutor with good support, taking the most advantage out of instant recovery and its Grass / Psychic typing.


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    Slowking: special Slowbro w/ NP



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    Porygon2
    Type: Normal
    Stats: 85 HP / 80 Atk / 90 Def / 105 SpA / 95 SpD / 60 Spe
    Abilities: Trace / Download / Analytic
    Useful Moves: Trick Room, Recover, Magic Coat, Tri Attack, Psyshock, Toxic, Ice Beam, Thunderbolt, Psychic, Shadow Ball, Substitute, Trick

    In the old days, Porygon2 really only lacked defenses. However, as the generation upgraded, Eviolite was introduced, thus elevating the CyberDuck Pokemon to a potent wall. Its great defenses, now able to take Gengar's Focus Blast among other things, and access to Recover mean Porygon2 can repeatedly replenish Trick Room. It also has a decent 105 base Special Attack, meaning it can run an offensive set with BoltBeam coverage. This is generally ineffective, however, as common OU Pokemon such as Tyranitar and Ferrothorn take little damage from even a fully invested Ice Beam or Thunderbolt. Instead, Porygon2's offenses should be used to defeat specific threats rather than attempt a sweep. Dropping offense by no means lowers its effectiveness, as Porygon2 has access to a variety of support moves including Magic Coat, useful for reflecting Taunts and Phazing. Both of these thing prevent Porygon2 setting up Trick Room, forcing it out and causing the player to lose momentum.

    A great Trick Roomer is not without its downsides, unfortunately. Porygon2's Normal typing means it is weak to Fighting-type moves, one of the most common in the current metagame. It also has no resistances, meaning powerful STAB moves will still harm Porygon2. These factors can potentially decrease the lifespan of the duck. Against stall teams, Porygon2 will also lose some effectiveness, as it is susceptible to all entry hazards and takes passive Poison and Burn damage. Overall, however, Porygon2 is an exceptional general Trick Roomer, able to be fit on any team and function effectively.



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    Claydol:maybe


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    Banette
    Type: Ghost
    Stats: 64 HP / 115 Atk / 65 Def / 83 SpA / 63 SpD / 65 Spe
    Abilitie(s): Insomnia
    Useful Moves: Trick Room, Destiny Bond, Magic Coat, Knock Off, Shadow Sneak, Sucker Punch, Will-O-Wisp, Pain Split, Protect

    Banette doesn’t look like your average Trick Roomer. Its below average stats lend way to images of Tyranitar’s Crunch tearing the ghost to shreds, or Scizor’s Bullet Punch ripping holes in its doll-like image. However, Banette isn’t meant to tank hits and Trick Room like other Pokemon. It has a niche as a suicide dimension twister, functioning best in the lead position. The course of action depends on the opposing lead, but the general idea is to hang on with 1 HP (through Focus Sash) with 4 turns of Trick Room left. From there, Destiny Bond takes out the opposing Pokemon, and your sweeper of choice comes in unscathed and with 3 turns left to rampage. This strategy must be used with caution, however, as a misprediction of when to Magic Coat or Destiny Bond can lead to a 5-6 disadvantage right off the bat.

    Partners:

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    Dusclops
    Type: Ghost
    Stats: 40 HP / 70 Atk / 130 Def / 60 SpA / 130 SpD / 25 Spe
    Abilities: Pressure
    Useful Moves: Trick Room, Disable, Will-o-Wisp, Mean Look, Toxic, Seismic Toss, Night Shade, Substitute, Destiny Bond, Pain Split, Trick, Spite

    Dusclops is another Pokemon revived by the generation shift. While one would have used Dusknoir in the past, Eviolite boosts Dusclop's defenses to gigantic levels. This allows it to tank a powerful hit and set up Trick Room, as few things can OHKO an efficiently EV'd Dusclops. In addition, it has a great support movepool. It can cripple physical sweepers with Will-o-Wisp, Destiny Bond in a last ditch effort, or Spite the PP away from annoying recovery moves. Its abysmal speed and access to Taunt means it can somewhat combat stall after Trick Room is up, useful if one doesn't carry a Rapid Spinner.

    Unfortunately, Dusclops, typical of Ghost-types, has low HP. This hinders its tanking abilities; it can take a few hits extremely well, but repeated attacks will wear it down. This is not helped by its only form of recovery, the unreliable Pain Split. Furthermore, Dusclops is susceptible to all hazards, meaning that against stall it will not be able to switch in many times. Toxic, and to a lesser extent, Burn, is detrimental because Dusclops loses Leftovers from Eviolite. Also, Dusclops has little offensive capability. With 70 base Attack and 60 Base Special Attack, it must rely on Seismic Toss or Night Shade to deal damage. Seismic Toss will leave it bait for Ghost-types, who can come in and KO it before it can replenish Trick Room. Then, that ghost can continue to plow through the player's team if most of the Trick Roomers are weak to ghost. Likewise, Night Shade means it can't hit Normal-types, though this fact is less important. Overall, Dusclops is very good in fulfilling a defensive Trick Room core, pairing well with Trick Roomers like Porygon2.



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    Bronzong
    Type: Steel / Psychic
    Stats: 67 HP / 89 Atk / 116 Def / 79 SpA / 116 SpD / 33 Spe
    Abilities: Levitate / Fireproof / Heavy Metal
    Useful Moves: Trick Room, Confuse Ray, Iron Defense, Gyro Ball, Earthquake, Explosion, Substitute, Stealth Rock, Trick, Zen Headbutt, Iron Head

    Bronzong makes its return as one of the sturdiest Trick Roomers. Its great resistances due to its Steel/Psychic typing allow it the repeatedly come in and re-twist the dimensions. Furthermore, it has two great abilities in Levitate and Heatproof. Either eliminates one of Brozong's two weaknesses. Because of this, Bronzong will be able to tank a powerful hit and set up Trick Room. Levitate is generally preferred because it can handle Excadrill, and works great under Rain. Another fact that increases its longevity is its immunity to Toxic, meaning common walls will be unable to touch it. Additionally, Brozong has a decent 89 base attack, so it won't become Substitute fodder.

    Brozong is not without its faults. First, it has no reliable recovery. Thus, it won't be able to continually take powerful moves. In regards to this aspect one should play Bronzong to cover other Trick Roomer's weaknesses. Another problem Bronzong faces is Taunting and Phazing. It's offensive moves can't damage common Taunters like Thunderus and Whimsicott or common Phazers like Skarmory. It also has no way to prevent others from setting hazards with its Gyro Ball being resisted by Ferrothorn, Forretress, and Skarmory. Overall, Bronzong is effective when paired in a Trick Room core that can make use of its neutrality to Dark- and Bug- types.


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    Gallade
    Type: Psychic / Fighting
    Stats: 85 HP / 115 Atk / 80 Def / 105 SpA / 80 SpD / 50 Spe
    Abilities:
    Useful Moves:

    Gallade has a distinguished position among Trick Room users, as it is one of two Pokemon that can both set up Trick Room and abuse a physical movepool. Because many other Trick Roomers can only viably use Special moves, namely Reuniclus, Chandelure, etc., an imbalance may arise in offensive presence, leaving the team easily walled by Blissey or Chansey. Gallade isn’t shabby either; it boasts a 125 base Attack stat and a great STAB move in Close Combat. It also attains that Fighting-Psychic-Dark/Ghost coverage, and can use that trifecta to clean weakened teams, and has a threatening presence that can force Ferrothorn, Tyranitar, and others out.

    Unfortunately, a few attributes hold Gallade back from the limelight. It has a pathetic X base Defense, meaning it will be hard pressed to switch in. Furthermore, its attacks are rather weak, aside from the aforementioned Close Combat. Psycho Cut has only 70 Base Power, equating to 105 with STAB. Its [dark/ghost move] receives no STAB, and has only X base power. This lacking of power can lend itself to disaster, as a failure to KO can result in the elimination of Gallade.



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    Dusknoir

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    Uxie


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    Cresselia


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    Whimsicott: DAMN good premily writings
    Type: Grass
    Stats: 60/67/85/75/77/116
    Abilities: Prankster/
    Useful Moves: Trick Room, Encore, Taunt, Leech Seed, Substitute,
    details
    -patches up TR problems like set up sweepers, phazers, taunters, etc
    -decent defenses
    -forces many switches = opportunity for TR
    -pulls weight w/o TR well

    -entry hazard weak limits switching
    -status weak
    -weak to common Bug moves


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    Sigilyph

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    Cofagrigus
    Type:
    Stats: 58 HP / 50 Atk / 145 Def / 95 SpA / 105 SpD / 30 Spe
    Abilitie(s): Mummy
    Useful Moves: Trick Room, Protect, Disable, Haze, Night Shade, Will-O-Wisp, Shadow Ball, Destiny Bond, Heal Block, Memento, Nasty Plot, Calm Mind, Toxic, Hidden Power, Psychic, Rest

    Cofagrigus joins the undead of the 5th generation as a bulky ghost. Its base 145 defense and base 105 special defense allow it to tank hits marvelously. This ability can be further increased by using Calm Mind, which also boosts its decent 95 base Special Attack. With access to Nasty Plot, it can fill a much needed offensive Trick Roomer slot along the lines of Reuiclus and Slowking, using Shadow Ball and Hidden Power Fighting for good neutral coverage. In addition, it has a great typing to fit into certain Trick Room cores, as Ghost resist the Bug weakness of Psychic types. It is recommended, however, to then run a Dark resist so Crunches and Dark Pulses will not ruin the team. Furthermore, it has access to support moves such as Will-o-wisp. This will let it cripple Physical attackers before setting up Trick Room, or let it Trick Room on a predicted switch-out. Mummy also has its situational uses, as Scizor will lose its much coveted Technicial when Bullet Punching this sarchophagus.

    Unfortunately, its Ghost typing brings some familiar characteristics. It has a low base 58 HP, which means its tanking abilities are cut short. In addition, it will take Stealth Rock and Spikes damage, and without a reliable recovery move, will be worn down quickly. This is not helped by the fact that it is susceptible to Toxic and Burn. Its typing is another liability, potentially leaving all of one's Trick Roomers food for Tyranitar's Crunch. Overall, Cofagrigus must be distinguished from other Ghost-types that Recover or at least Pain Split, and functions best covering Bug-type weaknesses.


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    Reuniclus
    Type: Psychic
    Stats: 110 HP / 65 Atk / 75 Def / 125 SpA / 85 SpD / 30 Spe
    Abilities: Overcoat / Magic Guard / Regenerator
    Useful Moves: Trick Room, Reflect, Hidden Power, Recover, Psyshock, Endeavor, Psychic, Toxic, Shadow Ball, Focus Blast, Energy Ball


    Reuinclus is a unique Trick Roomer in that it has made its way into the mainstream metagame. It is now a more common threat that teams prepare for, which is somewhat disadvantageous for the surprise factor of Trick Room. Nonetheless, it is still very effective at its job. With great HP and average defenses, it can tank hits and twist the dimensions. Its ability, Magic Guard, allows it to switch in numerous times to replenish Trick Room. Reuniclus is also very versatile; in three moves it has near perfect neutral coverage, but it can also run a more defensive set with Recover. In addition, Taunters and Phazers will think twice about switching in to this homunculus, as its base 125 Special Attack is capable of hitting anything hard. To add to all of this, Reuniclus resists the common priority move Mach Punch, and is not weak to any. This is especially useful, as priority moves bypass the effects of Trick Room.

    Of course, Reuniclus is not without its faults. Because it has permeated the standard metagame, its surprise factor is lost. Opponents will know how to handle it, thus reducing its effectiveness. Also, Reuniclus is weak to Bug- and Dark-type moves, a common weakness amongst Trick Roomers and a common offensive typing. For example, Reuniclus cannot always withstand Scizor’s Bug Bite or Tyranitar’s Crunch, two very common moves. It also has trouble breaking through Blissey and Chansey, as Psychoshock does not reliably 2HKO them. Despite these drawbacks, however, Reuniclus functions superbly as an offensive Trick Roomer, able to twist the dimensions and run through an unprepared team.


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    Jellicent

    Jellicent is a solid OU Pokemon, capable of checking Excadrill or smashing through walls with Choice Specs Water Absorb. In its repertoire is Trick Room as well, and Jellicent makes and excellent setter with various support and offensive moves. Access to Recover means it can heal up on non-threats and replenish Trick Room multiple times. Will-O-Wisp allows to the threaten physical attackers, potentially forcing a switch and allowing Jellicent to twist the dimensions safely. Scald will also dissuade physical attackers from coming in, protecting Jellicent's weaker defense. The key to Jellicent, however, is still its defense, so it should be selectively placed onto teams tailored in such a way.

    There are a couple of unfortunate flaws the come with Jellicent. As with most Trick Room users it is weak to Dark- and Ghost-type moves, making it a dangerous selection on some teams. Furthermore, it has low Defense, meaning it will be hard-pressed to cover multiple physical threats and set up Trick Room. Another issue is its relative lack of offensive pressure; Bulk Up variants of Scrafty or Reuniclus and more can use the turn Jellicent uses Trick Room to set up, and Jellicent will be unable to do much afterwards. In addition, it hates stall teams since it will take all entry hazard damage and be slowly worn down by status. Thus, it works earlier in the game when the fields are still clean.

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    Chandelure
    Type: Fire / Ghost
    Stats: 60 HP / 55 Atk / 90 Def / 145 SpA / 90 SpD / 80 Spe
    Abilitie(s): Flash Fire / Flame Body / Shadow Tag
    Useful Moves: Trick Room, Psychic, Shadow Ball, Flamethrower, Fire Blast, Energy Ball, Hidden Power

    Chandelure is an interesting choice for a Trick Roomer. It commonly appears as a scarfer or a lure, and its Trick Room set is often overlooked in lieu of Reuniclus, who has a better ability and typing. However, Chandelure has attributes that make it effective on the right team. With a base 145 Special Attack stat, it will take a chunk out of any opponent. This also makes Chandelure a viable option over Reuniclus as an offensive Trick Roomer. It 4x resists Bug-type moves, meaning it synergizes with the Psychic-types. In addition, Chandelure has a threatening offensive presence that forces switches and allows for that extra turn to set up Trick Room. For example, Ferrothorn’s best bet is to switch out to escape from being roasted. Scizor is completely walled, as Chandelure resists or is immune to all of its moves. Furthermore, Chandelure has decent 60/90/90 defenses, allowing it to take weak hit and Trick Room if needed.

    Unfortunately, Chandelure’s Fire typing holds it back. Taking 25% from Stealth Rock each switch in means either Rapid Spin support is needed, or Chandelure will fall early. Rapid Spin is hard to come by on a Trick Room team, as those extra turns needed to switch in and spin could be better used by a Trick Room abuser. It is also weak to Dark- and Ghost- type moves, so choosing it cannot patch up all of your weaknesses. Furthermore, Blissey, Chansey, and Heatran wall Chandelure. This can be problematic when you can’t afford to switch due to the hazard-infested field. A final thing to consider is that Chandelure is rather fast by Trick Room standards, so bulky sweepers like Conkeldurr and Scrafty can come in under Trick Room and outspeed it.

    Special Mentions

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    Smeargle can do anything you want it to, but it is important to distinguish it from the bulkier Trick Room setters. Thus, it functions best as a lead, where it can use Spore, Trick Room, and Endeavor to weaken an opponent right off the bat. However, it can literally do anything, so play around with it.

    Solosis (or w/e)

    Because of Magic Guard, this young Reuniclus can Endeavor its way to victory any time during the match with an intact Focus Sash. Sweepers can optimally capitalize on the the leftover turns.


    Sweepers that use it

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    Escavalier
    Type: Bug / Steel
    Stats: 70 HP / 135 Atk / 105 Def / 60 SpA / 105 SpD / 20 Spe
    Abilities: Swarm / Shell Armor / Overcoat
    Useful Moves: X-Scissor, Reversal, Megahorn, Pursuit, Return, Take Down, Double Edge, Iron Head

    Escavalier is another potent Trick Room sweeper, boasting lower speed than Ferrothorn and a massive base 135 Attack. It is no slouch in the defensive department, either, its 70/105/105 defenses making it bulkier than Scizor. This also helps in allowing Escavalier to function when Trick Room is down, as it will be able to take a hit and strike back. Furthermore, it has high Base Power moves such as Megahorn and Double Edge, allowing it to deal heavy damage to even resists. This is very helpful for other Trick Room sweepers who can’t otherwise break through walls. Its resistance also help the team, as it is able to take the Dark-, Bug-, and Ghost-type moves that will be constantly directed at the Trick Roomers.

    There are, of course, faults with Escavalier. It takes damage from all entry hazards, meaning it will have trouble against stall. This is not helped by its poor movepool, meaning it will have to constantly switch when facing Steel-types named Skarmory. A switch means one less Trick Room turn you can use, which can potentially be a problem if your Trick Roomers are weakened. A burn will also completely cripple Escavalier, rendering its great attack useless and turning it into fodder.

    Partners: Politeod provides rain, covering Escavalier’s 4x Fire weakness. Rampardos easily takes down Skarmory and Gliscor, two of Escavalier’s greatest obstacles. Most Trick Room setters appreciate Escavalier’s resistances, and will give the escargot easy chances to switch in.


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    Emboar
    Type: Fire / Fighting
    Stats: 110 HP / 123 Atk / 65 Def / 100 SpA / 65 SpD / 65 Spe
    Abilities: Blaze / Reckless
    Useful Moves: Hammer Arm, Head Smash, Flare Blitz, Earthquake, Brick Break, Scald????? Stone Edge, Wild Charge

    Emboar is the third Fire / Fighting starter in a row. Unlike its predecessors, however, Emboar has no place in OU under normal conditions. After all, its abysmal speed and mediocre defenses mean it will be defeated before accomplishing anything. Trick Room gives it another change to shine, however, now that Emboar won’t have to worry about speed. It becomes a great physical or mixed attacker, hitting 13/17 types super effectively with its 4 moves. Furthermore, these are all recoil moves, which means they have high Base Power. It can easily clean up a weakened team in 3 turns, smashing every opponent with the proper attacks.

    Unfortunately, Emboar is somewhat of a glass cannon like Rampardos. Since all of its moves have recoil, repeated hitting and receiving hits mean it will fall very quickly. This fact is not helped by its susceptibility to entry hazards, meaning stall will break down Emboar quickly. In addition, it is almost completely reliant on Trick Room, as its rather low defenses mean it will be unable to take a hit. Overall, Emboar functions well when putting offensive pressure on the opponent, forcing switches and predicting the switch in to hit with super effective damage.

    Partners: Emboar has a nice 4x resistance to Bug-type moves, so it will have many chances to switch in when paired with Slowbro, Celebi, or other Psychic-types. It also appreciates having the opponent severely weakened, so hard hitters like Escavalier and Rampardos are good partners.

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    Eelektross
    Type: Electric
    Stats: 85 HP / 115 Atk / 80 Def / 105 SpA / 80 SpD / 50 Spe
    Abilitie(s): Levitate
    Useful Moves: Dragon Claw, Thunderbolt, Thunder, Brick Break, Flamethrower, Volt Switch, Dragon Tail, U-Turn, Wild Charge,

    Eelektross is an interesting Pokemon, arriving as the 3rd with no weaknesses thanks the Levitate. While its offenses do look rather meager, it does have many redeeming qualities. For one, immunity to Spikes is very useful in repeatedly coming in to threaten the opponent. It also has decent bulk, so it can take a hit outside of Trick Room and retaliate with its many coverage moves, mixed or not. Access to U-turn and Volt Switch allows the hit-and-run Trick Room strategy, where at turn 5 you switch back to your Trick Room user to replenish the dimensions.

    There are disadvantages to this eel, however. Since it has rather low Attack and Special Attack, it will struggle to attain needed KOs. While hazard support mitigates this, it will be hard to find spaces and turns on a Trick Room team to layer Spikes. Also, despite the lack of weaknesses, it has few resistances, meaning it cannot switch in as easily to the flow of Dark-, Ghost-, and Bug-type moves, especially if it is fully mixed and not EVs are left in defense. Eelektross is best used for its superb coverage and mixed stats, dishing out enough damage for the rest of the team to break through.

    Partners:


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    Marowak
    Type: Ground
    Stats: 60 HP / 80 Atk / 110 Def / 50 SpA / 80 SpD / 45 Spe
    Abilitie(s): Rock Head / Lightningrod / Battle Armor
    Useful Moves: Double Edge, Earthquake, Brick Break, Stone Edge, Fire Punch, Thunderpunch, Outrage, Low Kick

    A first glance at Marowak will leave you wondering why anyone would want to use it, even under Trick Room. However, its meager 80 base Attack is doubled with its signature item, Thick Club. With unparalleled 568 Attack, it can also switch moves, making Marowak a very versatile late game sweeper. It has great neutral coverage in Earthquake, Stone Edge, and Fire Punch, and can decimate weakened teams. Marowak also has great defenses; although its base 60 HP is poor, it has 110 base Defense and 80 base Special Defense. This means Marowak can tank some it and KO back, especially useful if Trick Room is not up. Its typing also helps in switching, as it resists Stealth Rock.

    Unfortunately, Marowak's Ground typing leaves it with disadvantages. It is weak to Water-, Ice-, and Grass-type moves, all of which are fairly common. Both Water and Ice have priority moves that will outpace Marowak regardless of Trick Room. It doesn't help that a majority of these moves are specially based, meaning they will be hitting Marowak's weaker side. In addition, Marowak is hard pressed to break down physical walls like Skarmory, Gliscor, and Rotom-W. Physically Defensive Skarmory can Roost off Fire Punch damage until Trick Room ends, as it is a 3HKO. Gliscor takes minimal damage from Stone Edge, and a miss will allow Poison-Heal the undue the work done. Although Marowak can use Double-Edge to remedy this, the loss of the last coverage move will leave it hopeless against other walls. Rotom-W also tanks Stone Edge with ease and retaliates with a Super Effective Hydro Pump. Overall, Marowak enjoys when physical walls are eliminated and the rest of the opponents team is weak, as from there on out it is just a cakewalk to victory.

    Donphan

    This should be only used for Rapid Spin, because Marowak is a much better offensive Ground-type under Trick Room.


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    Druddigon
    Type: Dragon
    Stats: 77 HP / 120 Atk / 90 Def / 60 SpA / 90 SpD / 48 Spe
    Abilitie(s): Rough Skin / Sheer Force / Mold Breaker
    Useful Moves: Crunch, Dragon Claw, Night Slash, Dragon Tail, Superpower, Outrage, Earthquake, Fire Fang, Thunder Fang, Pursuit, Sucker Punch

    Despite great bulk and Attack, Druddigon is shunned from OU because so many better Dragon-types reside in the lofty clouds. Trick Room reverses the roles, as the speedy Latios, Haxorus, Hydriegon, and others struggle to keep up for 5 turns. Druddigon has access to the Dragon-Ground-Fire trifecta of offense, leaving all that oppose it with a wound of some kind. Furthermore, it has great abilities in Sheer Force or Mold Breaker; the former powers up Fire Fang while the latter allows Earthquake to hit pesky levitators. Sucker Punch is another welcome addition, giving Druddigon some form a priority to use in case of emergency.

    Despite its relative bulkiness, Druddigon won’t function well without Trick Room. It is very slow, and Sucker Punch is rather unreliable in many cases. Furthermore, it will be the target of many moves; in a Dragon infested tier it is natural that many Dragon- or Ice-type moves are floating around. It is also grounded, unlike the Lati twins, meaning it will not fare well against stall teams, especially since Steel-types such as Skarmory take little from Fire Fang and force it out easily for hazards damage. Status is another issue; burns will outright cripple it while Toxic will slowly chip away at its health.

    Partners: Magnezone


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    Conkledurr
    Type: Fighting
    Stats: 105 HP / 140 Atk / 95 Def / 55 SpA / 65 SpD / 45 Spe
    Abilitie(s): Iron Fist / Guts
    Useful Moves: Hammer Arm, Stone Edge, Earthquake, Drain Punch, Mach Punch, Facade
    Details (goods and bads separate into paragraphs, strategies, etc.):
     Great bulk allow it to take hits and function outside of TR
     Access to priority, a huge benefit
     Amazing attack with high powered moves mean good damage output
     Resists Stealth Rock
     Guts to boost attack (usually with toxic orb)
    [] resists Dark and Bug, two common Trick Roomer weaknesses: many opportunities to switch in <-add this to non-online draft

     Residual damage wears Conk down quickly, especially since it has an orb to boost its attack
     Having no answer to Gliscor except Stone Edge means a switch will probably be forced
     Cannot reliably damage ghosts

    Partners:
    Example Trick Room Set(s):

    Conkeldurr (M) @ Toxic Orb
    Trait: Guts
    EVs: 120HP / 252 Atk / 136 SDef (don’t remember exact spread for most efficiency)
    Brave Nature (+Atk, -Spd)
    - Hammer Arm
    - Stone Edge / Earthquake
    - Facade
    - Mach Punch

     624 attack after toxic kicks in
     Toxic Orb > Flame Orb, as under Trick Room Conk should only be staying in for a MAXIMUM of 3 turns
     Hammer Arm’s minus speed actually helps
     High powered moves with great neutral coverage means it hits a lot
     Mach Punch lets it keep utility outside of Trick Room

    [​IMG]

    Bouffalant
    Type: Normal
    Stats: 95 HP / 110 Atk / 95 Def / 40 SpA / 95 SpD / 55 Spe
    Abilities: Reckless / Sap Sipper
    Useful Moves: Pursuit, Head Charge, Megahorn, Earthquake, Stone Edge, Rock Slide, Wild Charge
    Details (goods and bads separate into paragraphs, strategies, etc.):
     Bulky sweeper enables it to come back and take hits
     Decent attack with highly powered moves means high damage output
     Both abilities usable to increase offensive capabilities

     Weakness to entry hazards means it falls to stall
     Slightly sub-par Attack means physical walls (Skarmory, Gliscor) will give it a hard time
     Normal STAB doesn’t have the best coverage, so Bouffalant won’t be able to power through things
     Typing affords no resistances, limiting good chances to switch in
     Recoil on moves will hinder its longevity, especially if using Life Orb

    Partners:
    Example Trick Room Set(s):

    Bouffalant @ Life Orb
    Trait: Sap Sipper / Reckless
    EVs: 252 HP / 252 Atk / 4 SDef
    Brave Nature (+Atk, -Spe)
    - Head Charge
    - Earthquake
    - Stone Edge
    - Wild Charge

     uses full offensive abilities to face most opponents in the limited TR time
     Head Smash give reliable STAB to dish out damage
     EQ hits steels that resist Head Charge and other grounded stuff hard
     Stone Edge hits Flying things harder than HS
     Wild Charge is boosted by Reckless and gives more SE coverage
     Attack Maximized to deal damage, while rest is put into HP to take hits on both sides
     more specialized EV spreads possible
     Eats Grass for maximum overdrive

    [​IMG]

    Rampardos
    Type: Rock
    Stats: 97 HP / 165 Atk / 60 Def / 65 SpA / 50 SpD / 58 Spe
    Abilitie(s): Mold Breaker / Sheer Force
    Useful Moves: Head Smash is all you need unless the opponent has Steelix

    Only two words are needed to describe this resurrected prehistoric beast: glass cannon. Its nonexistent defenses and massive recoil from Head Smash ensure that it will shatter after three turns. However, three turns are all it needs to do its damage with its gargantuan 165 base Attack stat. With a Choice Band and Head Smash, Rampardos can easily eliminate any physical wall not named Steelix. It also has access to the sublime Earthquake-Rock-type-Move-Fire Punch neutral coverage combo, ensuring that, with acute prediction, any opponent will be OHKO'd. Rampardos is especially useful for eliminating Gliscor and Skarmory, two physical walls that give other potent Trick Room sweepers tons of trouble.

    Of course, as with all glass cannons, Rampardos will not last long. The heavy recoil from OHKO'ing Blissey will also KO Rampardos. After three turns of Head Smashing Rampardos will have fainted without question. In addition, the accuracy of Head Smash can pose a problem. If your team relies on Rampardos to eliminate physical walls but Head Smash misses, it may be KO'd before doing any damage. This will leave you with a huge handicap that will be hard to overcome if you don't have other means of eliminating those physical walls. Don't let the frailty of Rampardos turn you away, however. It is a great asset to teams that can properly utilize its massive attack, and still helpful to those that don't.




    Fast Mons Setting UP
    These Pokemon are slightly too fast, even with minimum speed to comfortable outrun the majority of the metagame after the dimensions are twisted. However, each are unique and add a perspective that may be necessary for one's team.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Fast Mons for revenge killing outside of TR
    These Pokemon are a nice addition to Trick Room teams in that they provide speed without having to rely on the field effect. Most of these Pokemon are relatively unaffected by certain entry hazards to ensure they can come in and out many times.

    Salamence mixed is good at KOing stuff
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Hydregion is a great revenge killer outside of Trick Room due to its immunity to Spikes and Toxic Spikes and neutrality to Stealth Rock. Furthermore, it has a high base 125 Special Attack, and is not dependent on set up to deal damage with its Draco Meteor. It also has great coverage options in Flamethrower / Fire Blast and Focus Blast and is not weak to Pursuit. These factors allow it to come in and out multiple times, handling threats when you have no time to Trick Room. Slap a Scarf on its 98 base Speed and not much will be catching this floating hydra.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Gengar is another Pokemon with Levitate and has a great base 130 Special Attack to boot. It can effectively use Choice Scarf if your team requires something blazing fast, but can just as easily use a Life Orb and 4 attacks sets, outspeeding the majority of threats you can't take down under Trick Room. It gets great coverage in Shadow Ball and Focus Blast, meaning if your team has run its course, not much left is needed for a sweep.
    [​IMG]
    more....?







    General Theory Behind Making it Work (Advanced Checklist, things to keep in mind)
     Pure stall doesn’t really work (get hazards up first?), but Trick Room teams are very good at capitalizing on hazards
     Offense not dependent on set up: instant power or one turn of +2 (TR, SD, two attacks)
     Balance use of frail sweepers and bulky sweepers: some to hit and run to another set up, others so that after the Trick Roomers go down you aren’t helpless
     CB/Specs/LO and spam high powered moves (Escavelier), or rely on great coverage (Machamp)
     More on Choice
     Get rid of typical Pokemon that run protect: stalling turns out can be a problem (Ferrothorn, Gliscor, etc)
     Find ways to get sweepers, supporters, and Trick Roomers in quickly and safely: slow U-turn or synergistic typing
     Ways to deal with stall teams/annoying cores who will whittle away the turns (major cores) (use this to capitalize on hazards SkarmBliss cores example)
     Ways to deal with users of Whirlwind/Roar/Dragon Tail/Overhead Throw because they will “outspeed” your Trick Room (list of a few of these Pokes)
     Ways to deal with taunters (especially Prankster) (hazards will discourage taunters to keep coming in) (magic Coat Pory2?)
     Ways to deal with bulky set up sweepers (Whimsicott, phazers)
     Ways to deal with substitute and common users (phazing and luring to accomplish this?)
     Defensive Trick Room core with offensive capabilities: set up many times
     Dual Screens helps TR sweepers get in and finish when TR reverts
     Create chances to freely set up Trick Room


    Using Choice (Band/Specs, or for troll teams, Scarf)
     Problem arises from the opponent switching in resists, thus reducing your TR turns
     Best with high powered STAB moves coming off high stats (CB Escavelier Megahorn, CB Rampardos Head Smash, Specs Chandelure Fire Blast, etc.)
     Lure out walls/resists early game and spam choicers late game

    Basic Plays Behind It
     Pure Offense
     Balanced
     Stallish: have ways to handle levitates that take 12% or less from SR
     Dual Screens
     Use early or keep as trump card

    Building a Team

    Checklist


    Highly Advanced Stuff to Consider
    Creating Chances to Set Up Trick Room (examples of specific situations)
     Alluded to above
     Harnessing these chances keeps your Trick Roomers around longer
     Situations to take advantage of: switches
     Forcing a switch: Yawn, etc.
     Scaring something off: Will-o-Wisp physical sweepers
     Baiting a switch: switching in a counter/check and Trick Rooming as they bring in something to get rid of it??
     Come in on something that “can’t touch this”


    Type stacking so CB/Specs stuff can sweep?
    Weather Rooms?
  4. InftHitbox

    InftHitbox

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    I used a Cofagrigus on my Trick Room team for a long time (I have since switched off using it in favor of Jellicent, mostly because my team sorely lacked a fire resist).

    Cofagrigus

    set: Trick Room Physical Wall
    move 1: Trick Room
    move 2: Calm Mind
    move 3: Will-O-Wisp
    move 4: Shadow Ball
    nature: Relaxed
    item: Leftovers
    evs: 252 HP / 252 Def / 4 SpD
    ivs: 0 Spe

    This set worked well for me, switching in well on physical attackers (often removing their all-important ability), and forcing a switch and setting up Trick Room. Calm Mind is to help boost Special Defense if you get in a pinch, WoW for doing something to Ferrothorn, and Shadow Ball for not being complete Taunt bait and usable offense after a Calm Mind boost.
  5. V0x

    V0x ah
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    yeah I'll definitely be giving Cofagrigus a look, especially as an offensive ghost. I've seen other people run TR, Nasty Plot, Shadow Ball, HP Fighting. Do you have any insight about this?


    Also, I've added a few setter-uppers and sweepers.
  6. InftHitbox

    InftHitbox

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    I don't use Cofag as an attacker generally, I just don't find him good enough. My Trick Room special sweeper is generally Reuniclus. I think Cofag is much better suited to a defensive pivot, particularly for the last turn of Trick Room, and he can sponge an attack and put Trick Room back up.

    In the future, when Cofag is inevitably relegated to UU, I'll be taking a good long look at him for that role, but I just don't think in general he's quite good enough.

    EDIT: Escavalier needs Pursuit. 100% of the time.
  7. V0x

    V0x ah
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    Alright. I'll keep that in mind.
    Is there anything else you can suggest I try? Or disagreements with some of the stuff I've said?
  8. InftHitbox

    InftHitbox

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    I use Porygon2, and he's a champ. I don't use Magic Coat though, as I prefer to be able to run both Ice Beam and Thunderbolt. Conkeldurr does really well in Trick Room as well, and teams well with people like Reuniclus (and to a lesser extent, Escavalier).
  9. Xyless

    Xyless

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    Yes, you really should add Conkeldurr to your list. Giving it a Toxic Orb makes it far stronger (and considering it's a TR team, you should be switching him out before it does enough to do more than Flame Orb). Mach Punch is its biggest asset in the TR team, in case you run out of Trick Roomers or are in need of a quick hit before switching out to a TR. Also, giving it Hammer Arm, like Emboar, is RIDICULOUSLY strong. Throw in Stone Edge for some coverage and Drain Arm to give it curing for its Toxic Orb, and you have a pretty legitimate TR physical sweeper.

    This is my build for it, which has worked wonders.

    [​IMG]
    Conkeldurr @ Toxic Orb / Flame Orb
    Trait: Guts
    EVs: 120 HP / 252 Atk / 136 SpDef
    Brave Nature (+Atk, -Spd)
    -Stone Edge

    -Drain Punch
    -Mach Punch
    -Facade
  10. Lee

    Lee @ Thick Club
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    I have been promoting TR erufuun since day 1 and I was worried it wouldn't catch on - thank you! I've used a lot of TR this gen so I'll keep an eye on this. Good luck!
  11. Xyless

    Xyless

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    I use Whimsi mostly as a counter-lead and as a Trick Roomer second. I replaced Seed with Stun Spore, so once I taunt the lead (assuming I feel the need to), the next step is Stun Sporing and hoping it hits. I play with luck, so I not only bank on SS hitting, but accepting the potential chance of the opponent being "slower" than me in TR and risking the Paralyze check.

    If/Once I get that off, if they get a good hit on me, I have a Sash to absorb the hit. Then, I go for the TR, pray it hits, and if it does, then it pretty much implies that the opponent lost the Paralyze check. And then I sneak it out and bring in whatever I have to counter that Pokemon.

    I do all of this because I run Whimsi under the assumption that there will be traps of some kind, and thus he needs to try to have a long-term impact while he can. And what better way to do that than to stun the leader, who tends to be the trapper?

    Only major issue it has is Mirror Bouncers, which...is a pretty major issue. That is why I generally start with Taunt. In case one shows up, all I have to do is switch out anyways.

    This is the build I run (it works, though it's more of a gamble set than many would be willing to do):

    [​IMG]
    Whimsicott @ Focus Sash / Focus Sash
    Trait: Prankster
    EVs: 252 HP / 252 Spd / SpDef 4
    Jolly Nature (+Spd, -SpAtk)
    -Trick Room
    -Taunt
    -Encore
    -Stun Spore
  12. InftHitbox

    InftHitbox

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    I wouldn't run paralysis support on a Trick Room team. Runs the risk of something retarded like Guts Conkeldurr coming in, taking the paralysis and then "outspeeding" all your guys in Trick Room and destroying everything. Whimsicott would be good for an annoyance factor early on, but the main reason I would use it (disguising the fact that I had a Trick Room team based on my lead Poke) is rendered basically useless by Wifi clause and the fact that most competent players will know what I'm doing before the battle starts.
  13. Kemmi

    Kemmi

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    Tyranitar and steels like Ferro/Forry/Skarm benefit. Basically any slow powerhouse made "faster" by TR nearly sweep a team, while slow walls can set up and do their thing.
  14. Xyless

    Xyless

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    If it's a Pokemon that I know benefits enough, I don't Stun. ESPECIALLY Tyranitar. The others I can actually stand stunned, since I have counters for them and I will just save TR for when they are benched.

    Skarmory I'd rather have Stunned out of those, so I can finger-cross a Stun if it tries to Roost.
  15. Xyless

    Xyless

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    Also, like I said, I'm not rolling SS for speed situations, I'm running it for stun checks. Even if they out-slow me, they still have to pass a 25% chance of not being able to act, which can be a deal breaker, especially if their lead (or whoever is stunned) is saved for the end.
  16. mudkipmaster

    mudkipmaster

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    Why would you ever need 3 STABS? Replace Hammer Arm with Facade because 140 base power plus the guts boost equals an awesome attack. Also, burn orb is better than toxic orb. I don't know why you would need toxic orb, since burn orb kills you slower.
  17. Xyless

    Xyless

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    I completely forgot about Facade, considering I haven't played Pokemon for serious in many years I don't tend to remember moves that aren't clearly defined damage dealers. I'll make sure to add that.

    And Toxic Orb should be better than Flame Orb, due to the fact that it'll only be stronger than Flame Orb if it is in for more than 3 turns, which it really shouldn't be. If you're able to switch out before then, especially if you do so in one turn, you don't take that much damage.

    or at least that is what my friend recommended, so obviously either works

    Updated.
  18. V0x

    V0x ah
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    Alright, I've taken in these things and will begin testing Conk probably tonight (CA time). Marowak and that Dragon *should* be up tonight sometime also.

    @Xyless I don't really understand your Whimsicott. What is the Paralysis check or whatever?

    @Lee Thanks! I've noticed from the TR discussion thread, which has been really helpful ;)
  19. Xyless

    Xyless

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    [​IMG]

    Just so I can give a visual of what I mean. Basically, the "Paralyze check" is whether the Paralyzed Pokemon will "be paralyzed" and unable to move or be able to act. Basically, a 1/4 chance of having the same effect as sleep, without a chance of healing out of it unless they have an ability or there is a Pokemon with group status healing.
  20. V0x

    V0x ah
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    yes, but why do you need Whimsicott to paralyze the opponent before setting up Trick Room? and does losing the Paralysis check mean the Pokemon gets paralyzed and can't move, or that it does make its move?
  21. Xyless

    Xyless

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    I don't need Whimsicott to paralyze, but if it does, then I have a potential chance at further actions. I want them to "lose" the Paralyze Check, so they are unable to attack (aka the 1/4 chance). If they do, then I get a free Trick Room, and if, on the turn I DO Trick Room, they "lose" the check again, bam, you can swap Whimsicott out with full health.

    It is pure luck and stuff. I like to play my games more based on janky things than structure.
  22. V0x

    V0x ah
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    I see. The problem is not many people like relying on luck. This could work (for the majority) as a last ditch effort though, say, if all the Trick Roomers are down but your sweepers aren't. IDK yet I always test before making final final conclusions.




    Anyway, Marowak has been posted. I think I got the optimal moveset down, but if anyone has anything to add to that or the comments go right ahead.
    I've barely played any matches where I actually had to use Druddigon, or that it made an impact, so I'm still testing. I've also started looking at Conkeldurr, and I'm probably going to try Dragonite and Baffuron next. For Trick Roomers, I'm looking at writing Cofagrius next and fiddling more with Whimsicott.
  23. Lee

    Lee @ Thick Club
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    Wouldn't bother with Stun Spore on Erufuun - it's counteractive to a TR team and you're sacrificing the incredibly valuable U-turn for it. Trick Room/Encore/U-turn/Leech Seed @ Leftovers with a very defensive EV spread was what I found to be most effective.

    obligatory marowak comments -

    568

    Low Kick is better in just about every situation. One of the more tempting prospects is landing an easy OHKO on Balloon variants of Heatran and Terrakion (edit: and Hydreigon) whilst Brick Break falls short more often than not. I can't think of any KO's Brick Break gets that Low Kick misses, with the exception of Balloon Doryuuzu who takes a minimum of 108% from Fire Punch anyway.



    This just reminded me how huge of a pain Gliscor is for TR teams with his huge defense, key resistances and tendency to spam Protect to waste away TR turns.
  24. CTNC

    CTNC

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    I'd like to point out Level 1 Pokemon are batter OUTSIDE of Trick Room. Why? Lets say Aron uses Endeavor then gets hit, the opponent will have 12 HP and Aron will have 1 HP.

    Edit: Didn't think of Endeaver + Trick Room for some reason... By the way, Level 1 Smeargle seems like a lead to me because of Entry Hazards, but Solosis (Reunicus Unevolved) seems like a good TR Revenge Killer because of Magic Guard.
  25. InftHitbox

    InftHitbox

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    Porygon2. Switches in on Gliscor (hopefully eating a Toxic, Fling, or a layer or two of Toxic Spikes), traces Poison Heal, and packs Ice Beam. He can then set up Trick Room again once Gliscor has retreated or been KO'd. Unfortunately, Gliscor does ruin many a good Conkeldurr rampage, and immediately forces my man Escavalier out as well. If I didn't have Porygon2 on my TR team, I'd lose almost every time I ran into a Gliscor.

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