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A Guide to Entry Hazards in BW UU (GP 2/2)

Discussion in 'Uploaded Analyses' started by ScraftyIsTheBest, Jan 21, 2013.

  1. ScraftyIsTheBest

    ScraftyIsTheBest DreamDream
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    A Guide to Entry Hazards in BW UU
    Written by ScraftyIsTheBest

    1. Introduction
    2. Stealth Rock
    3. Spikes
    4. Toxic Spikes
    5. The Users
    6. Preventing Hazards
      • Rapid Spin
      • Taunt
      • Magic Bounce
    7. Spinblocking
    8. Phazing
    9. Conclusion

    Introduction

    Entry hazards have been one of the most important aspects of competitive battling for a long time. With threats such as Yanmega, Chandelure, and Darmanitan being quite prominent, the presence of Spikes and Stealth Rock is vital to eliminating them. Entry hazards also play an important role in attaining needed KOes and racking up damage with switches. With the myriad of hazard setters and few spinners present in the UU tier, hazards are fairly difficult to remove from the field. With this taken into account, Pokemon such as Blastoise, Claydol, and Xatu have risen in usage, and this guide will introduce the many aspects of entry hazards in UU.

    Stealth Rock

    Stealth Rock is the most common of entry hazards in any tier. Out of the three available entry hazards, Stealth Rock is arguably the easiest to set up. Requiring only one turn to be used to its fullest effect, it's arguably the most influential entry hazard. Without its presence, threats such as Yanmega and Chandelure become much harder to eliminate, but with it, they are much easier to deal with, as they have a much more limited lifespan due to the Rock-type damage it inflicts. Stealth Rock is also the lone hazard that no Pokemon is immune to, bar users of Magic Guard, which are rare sights in UU. Additionally, it is the most widely distributed, so it can easily fit onto any team.

    Spikes

    Spikes is the oldest of entry hazards, and is quite a reliable one too. Spikes offers a consistent 25% damage output after three layers, which is very useful for stall teams to keep racking up damage with. Spikes also helps with offensive teams, wearing down walls and turning some 2HKOs into OHKOs. After all three layers have been set up, it will be very hard for the opposition to act, as Spikes damage stacks up much more quickly than Stealth Rock. The only major drawback to Spikes is that Pokemon with Levitate as well as Flying-types are immune to it. Although it takes three turns to set up, this is mitigated by the fact that most of its users have enough bulk or Speed to pull this job off effectively.

    Toxic Spikes

    Toxic Spikes is the least used of entry hazards, and for good reason. There are numerous Pokemon immune to Toxic Spikes, and with Pokemon such as Roserade, Nidoqueen, and Qwilfish being some of the more popular Pokemon in the tier, Toxic Spikes are very difficult to keep on the field. The effect of Toxic Spikes is also ignored by Pokemon with Levitate, such as Bronzong, Azelf, and Claydol, the last of which can spin the Toxic Spikes away, as well as Pokemon of the Steel typing such as Empoleon and Bisharp. However, once said Pokemon are eliminated, Toxic Spikes comes with its lethal effect; poisoning the target after one layer, and badly poisoning after two. This can wear down walls such as Cofagrigus and Snorlax at a steady pace, and if a spinner or cleric is not used, it can be very hard to deal with the poison damage.

    The Users

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    Bronzong
    Type: Steel / Psychic
    Base Stats: 67 HP / 89 Atk / 116 Def / 79 SpA / 116 SpD / 33 Spe
    Abilities: Levitate / Heatproof / Heavy Metal
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    When it comes to users of Stealth Rock, Bronzong comes to the table as one of the most reliable of them. With a great Steel / Psychic typing along with a fantastic ability in Levitate, Bronzong can take many hits. This is further complemented by great 67 / 116 / 116 defenses, making Bronzong the epitome of a sturdy Stealth Rock user. Thanks to these qualities, Bronzong will find many opportunities to set up Stealth Rock, while also being able to wall a sizable portion of the metagame. Bronzong's low Speed stat allows it to utilize Gyro Ball very effectively, ensuring Bronzong will be able to dish out some damage, so it's still capable of doing decent damage. However, one of the downsides to Bronzong is how prone it is to spinners such as Blastoise as well as Taunt and Magic Bounce users. Nonetheless, when it comes to setting up Stealth Rock in UU, Bronzong is one of the best.

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    Azelf
    Type: Psychic
    Base Stats: 75 HP / 125 Atk / 70 Def / 125 SpA / 70 SpD / 115 Spe
    Abilities: Levitate
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    Azelf enters BW UU as one of the few surviving dedicated leads in the fifth generation. Azelf is the second fastest user of Stealth Rock available in UU, which means he will always be sure to get Stealth Rock up on the battlefield, unless there happens to be a Sableye with Taunt. Speaking of which, Azelf has access to Taunt himself, so he can stop other users of Stealth Rock or Spikes from setting up. Azelf also sports high offensive stats, so he can put sizable dents in the opponent with Psyshock or Psychic. He also has decent coverage to boot, so he can definitely do some damage with Psyshock and Fire Blast after setting up Stealth Rock. Overall, Azelf can make for a great lead to quickly set up Stealth Rock, stop the opposition from setting up, and deal good damage to the opponent.

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    Claydol
    Type: Ground / Psychic
    Base Stats: 60 HP / 70 Atk / 105 Def / 70 SpA / 120 SpD / 75 Spe
    Abilities: Levitate
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    Claydol stands out from other Stealth Rock users with its good bulk as well as its ability to both set up Stealth Rock and spin hazards away. This gives Claydol its role as a solid utility Pokemon; thanks to its good bulk and resistances to Electric, Psychic, and Ground, it will be sure to set up Stealth Rock quite a few times in the match. Claydol also boasts the unique ability to use Rapid Spin as well, so while setting up, it can also remove entry hazards from its side of the field. If needed, Claydol could also set up Light Screen and Reflect to support its team even further. Claydol's ultimate downfall is its weak offensive stats, so it usually fails to do much damage to the opposition. It also has numerous exploitable weaknesses, especially to Dark, making it prone to being trapped by Pursuit. Nonetheless, if you want a Pokemon that can set up Stealth Rock and be a solid supporter, look no further than Claydol.

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    Rhyperior
    Type: Ground / Rock
    Base Stats: 115 HP / 140 Atk / 130 Def / 55 SpA / 55 SpD / 40 Spe
    Abilities: Lightningrod / Solid Rock / Reckless
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    Rhyperior is a very solid user of Stealth Rock. With an immunity to Electric, a great ability in Solid Rock, and STABs that provide great coverage together, Rhyperior can fit on many teams. His big perks are his ability to reliably check the Electric-types running rampant in UU, namely Raikou, Zapdos, and Rotom-H. Thanks to this, he can set up Stealth Rock very reliably, which is useful for any team in need of a hand. Rhyperior also has decent resistances to Normal and Fire, meaning he can take onslaughts from Snorlax and Darmanitan. This gives him numerous opportunities to set up. On top of that, Rhyperior has a massive 140 Attack, and when combined with great two-move coverage, he can deal a lot of damage to numerous Pokemon in the tier, ensuring he's no sitting duck. Rhyperior also has Dragon Tail in order to shuffle the opponent's team, so he can take advantage of the Stealth Rock he sets. However, Rhyperior lacks recovery, which hampers his ability to set up numerous times. He also has multiple weaknesses, which must be kept in mind. However, if you want a solid Stealth Rock user who can check Raikou and Zapdos, as well as dish out damage, Rhyperior is the choice to consider.

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    Cobalion
    Type: Steel / Fighting
    Base Stats: 91 HP / 90 Atk / 129 Def / 90 SpA / 72 SpD / 108 Spe
    Abilities: Justified
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    Cobalion may seem like an odd choice for a Stealth Rock user, but his access to a coveted Fighting STAB, great Steel typing, and a high base 129 Defense, Cobalion is very capable of laying Stealth Rock down on the field. His great 108 Speed is also a nice asset, allowing him to outspeed a good portion of the metagame, which is a plus when it comes to setting up Stealth Rock, ensuring he will do it before going down. Cobalion also has access to the rare Volt Switch, allowing him to keep up momentum by switching out of common switch-ins while dealing decent damage. It also dents Blastoise, the most common spinner in the tier. His usable mixed attacking stats also ensure that Cobalion does more than set up Stealth Rock. Additionally, he has Thunder Wave to cripple opponents. All in all, Cobalion is a good choice for setting up Stealth Rock while being a defensive pivot.

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    Swampert
    Type: Water / Ground
    Base Stats: 100 HP / 110 Atk / 90 Def / 85 SpA / 90 Def / 60 Spe
    Abilities: Torrent / Damp
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    Say hello to Swampert, a Pokemon who was in OU the previous two generations, a testament to just how good it is. Swampert stands out from other Stealth Rock users with its great typing, giving it only one weakness, albeit a big one. This, when combined with its good 100 / 90 / 90 defenses, makes Swampert one of the better users of Stealth Rock in the tier. Swampert can come in on some of UU's strongest physical attackers, such as Darmanitan and Choice Scarf Flygon, and set up the hazard. Swampert also has access to Roar, allowing it to shuffle the team and rack up Stealth Rock damage. Its 110 Attack stat ensures that it isn't a sitting duck either, and can deal some damage with Earthquake and Waterfall, especially to the things it can set up on, particularly Darmanitan. However, Swampert has no reliable recovery, which limits its ability to set up Stealth Rock numerous times in the match.

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    Empoleon
    Type: Water / Steel
    Base Stats: 84 HP / 86 Atk / 88 Def / 111 SpA / 101 SpD / 60 Spe
    Abilities: Torrent / Defiant
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    Empoleon sports a unique Water / Steel typing, granting it a myriad of resistances, allowing it to take on threats such as Snorlax. This makes Empoleon a great candidate for Stealth Rock, as it can utilize its great defensive typing to reliably set up Stealth Rock numerous times in the match. Empoleon also comes with a usable base 111 Special Attack, allowing it to deal decent chunks of damage with Scald and Ice Beam. Like Swampert, Empoleon also has access to Roar, giving it the ability to shuffle the team to rack up damage from Stealth Rock. However, Empoleon is weak to Fighting-type attacks, making it easy bait for dangerous Pokemon such as Heracross and Mienshao. It also lacks any form of reliable recovery, something you must keep in mind.

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    Registeel
    Type: Steel
    Base Stats: 80 HP / 75 Atk / 150 Def / 75 SpA / 150 SpD / 50 Spe
    Abilities: Clear Body / Light Metal
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    Registeel is a defensive behemoth, sporting gargantuan 150 defensive stats and a Steel typing granting it numerous resistances. This makes Registeel one of the sturdiest users of Stealth Rock. Registeel can wall a myriad of threats such as Yanmega, Shaymin, and Raikou without much trouble, and this allows it to set up Stealth Rock numerous times in the match. Thunder Wave is also a plus to using Registeel, which allows it to cripple opponents, making setting up Stealth Rock an easier task. However, Registeel lacks any offensive presence and often provides free switch-ins for dangerous Pokemon such as Mienshao and Rhyperior. Therefore, Registeel will usually face stiff competition from the likes of other users of Stealth Rock such as Bronzong, Cobalion, and Empoleon, which are things you must keep in mind before choosing Registeel as your hazard setter.

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    Gligar
    Type: Ground / Flying
    Base Stats: 65 HP / 75 Atk / 105 Def / 35 SpA / 65 Def / 85 Spe
    Abilities: Hyper Cutter / Sand Veil / Immunity
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    Gligar may seem inferior to other Stealth Rock users due to his inferior stats, but his physical bulk, when boosted by Eviolite, reaches nearly unreachable levels. This, along with useful resistances to Fighting, Electric, and Ground, grant Gligar many opportunities to set up Stealth Rock throughout the match. His access to other supportive moves such as Toxic and Taunt are useful assets as well, which ensure he can do more than set up Stealth Rock. While the use of Eviolite may seem detrimental, Gligar makes up for that with his access to Roost, ensuring he will last even longer to be able to set up. Immunity along with a Ground typing make him immune to both Thunder Wave and Toxic, making him less prone to being crippled. His usable 75 Attack stat is decent enough to utilize Earthquake and U-turn to deal decent damage, as well as switch out in the latter's case. Just be careful that Gligar's lack of offensive presence makes him massive setup fodder, so as he sets up Stealth Rock, he may attract some dangerous Pokemon such as Abomasnow and Slowbro or give dangerous setup opportunities.

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    Golurk
    Type: Ground / Ghost
    Base Stats: 89 HP / 124 Atk / 80 Def / 55 SpA / 80 SpD / 55 Spe
    Abilities: Klutz / Iron Fist / No Guard
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    Golurk does a fairly solid job when it comes to setting up Stealth Rock. Golurk is unique in that it is the only Ghost-type with access to Stealth Rock, which means it can set up Stealth Rock and prevent the opponent from spinning it away. Golurk packs great resistances to Rock and Bug while it also has immunities to Normal, Fighting, and Electric. This, along with its usable 89 / 80 / 80 defenses grant Golurk many opportunities to set up Stealth Rock against common threats such as Snorlax, Raikou, and Mienshao. Golurk isn't a sitting duck either; it has a great 124 Attack stat to put pressure on the opposition. That said, Golurk does sport numerous exploitable weaknesses which, besides making it bait for common threats such as Roserade and Weavile, give Golurk a hard time against UU's most popular spinner, Blastoise, which can make spinblocking hard. Therefore, it is advisable to pair Golurk up with a second Ghost-type such as Cofagrigus if you want to keep Stealth Rock on the field for long.

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    Druddigon
    Type: Dragon
    Base Stats: 77 HP / 120 Atk / 90 Def / 60 SpA / 90 SpD / 48 Spe
    Abilities: Rough Skin / Sheer Force / Mold Breaker
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    If you can overlook Druddigon's horrible design, you can find that it has quite a lot of unique qualities for a Stealth Rock user. The first thing that stands out is that Druddigon has the rare Dragon type, which gives it some useful resistances. Combine this with its good 77 / 90 / 90 defenses and it can set up Stealth Rock reliably throughout the match. Rough Skin is an extremely useful ability, which aside from wearing down physical attackers, especially Darmanitan, also chips HP away when the opponent uses Rapid Spin, meaning Blastoise and Claydol can be worn down to the point where they cannot spin. Druddigon also has access to both Roar and Dragon Tail, so it can shuffle the team and rack up damage from the Stealth Rock it sets up. 120 Attack is no pittance either and can hit for solid damage, so Druddigon isn't just about residual damage. Overall, Druddigon is a great Stealth Rock user who can wear the team down with residual damage.

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    Uxie
    Type: Psychic
    Base Stats: 75 HP / 75 Atk / 130 Def / 75 SpA / 130 Def / 95 Spe
    Abilities: Levitate
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    Although Uxie is generally overlooked by other Stealth Rock users, such as his brother Azelf for his higher speed and offenses, Claydol with its access to Rapid Spin, and Bronzong who sports the coveted Steel typing, Uxie does have his perks. Uxie has strong 75 / 130 / 130 defenses, and when combined with a Psychic typing and Levitate, make him a great check to threats such as Nidoqueen and Mienshao. This grants Uxie many opportunities to set up Stealth Rock throughout the match. Uxie's support movepool is a boon as well, as he has access to Thunder Wave to cripple opponents, as well as Yawn to force switches (and rack up hazard damage). U-turn is Uxie's biggest selling point and allows him to switch out so he can come in later to set up Stealth Rock again if needed. However, Uxie's pitiful offenses are his ultimate downfall, often causing Uxie to kill offensive momentum, something you must keep in mind before using Uxie as a Stealth Rock user.

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    Aerodactyl
    Type: Rock / Flying
    Base Stats: 80 HP / 105 Atk / 65 Def / 60 SpA / 75 SpD / 130 Spe
    Abilities: Rock Head / Pressure / Unnerve
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    Once a popular suicide lead in DPP OU, Aerodactyl now finds itself in BW RU. Despite this, Aerodactyl can still effectively perform its former duties in the UU tier. It has an extremely high Speed, outpacing even Azelf, meaning it will always set Stealth Rock up early in the match. Its access to Taunt also helps out in this too, as Aerodactyl can stop other entry hazard leads from setting up. And its 105 Attack means it is never useless outside of simply quick Stealth Rock. However, Aerodactyl is frail, vulnerable to priority, and faces stiff competition in its role from Azelf, who is generally more useful. Despite this, Aerodactyl can still be a useful asset to those in need of a quick Stealth Rock early in the match.

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    Accelgor
    Type: Bug
    Base Stats: 80 HP / 70 Atk / 40 Def / 100 SpA / 60 SpD / 145 Spe
    Abilities: Hydration / Sticky Hold / Unburden
    Usable entry hazards: Spikes

    True to his name, Accelgor is the second fastest Pokemon legal in UU, outpaced only by Ninjask. His quick Speed along with his access to Spikes make him an excellent suicide lead, quickly getting up Spikes before the opponent can react. Accelgor isn't a sitting duck either, as it has a solid 100 Special Attack stat and great moves in Bug Buzz, Focus Blast, and Giga Drain to make good use of it. Accelgor also has Final Gambit to sacrifice itself, denting an opposing spinner while setting up a couple layers of Spikes in the process. Accelgor is an excellent Pokemon when it comes to Spikes stacking, and although it faces competition from Froslass, it's still a great choice.

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    Crustle
    Type: Bug / Rock
    Base Stats: 70 HP / 95 Atk / 125 Def / 65 SpA / 75 SpD / 45 Spe
    Abilities: Sturdy / Shell Armor / Weak Armor
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock, Spikes

    Although Crustle might seem outclassed by other hazard users, it has one unique trait that makes it worth using; access to both Spikes and Stealth Rock. This makes Crustle an excellent hazard setter, as it can set up both hazards and is bulky enough to do so. It also has Sturdy, which means even if something hits it too hard, it can still guarantee a layer of hazards. It can be an effective lead with Custap Berry thanks to this. It also has a solid 95 Attack, which, in conjunction with its STABs, allow it to pack a punch, and also allow it to defeat most anti-leads such as Azelf, Sableye, and Xatu.

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    Ferroseed
    Type: Grass / Steel
    Base Stats: 44 HP / 50 Atk / 91 Def / 24 SpA / 86 SpD / 10 Spe
    Abilities: Iron Barbs
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock, Spikes

    Don't let Ferroseed's small size, low stats, and NFE status drive you away; Ferroseed is a solid choice for a hazard user in UU. Ferroseed has access to Eviolite, giving it solid bulk overall and allowing it to take enough hits to be able to set up Stealth Rock and Spikes. Its typing is another big boon to this, granting it many resistances that allow it to take on plenty of threats, giving it many opportunities to set up hazards. It also has Iron Barbs and Leech Seed to be able to wear down the opponent, while Thunder Wave allows Ferroseed to further support the team. While it has a pitiful Attack stat, Gyro Ball gives it some decent offensive power. Ferroseed is unfortunately slow and its power is sometimes very lacking, but despite this, Ferroseed is still a solid hazard user that can wall and support.

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    Nidoking and Nidoqueen

    Nidoking
    Type: Poison / Ground
    Base Stats: 81 HP / 92 Atk / 77 Def / 85 SpA / 75 SpD / 85 Spe
    Abilities: Poison Point / Rivalry / Sheer Force
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock, Toxic Spikes

    Nidoqueen
    Type: Poison / Ground
    Base Stats: 90 HP / 82 Atk / 87 Def / 75 SpA / 85 SpD / 76 Spe
    Abilities: Poison Point / Rivalry / Sheer Force
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock, Toxic Spikes

    Two of the pinnacles of wallbreaking, Nidoking and Nidoqueen are some of the best hazard users available in UU. They have an easy time setting up Stealth Rock, mostly because of the number of switches they force. Their incredible power makes them no sitting ducks, putting massive dents in the opposing team, thanks to Sheer Force and Life Orb as well as excellent coverage moves. Nidoking is the faster one of the two, and mostly aims for the raw power, whereas Nidoqueen is bulkier and slower. Their typing is quite ideal defensively as well, giving them useful resistances to take on the common Fighting- and Electric-types in UU, giving them even more chances to set up. The duo also have access to Toxic Spikes to go for residual damage; Nidoqueen especially could go the defensive route and run Toxic Spikes and Dragon Tail, though it is often an inferior choice to Stealth Rock.

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    Roserade
    Type: Grass / Poison
    Base Stats: 60 HP / 70 Atk / 55 Def / 125 SpA / 105 SpD / 90 Spe
    Abilities: Natural Cure / Poison Point / Technician
    Usable entry hazards: Spikes, Toxic Spikes

    Roserade functions as one of the best Spikes users in UU thanks to its many positive qualities. Aside from its cool appearance, Roserade has a high Special Defense and a typing decent enough to allow it to take on Water-types and Shaymin, giving it numerous opportunities to set up Spikes. Roserade also has access to Natural Cure, which when paired with its typing, makes it a viable weapon against Water-types, and can use them as setup fodder for Spikes. This also makes it the only Spikes user capable of defeating Blastoise, UU's premier spinner, one-on-one. It also beats Claydol, which is another plus in terms of hazard setting. Roserade has useful support moves in Leech Seed, Sleep Powder, and Aromatherapy, allowing it to provide even more support to the team. It even has reliable recovery in either Rest or Synthesis as well, meaning it can stay healthy to repeatedly set up Spikes. To top it off it has an excellent 125 Special Attack, and with Giga Drain and Sludge Bomb, Roserade can put some real hurt on the opposing team. However, Sleep Powder is illegal with Spikes, which means Roserade will always have to run Toxic Spikes if you want Sleep Powder, although this is still a usable hazard for more defensive teams. Overall, Roserade is always a choice to consider for a Spiker, whether on a defensive team or for those in need of a weapon against bulky Water-types.

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    Qwilfish
    Type: Water / Poison
    Base Stats: 65 HP / 95 Atk / 75 Def / 55 SpA / 55 SpD / 85 Spe
    Abilities: Poison Point / Swift Swim / Intimidate
    Usable entry hazards: Spikes, Toxic Spikes

    Like Froslass and Roserade, Qwilfish is one of UU's best Spikes users. Although his stats scream "mediocrity," Qwilfish has an excellent ability in Intimidate, making his mediocre physical bulk great, while he has an excellent defensive typing to back it up. This makes Qwilfish an excellent check to many of UU's top physical attackers such as Mienshao, Heracross, and Darmanitan. As such, Qwilfish can find multiple opportunities to set up Spikes throughout the match. He has decent recovery in Pain Split, which, aside from dealing decent damage, will be able to keep Qwilfish at enough HP to repeatedly do his job. He can support the team even further as well, with Thunder Wave, Haze, and Taunt being useful supportive options. Alternatively, you could also run Toxic Spikes on Qwilfish, although the popularity of Poison-types such as Roserade, Nidoqueen, and Qwilfish himself make this a lesser option. Qwilfish's many positive qualities make it a choice you must consider when looking for a Spiker in UU.

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    Scolipede
    Type: Bug / Poison
    Base Stats: 60 HP / 90 Atk / 89 Def / 55 SpA / 69 SpD / 112 Spe
    Abilities: Poison Point / Swarm / Quick Feet
    Usable entry hazards: Spikes, Toxic Spikes

    Although generally overlooked in favor of other Spikers such as Froslass, Scolipede is still a solid choice, especially for offensive teams. Scolipede has an excellent 112 Speed, which means he can set up Spikes quickly before the opponent can react. He also poses a solid offensive threat with his decent 90 Attack, and a powerful STAB Megahorn is fairly brutal, while Earthquake and Rock Slide allow him to hurt anything that resists his Megahorn. With a Focus Sash, Scolipede can not only guarantee two layers of Spikes most of the time, but also activates his ability Swarm to power up Megahorn to even more brutal levels, meaning Scolipede can deal extreme damage to the opponent before going down. Despite the competition from Froslass as a fast Spiker, Scolipede still makes an excellent Pokemon for offensive Spike-stacking teams.

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    Smeargle
    Type: Normal
    Base Stats: 55 HP / 20 Atk / 35 Def / 20 SpA / 45 SpD / 75 Spe
    Abilities: Own Tempo / Technician / Moody
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock, Spikes, Toxic Spikes

    At first glance, Smeargle looks like a complete joke; it has laughable stats in all areas and has only one move in Sketch. However, its signature move has granted it the widest movepool in the game, which makes Smeargle unique among the many hazard setters in that it is capable of setting up all three kinds of entry hazards. Smeargle also has access to Spore, which means it can put an opponent to sleep, and proceed to use the free turns to set up many hazards. Alongside a Focus Sash, Smeargle is almost always guaranteed to set up at least two layers of hazards in a match. It has Magic Coat and Whirlwind, meaning it can stop Taunt or prevent itself from being setup fodder. Its low stats, however, do haunt it, as Smeargle has no use outside of setting up entry hazards. However, this is usually enough for Smeargle to leave its mark in the match.

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    Omastar
    Type: Rock / Water
    Base Stats: 70 HP / 60 Atk / 125 Def / 115 SpA / 70 SpD / 55 Spe
    Abilities: Swift Swim / Shell Armor / Weak Armor
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock, Spikes, Toxic Spikes

    Omastar is one of the only two Pokemon that can set up all three entry hazards, the other being Smeargle. Unlike Smeargle however, Omastar boasts actual defensive stats as well as a typing with some use defensively. Omastar can take on some common threats such as Darmanitan, Victini, and Snorlax, which alongside its physical bulk, gives it a number of opportunities to set up entry hazards. Omastar also can run a decently powerful Scald coming off of its high Special Attack stat, and its burn chance is excellent in weakening physical attackers, allowing Omastar to give some extra support to the team.

    Preventing Hazards

    Luckily, there are numerous ways to stop entry hazards from being on your field. The following are all great to have on your team to prevent its members from being worn down over time.

    Rapid Spin

    The most popular way to remove entry hazards is the move Rapid Spin. This move is the sole reason some Pokemon, particularly Blastoise and Claydol, see usage in UU, as many of UU's spinners have little use outside of this move. All of the viable spinners in UU have their own advantages that make them worth using.

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    Blastoise
    Type: Water
    Base Stats: 79 HP / 83 Atk / 100 Def / 85 SpA / 105 SpD / 78 Spe
    Abilities: Torrent / Rain Dish

    A fan favorite from RBY, Blastoise sees usage as UU's best Rapid Spin user. It has a solid Water type, giving it something useful defensively. It also has solid bulk, meaning it can take a number of hits. Blastoise can take on a number of UU's spinblockers with its decently powerful Scald as well as Toxic, preventing them from being safe. It also has Roar to constantly force them out, and rack up entry hazard damage. Its Scald can also weaken physical attackers, which can help out the team pretty decently. Blastoise is also capable of guaranteeing Rapid Spins with Foresight. However, Blastoise lacks recovery, which can sometimes get in its way of repeatedly pulling off Rapid Spin. Also note that if Blastoise is not used for spinning, it is outclassed by the other Water-types available in UU.

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    Claydol
    Type: Ground / Psychic
    Base Stats: 60 HP / 70 Atk / 105 Def / 70 SpA / 120 SpD / 75 Spe
    Ability: Levitate

    Claydol also has membership in UU's Rapid Spin club, and has some useful qualities to let it stand out from the rest. Although Claydol has a number of weaknesses, it also sports excellent resistances, and alongside its good 60 / 105 / 120 defenses, it's able to pull off a Rapid Spin whenever it needs to. One of Claydol's biggest selling points is its excellent ability in Levitate, which makes it indifferent to all three entry hazards, meaning it can repeatedly come in to spin throughout the match. Claydol can support its team well with Stealth Rock and dual screens, making it a decent choice for a supportive Pokemon. It also has Toxic to wear down spinblockers that try to come in, meaning they are not always safe. It can run a gimmicky set with Trick and Ring Target as well, removing incoming Ghost-types' ability to spinblock. However, Claydol's main problem is its nonexistent offensive stats, which make it hard to spin against bulkier Ghost-types.

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    Cryogonal
    Type: Ice
    Base Stats: 70 HP / 50 Atk / 30 Def / 95 SpA / 135 SpD / 105 Spe
    Ability: Levitate

    Cryogonal is a unique Pokemon in UU's group of Rapid Spinners. Like its friend Claydol, Cryogonal also has access to Levitate, meaning it is immune to Spikes and Toxic Spikes; however, it has a Stealth Rock weakness. That said, it also has an excellent Special Defense, meaning it can take many special hits and pull off a spin in the process. Cryogonal's biggest selling point is its access to reliable recovery in Recover, meaning it can heal itself to pull off multiple Rapid Spins. It can also go the offensive route thanks to its 95 Special Attack, and with Ice Beam and Hidden Power, it can pose a solid offensive threat on its own. It often finds itself a spot on hail teams to remove entry hazards and spam Blizzard on its own. Overall, Cryogonal is a decent choice on certain teams looking for its qualities.

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    Hitmontop
    Type: Fighting
    Base Stats: 50 HP / 95 Atk / 95 Def / 35 SpA / 110 SpD / 70 Spe
    Abilities: Intimidate / Technician / Steadfast

    Hitmontop has quite a bit going for it in terms of Rapid Spin. It has Intimidate, allowing it to check common physical threats such as Mienshao and Darmanitan. This means Hitmontop can pull off a spin quite often. Its access to Foresight also allows it to spin even against Ghost-types, which makes it quite a solid choice. It also has a decently powerful Close Combat, coming off of its 95 Attack, meaning it is never going to be a complete sitting duck. Overall, Hitmontop may be outclassed by Blastoise at spinning, but it is still a pretty solid choice.

    [​IMG]

    Kabutops
    Type: Rock / Water
    Base Stats: 60 HP / 115 Atk / 105 Def / 65 SpA / 70 SpD / 80 Spe
    Abilities: Swift Swim / Battle Armor / Weak Armor

    Kabutops is a solid choice for an offensive spinner thanks to its excellent 115 Attack and access to Swords Dance, making it a powerful offensive threat. Its access to Aqua Jet and Stone Edge allow it to put the hurt on opposing spinblockers, pulling off a Rapid Spin afterwards. Its priority Aqua Jet also comes in handy to pace faster threats such as Mienshao and Cinccino, meaning Kabutops can also revenge kill and sweep, making it more useful. It can also run Stealth Rock to provide decent support to the team.

    Taunt

    Although not as reliable a way to prevent entry hazards as Rapid Spin, Taunt is still a decent way to stop hazards from going down on your side of the field. There a a number of fast Taunt users in UU, all of them being good options for this move.

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    Sableye
    Type: Dark / Ghost
    Base Stats: 50 HP / 75 Atk / 75 Def / 65 SpA / 65 SpA / 50 Spe
    Abilities: Keen Eye / Stall / Prankster

    Sableye was once one of the worst Pokemon in the game, but now thanks to its ability Prankster, it packs a priority Taunt, which ensures that it can quickly stop the use of entry hazards. It also has Recover, keeping itself healthy to Taunt entry hazard users multiple times in the match.

    [​IMG]

    Azelf
    Type: Psychic
    Base Stats: 75 HP / 125 Atk / 70 Def / 125 SpA / 70 SpD / 115 Spe
    Ability: Levitate

    Azelf has a fast Taunt, which means he can quickly stop entry hazards unless the opponent has the rare Aerodactyl or Accelgor. He can also set up Stealth Rock himself, and can be a good anti-lead in general thanks to his blistering Speed. He also poses a powerful offensive threat with his high offensive stats, putting dents in the opposing team before going down.

    [​IMG]

    Crobat
    Type: Poison / Flying
    Base Stats: 85 HP / 90 Atk / 80 Def / 70 SpA / 80 SpD / 130 Spe
    Abilities: Inner Focus / Infiltrator

    Crobat has the fastest Taunt in UU aside from Aerodactyl. It can quickly fire off a Taunt before anything can react and then U-turn to a teammate to deal with the opponent. It has access to Roost to keep itself healthy to be able to repeatedly use Taunt. Overall, Crobat is a great choice to stop entry hazards from being on your side of the field.

    [​IMG]

    Aerodactyl
    Type: Rock / Flying
    Base Stats: 80 HP / 105 Atk / 65 Def / 60 SpA / 75 SpD / 130 Spe
    Abilities: Rock Head / Pressure / Unnerve

    Like Crobat, Aerodactyl also has the fastest Taunt in UU, meaning it will stop hazards from going up most of the time. It also poses a solid offensive threat thanks to its base 105 Attack, and can run Stone Edge and Earthquake to be able to put dents in the team. It also sets up Stealth Rock on its own, making it a decent choice for a Taunt user. It is, however, often outclassed by Azelf as an anti-lead.

    [​IMG]

    Tornadus
    Type: Flying
    Base Stats: 79 HP / 115 Atk / 70 Def / 125 SpA / 80 SpD / 111 Spe
    Abilities: Prankster / Defiant

    Tornadus has priority Taunt, like Sableye, but it also has great stats, meaning it can be an offensive threat with Hurricane and Superpower, decimating teams on its own while stopping entry hazards. It also has a higher Speed than Sableye, making it less prone to opposing priority. Tornadus can be a very good choice to Taunt entry hazards users overall.

    Magic Bounce

    Magic Bounce is a pretty solid way to stop the use of entry hazards from going onto the field, while also bouncing it back to the opponent, leaving them in a lethal situation. Magic Bounce has limited distribution, but the one user has its uses in UU for the move.

    [​IMG]

    Xatu
    Type: Psychic / Flying
    Base Stats: 65 HP / 75 Atk / 70 Def / 95 SpA / 70 SpD / 95 Spe
    Abilities: Synchronize / Early Bird / Magic Bounce

    Xatu is a Pokemon that can block the use of entry hazards, and bounce them back to the opponent, which can be useful to stop Spikes and Stealth Rock from threatening your team. It also can bounce back status moves such as Toxic and Thunder Wave, making it useful to stop paralysis spreading or poison. Xatu also has reliable recovery in Roost, which means it can repeatedly come in to bounce hazards back to the opponent. It can also support its team with Thunder Wave, Light Screen, and Reflect, making it a decent team supporter. It even has U-turn to switch out whenever needed. It pairs up well with a spinner or a Taunt user, such as Sableye, to be sure entry hazards stay off the field.

    Spinblocking

    Rapid Spin has become such a common sight that a strategy has arisen to counter the move; spinblocking. Since Rapid Spin is a damaging Normal-type move, Ghost-types effectively stop the move from working. A number of Ghost-types in UU are effective at spinblocking, and each one has their own qualities that make them worth using as spinblockers.

    [​IMG]

    Cofagrigus
    Type: Ghost
    Base Stats: 58 HP / 50 Atk / 145 Def / 95 SpA / 105 SpD / 30 Spe
    Ability: Mummy

    Cofagrigus is the premier spinblocker in the UU environment, as it holds many positive qualities that make it wonderful on any team in need. It has a titanic base 145 Defense and a solid base 105 Special Defense, and its typing allows it to take on all of the tier's spinners one-on-one. It has Will-O-Wisp to cripple Pokemon and wear them down, while it packs a decently powerful Shadow Ball to bring the hurt. It also has Mummy to negate common abilities of the spinners. Cofagrigus can also pose a solid offensive threat on its own thanks to Trick Room and Nasty Plot, allowing it to set up and proceed to destroy the opposing spinner with powerful Shadow Balls. It can beat Blastoise and Claydol with relative ease thanks to these qualities. Overall, Cofagrigus is the best spinblocker in the tier.

    [​IMG]

    Sableye
    Type: Dark / Ghost
    Base Stats: 50 HP / 75 Atk / 75 Def / 65 SpA / 65 SpD / 50 Spe
    Abilities: Keen Eye / Stall / Prankster

    Despite its terrible stats, Sableye is an excellent spinblocker in UU thanks to its Dream World ability, Prankster. It can quickly use Taunt to prevent Foresight from Hitmontop and Blastoise, while it has Will-O-Wisp to cripple offensive spinners. It has Recover to keep itself healthy, and its typing grants it no weaknesses, aiding in its ability to stall the opponent. While its bulk leaves a lot to be desired, it's enough to handle the spinblockers. It can constantly be an annoyance to the opposing spinners as many of them are defensively oriented. Although Sableye is fairly limited in what it can do, it still makes for a solid spinblocker.

    [​IMG]

    Dusclops
    Type: Ghost
    Base Stats: 40 HP / 70 Atk / 130 Def / 60 SpA / 130 Def / 25 Spe
    Ability: Pressure

    Dusclops was a big winner of the fifth generation, as due to its NFE status, it can bolster its already good defenses to formidable levels with Eviolite, making it one of the only Pokemon that cannot be OHKOed by nearly any move. This helps Dusclops in its role as a spinblocker immensely, as it can take many hits from any of the spinners in the tier while crippling them with Will-O-Wisp and Curse. This means it can slowly chip away at their HP combined with entry hazard damage. It can run Pain Split and Rest as decent forms of recovery, keeping it at enough HP to constantly take on spinblockers. Be careful, however, as Dusclops lacks Leftovers recovery, which can sometimes get in its way at performing its spinblocking duties. However, despite this, Dusclops can make for a useful defensive spinblocker.

    [​IMG]

    Mismagius
    Type: Ghost
    Base Stats: 60 HP / 60 Atk / 60 Def / 105 SpA / 105 SpD / 105 Spe
    Abilities: Levitate

    Mismagius is a more offensive spinblocker, which makes it a good fit on the fast offensive teams looking into the use of a fast Ghost-type. Mismagius has access to Thunderbolt, which allows it to deal with the premier spinner, Blastoise. Its Shadow Ball allows it to handle Claydol and Hitmontop as well. Mismagius also has Nasty Plot and Calm Mind, allowing it to boost its Special Attack to become even more threatening to opposing spinners. It can avoid Toxic with Substitute, while it also has access to other moves such as Taunt and Will-O-Wisp. Mismagius is also quite fast, allowing it to move before opposing spinners can react. Mismagius can overall find itself a spot as a more offensive spinblocker compared to the other Ghost-types.

    [​IMG]

    Chandelure
    Type: Ghost / Fire
    Base Stats: 60 HP / 55 Atk / 90 Def / 145 SpA / 90 SpD / 80 Spe
    Abilities: Flash Fire / Flame Body / Shadow Tag

    Chandelure is not that great of a spinblocker on its own, mostly due to being weak to Blastoise's Scald and Claydol's Earthquake. This makes it advisable to pair Chandelure up with another spinblocker to make full use of spinblocking. That said, Chandelure can come in and use its extreme Special Attack to scorch opposing spinners with Fire Blast and Shadow Ball. It can also run Substitute to avoid a stray Toxic, while running Pain Split is usable to heal itself and deal damage. Chandelure can also run a Choice Specs set to make its damage more brutal. Outside of that, Chandelure is limited to mostly being an offensive spinblocker, as its defensive capabilities are lacking.

    [​IMG]

    Rotom
    Type: Electric / Ghost
    Base Stats: 50 HP / 50 Atk / 77 Def / 95 SpA / 77 SpD / 91 Spe
    Abilities: Levitate

    Rotom is a rather unique choice for a spinblocker. Its main selling point is its Electric STAB; which means it can deal with Blastoise fairly easily, and it also takes on Claydol rather well. The other unique thing about Rotom is its access to Volt Switch, which means it can grab momentum as opposing spinners switch out of the match. It has a solid Special Attack and a decent Speed to deal some strong and fast damage, which makes it decent on offensive teams. Although it may not seem like it, Rotom is also capable of going on the defensive despite its low defenses, as it has some excellent resistances, and can take a number of hits from opposing spinners and cripple them with Will-O-Wisp. Overall, Rotom is a very unique choice for a spinblocker.

    [​IMG]

    Golurk
    Type: Ground / Ghost
    Base Stats: 89 HP / 124 Atk / 80 Def / 55 SpA / 80 SpD / 55 Spe
    Abilities: Klutz / Iron Fist / No Guard

    Golurk is also capable of spinblocking and setting up hazards at the same time. It can set up Stealth Rock to support its team, and has decent bulk to take on opposing spinners. It has a high 124 Attack and a STAB Earthquake to deal heavy damage to Blastoise and Hitmontop, while its STAB Shadow Punch also puts the hurt on Claydol. This makes Golurk a pretty solid choice to set up Stealth Rock and spinblock at the same time. Golurk could also run No Guard along with DynamicPunch to annoy opposing spinners with confusion, although this is rather gimmicky.

    Phazing

    Phazing, short for "pseudo-Hazing", is a common way to take advantage of hazards. This is done by the moves Roar, Whirlwind, Dragon Tail, and Circle Throw, which can force the Pokemon out of the field, racking up entry hazard damage. Common defensive Pokemon such as Snorlax, Blastoise, Empoleon, and Slowking often run these moves in their sets. One of the most well-known examples of phazers is Prankster Riolu, being able to use priority Roar thanks to its access to Copycat, and Prankster gives the move +1 priority.

    Conclusion

    Like in any tier, entry hazards are a dominant force in UU, and hopefully you now have an understanding of entry hazards, including the viable users, ways to counter them, and how to make use of them. When making a team, be sure to fit at least one kind of hazard onto your team; they are vital to victory. Always be sure to pack a spinblocker as well, as maintaining the entry hazards can make a big difference in the match. Always pack something that can take advantage of entry hazards, whether by phazing or just sweeping teams outright. And since hazards are so important, make sure that that Blastoise or Claydol of yours stays alive throughout the match; if they go down before they spin, you can be in trouble. There is always a risk to entry hazards, so plan carefully for them.
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 18, 2014
  2. Santuga

    Santuga

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    Although this is still incomplete, I can see you're doing a very good job and a very good writing process! I noticed two things:

    "Stealth Rock is also the lone hazard that no Pokemon is immune to bar users of Magic Bounce" you probably wanted to say Magic Guard?

    "However, once they are eliminated, Toxic Spikes comes with its lethal effect;" if they are not eliminated maybe?
  3. Magcargo

    Magcargo Okay
    is a Contributor to Smogon
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    Frosslass and Golurk deserve to be on this list somewhere. They can spinblock and setup entry hazards. They also have alright attacking stats and can put pressure on the opponent as golurk has sheer power and froslass has destiny bond. I know this is still uncomplete, but don't forget about these two.
  4. ScraftyIsTheBest

    ScraftyIsTheBest DreamDream
    is a Community Contributoris a Contributor to Smogon
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    I took care of those, thanks for noticing!

    Yeah, I'm not quite done with this yet, but when I started this I was sure to put both of them on the list. As I expand, they'll be listed, no worries.

    Anyways, got to continue!
  5. Garchomp for president

    Garchomp for president

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    It would be nice to mention riolu's phazing abilities, just my two sense.
  6. ScraftyIsTheBest

    ScraftyIsTheBest DreamDream
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    Yeah I acknowledged that, and phazing in general.

    And I fully completed writing through the article, so I guess this should be ready for GP?
  7. Ulriken

    Ulriken

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    Hi, I'm not sure why this has sat so long, so maybe there's something else going on I don't know about. I decided to go ahead and amateur check, so here's the result:

    Blue is add
    Red is remove
    [Green] is comments

    Show Hide

    For a long time, Entry hazards have always been one of the most important aspects of competitive battling for a long time. With the presence of threats such as Yanmega, Chandelure, and Darmanitan, the presence of Spikes and Stealth Rock is vital to eliminating them. Entry Hazards also play an important role in attaining needed KO's and racking up damage with switches. With the myriad of hazard setters and few spinners present in the UU tier, hazards are fairly difficult to remove from the field. UU has a number of hazard setters as well as spinners, [this mostly restates your previous sentence, can keep it though] and this guide will introduce the aspects of entry hazards in UU.

    Stealth Rock

    Stealth Rock is the most common of entry hazards in UU. Out of the three available entry hazards, Stealth Rock is arguably the easiest to set up, only requiring one turn to be used to its fullest effect. Stealth Rock is also arguably the most influential entry hazard. Without its presence, threats such as Yanmega and Chandelure become much harder to eliminate, but with it [delete comma] they are much easier to deal with, as they have a much more limited lifespan. Stealth Rock is also the lone hazard that no Pokemon is immune to bar users of Magic Guard, of which are rare sights in UU. Additionally, it is the most widely distributed, so it can fit easily be on any team.

    [I'm not QC, but you might want to mention that SR inflicts Rock-type damage, that's why it hits Yanmega/Chandelure/etc so hard]

    Spikes

    Spikes is the oldest of entry hazards, and is quite a reliable one too. Spikes offers a consistent 25% damage output after three layers, which is very useful for stall teams to keep racking up damage as they cause numerous switches. Spikes also helps with offensive teams, wearing down walls and turning some 2HKO's into OHKO's, and vice versa. [I'm guessing you mean "and 3HKO's into 2" or something like this, vice versa would mean turning OHKO's into 2] After all three layers have been set up, it will be very hard for the opposition to act, as Spikes damage stacks up much more quickly than Stealth Rock. Although it takes three turns to set up, this is mitigated by the fact that most of its users have enough bulk or speed to pull this job off effectively.

    Toxic Spikes

    Toxic Spikes is the least used of entry hazards, and for a good reason. There are numerous Pokemon immune to Toxic Spikes, and with Pokemon such as Roserade, Nidoqueen, and Qwilfish being some of the more popular Pokemon in the tier, Toxic Spikes are very difficult to keep on the field due to their ability to remove it upon entering the battlefield. The effect of Toxic Spikes is also ignored by Pokemon with Levitate, such as Bronzong, Azelf, and Claydol, the latter third last of which can spin the Toxic Spikes away, as well as Pokemon of the Steel-typing such as Empoleon and Bisharp. However, once said Pokemon are eliminated, Toxic Spikes comes with its lethal effect; badly poisoning the target, especially with two layers on, and it can wear down walls such as Cofagrigus and Umbreon at a steady pace. [Insert period/remove comma] and If a spinner or cleric is not used, it can be very hard for your opponent to deal with the poison damage.

    [Should explain that 1 level = regular poison, 2 levels = toxic poison, last sentence doesn't make it too clear]

    The Users

    [​IMG]
    Bronzong
    Type: Steel / Psychic
    Base Stats: 67 HP / 89 Atk / 116 Def / 79 SpA / 116 SpD / 33 Spe
    Abilities: Levitate / Heatproof / Heavy Metal
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    When it comes to users of Stealth Rock, Bronzong comes to the table as one of the most reliable of them. With a great Steel / Psychic typing along with a fantastic ability in Levitate, Bronzong can take many hits. This is further complemented by great 67 / 116 / 116 bulk, making Bronzong the perfect epitome example of a sturdy Stealth Rock user. Thanks to these qualities [delete comma] Bronzong will find many opportunities to set up Stealth Rock, while also being able to wall a sizable portion of the metagame. Bronzong's low Speed stat allows it to utilize Gyro Ball very effectively, ensuring Bronzong will be able to dish out some damage, so it's no sitting duck. However [delete comma] one of the downsides to Bronzong is how easily prone it is to spinners such as Blastoise as well as Taunt and Magic Bounce. Nonetheless, when it comes to setting up Stealth Rock in UU, Bronzong is one of the best.

    [​IMG]
    Azelf
    Type: Psychic
    Base Stats: 75 HP / 125 Atk / 70 Def / 125 SpA / 70 SpD / 115 Spe
    Abilities: Levitate
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    Azelf enters BW UU as one of the few surviving dedicated leads in the fifth generation. Azelf is the second fastest user of Stealth Rock available in UU, which means he will almost always be sure to get Stealth Rock up on the battlefield, unless there happens to be a Sableye with Taunt. Speaking of which, Azelf does have access to Taunt himself, so he can stop other users of Stealth Rock or Spikes from setting them up. Azelf also sports high offensive stats, so he can put sizable dents in the opponent with Psyshock or Psychic. He also has decent coverage to boot, so he can definitely do some damage with Psyshock and Fire Blast after setting up Stealth Rock. Overall, Azelf can make for a great Stealth Rock lead to quickly set up Stealth Rock, stop the opposition from setting up, and dealing good damage to the opponent.

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    Claydol
    Type: Ground / Psychic
    Base Stats: 60 HP / 70 Atk / 105 Def / 70 SpA / 120 SpD / 75 Spe
    Abilities: Levitate
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    Claydol stands out from the rest of Stealth Rock users with its good bulk as well as its ability to both set up Stealth Rock and spin hazards away. This gives Claydol its role as a solid utility Pokemon; thanks to its good bulk and some resistances to Electric, Psychic, and Ground, it will be sure to set up Stealth Rock quite a few times in the match. Claydol also boasts the unique ability to use Rapid Spin as well, so while setting up, it can also remove entry hazards from its side of the field. If needed, Claydol could can also set up Light Screen and Reflect to be a better support its teammates. Claydol's ultimate downfall is its weak offensive stats, so it usually fails to do much damage to the opposition. It also has numerous exploitable weaknesses, especially to Dark-type attacks, making it prone to being trapped by Pursuit. Nonetheless, if you want a Pokemon who can set up Stealth Rock and be a solid supportive Pokemon, look no further than Claydol.

    [​IMG]
    Rhyperior
    Type: Ground / Rock
    Base Stats: 115 HP / 140 Atk / 130 Def / 55 SpA / 55 SpD / 40 Spe
    Abilities: Lightningrod / Solid Rock / Reckless
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    Rhyperior is a very solid user of Stealth Rock. With an immunity to Electric, a great ability in Solid Rock, and STAB's STABs that provide great coverage together, Rhyperior can fit himself on many teams. His big perks are his ability to reliably check the Electric-types running rampant in UU, namely Raikou, Zapdos, and Rotom-H. Along with this, he can also set up Stealth Rock very reliably, which is useful for any team in need of a hand. Rhyperior also has some decent resistances to Normal and Fire, meaning he can take onslaughts attacks from Snorlax and Darmanitan. This gives him numerous ample [numerous or ample, your choice] opportunities to set up. But on top of that, Rhyperior has a massive 140 Attack stat, and when combined with its great two-move coverage, can deal some significant damage to numerous Pokemon in the tier, ensuring it's no sitting duck. Rhyperior also has Dragon Tail in order to shuffle the opponent's team, so he can take advantage of the Stealth Rocks it uses. However, Rhyperior lacks recovery, which hampers his ability to set up numerous times. He also has multiple weaknesses, which must be kept in mind. However, if you want a solid Stealth Rock user who can check Raikou and Zapdos, as well as dish out damage, there's Rhyperior.

    [​IMG]
    Cobalion
    Type: Steel / Fighting
    Base Stats: 91 HP / 90 Atk / 129 Def / 90 SpA / 72 SpD / 108 Spe
    Abilities: Justified
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    Cobalion may seem like an odd choice for a Stealth Rock user. However, with access to the coveted Fighting STAB, a great Steel typing, and a high 129 Defense stat, Cobalion is very capable of laying Stealth Rock down on the field. His great 108 Speed is also a nice asset, allowing him to outspeed a good portion of a metagame, which is a plus when it comes to setting up Stealth Rock, ensuring it will do it so before going down. Cobalion also has access to the rare Volt Switch, allowing it to keep up momentum by switching out of common switch-ins while dealing decent damage. It also dents Blastoise, the most common spinner in the tier. Its usable mixed attacking stats are also ensure that Cobalion does more than set up Stealth Rock. Additionally, it has Thunder Wave to cripple opponents as well. All in all, Cobalion is a good choice for setting up Stealth Rock while being a defensive pivot.

    [​IMG]
    Swampert
    Type: Water / Ground
    Base Stats: 100 HP / 110 Atk / 90 Def / 85 SpA / 90 Def / 60 Spe
    Abilities: Torrent / Damp
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    Say hello to Swampert, a Pokemon who has been in OU for the past two generations, a testament to just how good it is. Swampert stands out from other Stealth Rock users with its great typing, giving it only one weakness, albeit a big one. This typing, when combined with its good 100 / 90 / 90 bulk, makes Swampert one of the better users of Stealth Rock in the tier. Swampert can come in on some of UU's physical attackers, such as Darmanitan and Choice Scarf Flygon, and set up the hazard. Swampert also has access to Roar, allowing it to shuffle the team and rack up Stealth Rock damage. Its 110 Attack stat ensures that it isn't a sitting duck either, and can deal some damage with Earthquake and Waterfall, especially to the things it can set up on, particularly Darmanitan. However, Swampert has no reliable recovery, which limits its ability to set up Stealth Rock numerous multiple times in the match.

    [​IMG]
    Empoleon
    Type: Water / Steel
    Base Stats: 84 HP / 86 Atk / 88 Def / 111 SpA / 101 SpD / 60 Spe
    Abilities: Torrent / Defiant
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    Empoleon sports a unique Water / Steel typing, granting it a myriad of resistances, and allowing it to take on threats such as [???] This makes Empoleon a great candidate for Stealth Rock, as it can utilize its great defensive typing to reliably set up Stealth Rock numerous times in the match. Empoleon also comes with a usable 111 Special Attack, allowing it to deal decent chunks of damage with Scald and Ice Beam, which makes it no sitting duck. Like Swampert, Empoleon also has access to Roar, giving it the ability to shuffle the team to rack up damage from Stealth Rock. However, Empoleon is weak to Fighting-type attacks, making it easy bait for dangerous Pokemon such as Heracross and Mienshao. It also lacks any form of reliable recovery, something you must keep in mind.

    [​IMG]
    Registeel
    Type: Steel
    Base Stats: 80 HP / 75 Atk / 150 Def / 75 SpA / 150 SpD / 50 Spe
    Abilities: Clear Body / Light Metal
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    Registeel is a defensive behemoth, sporting gargantuan 150 defensive stats and a Steel-typing granting it numerous resistances. This makes Registeel one of the sturdiest users of Stealth Rock. Registeel can wall a myriad threats such as Yanmega, Shaymin, and Raikou without much trouble, and this allows it to set up Stealth Rock numerous times in the match. Thunder Wave is also a plus to using a useful option for Registeel, which allows it to cripple opponents, making setting up Stealth Rock an easier task. However, Registeel lacks any offensive presence and often provides free switch ins for dangerous Pokemon such as Mienshao and Rhyperior. Therefore, Registeel will usually face stiff competition from the likes of other users of Stealth Rock such as Bronzong, Cobalion, and Empoleon, which are things you must keep in mind before choosing Registeel as your hazard setter.

    [​IMG]
    Gligar
    Type: Ground / Flying
    Base Stats: 65 HP / 75 Atk / 105 Def / 35 SpA / 65 Def / 85 Spe
    Abilities: Hyper Cutter / Sand Veil / Immunity
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    Gligar may seem inferior to other Stealth Rock users thanks to its inferior lower stats, but his physical bulk, when boosted by Eviolite, reaches nearly unreachable formidable levels. This, along with a useful resistances to Fighting [delete comma] and immunities to Electric, and Ground, grant Gligar many opportunities to set up Stealth Rock throughout the match. His access to other supportive moves such as Toxic and Taunt are useful assets as well, which ensure he can do more than set up Stealth Rock. While the use of Eviolite may seem detrimental, [how so, since you've already explained that Eviolite gives him great defenses?] Gligar makes up for that with his access to Roost, ensuring he will last even longer to be able to set up. Immunity along with a Ground typing make him immune to both Thunder Wave and Toxic, making him less prone to being crippled. Its usable 75 Attack stat is decent enough to utilize Earthquake and U-turn to deal decent damage, as well as switch out in the latter's case. Just be careful that Gligar's lack of offensive presence makes it a momentum murderer killer, so as it sets up Stealth Rock, it may attract some dangerous Pokemon such as Abomasnow and Slowbro.
    [These last couple sentences aren't making sense to me. You call its attack stat "usable", then state that it lacks offensive presence, and also call it a momentum killer despite having U-turn]




    I'm stopping here both because this is extremely long and I can't do it in one sitting, and because there's enough repeated mistakes that I think it makes sense for you to go back through. These include several repeated phrases, such as "not a sitting duck" and "numerous times throughout the match" which should be changed to equivalent phrases for better readability.
    I would also change the many usages of words like "ensures" and "guarantees", since this type of surety is rarely the case in Pokemon, and in practice not too many Pokemon set up Stealth Rock twice in a match, let alone numerous times.
    Finally, though this may be corrected by others, is it my understanding that the phrase "to set up" generally refers to sweeper using a boosting move. Other types of setting up, such as TR or screens or hazards, would include these specifically, ie. "Reuniclus's bulk allows it to take a hit and set up Trick Room for itself." For this reason I'd suggest that where you use the phrase "set up" it be changed to something along the lines of "set up Stealth Rock" or "set up hazards."

    I am just an amateur checker though so there is that. If you would like to run anything by me, please feel free. I hope I was able to help!
  8. Rohail

    Rohail Vaporeon <3
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    Gonna (try !_!) to work off of that amcheck.

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    Introduction

    Entry hazards have been one of the most important aspects of competitive battling for a long time. With the presence of threats such as Yanmega, Chandelure, and Darmanitan lurking around, the presence of Spikes and Stealth Rock is vital to eliminating them. Entry Hazards also play an important role in attaining needed KO'(RA)s and racking up damage with switches. With the myriad of hazard setters and few spinners present in the UU tier, hazards are fairly difficult to remove from the field. With this, Pokemon such as Blastoise, Claydol, and Xatu have risen in usage, and this guide will introduce the aspects of entry hazards in UU.

    Stealth Rock

    Stealth Rock is the most common of entry hazards in UUany tier. Out of the three available entry hazards, Stealth Rock is arguably the easiest to set up, only requiring one turn to be used to its fullest effect. Stealth Rock is also arguably the most influential entry hazard. Without its presence, threats such as Yanmega and Chandelure become much harder to eliminate, but with it, they are much easier to deal with, as they have a much more limited lifespan due to the Rock-type damage it inflicts. Stealth Rock is also the lone hazard that no Pokemon is immune to,(AC) bar users of Magic Guard, of which are rare sights in UU. Additionally, it is the most widely distributed, so it can easily fit onto any team.

    Spikes

    Spikes is the oldest of entry hazards, and is quite a reliable one too. Spikes offers a consistent 25% damage output after three layers, which is very useful for stall teams to keep racking up damage with, as they cause numerous switches. Spikes also helps with offensive teams, wearing down walls and turning some 2HKO'(RA)s into OHKO'(RA)s, and vice versa (???). After all three layers have been set up, it will be very hard for the opposition to act, as Spikes damage stacks up much more quickly than Stealth Rock. Although it takes three turns to set up, this is mitigated by the fact that most of its users have enough bulk or sSpeed to pull this job off effectively.

    Toxic Spikes

    Toxic Spikes is the least used of entry hazards, and for a good reason. There are numerous Pokemon immune to Toxic Spikes, and with Pokemon such as Roserade, Nidoqueen, and Qwilfish being some of the more popular Pokemon in the tier, Toxic Spikes are very difficult to keep on the field. The effect of Toxic Spikes is also ignored by Pokemon with Levitate (mention this for Spikes too), such as Bronzong, Azelf, and Claydol, the latter thirdst of which can spin the Toxic Spikes away, as well as Pokemon of the Steel-(remove hyphen)typing such as Empoleon and Bisharp. However, once said Pokemon are eliminated, Toxic Spikes comes with its lethal effect; badly poisoning the target, especially with two layers onup, and it can wear down walls such as Cofagrigus and Umbreon at a steady pace, and if a spinner or cleric is not used, it can be very hard to deal with the poison damage.
    (Agreeing with Ulriken, explain 1 layer = regular poison and 2 layers = toxic poison)

    The Users

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    Bronzong
    Type: Steel / Psychic
    Base Stats: 67 HP / 89 Atk / 116 Def / 79 SpA / 116 SpD / 33 Spe
    Abilities: Levitate / Heatproof / Heavy Metal
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    When it comes to users of Stealth Rock, Bronzong comes to the table as one of the most reliable of them. With a great Steel / Psychic typing along with a fantastic ability in Levitate, Bronzong can take many hits. This is further complemented by great 67 / 116 / 116 bulk, making Bronzong the perfect epitome of a sturdy Stealth Rock user. Thanks to these qualities, Bronzong will find many opportunities to set up Stealth Rock, while also being able to wall a sizable portion of the metagame. Bronzong's low Speed stat allows it to utilize Gyro Ball very effectively, ensuring Bronzong will be able to dish out some damage, so it's no sitting duck. However, one of the downsides to Bronzong is how easily prone it is to spinners such as Blastoise as well as Taunt and Magic Bounce users. Nonetheless, when it comes to setting up Stealth Rock in UU, Bronzong is one of the best.

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    Azelf
    Type: Psychic
    Base Stats: 75 HP / 125 Atk / 70 Def / 125 SpA / 70 SpD / 115 Spe
    Abilities: Levitate
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    Azelf enters BW UU as one of the few surviving dedicated leads in the fifth generation. Azelf is the second fastest user of Stealth Rock available in UU, which means he will always be sure to get Stealth Rock up on the battlefield, unless there happens to be a Sableye with Taunt. Speaking of which, Azelf does have access to Taunt himself, so he can stop other users of Stealth Rock or Spikes from setting up. Azelf also sports high offensive stats, so he can put sizable dents in the opponent with Psyshock or Psychic. He also has decent coverage to boot, so he can definitely do some damage with Psyshock and Fire Blast after setting up Stealth Rock. Overall, Azelf can make for a great Stealth Rock lead to quickly set up Stealth Rock, stop the opposition from setting up, and dealing good damage to the opponent.

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    Claydol
    Type: Ground / Psychic
    Base Stats: 60 HP / 70 Atk / 105 Def / 70 SpA / 120 SpD / 75 Spe
    Abilities: Levitate
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    Claydol stands out from othe rest of Stealth Rock users with its good bulk as well as its ability to both set up Stealth Rock and spin hazards away. This gives Claydol its role as a solid utility Pokemon; thanks to its good bulk and some resistances to Electric, Psychic, and Ground, it will be sure to set up Stealth Rock quite a few times in the match. Claydol also boasts the unique ability to use Rapid Spin as well, so while setting up, it can also remove entry hazards from its side of the field. If needed, Claydol could also set up Light Screen and Reflect to be a bettersupport its teammate even further. Claydol's ultimate downfall is its weak offensive stats, so it usually fails to do much damage to the opposition. It also has numerous exploitable weaknesses, especially to Dark, making it prone to being trapped by Pursuit. Nonetheless, if you want a Pokemon who can set up Stealth Rock and be a solid supportive Pokemoner, look no further than Claydol.

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    Rhyperior
    Type: Ground / Rock
    Base Stats: 115 HP / 140 Atk / 130 Def / 55 SpA / 55 SpD / 40 Spe
    Abilities: Lightningrod / Solid Rock / Reckless
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    Rhyperior is a very solid user of Stealth Rock. With an immunity to Electric, a great ability in Solid Rock, and STAB'(RA)s that provide great coverage together, Rhyperior can fit himself on many teams. His big perks are his ability to reliably check the Electric-types running rampant in UU, namely Raikou, Zapdos, and Rotom-H. With this, he can also set up Stealth Rock very reliably, which is useful for any team in need of a hand. Rhyperior also has some decent resistances to Normal and Fire, meaning he can take onslaughts from Snorlax and Darmanitan. This gives him numerous ample opportunities to set up. But oOn top of that, Rhyperior has a massive 140 Attack, and when combined with great two-move coverage, can deal somea lot of damage to numerous Pokemon in the tier, ensuring it's no sitting duck. Rhyperior also has Dragon Tail in order to shuffle the opponent's team, so he can take advantage of the Stealth Rocks it u he sets. However, Rhyperior lacks recovery, which hampers his ability to set up numerous times. He also has multiple weaknesses, which must be kept in mind. However, if you want a solid Stealth Rock user who can check Raikou and Zapdos, as well as dish out damage, there's no better choice than Rhyperior (This might be too subjective, but the conclusion was kind of awkward).

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    Cobalion
    Type: Steel / Fighting
    Base Stats: 91 HP / 90 Atk / 129 Def / 90 SpA / 72 SpD / 108 Spe
    Abilities: Justified
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    Cobalion mayight seem like an odd choice for a Stealth Rock user. However, withbut his access to thea coveted Fighting STAB, a great Steel typing, and a high 129 Defense stat, Cobalion is very capable of laying Stealth Rock down on the field. His great 108 Speed is also a nice asset, allowing him to outspeed a good portion of athe metagame, which is a plus when it comes to setting up Stealth Rock, ensuring ithe will do it before going down. Cobalion also has access to the rare Volt Switch, allowing it to keep up momentum by switching out of common switch-ins while dealing decent damage. It also dents Blastoise, the most common spinner in the tier. ItHis usable mixed attacking stats are also ensure that Cobalion does more than set up Stealth Rock. Additionally, ithe has Thunder Wave to cripple opponents as well. All in all, Cobalion is a good choice for setting up Stealth Rock while being a defensive pivot.

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    Swampert
    Type: Water / Ground
    Base Stats: 100 HP / 110 Atk / 90 Def / 85 SpA / 90 Def / 60 Spe
    Abilities: Torrent / Damp
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    Say hello to Swampert, a Pokemon who has been in OU for the past two generations, a testament to just how good it is. Swampert stands out from other Stealth Rock users with its great typing, giving it only one weakness, albeit a big one. This, when combined with its good 100 / 90 / 90 bulk, makes Swampert one of the better users of Stealth Rock in the tier. Swampert can come in on some of UU's physical attackers, such as Darmanitan and Choice Scarf Flygon, and set up the hazard. Swampert also has access to Roar, allowing it to shuffle the team and rack up Stealth Rock damage. Its 110 Attack stat ensures that it isn't a sitting duck either, and can deal some damage with Earthquake and Waterfall, especially to the things it can set up on, particularly Darmanitan. However, Swampert has no reliable recovery, which limits its ability to set up Stealth Rock numerous times in the match.

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    Empoleon
    Type: Water / Steel
    Base Stats: 84 HP / 86 Atk / 88 Def / 111 SpA / 101 SpD / 60 Spe
    Abilities: Torrent / Defiant
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    Empoleon sports a unique Water / Steel typing, granting it a myriad of resistances, allowing it to take on threats such as (??).(AP) This makes Empoleon a great candidate for Stealth Rock, as it can utilize its great defensive typing to reliably set up Stealth Rock numerous times in the match. Empoleon also comes with a usable base 111 Special Attack, allowing it to deal decent chunks of damage with Scald and Ice Beam, which makes it no sitting duck (Too run-on). Like Swampert, Empoleon also has access to Roar, giving it the ability to shuffle the team to rack up damage from Stealth Rock. However, Empoleon is weak to Fighting-type attacks, making it easy bait for dangerous Pokemon such as Heracross and Mienshao. It also lacks any form of reliable recovery, something you must keep in mind.

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    Registeel
    Type: Steel
    Base Stats: 80 HP / 75 Atk / 150 Def / 75 SpA / 150 SpD / 50 Spe
    Abilities: Clear Body / Light Metal
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    Registeel is a defensive behemoth, sporting gargantuan 150 defensive stats and a Steel-(remove hyphen)typing granting it numerous resistances. This makes Registeel one of the sturdiest users of Stealth Rock. Registeel can wall a myriad of threats such as Yanmega, Shaymin, and Raikou without much trouble, and this allows it to set up Stealth Rock numerous times in the match. Thunder Wave is also a plus to using Registeel, which allows it to cripple opponents, making setting up Stealth Rock an easier task. However, Registeel lacks any offensive presence and often provides free switch -(hyphen)ins for dangerous Pokemon such as Mienshao and Rhyperior. Therefore, Registeel will usually face stiff competition from the likes of other users of Stealth Rock such as Bronzong, Cobalion, and Empoleon, which are things you must keep in mind before choosing Registeel as your hazard setter.

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    Gligar
    Type: Ground / Flying
    Base Stats: 65 HP / 75 Atk / 105 Def / 35 SpA / 65 Def / 85 Spe
    Abilities: Hyper Cutter / Sand Veil / Immunity
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    Gligar mayight seem inferior to other Stealth Rock users thanksdue to its inflowerior stats, but his physical bulk, when boosted by Eviolite, reaches nearly unreatouchable levels. This, along with useful resistances to Fighting, Electric, and Ground, grant Gligar many opportunities to set up Stealth Rock throughout the match. His access to other supportive moves such as Toxic and Taunt are useful assets as well, which ensure he can do more than set up Stealth Rock. While the use of Eviolite mayight seem detrimental, Gligar makes up for that with his access to Roost, ensuring he will last even longer to be able to set up. Immunity along with a Ground typing make him immune to both Thunder Wave and Toxic, making him less prone to being crippled. Its usable 75 Attack stat is decent enough to utilize Earthquake and U-turn to deal decent damage, as well as switch out in the latter'(RA)s case. Just be careful that Gligar's lack of offensive presence makes it a momentum murderer, so as it sets up Stealth Rock, it mayight attract some dangerous Pokemon such as Abomasnow and Slowbro.

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    Golurk
    Type: Ground / Ghost
    Base Stats: 89 HP / 124 Atk / 80 Def / 55 SpA / 80 SpD / 55 Spe
    Abilities: Klutz / Iron Fist / No Guard
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    Golurk does a fairly solid job when it comes to setting up Stealth Rock. Golurk is unique in that it is the only Ghost-type with access to Stealth Rock, which means it can set up Stealth Rock and prevent the opponent from spinning it away. Golurk packs great resistances to Rock and Bug while it also has immunities to Normal, Fighting, and Electric. This, along with its usable 89 / 80 / 80 bulk grants Golurk many opportunities to set up Stealth Rock against common threats such as Snorlax, Raikou, and Mienshao. Golurk isn't a sitting duck either; it has a great 124 Attack stat to put damage on the opposition. That said, Golurk does sport numerous exploitable weaknesses which, besides making it bait for common threats such as Roserade and Weavile, give Golurk a hard time against UU's most popular spinner, Blastoise, which can make spinblocking hard. Therefore, it is advisable to pair Golurk up with a second Ghost-type such as Cofagrigus if you want to keep Stealth Rock on the field for long.

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    Druddigon
    Type: Dragon
    Base Stats: 77 HP / 120 Atk / 90 Def / 60 SpA / 90 SpD / 48 Spe
    Abilities: Rough Skin / Sheer Force / Mold Breaker
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    If you can overlook Druddigon's horrible design, you can find that it has quite a lot of unique qualities for a Stealth Rock user. The first thing that stands out is that Druddigon has the rare Dragon-type, which gives it some useful resistances. Combine this with its good 77 / 90 / 90 bulk, and it can set up Stealth Rock reliably throughout the match. Rough Skin is an extremely useful ability, which aside from wearing down physical attackers, especially Darmanitan, also chips HP away when the opponent uses Rapid Spin, meaning Blastoise and Claydol can be worn down to the point where they cannot spin. Druddigon also has access to both Roar and Dragon Tail, so it can shuffle the team and rack up damage from the Stealth Rock it sets up. With base 120 Attack,(AC) it is no slouch either and can hit for solid damage, so Druddigon isn't just about residual damage. Overall, Druddigon is a great Stealth Rock user who can wear the opposing team down with residual damage.

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    Uxie
    Type: Psychic
    Base Stats: 75 HP / 75 Atk / 130 Def / 75 SpA / 130 Def / 95 Spe
    Abilities: Levitate
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    Although Uxie is generally overlooked by other Stealth Rock users, such as his brother Azelf for his higher sSpeed and offenses, Claydol with its access to Rapid Spin, and Bronzong, who sports the coveted Steel-(remove hyphen)typing, Uxie does have his perks. Uxie has strongbulky 75 / 130 / 130 defenses, and when combined with a Psychic-(remove hyphen)typing and Levitate, he make hims a great check to threats such as Nidoqueen and Mienshao. This grants Uxie many opportunities to set up Stealth Rock throughout the match. Uxie's support movepool is a boon as well, as he has access to Thunder Wave to cripple opponents, as well as Yawn to force switches (and rack up hazard damage). U-turn is Uxie's big selling point and allows him to switch out so he can come in later to set up Stealth Rock again if needed. However, Uxie's pitiful offenses are his ultimate downfall, often causing Uxie to kill offensive momentum, something you must keep in mind before using Uxie as a Stealth Rock user.

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    Kabutops
    Type: Water / Rock
    Base Stats: 60 HP / 115 Atk / 105 Def / 65 SpA / 70 SpD / 80 Spe
    Abilities: Swift Swim / Battle Armor / Weak Armor
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    Kabutops seems like an odd choice because it's primarily an offensive Pokemon, but it has its perks. Its 105 Defense allows it to take physical hits decently, and although itKabutop's defensive typing gives it a number of crippling weaknesses, it also has useful resistances that allow it multiple opportunities to set up Stealth Rock. Aside from that, Kabutops can support the team further with its access to Rapid Spin, much like Claydol. Kabutops also possesses a solid 115 Attack stat and good STAB moves that make sure it isn't a sitting duck in the match. It loses to most of the spinners though, but with all of its positive points in mind, Kabutops can be a solid choice for a Stealth Rock user.

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    Piloswine
    Type: Ice / Ground
    Base Stats: 100 HP / 100 Atk / 80 Def / 60 SpA / 60 SpD / 50 Spe
    Abilities: Oblivious / Snow Cloak / Thick Fat
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    At first glance, Piloswine doesn't look like much; its stats are not particularly appealing and there are other Ground-type Stealth Rock setters out there. However, Piloswine does have its perks as a Stealth Rock setter. With Eviolite equipped, Piloswine sports solid mixed bulk, allowing it to endure hits both physically and specially. Its Thick Fat ability, granting it a resistance to Ice and neutralizing its Fire weakness,(AC) adds to the deal. This means it can set up Stealth Rock quite reliably whenever it is needed. Piloswine isn't a sitting duck either; it has a solid base 100 Attack stat and good dual STAB'(RA)s in Earthquake and Icicle Crash, hitting the majority of the tier for great damage, so it is never useless outside of setting up Stealth Rock. Its priority Ice Shard helps too, allowing it to pick off weakened opponents and makes Piloswineg it an excellent Flygon check. ItPiloswine is also not as weak to Grass-type moves as Rhyperior and Swampert. Overall, while it faces competition from other Ground-types, Piloswine has enough perks to make it worth using for a bulky Stealth Rock setter in the Underused tier.

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    Aerodactyl
    Type: Rock / Flying
    Base Stats: 80 HP / 105 Atk / 65 Def / 60 SpA / 75 SpD / 130 Spe
    Abilities: Rock Head / Pressure / Unnerve
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock

    Once a popular suicude lead in DPP OU, Aerodactyl now finds itself in BW RU. Despite this, Aerodactyl can still effectively perform its former duties in the UU tier. It has an extremely high Speed, outpacing even Azelf, meaning it will almost always set Stealth Rock up early in the match. Its access to Taunt also helps out in this too, as Aerodactyl can stop other entry hazard leads from setting up. Its 105 Attack allows it to deal solid damage too, which means it is never useless outside of simplycan do more than just set up a quick Stealth Rock. However, Aerodactyl is frail and vulnerable to priority and faces stiff competition in its role from Azelf, who is generally more useful. Despite this, Aerodactyl can still be a useful asset to those in need of a quick Stealth Rock early in the match.

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    Accelgor
    Type: Bug
    Base Stats: 80 HP / 70 Atk / 40 Def / 100 SpA / 60 SpD / 145 Spe
    Abilities: Hydration / Sticky Hold / Unburden
    Usable entry hazards: Spikes

    True to his name, Accelgor is the second fastest Pokemon legal in UU, outpaced only by Ninjask. His quick Speed along with his access to Spikes make him an excellent suicide lead, quickly getting up Spikes before the opponent can react. Accelgor isn't a sitting duck either, as it has a solid 100 Special Attack stat and great moves in Bug Buzz, Focus Blast, and Giga Drain to make good use of it. Accelgor also has Final Gambit to sacrifice itself, denting an opposing spinner while setting up a couple layers of Spikes in the process. Accelgor is an excellent Pokemon when it comes to Spikes stacking, and although it faces competition from Froslass (Speaking of which, Froslass should really be included in this letter), it is still a great choice.

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    Crustle
    Type: Bug / Rock
    Base Stats: 70 HP / 95 Atk / 125 Def / 65 SpA / 75 SpD / 45 Spe
    Abilities: Sturdy / Shell Armor / Weak Armor
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock, Spikes

    Although Crustle might seem outclassed by other hazard users, it has one unique trait that makes it worth using; access to both Spikes and Stealth Rock. This makes Crustle an excellent hazard setter, as it can set up both hazards and is bulky enough to do so. It also has Sturdy, which means even if something hits it too hard, it can still guarantee a layer of hazards. It can be an effective lead with Custap Berry thanks to this. Crustle isn't a sitting duck either; it has a solid base 95 Attack, which, in conjunction with its STABs, allow it to pack a punch, and also allow it to defeat most anti-leads such as Azelf, Sableye, and Xatu.

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    Ferroseed
    Type: Grass / Steel
    Base Stats: 44 HP / 50 Atk / 91 Def / 24 SpA / 86 SpD / 10 Spe
    Abilities: Iron Barbs
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock, Spikes

    Don't let Ferroseed's small size, low stats, and NFE status drive you away; Ferroseed is a solid choice for an entry hazard user in UU. Ferroseed has access to Eviolite, giving it solid bulk overall and allowing it to take enough hits to be able to set up Stealth Rock and Spikes. Its typing is another big boon to this, granting itFerroseed many resistances that allow it to take on plenty of threats, giving it many opportunities to set up hazards. It also has Iron Barbs and Leech Seed to be able to wear down the opponent, while Thunder Wave allows Ferroseed to further support the team. While it has a pitiful Attack stat, Gyro Ball gives it some decent offensive power. Ferroseed is unfortunately slow and its power is sometimes very lacking, but despite this, Ferroseed is still a solid hazard user that can wall and support.

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    Nidoking and Nidoqueen

    Nidoking
    Type: Poison / Ground
    Base Stats: 81 HP / 92 Atk / 77 Def / 85 SpA / 75 SpD / 85 Spe
    Abilities: Poison Point / Rivalry / Sheer Force
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock, Toxic Spikes

    Nidoqueen
    Type: Poison / Ground
    Base Stats: 90 HP / 82 Atk / 87 Def / 75 SpA / 85 SpD / 76 Spe
    Abilities: Poison Point / Rivalry / Sheer Force
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock, Toxic Spikes

    Two of the pinnacles of wallbreaking, Nidoking and Nidoqueen are some of the best entry hazard users available in UU. They have an easy time setting up Stealth Rock, mostly because of the number of switches they force. Their incredible power makes them no sitting ducks, putting massive dents in the opposing team, thanks to Sheer Force and Life Orb as well as excellent coverage moves. Nidoking is the faster one of the two, and mostly aims for the raw power, whereas Nidoqueen is bulkier and slower and hits slightly harder. Their typing is quite ideal defensively as well, giving them useful resistances to take on the common Fighting- and Electric-types in UU, giving them even more chances to set up. The duo also have access to Toxic Spikes to go for residual damage; Nidoqueen especially could go the defensive and run Toxic Spikes and Dragon Tail, though it is often an inferior choice to Stealth Rock.

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    Roserade
    Type: Grass / Poison
    Base Stats: 60 HP / 70 Atk / 55 Def / 125 SpA / 105 SpD / 90 Spe
    Abilities: Natural Cure / Poison Point / Technician
    Usable entry hazards: Spikes, Toxic Spikes

    Roserade functions as one of the best Spikes users in UU thanks to its many positive qualities. Aside from its cool appearance, Roserade has a high Special Defense and a typing decent enough to allow it to take on Water-types and Shaymin, giving it numerous opportunities to set up Spikes. Roserade also has access to Natural Cure, which when paired with its typing, make it a viable weapon against Water-types, and can use them as setup fodder for Spikes. This also makes it the only Spikes user capable of defeating Blastoise, UU's premier spinner, one-on-one. It also beats Claydol, which is another plus in terms of hazard setting. Roserade alsoeven has useful support moves in Leech Seed, Sleep Powder,(AC) and Aromatherapy, allowing it to provide even more support to the team. It has reliablte recovery in either Rest orand Synthesis as well, meaning it can stay healthy to repeatedly set up Spikes. It isn't a sitting duck either; it has an excellent 125 Special Attack, and with Giga Drain and Sludge Bomb, Roserade can put some real hurt on the opposing team. However, Sleep Powder is illegal with Spikes, which means Roserade will always have to run Toxic Spikes, although this is still a usable hazard for more defensive teams. Overall, Roserade is always a choice to consider for a sSpiker, whether on a defensive team or for those in need of a weapon against bulky Water-types.

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    Qwilfish
    Type: Water / Poison
    Base Stats: 65 HP / 95 Atk / 75 Def / 55 SpA / 55 SpD / 85 Spe
    Abilities: Poison Point / Swift Swim / Intimidate
    Usable entry hazards: Spikes, Toxic Spikes

    Like Froslass and Roserade, Qwilfish is one of UU's best Spikes users. Although his stats scream "mediocrity", Qwilfish has an excellent ability in Intimidate, making his mediocre bulk great, while he has an excellent defensive typing. This makes Qwilfish an excellen great check to many of UU's top physical attackers, such as Mienshao, Heracross, and Darmanitan. As such, Qwilfish can find multiple opportunities to set up Spikes throughout the match. He has decent recovery in Pain Split, which, aside from dealing decent damage, will be able to keep Qwilfish at enough HP to repeatedly do his job. He can support the team even further as well, with Thunder Wave, Haze, and Taunt being useful supportive options. Alternatively, you could also run Toxic Spikes on Qwilfish, although the popularity of Poison-types such as Roserade, Nidoqueen, and Qwilfish himself make this a lesser option. Qwilfish's many positive qualities make it a choice you must consider when looking for a Spiker in UU.

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    Scolipede
    Type: Bug / Poison
    Base Stats: 60 HP / 90 Atk / 89 Def / 55 SpA / 69 SpD / 112 Spe
    Abilities: Poison Point / Swarm / Quick Feet
    Usable entry hazards: Spikes, Toxic Spikes

    Although generally overlooked in favor of other Spikers such as Froslass, Scolipede is still a solid choice, especially for offensive teams. Scolipede has an excellent base 112 Speed stat, which means he can set up Spikes quickly before the opponent can react. He also posehas a solid offensive threatpresence with his decent base 90 Attack, and a powerful STAB Megahorn is fairly brutal, while Earthquake and Rock Slide allow him to hurt anything that resists his Megahorn. With a Focus Sash, Scolipede can not only guarantee two layers of Spikes most of the time, but also use hits Swarm ability Swarm to power up hits Megahorn to even more brutal levels, meaning Scolipede can deal extreme damage to the opponent before going down. Despite hits competition from Froslass as a fast Spiker, Scolipede still makes an excellent Pokemon for offensive Spike-stacking teams.

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    Smeargle
    Type: Normal
    Base Stats: 55 HP / 20 Atk / 35 Def / 20 SpA / 45 SpD / 75 Spe
    Abilities: Own Tempo / Technician / Moody
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock, Spikes, Toxic Spikes

    At first glance, Smeargle looks like a complete joke; it has laughable stats in all areas and has only one move in Sketch. However, its signature move has granted it the widest movepool in the game, which makes Smeargle unique among the many hazard setters in that it is capable of setting up all three kinds of entry hazards. Smeargle also has access to Spore, which means it can put an opponent to sleep, and proceed to use the free turns to set up many hazards. Alongside a Focus Sash, Smeargle is almost always guaranteed to set up at least two layers of hazards in a match. It has Magic Coat and Whirlwind, meaning it can stop Taunt or prevent itself from being setup fodder. Its low stats, however, do come to haunt it, as Smeargle has no use outside of setting up entry hazards in UU. However, this is usually enough for Smeargle to leave its mark in the match.

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    Omastar
    Type: Rock / Water
    Base Stats: 70 HP / 60 Atk / 125 Def / 115 SpA / 70 SpD / 55 Spe
    Abilities: Swift Swim / Shell Armor / Weak Armor
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock, Spikes, Toxic Spikes

    Omastar is one of the only two Pokemon that can set up all three entry hazards, the other being Smeargle. Unlike Smeargle however, Omastar boasts actual stats as well as a typing with some use defensively. Omastar can take on some common threats such as Darmanitan, Victini, and Snorlax, which alongside its physical bulk, gives it a number of opportunities to set up entry hazards. Omastar also can run a decently powerful Scald coming off of its high Special Attack stat, and its burn chance is excellent in weakening physical attackers, allowing Omastar to give some extra support to the team. This also ensures Omastar isn't a sitting duck.

    (The phrase "x Pokemon isn't a sitting duck" is used way too often and gets really repetitive. I'd recommend changing some of the phrases to "x Pokemon still has a decent/solid/good offensive presence", or something along those lines)

    Preventing Hazards

    Luckily, there are numerous ways to stop entry hazards from going on your field. These ways are all great to have on your team to prevent themresidual damage from being worn down quickerhazards. Here are the following three ways to prevent entry hazards, and the viable Pokemon to perform them.


    Rapid Spin

    The most popular way to remove entry hazards is the move Rapid Spin. This move is the sole reason some Pokemon,(RC) such as like Blastoise and Claydol,(RC) see usage in UU, as many of UU's spinners have little use outside of this move. All of the viable rRapid sSpinn users in UU have their own advantages that make them worth using.



    [​IMG]
    Blastoise
    Type: Water
    Base Stats: 79 HP / 83 Atk / 100 Def / 85 SpA / 105 SpD / 78 Spe
    Abilities: Torrent / Rain Dish

    A fan favorite from RBY, Blastoise sees usage as UU's best Rapid Spin user. It has a solid Water- typeing, giving it something useful defensively. It also has solid bulk, meaning it can take a number of hits. Blastoise can, as a result, pull off a Rapid Spin quite easily, thanks to its defensive capabilities. Blastoise can take on a number of UU's spinblockers with its decently powerful Scald as well as Toxic, preventing them from being safe. It also has Roar to constantly force them out,(RC) and rack up entry hazard damage. Its Scald can also had a good burn chance, weakening physical attackers, wh drastich can help out the team pretty decently (The way the sentence was worded before was really weird, and I'm pretty sure my change suits what you were trying to say just fine; if not, then feel free to reword to your liking). Blastoise is also capable of guaranteeing Rapid Spins with Foresight. However, Blastoise lacks recovery, which can sometimes get in its way for the task of repeatedly pulling off Rapid Spin to remove entry hazards. Also note that if Blastoise is not to be used for spinning, it is outclassed by the other Water-types available in UU.


    [​IMG]
    Claydol
    Type: Ground / Psychic
    Base Stats: 60 HP / 70 Atk / 105 Def / 70 SpA / 120 SpD / 75 Spe
    Abilities: Levitate

    Claydol also takes membership in UU's Rapid Spin club, and has some useful qualities to let it stand out from the rest. Although Claydol has a number of weaknesses, it also sports excellent resistances, and alongside its good 60 / 105 / 120 defenses, allow it tocan pull off a Rapid Spin whenever it needs to. One of Claydol's biggest selling points an excellent ability in Levitate, which,(AC) along with its typing,(AC) makes it indifferent to all three entry hazards, meaning it can repeatedly come in to spin throughout the match. Claydol can support its team well with Stealth Rock and dual screens, making it a decent choice for a supportive Pokemon. It also has Toxic to wear down spinblockers that try to come in, meaning they are not always safe. It can run a gimmicky set with Trick and Ring Target as well, removing incoming Ghost-types' ability to spinblock. However, Claydol's main problem is its non-(hyphen)existent offensive stats, which make it hard to spin against Ghost-types.



    [​IMG]
    Cryogonal
    Type: Ice
    Base Stats: 70 HP / 50 Atk / 30 Def / 95 SpA / 135 SpD / 105 Spe
    Abilties: Levitate

    Cryogonal is a unique Pokemon in UU's group of Rapid Spinn users. Like its friend Claydol, Cryogonal also has access to Levitate, meaning it is immune to Spikes and Toxic Spikes; however, it has a Stealth Rock weakness. That said, it also has an excellent Special Defense, meaning it can take many special hits and pull off a spin in the process. Cryogonal's biggest selling point is its access to reliable recovery in Recover, meaning it can heal itself to pull off multiple Rapid Spins. It can also go the offensive route thanks to its base 95 Special Attack, and with Ice Beam and Hidden Power, it can pose a solid offensive threat on its own. It also finds itself a spot on hail teams, to remove entry hazards and spam Blizzard on its own. Overall, Cryogonal is a decent choice on certain teams looking for its qualities.



    [​IMG]
    Hitmontop
    Type: Fighting
    Base Stats: 50 HP / 95 Atk / 95 Def / 35 SpA / 110 SpD / 70 Spe
    Abilities: Intimidate / Technician / Steadfast

    Hitmontop has quite a bit going for it in terms of Rapid Spin. It has Intimidate, allowing it to check common physical threats such as Mienshao and Darmanitan. This means Hitmontop can pull off a spin quite often. Its access to Foresight also allows it to spin even against Ghost-types, which makes it quite a solid choice. It also has a decently powerful Close Combat, coming off of its base 95 Attack, meaning it is never going to be a complete sitting duck. Overall, while Hitmontop maycan be outclassed by Blastoise at spinning, buttimes, it is still a pretty solid choice
    (Same thing as my comment on Blastoise).


    [​IMG]
    Kabutops
    Type: Rock / Water
    Base Stats: 60 HP / 115 Atk / 105 Def / 65 SpA / 70 SpD / 80 Spe
    Abilities: Swift Swim / Battle Armor / Weak Armor

    Kabutops is a solid choice for an offensive Rapid Spinn user thanks to its excellent base 115 Attack and access to Swords Dance, making it a powerful offensive threat. Its access to Aqua Jet and Stone Edge allow it to put the hurt on opposing spinblockers, which also let it pulling off a Rapid Spin afterwards. ItKabutop's priority Aqua Jet also comes in handy to pace faster threats such as Mienshao and Cinccino, meaning Kabutops can also revenge kill and sweep, making it more useful. It can also run Stealth Rock to provide decent support to the team.

    (It's either Rapid Spin user or spinner, never Rapid Spinner)

    [​IMG]
    Sableye
    Type: Dark / Ghost
    Base Stats: 50 HP / 75 Atk / 75 Def / 65 SpA / 65 SpAD / 50 Spe

    Abilities: Keen Eye / Stall / Prankster

    Sableye was once one of the worst Pokemon in the game, but now thanks to its ability in Prankster, it packs a priority Taunt, which ensures that it can quickly stop the use of entry hazards. It also has Recover, keeping itself healthy to Taunt entry hazard users multiple times in the match.

    [​IMG]
    Azelf
    Type: Psychic
    Base Stats: 75 HP / 125 Atk / 70 Def / 125 SpA / 70 SpD / 115 Spe
    Abilities: Levitate

    Azelf has a fast Taunt, which means he can quickly stop entry hazards unless the opponent has the rare Aerodactyl or Accelgor. He can also set up Stealth Rock himself, and can be a good anti-lead in general thanks to his blistering Speed. He also poses as a powerful offensive threat with his high offensive stats, putting dents in the opposing team before going down.


    [​IMG]
    Crobat
    Type: Poison / Flying
    Base Stats: 85 HP / 90 Atk / 80 Def / 70 SpA / 80 SpD / 130 Spe
    Abilities: Inner Focus / Infiltrator

    Crobat is tied for hasving the fastest Taunt in UU aside fromwith Aerodactyl. It can quickly fire a Taunt before anything can react, while U-turning to a teammate to deal with the opponenteam. It has access to Roost to keep itself healthy to be able to repeatedly use Taunt. Overall, Crobat is a great choice to stop entry hazards from going on your side of the field.


    [​IMG]
    Aerodactyl
    Type: Rock / Flying
    Base Stats: 80 HP / 105 Atk / 65 Def / 60 SpA / 75 SpD / 130 Spe
    Abilities: Rock Head / Pressure / Unnerve

    Like Crobat, Aerodactyl also has the fastest Taunt in UU, meaning it will stop hazards from going up most of the time. It also poses as a solid offensive threat thanks to its base 105 Attack, and can run Stone Edge and Earthquake to be able to put dents on the opposin theg team. It also sets up Stealth Rock on its own, making it a decent choice for a Taunt user. It is, however, often outclassed by Azelf as an anti-lead.


    [​IMG]
    Tornadus
    Type: Flying
    Base Stats: 79 HP / 115 Atk / 70 Def / 125 SpA / 80 SpD / 111 Spe
    Abilities: Pranster / Defiant

    Tornadus also has priority Taunt, like Sableye, but it also has actual stats, meaning it can be an offensive threat with Hurricane and Superpower, decimating teams on its own while stopping entry hazards. It also has a higher Speed than Sableye, making it less prone to opposing priority than it. Overall, Tornadus can beis a very good choice toas a Taunt entry hazards users overall.


    Magic Bounce

    Magic Bounce is a pretty solid way to stop the use of entry hazards from going onto the field, while also bouncing it back to the opponent, leaving them in a lethal situation. Magic Bounce has very limited distribution however, butwith Xatu being the one userly legal Pokemon in UU to has its uses in UU for the moveve the ability, aside from Natu,(AC) which isn't good at all. (A bit subjective here, but I felt that it was required as the sentence was very awkward and confusing before; feel free to reword to your liking though.)

    [​IMG]
    Xatu
    Type: Psychic / Flying
    Base Stats: 65 HP / 75 Atk / 70 Def / 95 SpA / 70 SpD / 95 Spe
    Abilities: Synchronize / Early Bird / Magic Bounce

    Xatu is a Pokemon that can block the use of entry hazards, and bounce them back to the opponent, which can be useful to stop Spikes and Stealth Rock from threatening your team. It also can bounce back status moves such as Toxic and Thunder Wave, making it useful to stop paralysis or poison from spreading or poisonas well. Xatu also has reliable recovery in Roost, which means it can repeatedly come in to bounce hazards back to the opponent. It can also support its team withas Thunder Wave, Light Screen, and Reflect, making it a decent team supporter. It has U-turn to switch out whenever needed. ItLastly, Xatu also pairs up well with a spinner or a Taunter, such as Sableye, to be sure entry hazards stay off the field.


    Spinblocking

    Rapid Spin has become such a common sight that a strategy has arisen to counter the move; spinblocking. The term means "Bblock Rapid Spin". This is done as Rapid Spin is a damaging Normal-type move, which means Ghost-types can effectively stop the move from working. A number of Ghost-types in UU are effective at spinblocking, and each one has their own qualities that make them worth using as spinblockers.



    [​IMG]
    Cofagrigus
    Type: Ghost
    Base Stats: 58 HP / 50 Atk / 145 Def / 95 SpA / 105 SpD / 30 Spe
    Abilities: Mummy

    Cofagrigus is the premier spinblocker in the UU environment, as it holds many positive qualities that make it wonderful on any team in need. It has a titanic base 145 Defense and a solid base 105 Special Defense, and its typing allows it to take on all of the tier's spinners one-on-one. ItCofagrigus has Will-O-Wisp to cripple Pokemon and wear them down, while it packs a decently powerful Shadow Ball to lay the hurt. It also has Mummy to negate common abilities of the spinnerphysical attackers' abilities (Not many spinners will be physically touching Cofag, furthermore, the abilities that spinners have aren't really "common"). Cofagrigus can also pose as a solid offensive threat on its own thanks to Trick Room and Nasty Plot, allowing it to set up and proceed to destroy the opposing spinner with powerful Shadow Balls. It can beat Blastoise and Claydol with relative ease thanks to these qualities. Overall, Cofagrigus is the best spinblocker in the tier.


    [​IMG]
    Sableye
    Type: Dark / Ghost
    Base Stats: 50 HP / 75 Atk / 75 Def / 65 SpA / 65 SpD / 50 Spe
    Abilities: Keen Eye / Stall / Prankster

    Despite its terrible stats, Sableye is an excellent spinblocker in UU thanks to its Dream World ability, Prankster. It can quickly use Taunt to prevent Foresight from Hitmontop and Blastoise, while it has Will-O-Wisp to cripple spinners. It has Recover to keep itself healthy, while its typing grants it no weaknesses, aiding in its ability to stall the opponent. While its bulk leaves a lot to be desired, it provides enough to make Sableye ampdurable against the spinblockners. It can constantly be an annoyance to the opposing spinners as many of them are defensively oriented. Although Sableye is fairly limited in what it can do, it still makes for a solid spinblocker.


    [​IMG]
    Dusclops
    Type: Ghost
    Base Stats: 40 HP / 70 Atk / 130 Def / 60 SpA / 130 Def / 25 Spe
    Abilities: Pressure

    Dusclops was a big winner of the fifth generation, as due to its NFE status, it can bolster its already good defenses to formidable levels, making it one of the only Pokemon that cannot be OHKO'(RA)ed. This immensly helps Dusclops in its role as a spinblocker immensely, as it can take many hits from any of the spinners in the tier while crippling them with Will-O-Wisp and Curse. This means it can slowly chip away at their HP combined with the entry hazard damage. It can run Pain Split and Rest as decent forms of recovery; keeping it at enough HP to constantly take on spinblockners. Be careful, however, as Dusclops lacks Leftovers recovery, which can sometimes get in its way at performing its spinblocking duties. However, despite this, Dusclops can make for a useful defensive spinblocker.


    [​IMG]
    Mismagius
    Type: Ghost
    Base Stats: 60 HP / 60 Atk / 60 Def / 105 SpA / 105 SpD / 105 Spe
    Abilities: Levitate

    Mismagius is a more offensive spinblocker, which makes it a good fit on the fast offensive teams looking into the use of a fast Ghost-type. Mismagius has access to Thunderbolt, which allows it to deal with the premier spinner, Blastoise. Its Shadow Ball allows it to handle Claydol and Hitmontop as well. Mismagius also has Nasty Plot and Calm Mind, allowing it to boost its Special Attack to become even more threatening to opposing spinners. It can avoid Toxic with Substitute, while it also has access to other moves such as Taunt and Will-O-Wisp. Mismagius is also quite fast, allowing it to move before opposing spinners can react. Mismagius can overall find itself a spot as a more offensive spinblocker compared to the other Ghost-types.


    [​IMG]
    Chandelure
    Type: Ghost / Fire
    Base Stats: 60 HP / 55 Atk / 90 Def / 145 SpA / 90 SpD / 80 Spe
    Abilities: Flash Fire / Flame Body / Shadow Tag

    Chandelure is not that great of a spinblocker on its own, mostly due to being weak to Blastoise's Scald and Claydol's Earthquake. This makes it advisable to pair Chandelure up with another spinblocker to make full use of spinblocking. That said, Chandelure can come in and use its extreme Special Attack to demoliscorch ("scorch" doesn't really make sense with Shadow Ball; however, feel free to use another verb of your choice) opposing spinners with Fire Blast and Shadow Ball. It can also run Substitute to avoid a stray Toxic, while running Pain Split is usable to heal itself and deal damage. Chandelure also can run a Choice Specs to make its damage more brutal. Outside of that, Chandelure is limited to mostly being an offensive spinblocker, as its defensive capabilities are lacking.


    [​IMG]
    Rotom
    Type: Electric / Ghost
    Base Stats: 50 HP / 50 Atk / 77 Def / 95 SpA / 77 SpD / 91 Spe
    Abilities: Levitate

    Rotom-N is a rather unique choice for a spinblocker. Its main selling point is its Electric STAB; which means it can deal with Blastoise fairly easily, and it also takes on Claydol rather well. The other unique thing about Rotom is its access to Volt Switch, which means it can grab momentum as opposing spinners switch out of the match. It has a solid Special Attack stat and a decent base Speed to deal some strong and fast damage, which makes it decent on offensive teams. Although it mayight not seem like it, Rotom is also capable of going defensive despite its low defenses, as it has some excellent resistances, and can take a number of hits from opposing spinners and cripple them with Will-O-Wisp. Overall, Rotom-N is a very unique choice for a spinblocker.


    [​IMG]
    Golurk
    Type: Ground / Ghost
    Base Stats: 89 HP / 124 Atk / 80 Def / 55 SpA / 80 SpD / 55 Spe
    Abilities: Klutz / Iron Fist / No Guard

    Golurk is also capable of spinblocking and setting up hazards at the same time. It can set up Stealth Rock to support its team, and has decent bulk to take on opposing spinners. It has a high base 124 Attack and a STAB Earthquake to deal heavy damage to Blastoise and Hitmontop, while its STAB Shadow Punch also puts the hurt on Claydol. This makes Golurk a pretty solid choice to set up Stealth Rock and spinblock at the same time. Golurk could also run No Guard along with DynamicPunch to annoy opposing spinners with confusion, although this is rather gimmicky.

    Phazing

    Phazing, short for "pseudo-Hazing", is a common way to take advantage of hazards. This is done by the moves such as Roar, Whirlwind, Dragon Tail, and Circle Throw, which can force the opposing Pokemon out of the field, racking up entry hazard damage. Common defensive Pokemon such as Snorlax, Blastoise, Empoleon, and Slowking often run these moves in their sets. One of the most well-known examples of phazers is Prankster Riolu, being able to use priority Roar thanks to its access to Copycat, and Prankster gives the move +1 priority.

    Conclusion

    Like in any tier, entry hazards are a dominant force in UU, and hopefully you now have an understanding of entry hazards, including the viable users of them, ways to counter them, and how to make use of them. When making a team, be sure to fit at least one kind of hazard onto your team; as they can be vital to victory. Always be sure to pack a spinblocker as well, as maintaining the entry hazards can make a big difference in the match. Always pack something that can take advantage of entry hazards, whether by phazing or just sweeping teams outright,;(semi) make good use of them. And since hazards are so important, make sure that the Blastoise or Claydol of yours stays alive throughout the match; if they go down before they spin, you can be in trouble. There is always a risk to entry hazards, so plan carefully for them.


    Very well done! The only major issues were awkward sentence structure and improper use of apostrophes (mostly in the beginning though).

    GP Approved 1/2
  9. Kingler12345

    Kingler12345 COOKIE COOKIE COOKIE STARTS WITH C
    is a Contributor to Smogon

    Joined:
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    doing HTML(this is gonna be long....)
    NOTE- i have not implemented above gp check, but i'm just htmling this anyway and it shouldn't matter, you can implement this before the implementation of the GP check ^_^
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    <h2>Introduction</h2>

    <p>Entry hazards have been one of the most important aspects of competitive battling for a long time. With the presence of threats such as Yanmega, Chandelure, and Darmanitan, the presence of Spikes and Stealth Rock is vital to eliminating them. Entry Hazards also play an important role in attaining needed KOs and racking up damage with switches. With the myriad of hazard setters and few spinners present in the UU tier, hazards are fairly difficult to remove from the field. With this, Pokemon such as Blastoise, Claydol, and Xatu have risen in usage, and this guide will introduce the aspects of entry hazards in UU.</p>

    <strong>Stealth Rock</strong>

    <p>Stealth Rock is the most common of entry hazards in UU. Out of the three available entry hazards, Stealth Rock is arguably the easiest to set up, only requiring one turn to be used to its fullest effect. Stealth Rock is also arguably the most influential entry hazard. Without its presence, threats such as Yanmega and Chandelure become much harder to eliminate, but with it, they are much easier to deal with, as they have a much more limited lifespan due to the Rock-type damage it inflicts. Stealth Rock is also the lone hazard that no Pokemon is immune to bar users of Magic Guard, of which are rare sights in UU. Additionally, it is the most widely distributed, so it can easily fit onto any team.</p>

    <strong>Spikes</strong>

    <p>Spikes is the oldest of entry hazards, and is quite a reliable one too. Spikes offers a consistent 25% damage output after three layers, which is very useful for stall teams to keep racking up damage as they cause numerous switches. Spikes also helps with offensive teams, wearing down walls and turning some 2HKOs into OHKOs, and vice versa. After all three layers have been set up, it will be very hard for the opposition to act, as Spikes damage stacks up much more quickly than Stealth Rock. Although it takes three turns to set up, this is mitigated by the fact that most of its users have enough bulk or speed to pull this job off effectively.</p>

    <strong>Toxic Spikes</strong>

    <p>Toxic Spikes is the least used of entry hazards, and for a good reason. There are numerous Pokemon immune to Toxic Spikes, and with Pokemon such as Roserade, Nidoqueen, and Qwilfish being some of the more popular Pokemon in the tier, Toxic Spikes are very difficult to keep on the field. The effect of Toxic Spikes is also ignored by Pokemon with Levitate, such as Bronzong, Azelf, and Claydol, the latter third of which can spin the Toxic Spikes away, as well as Pokemon of the Steel typing such as Empoleon and Bisharp. However, once said Pokemon are eliminated, Toxic Spikes comes with its lethal effect; badly poisoning the target, especially with two layers on, and it can wear down walls such as Cofagrigus and Umbreon at a steady pace, and if a spinner or cleric is not used, it can be very hard to deal with the poison damage.</p>

    <strong>The Users</strong>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/bronzong">Bronzong</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/442.png" alt="Bronzong"><br />

    Type: Steel / Psychic<br />
    Base Stats: 67 HP / 89 Atk / 116 Def / 79 SpA / 116 SpD / 33 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Levitate / Heatproof / <em>Heavy Metal</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock</p>

    <p>When it comes to users of Stealth Rock, Bronzong comes to the table as one of the most reliable of them. With a great Steel / Psychic typing along with a fantastic ability in Levitate, Bronzong can take many hits. This is further complemented by great 67 / 116 / 116 bulk, making Bronzong the perfect epitome of a sturdy Stealth Rock user. Thanks to these qualities, Bronzong will find many opportunities to set up Stealth Rock, while also being able to wall a sizeable portion of the metagame. Bronzong's low Speed stat allows it to utilize Gyro Ball very effectively, ensuring Bronzong will be able to dish out some damage, so it's no sitting duck. However, one of the downsides to Bronzong is how easily prone it is to spinners such as Blastoise as well as Taunt and Magic Bounce. Nonetheless, when it comes to setting up Stealth Rock in UU, Bronzong is one of the best.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/azelf">Azelf</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/487.png" alt="Azelf"><br />

    Type: Psychic<br />
    Base Stats: 75 HP / 125 Atk / 70 Def / 125 SpA / 70 SpD / 115 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Levitate<br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock</p>

    <p>Azelf enters BW UU as one of the few surviving dedicated leads in the fifth generation. Azelf is the second fastest user of Stealth Rock available in UU, which means he will always be sure to get Stealth Rock up on the battlefield, unless there happens to be a Sableye with Taunt. Speaking of which, Azelf does have access to Taunt himself, so he can stop other users of Stealth Rock or Spikes from setting up. Azelf also sports high offensive stats, so he can put sizable dents in the opponent with Psyshock or Psychic. He also has decent coverage to boot, so he can definitely do some damage with Psyshock and Fire Blast after setting up Stealth Rock. Overall, Azelf can make for a great Stealth Rock lead to quickly set up Stealth Rock, stop the opposition from setting up, and dealing deal good damage to the opponent.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/claydol">Claydol</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/344.png" alt="Claydol"><br />

    Type: Ground / Psychic<br />
    Base Stats: 60 HP / 70 Atk / 105 Def / 70 SpA / 120 SpD / 75 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Levitate<br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock</p>

    <p>Claydol stands out from the rest of Stealth Rock users with its good bulk as well as its ability to both set up Stealth Rock and spin hazards away. This gives Claydol its role as a solid utility Pokemon; thanks to its good bulk and some resistances to Electric, Psychic, and Ground, it will be sure to set up Stealth Rock quite a few times in the match. Claydol also boasts the unique ability to use Rapid Spin as well, so while setting up, it can also remove entry hazards from its side of the field. If needed, Claydol could also set up Light Screen and Reflect to be a better teammate. Claydol's ultimate downfall is its weak offensive stats, so it usually fails to do much damage to the opposition. It also has numerous exploitable weaknesses, especially Dark, making it prone to being trapped by Pursuit. Nonetheless, if you want a Pokemon who can set up Stealth Rock and be a solid supportive Pokemon, look no further than Claydol.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/rhyperior">Rhyperior</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/469.png" alt="Rhyperior"><br />

    Type: Ground / Rock<br />
    Base Stats: 115 HP / 140 Atk / 130 Def / 55 SpA / 55 SpD / 40 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Lightningrod / Solid Rock / <em>Reckless</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock</p>

    <p>Rhyperior is a very solid user of Stealth Rock. With an immunity to Electric, a great ability in Solid Rock, and STAB's that provide great coverage together, Rhyperior can fit himself on many teams. His big perks are his ability to reliably check the Electric-types running rampant in UU, namely Raikou, Zapdos, and Rotom-H. With this, he can also set up Stealth Rock very reliably, which is useful for any team in need of a hand. Rhyperior also has some decent resistances to Normal and Fire, meaning he can take onslaughts from Snorlax and Darmanitan. This gives him numerous ample opportunities to set up. But on top of that, Rhyperior has a massive 140 Attack, and when combined with great two-move coverage, can deal some damage to numerous Pokemon in the tier, ensuring it's no sitting duck. Rhyperior also has Dragon Tail in order to shuffle the opponent's team, so he can take advantage of the Stealth Rocks it uses. However, Rhyperior lacks recovery, which hampers his ability to set up numerous times. He also has multiple weaknesses, which must be kept in mind. However, if you want a solid Stealth Rock user who can check Raikou and Zapdos, as well as dish out damage, there's Rhyperior.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/cobalion">Cobalion</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/668.png" alt="Cobalion"><br />

    Type: Steel / Fighting<br />
    Base Stats: 91 HP / 90 Atk / 129 Def / 90 SpA / 72 SpD / 108 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Justified<br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock</p>

    <p>Cobalion may seem like an odd choice for a Stealth Rock user. However, with access to the coveted Fighting STAB, a great Steel typing, and a high 129 Defense stat, Cobalion is very capable of laying Stealth Rock down on the field. His great 108 Speed is also a nice asset, allowing him to outspeed a good portion of a metagame, which is a plus when it comes to setting up Stealth Rock, ensuring it will do it before going down. Cobalion also has access to the rare Volt Switch, allowing it to keep up momentum by switching out of common switch-ins while dealing decent damage. It also dents Blastoise, the most common spinner in the tier. Its usable mixed attacking stats are also ensure that Cobalion does more than set up Stealth Rock. Additionally, it has Thunder Wave to cripple opponents as well. All in all, Cobalion is a good choice for setting up Stealth Rock while being a defensive pivot.</p>


    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/swampert">Swampert</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/260.png" alt="Swampert"><br />

    Type: Water / Ground<br />
    Base Stats: 100 HP / 110 Atk / 90 Def / 85 SpA / 90 Def / 60 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Torrent / <em>Damp</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock</p>

    <p>Say hello to Swampert, a Pokemon who has been in OU for the past two generations, a testament to just how good it is. Swampert stands out from other Stealth Rock users with its great typing, giving it only one weakness, albeit a big one. This, when combined with good 100 / 90 / 90 bulk, makes Swampert one of the better users of Stealth Rock in the tier. Swampert can come in on some of UU's physical attackers, such as Darmanitan and Choice Scarf Flygon, and set up the hazard. Swampert also has access to Roar, allowing it to shuffle the team and rack up Stealth Rock damage. Its 110 Attack stat ensures that it isn't a sitting duck either, and can deal some damage with Earthquake and Waterfall, especially to the things it can set up on, particularly Darmanitan. However, Swampert has no reliable recovery, which limits its ability to set up Stealth Rock numerous times in the match.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/empoleon">Empoleon</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/398.png" alt="Empoleon"><br />

    Type: Water / Steel<br />
    Base Stats: 84 HP / 86 Atk / 88 Def / 111 SpA / 101 SpD / 60 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Torrent / <em>Defiant</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock</p>

    <p>Empoleon sports a unique Water / Steel typing, granting it a myriad of resistances, allowing it to take on threats such as This makes Empoleon a great candidate for Stealth Rock, as it can utilize its great defensive typing to reliably set up Stealth Rock numerous times in the match. Empoleon also comes with a usable 111 Special Attack, allowing it to deal decent chunks of damage with Scald and Ice Beam, which makes it no sitting duck. Like Swampert, Empoleon also has access to Roar, giving it the ability to shuffle the team to rack up damage from Stealth Rock. However, Empoleon is weak to Fighting-type attacks, making it easy bait for dangerous Pokemon such as Heracross and Mienshao. It also lacks any form of reliable recovery, something you must keep in mind.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/registeel">Registeel</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/379.png" alt="Registeel"><br />

    Type: Steel<br />
    Base Stats: 80 HP / 75 Atk / 150 Def / 75 SpA / 150 SpD / 50 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Clear Body / <em>Light Metal</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock</p>

    <p>Registeel is a defensive behemoth, sporting gargantuan 150 defensive stats and a Steel-typing granting it numerous resistances. This makes Registeel one of the sturdiest users of Stealth Rock. Registeel can wall a myriad threats such as Yanmega, Shaymin, and Raikou without much trouble, and this allows it to set up Stealth Rock numerous times in the match. Thunder Wave is also a plus to using Registeel, which allows it to cripple opponents, making setting up Stealth Rock an easier task. However, Registeel lacks any offensive presence and often provides free switch ins for dangerous Pokemon such as Mienshao and Rhyperior. Therefore, Registeel will usually face stiff competition from the likes of other users of Stealth Rock such as Bronzong, Cobalion, and Empoleon, which are things you must keep in mind before choosing Registeel as your hazard setter.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/gligar">Gligar</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/207.png" alt="Gligar"><br />

    Type: Ground / Flying<br />
    Base Stats: 65 HP / 75 Atk / 105 Def / 35 SpA / 65 Def / 85 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Hyper Cutter / Sand Veil / <em>Immunity</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock</p>

    <p>Gligar may seem inferior to other Stealth Rock users thanks to its inferior stats, but his physical bulk, when boosted by Eviolite, reaches nearly unreachable levels. This, along with useful resistances to Fighting, Electric, and Ground, grant Gligar many opportunities to set up Stealth Rock throughout the match. His access to other supportive moves such as Toxic and Taunt are useful assets as well, which ensure he can do more than set up Stealth Rock. While the use of Eviolite may seem detrimental, Gligar makes up for that with his access to Roost, ensuring he will last even longer to be able to set up. Immunity along with a Ground typing make him immune to both Thunder Wave and Toxic, making him less prone to being crippled. Its usable 75 Attack stat is decent enough to utilize Earthquake and U-turn to deal decent damage, as well as switch out in the latter's case. Just be careful that Gligar's lack of offensive presence makes it a momentum murderer, so as it sets up Stealth Rock, it may attract some dangerous Pokemon such as Abomasnow and Slowbro.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/golurk/uu">Golurk</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/653.png" alt="Golurk"><br />

    Type: Ground / Ghost<br />
    Base Stats: 89 HP / 124 Atk / 80 Def / 55 SpA / 80 SpD / 55 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Klutz / Iron Fist / <em>No Guard</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock</p>

    <p>Golurk does a fairly solid job when it comes to setting up Stealth Rock. Golurk is unique in that it is the only Ghost-type with access to Stealth Rock, which means it can set up Stealth Rock and prevent the opponent from spinning it away. Golurk packs great resistances to Rock and Bug while it also has immunities to Normal, Fighting, and Electric. This, along with its usable 89 / 80 / 80 bulk grant Golurk many opportunities to set up Stealth Rock against common threats such as Snorlax, Raikou, and Mienshao. Golurk isn't a sitting duck either; it has a great 124 Attack stat to put damage on the opposition. That said, Golurk does sport numerous exploitable weaknesses which, besides making it bait for common threats such as Roserade and Weavile, give Golurk a hard time against UU's most popular spinner, Blastoise, which can make spinblocking hard. Therefore, it is advisable to pair Golurk up with a second Ghost-type such as Cofagrigus if you want to keep Stealth Rock on the field for long.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/druddigon/uu">Druddigon</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/651.png" alt="Druddigon"><br />

    Type: Dragon<br />
    Base Stats: 77 HP / 120 Atk / 90 Def / 60 SpA / 90 SpD / 48 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Rough Skin / Sheer Force / <em>Mold Breaker</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock</p>

    <p>If you can overlook Druddigon's horrible design, you can find that it has quite a lot of unique qualities for a Stealth Rock user. The first thing that stands out is that Druddigon has the rare Dragon-type, which gives it some useful resistances. Combine this with its good 77 / 90 / 90 bulk, and it can set up Stealth Rock reliably throughout the match. Rough Skin is an extremely useful ability, which aside from wearing down physical attackers, especially Darmanitan, also chips HP away when the opponent uses Rapid Spin, meaning Blastoise and Claydol can be worn down to the point where they cannot spin. Druddigon also has access to both Roar and Dragon Tail, so it can shuffle the team and rack up damage from the Stealth Rock it sets up. 120 Attack is no slouch and can hit for solid damage, so Druddigon isn't just about residual damage. Overall, Druddigon is a great Stealth Rock user who can wear the team down with residual damage.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/uxie/uu">Uxie</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/485.png" alt="Uxie"><br />

    Type: Psychic<br />
    Base Stats: 75 HP / 75 Atk / 130 Def / 75 SpA / 130 Def / 95 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Levitate<br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock</p>

    <p>Although Uxie is generally overlooked by other Stealth Rock users, such as his brother Azelf for his higher speed and offenses, Claydol with its access to Rapid Spin, and Bronzong, who sports the coveted Steel-typing, Uxie does have his perks. Uxie has strong 75 / 130 / 130 defenses, and when combined with a Psychic-typing and Levitate, make him a great check to threats such as Nidoqueen and Mienshao. This grants Uxie many opportunities to set up Stealth Rock throughout the match. Uxie's support movepool is a boon as well, as he has access to Thunder Wave to cripple opponents, as well as Yawn to force switches (and rack up hazard damage). U-turn is Uxie's big selling point and allows him to switch out so he can come in later to set up Stealth Rock again if needed. However, Uxie's pitiful offenses are his ultimate downfall, often causing Uxie to kill offensive momentum, something you must keep in mind before using Uxie as a Stealth Rock user.<p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/kabutops/uu">Kabutops</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/141.png" alt="Kabutops"><br />

    Type: Water / Rock<br />
    Base Stats: 60 HP / 115 Atk / 105 Def / 65 SpA / 70 SpD / 80 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Swift Swim / Battle Armor / <em>Weak Armor</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock</p>

    <p>Kabutops seems like an odd choice because it's primarily an offensive Pokemon, but it has its perks. Its 105 Defense allows it to take physical hits decently, and although its defensive typing gives it a number of crippling weaknesses, it also has useful resistances that allow it multiple opportunities to set up Stealth Rock. Aside from that, Kabutops can support the team further with its access to Rapid Spin, much like Claydol. Kabutops also possesses a solid 115 Attack stat and good STAB moves that make sure it isn't a sitting duck in the match. It loses to most of the spinners though, but with all of its positive points in mind, Kabutops can be a solid choice for a Stealth Rock user.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/piloswine/uu">Piloswine</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/221.png" alt="Piloswine"><br />

    Type: Ice / Ground<br />
    Base Stats: 100 HP / 100 Atk / 80 Def / 60 SpA / 60 SpD / 50 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Oblivious / Snow Cloak / <em>Thick Fat</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock</p>

    <p>At first glance, Piloswine doesn't look like much; its stats are not particularly appealing and there are other Ground-type Stealth Rock setters out there. However, Piloswine does have its perks as a Stealth Rock setter. With Eviolite equipped, Piloswine sports solid mixed bulk, allowing it to endure hits both physically and specially. Its Thick Fat ability, granting it a resistance to Ice and neutralizing its Fire weakness adds to the deal. This means it can set up Stealth Rock quite reliably whenever it is needed. Piloswine isn't a sitting duck either; it has a solid 100 Attack stat and good dual STAB's in Earthquake and Icicle Crash, hitting the majority of the tier for great damage, so it is never useless outside of setting up Stealth Rock. Its priority Ice Shard helps too, allowing it to pick off weakened opponents and makes Piloswine an excellent Flygon check. It is also not as weak to Grass-type moves as Rhyperior and Swampert. Overall, while it faces competition from other Ground-types, Piloswine has enough perks to make it worth using for a bulky Stealth Rock setter in the Underused tier.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/aerodactyl/uu">Aerodactyl</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/142.png" alt="Aerodactyl"><br />

    Type: Rock / Flying<br />
    Base Stats: 80 HP / 105 Atk / 65 Def / 60 SpA / 75 SpD / 130 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Rock Head / Pressure / <em>Unnerve</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock</p>

    <p>Once a popular suicude lead in DPP OU, Aerodactyl now finds itself in BW RU. Despite this, Aerodactyl can still effectively perform its former duties in the UU tier. It has an extremely high Speed, outpacing even Azelf, meaning it will always set Stealth Rock up early in the match. Its access to Taunt also helps out in this too, as Aerodactyl can stop other entry hazard leads from setting up. Its 105 Attack allows it to deal solid damage too, which means it is never useless outside of simply quick Stealth Rock. However, Aerodactyl is frail and vulnerable to priority and faces stiff competition in its role from Azelf, who is generally more useful. Despite this, Aerodactyl can still be a useful asset to those in need of a quick Stealth Rock early in the match.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/accelgor/uu">Accelgor</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/647.png" alt="Accelgor"><br />

    Type: Bug<br />
    Base Stats: 80 HP / 70 Atk / 40 Def / 100 SpA / 60 SpD / 145 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Hydration / Sticky Hold / <em>Unburden</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Spikes</p>

    <p>True to his name, Accelgor is the second fastest Pokemon legal in UU, outpaced only by Ninjask. His quick Speed along with his access to Spikes make him an excellent suicide lead, quickly getting up Spikes before the opponent can react. Accelgor isn't a sitting duck either, as it has a solid 100 Special Attack stat and great moves in Bug Buzz, Focus Blast, and Giga Drain to make good use of it. Accelgor also has Final Gambit to sacrifice itself, denting an opposing spinner while setting up a couple layers of Spikes in the process. Accelgor is an excellent Pokemon when it comes to Spikes stacking, and although it faces competition from Froslass, is still a great choice.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/crustle/uu">Crustle</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/588.png" alt="Crustle"><br />

    Type: Bug / Rock<br />
    Base Stats: 70 HP / 95 Atk / 125 Def / 65 SpA / 75 SpD / 45 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Sturdy / Shell Armor / <em>Weak Armor</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock, Spikes</p>

    <p>Although Crustle might seem outclassed by other hazard users, it has one unique trait that makes it worth using; access to both Spikes and Stealth Rock. This makes Crustle an excellent hazard setter, as it can set up both hazards and is bulky enough to do so. It also has Sturdy, which means even if something hits it too hard, it can still guarantee a layer of hazards. It can be an effective lead with Custap Berry thanks to this. Crustle isn't a sitting duck either; it has a solid 95 Attack, which, in conjunction with its STABs, allow it to pack a punch, and also allow it to defeat most anti-leads such as Azelf, Sableye, and Xatu.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/ferroseed/uu">Ferroseed</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/627.png" alt="Ferroseed"><br />

    Type: Grass / Steel<br />
    Base Stats: 44 HP / 50 Atk / 91 Def / 24 SpA / 86 SpD / 10 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Iron Barbs<br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock, Spikes</p>

    <p>Don't let Ferroseed's small size, low stats, and NFE status drive you away; Ferroseed is a solid choice for a hazard user in UU. Ferroseed has access to Eviolite, giving it solid bulk overall and allowing it to take enough hits to be able to set up Stealth Rock and Spikes. Its typing is another big boon to this, granting it many resistances that allow it to take on plenty of threats, giving it many opportunities to set up hazards. It also has Iron Barbs and Leech Seed to be able to wear down the opponent, while Thunder Wave allows Ferroseed to further support the team. While it has a pitiful Attack stat, Gyro Ball gives it some decent offensive power. Ferroseed is unfortunately slow and its power is sometimes very lacking, but despite this, Ferroseed is still a solid hazard user that can wall and support.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/nidoking">Nidoking</a></strong> and <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/nidoqueen">Nidoqueen</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/34.png" alt="Nidoking"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/nidoking">Nidoking</a></strong><br />

    Type: Poison / Ground<br />
    Base Stats: 81 HP / 92 Atk / 77 Def / 85 SpA / 75 SpD / 85 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Poison Point / Rivalry / <em>Sheer Force</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock, Toxic Spikes</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/nidoqueen">Nidoqueen</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/31.png" alt="Nidoqueen"><br />

    Type: Poison / Ground<br />
    Base Stats: 90 HP / 82 Atk / 87 Def / 75 SpA / 85 SpD / 76 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Poison Point / Rivalry / <em>Sheer Force</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock, Toxic Spikes</p>

    <p>Two of the pinnacles of wallbreaking, Nidoking and Nidoqueen are some of the best hazard users available in UU. They have an easy time setting up Stealth Rock, mostly because of the number of switches they force. Their incredible power makes them no sitting ducks, putting massive dents in the opposing team, thanks to Sheer Force and Life Orb as well as excellent coverage moves. Nidoking is the faster one of the two, and mostly aims for the raw power, whereas Nidoqueen is bulkier and slower and hits slightly harder. Their typing is quite ideal defensively as well, giving them useful resistances to take on the common Fighting- and Electric-types in UU, giving them even more chances to set up. The duo also have access to Toxic Spikes to go for residual damage; Nidoqueen especially could go the defensive and run Toxic Spikes and Dragon Tail, though it is often an inferior choice to Stealth Rock.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/roserade">Roserade</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/410.png" alt="Roserade"><br />

    Type: Grass / Poison<br />
    Base Stats: 60 HP / 70 Atk / 55 Def / 125 SpA / 105 SpD / 90 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Natural Cure / Poison Point / <em>Technician</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Spikes, Toxic Spikes</p>

    <p>Roserade functions as one of the best Spikes users in UU thanks to its many positive qualities. Aside from its cool appearance, Roserade has a high Special Defense and a typing decent enough to allow it to take on Water-types and Shaymin, giving it numerous opportunities to set up Spikes. Roserade also has access to Natural Cure, which when paired with its typing, make it a viable weapon against Water-types, and can use them as setup fodder for Spikes. This also makes it the only Spikes user capable of defeating Blastoise, UU's premier spinner, one-on-one. It also beats Claydol, which is another plus in terms of hazard setting. Roserade also has useful support moves in Leech Seed, Sleep Powder and Aromatherapy, allowing it to provide even more support to the team. It has reliablt recovery in either Rest or Synthesis as well, meaning it can stay healthy to repeatedly set up Spikes. It isn't a sitting duck either; it has an excellent 125 Special Attack, and with Giga Drain and Sludge Bomb, Roserade can put some real hurt on the opposing team. However, Sleep Powder is illegal with Spikes, which means Roserade will always have to run Toxic Spikes, although this is still a usable hazard for more defensive teams. Overall, Roserade is always a choice to consider for a spiker, whether on a defensive team or for those in need of a weapon against bulky Water-types.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/qwilfish/uu">Qwilfish</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/211.png" alt="Qwilfish"><br />

    Type: Water / Poison<br />
    Base Stats: 65 HP / 95 Atk / 75 Def / 55 SpA / 55 SpD / 85 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Poison Point / Swift Swim / <em>Intimidate</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Spikes, Toxic Spikes</p>

    <p>Like Froslass and Roserade, Qwilfish is one of UU's best Spikes users. Although his stats scream "mediocrity", Qwilfish has an excellent ability in Intimidate, making his mediocre bulk great, while he has an excellent defensive typing. This makes Qwilfish an excellent check to many of UU's top physical attackers, such as Mienshao, Heracross, and Darmanitan. As such, Qwilfish can find multiple opportunities to set up Spikes throughout the match. He has decent recovery in Pain Split, which, aside from dealing decent damage, will be able to keep Qwilfish at enough HP to repeatedly do his job. He can support the team even further as well, with Thunder Wave, Haze, and Taunt being useful supportive options. Alternatively, you could also run Toxic Spikes on Qwilfish, although the popularity of Poison-types such as Roserade, Nidoqueen, and Qwilfish himself make this a lesser option. Qwilfish's many positive qualities make it a choice you must consider when looking for a Spiker in UU.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/scolipede/uu">Scolipede</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/573.png" alt="Scolipede"><br />

    Type: Bug / Poison<br />
    Base Stats: 60 HP / 90 Atk / 89 Def / 55 SpA / 69 SpD / 112 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Poison Point / Swarm / <em>Quick Feet</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Spikes, Toxic Spikes</p>

    <p>Although generally overlooked in favor of other Spikers such as Froslass, Scolipede is still a solid choice, especially for offensive teams. Scolipede has an excellent 112 Speed, which means he can set up Spikes quickly before the opponent can react. He also poses a solid offensive threat with his decent 90 Attack, and a powerful STAB Megahorn is fairly brutal, while Earthquake and Rock Slide allow him to hurt anything that resists his Megahorn. With a Focus Sash, Scolipede can not only guarantee two layers of Spikes most of the time, but also use its ability Swarm to power up its Megahorn to even more brutal levels, meaning Scolipede can deal extreme damage to the opponent before going down. Despite its competition from Froslass as a fast Spiker, Scolipede still makes an excellent Pokemon for offensive Spike-stacking teams.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/smeargle/uu">Smeargle</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/235.png" alt="Smeargle"><br />

    Type: Normal<br />
    Base Stats: 55 HP / 20 Atk / 35 Def / 20 SpA / 45 SpD / 75 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Own Tempo / Technician / <em>Moody</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock, Spikes, Toxic Spikes</p>

    <p>At first glance, Smeargle looks like a complete joke; it has laughable stats in all areas and has only one move in Sketch. However, its signature move has granted it the widest movepool in the game, which makes Smeargle unique among the many hazard setters in that it is capable of setting up all three kinds of entry hazards. Smeargle also has access to Spore, which means it can put an opponent to sleep, and proceed to use the free turns to set up many hazards. Alongside a Focus Sash, Smeargle is almost always guaranteed to set up at least two layers of hazards in a match. It has Magic Coat and Whirlwind, meaning it can stop Taunt or prevent itself from being setup fodder. Its low stats, however, do come to haunt it, as Smeargle has no use outside of setting up entry hazards. However, this is usually enough for Smeargle to leave its mark in the match.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/omastar/uu">Omastar</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/139.png" alt="Omastar"><br />

    Type: Rock / Water<br />
    Base Stats: 70 HP / 60 Atk / 125 Def / 115 SpA / 70 SpD / 55 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Swift Swim / Shell Armor / <em>Weak Armor</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock, Spikes, Toxic Spikes</p>

    <p>Omastar is one of the only two Pokemon that can set up all three entry hazards, the other being Smeargle. Unlike Smeargle however, Omastar boasts actual stats as well as a typing with some use defensively. Omastar can take on some common threats such as Darmanitan, Victini, and Snorlax, which alongside its physical bulk, gives it a number of opportunities to set up entry hazards. Omastar also can run a decently powerful Scald coming off of its high Special Attack stat, and its burn chance is excellent in weakening physical attackers, allowing Omastar to give some extra support to the team. This also ensures Omastar isn't a sitting duck.</p>

    <h3>Preventing Hazards</h3>

    <p>Luckily, there are numerous ways to stop entry hazards from going on your field. These ways are all great to have on your team to prevent them from being worn down quicker. Here are the following three ways to prevent entry hazards, and the viable Pokemon to perform them.</p>

    <h4>Rapid Spin</h4>

    <p>The most popular way to remove entry hazards is the move Rapid Spin. This move is the sole reason some Pokemon, such as Blastoise and Claydol, see usage in UU, as many of UU's spinners have little use outside of this move. All of the viable rapid spinners in UU have their own advantages that make them worth using.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/blastoise">Blastoise</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/9.png" alt="Blastoise"><br />

    Type: Water<br />
    Base Stats: 79 HP / 83 Atk / 100 Def / 85 SpA / 105 SpD / 78 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Torrent / <em>Rain Dish</em></p>

    <p>A fan favorite from RBY, Blastoise sees usage as UU's best Rapid Spin user. It has a solid Water-type, giving it something useful defensively. It also has solid bulk, meaning it can take a number of hits. Blastoise can, as a result, pull off a Rapid Spin quite easily, thanks to its defensive capabilities. Blastoise can take on a number of UU's spinblockers with its decently powerful Scald as well as Toxic, preventing them from being safe. It also has Roar to constantly force them out, and rack up entry hazard damage. Its Scald can also weaken physical attackers, which can help out the team pretty decently. Blastoise is also capable of guaranteeing Rapid Spins with Foresight. However, Blastoise lacks recovery, which can sometimes get in its way for the task of repeatedly pulling off Rapid Spin to remove entry hazards. Also note that if Blastoise is not to be used for spinning, it is outclassed by the other Water-types available in UU.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/claydol">Claydol</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/344.png" alt="Claydol"><br />

    Type: Ground / Psychic<br />
    Base Stats: 60 HP / 70 Atk / 105 Def / 70 SpA / 120 SpD / 75 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Levitate</p>

    <p>Claydol also takes membership in UU's Rapid Spin club, and has some useful qualities to let it stand out from the rest. Although Claydol has a number of weaknesses, it also sports excellent resistances, and alongside its good 60 / 105 / 120 defenses, allow it to pull off a Rapid Spin whenever it needs to. One of Claydol's biggest selling points an excellent ability in Levitate, which makes it indifferent to all three entry hazards, meaning it can repeatedly come in to spin throughout the match. Claydol can support its team well with Stealth Rock and dual screens, making it a decent choice for a supportive Pokemon. It also has Toxic to wear down spinblockers that try to come in, meaning they are not always safe. It can run a gimmicky set with Trick and Ring Target as well, removing incoming Ghost-types' ability to spinblock. However, Claydol's main problem is its nonexistent offensive stats, which make it hard to spin against Ghost-types.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/cryonogal/uu">Cryogonal</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/645.png" alt="Claydol"><br />

    Type: Ice<br />
    Base Stats: 70 HP / 50 Atk / 30 Def / 95 SpA / 135 SpD / 105 Spe<br />
    Abilties: Levitate</p>

    <p>Cryogonal is a unique Pokemon in UU's group of Rapid Spinners. Like its friend Claydol, Cryogonal also has access to Levitate, meaning it is immune to Spikes and Toxic Spikes; however, it has a Stealth Rock weakness. That said, it also has an excellent Special Defense, meaning it can take many special hits and pull off a spin in the process. Cryogonal's biggest selling point is its access to reliable recovery in Recover, meaning it can heal itself to pull off multiple Rapid Spins. It can also go the offensive route thanks to its 95 Special Attack, and with Ice Beam and Hidden Power, it can pose a solid offensive threat on its own. It also finds itself a spot on hail teams, to remove entry hazards and spam Blizzard on its own. Overall, Cryogonal is a decent choice on certain teams looking for its qualities.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/hitmontop/uu">Hitmontop</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/237.png" alt="Hitmontop"><br />

    Type: Fighting<br />
    Base Stats: 50 HP / 95 Atk / 95 Def / 35 SpA / 110 SpD / 70 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Intimidate / Technician / <em>Steadfast</em></p>

    <p>Hitmontop has quite a bit going for it in terms of Rapid Spin. It has Intimidate, allowing it to check common physical threats such as Mienshao and Darmanitan. This means Hitmontop can pull off a spin quite often. Its access to Foresight also allows it to spin even against Ghost-types, which makes it quite a solid choice. It also has a decently powerful Close Combat, coming off of its 95 Attack, meaning it is never going to be a complete sitting duck. Overall, Hitmontop may be outclassed by Blastoise at spinning, but it is still a pretty solid choice.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/kabutops/uu">Kabutops</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/141.png" alt="Kabutops"><br />

    Type: Rock / Water<br />
    Base Stats: 60 HP / 115 Atk / 105 Def / 65 SpA / 70 SpD / 80 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Swift Swim / Battle Armor / <em>Weak Armor</em></p>

    <p>Kabutops is a solid choice for an offensive Rapid Spinner thanks to its excellent 115 Attack and access to Swords Dance, making it a powerful offensive threat. Its access to Aqua Jet and Stone Edge allow it to put the hurt on opposing spinblockers, while pulling off a Rapid Spin afterwards. Its priority Aqua Jet also comes in handy to pace faster threats such as Mienshao and Cinccino, meaning Kabutops can also revenge kill and sweep, making it more useful. It can also run Stealth Rock to provide decent support to the team.</p>

    <h4>Taunt</h4>

    <p>Although not as reliable a way to prevent entry hazards as Rapid Spin, Taunt is still a decent way to stop hazards from goiing on your side of the field. There a a number of fast Taunt users in UU, all of them being good options for this move.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/sableye">Sableye</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/302.png" alt="Sableye"><br />

    Type: Dark / Ghost<br />
    Base Stats: 50 HP / 75 Atk / 75 Def / 65 SpA / 65 SpA / 50 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Keen Eye / Stall / <em>Prankster</em></p>

    <p>Sableye was once one of the worst Pokemon in the game, but now thanks to its ability in Prankster, it packs a priority Taunt, which ensures that it can quickly stop the use of entry hazards. It also has Recover, keeping itself healthy to Taunt entry hazard users multiple times in the match.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/azelf">Azelf</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/487.png" alt="Azelf"><br />

    Type: Psychic<br />
    Base Stats: 75 HP / 125 Atk / 70 Def / 125 SpA / 70 SpD / 115 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Levitate</p>

    <p>Azelf has a fast Taunt, which means he can quickly stop entry hazards unless the opponent has the rare Aerodactyl or Accelgor. He can also set up Stealth Rock himself, and can be a good anti-lead in general thanks to his blistering Speed. He also poses a powerful offensive threat with his high offensive stats, putting dents in the opposing team before going down.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/crobat">Crobat</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/169.png" alt="Crobat"><br />

    Type: Poison / Flying<br />
    Base Stats: 85 HP / 90 Atk / 80 Def / 70 SpA / 80 SpD / 130 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Inner Focus / <em>Infiltrator</em></p>

    <p>Crobat has the fastest Taunt in UU aside from Aerodactyl. It can quickly fire a Taunt before anything can react, while U-turning to a teammate to deal with the team. It has access to Roost to keep itself healthy to be able to repeatedly use Taunt. Overall, Crobat is a great choice to stop entry hazards from going on your side of the field.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/aerodactyl/uu">Aerodactyl</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/142.png" alt="Aerodactyl"><br />

    Type: Rock / Flying<br />
    Base Stats: 80 HP / 105 Atk / 65 Def / 60 SpA / 75 SpD / 130 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Rock Head / Pressure / <em>Unnerve</em></p>

    <p>Like Crobat, Aerodactyl also has the fastest Taunt in UU, meaning it will stop hazards from going up most of the time. It also poses a solid offensive threat thanks to its 105 Attack, and can run Stone Edge and Earthquake to be able to put dents in the team. It also sets up Stealth Rock on its own, making it a decent choice for a Taunt user. It is, however, often outclassed by Azelf as an anti-lead.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/tornadus">Tornadus</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/671.png" alt="Tornadus"><br />

    Type: Flying<br />
    Base Stats: 79 HP / 115 Atk / 70 Def / 125 SpA / 80 SpD / 111 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Pranster / <em>Defiant</em></p>

    <p>Tornadus also has priority Taunt, like Sableye, but it also has actual stats, meaning it can be an offensive threat with Hurricane and Superpower, decimating teams on its own while stopping entry hazards. It also has a higher Speed than Sableye, making it less prone to opposing priority than it. Tornadus can be a very good choice to Taunt entry hazards users overall.</p>

    <h4>Magic Bounce</h4>

    <p>Magic Bounce is a pretty solid way to stop the use of entry hazards from going onto the field, while also bouncing it back to the opponent, leaving them in a lethal situation. Magic Bounce has limited distribution, but the one user has its uses in UU for the move.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/xatu">Xatu</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/178.png" alt="Xatu"><br />

    Type: Psychic / Flying<br />
    Base Stats: 65 HP / 75 Atk / 70 Def / 95 SpA / 70 SpD / 95 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Synchronize / Early Bird / <em>Magic Bounce</em></p>

    <p>Xatu is a Pokemon that can block the use of entry hazards, and bounce them back to the opponent, which can be useful to stop Spikes and Stealth Rock from threatening your team. It also can bounce back status moves such as Toxic and Thunder Wave, making it useful to stop paralysis spreading or poison. Xatu also has reliable recovery in Roost, which means it can repeatedly come in to bounce hazards back to the opponent. It can also support its team with Thunder Wave, Light Screen, and Reflect, making it a decent team supporter. It has U-turn to switch out whenever needed. It pairs up well with a spinner or a Taunter, such as Sableye, to be sure entry hazards stay off the field.</p>

    <h2>Spinblocking</h2>

    <p>Rapid Spin has become such a common sight that a strategy has arisen to counter the move; spinblocking. The term means "Block Rapid Spin". This is done as Rapid Spin is a damaging Normal-type move, which means Ghost-types can effectively stop the move from working. A number of Ghost-types in UU are effective at spinblocking, and each one has their own qualities that make them worth using as spinblockers.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/cofagrigus">Cofagrigus</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/593.png" alt="Cofagrigus"><br />

    Type: Ghost<br />
    Base Stats: 58 HP / 50 Atk / 145 Def / 95 SpA / 105 SpD / 30 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Mummy</p>

    <p>Cofagrigus is the premier spinblocker in the UU environment, as it holds many positive qualities that make it wonderful on any team in need. It has a titanic 145 Defense and a solid 105 Special Defense, and its typing allows it to take on all of the tier's spinners one-on-one. It has Will-O-Wisp to cripple Pokemon and wear them down, while it packs a decently powerful Shadow Ball to lay the hurt. It also has Mummy to negate common abilities of the spinners. Cofagrigus can also pose a solid offensive threat on its own thanks to Trick Room and Nasty Plot, allowing it to set up and proceed to destroy the opposing spinner with powerful Shadow Balls. It can beat Blastoise and Claydol with relative ease thanks to these qualities. Overall, Cofagrigus is the best spinblocker in the tier.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/sableye">Sableye</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/302.png" alt="Sableye"><br />

    Type: Dark / Ghost<br />
    Base Stats: 50 HP / 75 Atk / 75 Def / 65 SpA / 65 SpD / 50 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Keen Eye / Stall / <em>Prankster</em></p>

    <p>Despite its terrible stats, Sableye is an excellent spinblocker in UU thanks to its Dream World ability, Prankster. It can quickly use Taunt to prevent Foresight from Hitmontop and Blastoise, while it has Will-O-Wisp to cripple spinners. It has Recover to keep itself healthy, while its typing grants it no weaknesses, aiding in its ability to stall the opponent. While its bulk leaves a lot to be desired, it provides enough to make Sableye ample against the spinblockers. It can constantly be an annoyance to the opposing spinners as many of them are defensively oriented. Although Sableye is fairly limited in what it can do, it still makes for a solid spinblocker.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/dusclops">Dusclops</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/356.png" alt="Dusclops"><br />

    Type: Ghost<br />
    Base Stats: 40 HP / 70 Atk / 130 Def / 60 SpA / 130 Def / 25 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Pressure</p>

    <p>Dusclops was a big winner of the fifth generation, as due to its NFE status, it can bolster its already good defenses to formidable levels, making it one of the only Pokemon that cannot be OHKO'd. This helps Dusclops in its role as spinblocker immensely, as it can take many hits from any of the spinners in the tier while crippling them with Will-O-Wisp and Curse. This means it can slowly chip away at their HP combined with the entry hazard damage. It can run Pain Split and Rest as decent forms of recovery; keeping it at enough HP to constantly take on spinblockers. Be careful, however, as Dusclops lacks Leftovers recovery, which can sometimes get in its way at performing its spinblocking duties. However, despite this, Dusclops can make for a useful defensive spinblocker.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/mismagius">Mismagius</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/434.png" alt="Mismagius"><br />

    Type: Ghost<br />
    Base Stats: 60 HP / 60 Atk / 60 Def / 105 SpA / 105 SpD / 105 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Levitate</p>

    <p>Mismagius is a more offensive spinblocker, which makes it a good fit on the fast offensive teams looking into the use of a fast Ghost-type. Mismagius has access to Thunderbolt, which allows it to deal with the premier spinner, Blastoise. Its Shadow Ball allows it to handle Claydol and Hitmontop as well. Mismagius also has Nasty Plot and Calm Mind, allowing it to boost its Special Attack to become even more threatening to opposing spinners. It can avoid Toxic with Substitute, while it also has access to other moves such as Taunt and Will-O-Wisp. Mismagius is also quite fast, allowing it to move before opposing spinners can react. Mismagius can overall find itself a spot as a more offensive spinblocker compared to the other Ghost-types.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/chandelure">Chandelure</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/639.png" alt="Chandelure"><br />

    Type: Ghost / Fire<br />
    Base Stats: 60 HP / 55 Atk / 90 Def / 145 SpA / 90 SpD / 80 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Flash Fire / Flame Body / <em>Shadow Tag</em></p>

    <p>Chandelure is not that great of a spinblocker on its own, mostly due to being weak to Blastoise's Scald and Claydol's Earthquake. This makes it advisable to pair Chandelure up with another spinblocker to make full use of spinblocking. That said, Chandelure can come in and use its extreme Special Attack to scorch opposing spinners with Fire Blast and Shadow Ball. It can also run Substitute to avoid a stray Toxic, while running Pain Split is usable to heal itself and deal damage. Chandelure also can run a Choice Specs to make its damage more brutal. Outside of that, Chandelure is limited to mostly being an offensive spinblocker, as its defensive capabilities are lacking.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/rotom/uu">Rotom</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/484.png" alt="Rotom"><br />

    Type: Electric / Ghost<br />
    Base Stats: 50 HP / 50 Atk / 77 Def / 95 SpA / 77 SpD / 91 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Levitate</p>

    <p>Rotom is a rather unique choice for a spinblocker. Its main selling point is its Electric STAB; which means it can deal with Blastoise fairly easily, and it also takes on Claydol rather well. The other unique thing about Rotom is its access to Volt Switch, which means it can grab momentum as opposing spinners switch out of the match. It has a solid Special Attack and a decent Speed to deal some strong and fast damage, which makes it decent on offensive teams. Although it may not seem like it, Rotom is also capable of going defensive despite its low defenses, as it has some excellent resistances, and can take a number of hits from opposing spinners and cripple them with Will-O-Wisp. Overall, Rotom-N is a very unique choice for a spinblocker.</p>

    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/golurk/uu">Golurk</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/653.png" alt="Golurk">><br />

    Type: Ground / Ghost<br />
    Base Stats: 89 HP / 124 Atk / 80 Def / 55 SpA / 80 SpD / 55 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Klutz / Iron Fist / <em>No Guard</em></p>

    <p>Golurk is also capable of spinblocking and setting up hazards at the same time. It can set up Stealth Rock to support its team, and has decent bulk to take on opposing spinners. It has a high 124 Attack and a STAB Earthquake to deal heavy damage to Blastoise and Hitmontop, while its STAB Shadow Punch also puts the hurt on Claydol. This makes Golurk a pretty solid choice to set up Stealth Rock and spinblock at the same time. Golurk could also run No Guard along with DynamicPunch to annoy opposing spinners with confusion, although this is rather gimmicky.</p>

    <h2>Phazing</h2>

    <p>Phazing, short for "pseudo-Hazing", is a common way to take advantage of hazards. This is done by the moves Roar, Whirlwind, Dragon Tail, and Circle Throw, which can force the Pokemon out of the field, racking up entry hazard damage. Common defensive Pokemon such as Snorlax, Blastoise, Empoleon, and Slowking often run these moves in their sets. One of the most well-known examples of phazers is Prankster Riolu, being able to use priority Roar thanks to its access to Copycat, and Prankster gives the move +1 priority.</p>

    <h2>Conclusion</h2>

    <p>Like in any tier, entry hazards are a dominant force in UU, and hopefully you now have an understanding of entry hazards, including the viable users of them, ways to counter them, and how to make use of them. When making a team, be sure to fit at least one kind of hazard onto your team; as they can be vital to victory. Always be sure to pack a spinblocker as well, as maintaining the entry hazards can make a big difference in the match. Always pack something that can take advantage of entry hazards, whether by phazing or just sweeping teams outright, make good use of them. And since hazards are so important, make sure that Blastoise or Claydol of yours stays alive throughout the match; if they go down before they spin, you can be in trouble. There is always a risk to entry hazards, so plan carefully for them.</p>

    Ok finally done!!! This is c/pable so you can copy it directly into the op ScraftyIsTheBest
    Edit- piikachuu you did that for metal sonic's article that's why i did it to >:(((( ;~; anyway fixed
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2013
  10. piikachuu

    piikachuu now with a scarf
    is a Contributor to Smogon

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2013
    Messages:
    264
    Kingler12345, you have an extra > at the end of all your img src tags. furthermore, look over the last tag for each pokemon thing, it should just be a </p>, not <br /></p> or <br />

    for example:
    <p><strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/xatu">Xatu</a></strong><br />
    <img src="/download/sprites/bw/178.png" alt="Xatu">><br />
    Type: Psychic / Flying<br />
    Base Stats: 65 HP / 75 Atk / 70 Def / 95 SpA / 70 SpD / 95 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Synchronize / Early Bird / <em>Magic Bounce</em><br /></p>

    also add a <br /> to the end of bronzong's base stats
  11. sandshrewz

    sandshrewz
    is a Site Staff Alumnusis an Artist Alumnusis a Forum Moderator Alumnusis a Contributor Alumnusis a Smogon Media Contributor Alumnusis a Battle Server Moderator Alumnus

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2010
    Messages:
    2,440
    ScraftyIsTheBest erm so was the first gp check implemented? I'm not really sure cos the title is still GP 0/2. And lol this is ages ago but please don't jump to HTML until GP is finished. HTML makes it annoying to GP and it might get messed up somewhere in the process of GP. Also the sprite comes before the name not the other way around @ html thing :d
  12. Oglemi

    Oglemi The Legend of Oglemi: The Wiener Waker
    is a Tournament Directoris a member of the Site Staffis a Community Contributoris a Pokemon Researcheris a Contributor to Smogonis a Smogon Media Contributoris an Administratoris a Tiering Contributor Alumnus
    C&C Leader

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2009
    Messages:
    8,857
    GPed and removed mentions of Froslass, will remove hail and Chandelure mentions should they be banned

    Code:
    [title]
    A Guide to Entry Hazards in BW UU
    [head]
    <meta name="description" content="A Complete Guide to Entry Hazards in BW UU, courtesy of ScraftyIsTheBest." />
    [page]
    <div class="author">By <a href="/forums/members/scraftyisthebest.157610/">ScraftyIsTheBest</a>.</div>
    
    <h2>Introduction</h2>
    
    <p>Entry hazards have been one of the most important aspects of competitive battling for a long time. With threats such as Yanmega, Chandelure, and Darmanitan being quite prominent, the presence of Spikes and Stealth Rock is vital to eliminating them. Entry hazards also play an important role in attaining needed KOes and racking up damage with switches. With the myriad of hazard setters and few spinners present in the UU tier, hazards are fairly difficult to remove from the field. With this taken into account, Pokemon such as Blastoise, Claydol, and Xatu have risen in usage, and this guide will introduce the many aspects of entry hazards in UU.</p>
    
    <h3>Stealth Rock</h3>
    
    <p>Stealth Rock is the most common of entry hazards in any tier. Out of the three available entry hazards, Stealth Rock is arguably the easiest to set up. Requiring only one turn to be used to its fullest effect, it's arguably the most influential entry hazard. Without its presence, threats such as Yanmega and Chandelure become much harder to eliminate, but with it, they are much easier to deal with, as they have a much more limited lifespan due to the Rock-type damage it inflicts. Stealth Rock is also the lone hazard that no Pokemon is immune to, bar users of Magic Guard, which are rare sights in UU. Additionally, it is the most widely distributed, so it can easily fit onto any team.</p>
    
    <h3>Spikes</h3>
    
    <p>Spikes is the oldest of entry hazards, and is quite a reliable one too. Spikes offers a consistent 25% damage output after three layers, which is very useful for stall teams to keep racking up damage with. Spikes also helps with offensive teams, wearing down walls and turning some 2HKOs into OHKOs. After all three layers have been set up, it will be very hard for the opposition to act, as Spikes damage stacks up much more quickly than Stealth Rock. The only major drawback to Spikes is that Pokemon with Levitate as well as Flying-types are immune to it. Although it takes three turns to set up, this is mitigated by the fact that most of its users have enough bulk or Speed to pull this job off effectively.</p>
    
    <h3>Toxic Spikes</h3>
    
    <p>Toxic Spikes is the least used of entry hazards, and for good reason. There are numerous Pokemon immune to Toxic Spikes, and with Pokemon such as Roserade, Nidoqueen, and Qwilfish being some of the more popular Pokemon in the tier, Toxic Spikes are very difficult to keep on the field. The effect of Toxic Spikes is also ignored by Pokemon with Levitate, such as Bronzong, Azelf, and Claydol, the last of which can spin the Toxic Spikes away, as well as Pokemon of the Steel typing such as Empoleon and Bisharp. However, once said Pokemon are eliminated, Toxic Spikes comes with its lethal effect; poisoning the target after one layer, and badly poisoning after two. This can wear down walls such as Cofagrigus and Snorlax at a steady pace, and if a spinner or cleric is not used, it can be very hard to deal with the poison damage.</p>
    
    <h2>The Users</h2>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/442.png" alt="Bronzong"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/bronzong">Bronzong</a></strong><br />
    Type: Steel / Psychic<br />
    Base Stats: 67 HP / 89 Atk / 116 Def / 79 SpA / 116 SpD / 33 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Levitate / Heatproof / <em>Heavy Metal</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock</p>
    
    <p>When it comes to users of Stealth Rock, Bronzong comes to the table as one of the most reliable of them. With a great Steel / Psychic typing along with a fantastic ability in Levitate, Bronzong can take many hits. This is further complemented by great 67 / 116 / 116 defenses, making Bronzong the epitome of a sturdy Stealth Rock user. Thanks to these qualities, Bronzong will find many opportunities to set up Stealth Rock, while also being able to wall a sizable portion of the metagame. Bronzong's low Speed stat allows it to utilize Gyro Ball very effectively, ensuring Bronzong will be able to dish out some damage, so it's still capable of doing decent damage. However, one of the downsides to Bronzong is how prone it is to spinners such as Blastoise as well as Taunt and Magic Bounce users. Nonetheless, when it comes to setting up Stealth Rock in UU, Bronzong is one of the best.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/487.png" alt="Azelf"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/azelf">Azelf</a></strong><br />
    Type: Psychic<br />
    Base Stats: 75 HP / 125 Atk / 70 Def / 125 SpA / 70 SpD / 115 Spe<br />
    Ability: Levitate<br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock</p>
    
    <p>Azelf enters BW UU as one of the few surviving dedicated leads in the fifth generation. Azelf is the second fastest user of Stealth Rock available in UU, which means he will always be sure to get Stealth Rock up on the battlefield, unless there happens to be a Sableye with Taunt. Speaking of which, Azelf has access to Taunt himself, so he can stop other users of Stealth Rock or Spikes from setting up. Azelf also sports high offensive stats, so he can put sizable dents in the opponent with Psyshock or Psychic. He also has decent coverage to boot, so he can definitely do some damage with Psyshock and Fire Blast after setting up Stealth Rock. Overall, Azelf can make for a great lead to quickly set up Stealth Rock, stop the opposition from setting up, and deal good damage to the opponent.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/344.png" alt="Claydol"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/claydol">Claydol</a></strong><br />
    Type: Ground / Psychic<br />
    Base Stats: 60 HP / 70 Atk / 105 Def / 70 SpA / 120 SpD / 75 Spe<br />
    Ability: Levitate<br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock</p>
    
    <p>Claydol stands out from other Stealth Rock users with its good bulk as well as its ability to both set up Stealth Rock and spin hazards away. This gives Claydol its role as a solid utility Pokemon; thanks to its good bulk and resistances to Electric, Psychic, and Ground, it will be sure to set up Stealth Rock quite a few times in the match. Claydol also boasts the unique ability to use Rapid Spin as well, so while setting up, it can also remove entry hazards from its side of the field. If needed, Claydol could also set up Light Screen and Reflect to support its team even further. Claydol's ultimate downfall is its weak offensive stats, so it usually fails to do much damage to the opposition. It also has numerous exploitable weaknesses, especially to Dark, making it prone to being trapped by Pursuit. Nonetheless, if you want a Pokemon that can set up Stealth Rock and be a solid supporter, look no further than Claydol.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/469.png" alt="Rhyperior"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/rhyperior">Rhyperior</a></strong><br />
    Type: Ground / Rock<br />
    Base Stats: 115 HP / 140 Atk / 130 Def / 55 SpA / 55 SpD / 40 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Lightningrod / Solid Rock / <em>Reckless</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock</p>
    
    <p>Rhyperior is a very solid user of Stealth Rock. With an immunity to Electric, a great ability in Solid Rock, and STABs that provide great coverage together, Rhyperior can fit on many teams. His big perks are his ability to reliably check the Electric-types running rampant in UU, namely Raikou, Zapdos, and Rotom-H. Thanks to this, he can set up Stealth Rock very reliably, which is useful for any team in need of a hand. Rhyperior also has decent resistances to Normal and Fire, meaning he can take onslaughts from Snorlax and Darmanitan. This gives him numerous opportunities to set up. On top of that, Rhyperior has a massive 140 Attack, and when combined with great two-move coverage, he can deal a lot of damage to numerous Pokemon in the tier, ensuring he's no sitting duck. Rhyperior also has Dragon Tail in order to shuffle the opponent's team, so he can take advantage of the Stealth Rock he sets. However, Rhyperior lacks recovery, which hampers his ability to set up numerous times. He also has multiple weaknesses, which must be kept in mind. However, if you want a solid Stealth Rock user who can check Raikou and Zapdos, as well as dish out damage, Rhyperior is the choice to consider.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/668.png" alt="Cobalion"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/cobalion">Cobalion</a></strong><br />
    Type: Steel / Fighting<br />
    Base Stats: 91 HP / 90 Atk / 129 Def / 90 SpA / 72 SpD / 108 Spe<br />
    Ability: Justified<br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock</p>
    
    <p>Cobalion may seem like an odd choice for a Stealth Rock user, but his access to a coveted Fighting STAB, great Steel typing, and a high base 129 Defense, Cobalion is very capable of laying Stealth Rock down on the field. His great 108 Speed is also a nice asset, allowing him to outspeed a good portion of the metagame, which is a plus when it comes to setting up Stealth Rock, ensuring he will do it before going down. Cobalion also has access to the rare Volt Switch, allowing him to keep up momentum by switching out of common switch-ins while dealing decent damage. It also dents Blastoise, the most common spinner in the tier. His usable mixed attacking stats also ensure that Cobalion does more than set up Stealth Rock. Additionally, he has Thunder Wave to cripple opponents. All in all, Cobalion is a good choice for setting up Stealth Rock while being a defensive pivot.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/260.png" alt="Swampert"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/swampert">Swampert</a></strong><br />
    Type: Water / Ground<br />
    Base Stats: 100 HP / 110 Atk / 90 Def / 85 SpA / 90 Def / 60 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Torrent / <em>Damp</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock</p>
    
    <p>Say hello to Swampert, a Pokemon who was in OU the previous two generations, a testament to just how good it is. Swampert stands out from other Stealth Rock users with its great typing, giving it only one weakness, albeit a big one. This, when combined with its good 100 / 90 / 90 defenses, makes Swampert one of the better users of Stealth Rock in the tier. Swampert can come in on some of UU's strongest physical attackers, such as Darmanitan and Choice Scarf Flygon, and set up the hazard. Swampert also has access to Roar, allowing it to shuffle the team and rack up Stealth Rock damage. Its 110 Attack stat ensures that it isn't a sitting duck either, and can deal some damage with Earthquake and Waterfall, especially to the things it can set up on, particularly Darmanitan. However, Swampert has no reliable recovery, which limits its ability to set up Stealth Rock numerous times in the match.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/398.png" alt="Empoleon"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/empoleon">Empoleon</a></strong><br />
    Type: Water / Steel<br />
    Base Stats: 84 HP / 86 Atk / 88 Def / 111 SpA / 101 SpD / 60 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Torrent / <em>Defiant</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock</p>
    
    <p>Empoleon sports a unique Water / Steel typing, granting it a myriad of resistances, allowing it to take on threats such as Snorlax. This makes Empoleon a great candidate for Stealth Rock, as it can utilize its great defensive typing to reliably set up Stealth Rock numerous times in the match. Empoleon also comes with a usable base 111 Special Attack, allowing it to deal decent chunks of damage with Scald and Ice Beam. Like Swampert, Empoleon also has access to Roar, giving it the ability to shuffle the team to rack up damage from Stealth Rock. However, Empoleon is weak to Fighting-type attacks, making it easy bait for dangerous Pokemon such as Heracross and Mienshao. It also lacks any form of reliable recovery, something you must keep in mind.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/379.png" alt="Registeel"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/registeel">Registeel</a></strong><br />
    Type: Steel<br />
    Base Stats: 80 HP / 75 Atk / 150 Def / 75 SpA / 150 SpD / 50 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Clear Body / <em>Light Metal</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock</p>
    
    <p>Registeel is a defensive behemoth, sporting gargantuan 150 defensive stats and a Steel typing granting it numerous resistances. This makes Registeel one of the sturdiest users of Stealth Rock. Registeel can wall a myriad of threats such as Yanmega, Shaymin, and Raikou without much trouble, and this allows it to set up Stealth Rock numerous times in the match. Thunder Wave is also a plus to using Registeel, which allows it to cripple opponents, making setting up Stealth Rock an easier task. However, Registeel lacks any offensive presence and often provides free switch-ins for dangerous Pokemon such as Mienshao and Rhyperior. Therefore, Registeel will usually face stiff competition from the likes of other users of Stealth Rock such as Bronzong, Cobalion, and Empoleon, which are things you must keep in mind before choosing Registeel as your hazard setter.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/207.png" alt="Gligar"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/gligar">Gligar</a></strong><br />
    Type: Ground / Flying<br />
    Base Stats: 65 HP / 75 Atk / 105 Def / 35 SpA / 65 Def / 85 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Hyper Cutter / Sand Veil / <em>Immunity</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock</p>
    
    <p>Gligar may seem inferior to other Stealth Rock users due to his inferior stats, but his physical bulk, when boosted by Eviolite, reaches nearly unreachable levels. This, along with useful resistances to Fighting, Electric, and Ground, grant Gligar many opportunities to set up Stealth Rock throughout the match. His access to other supportive moves such as Toxic and Taunt are useful assets as well, which ensure he can do more than set up Stealth Rock. While the use of Eviolite may seem detrimental, Gligar makes up for that with his access to Roost, ensuring he will last even longer to be able to set up. Immunity along with a Ground typing make him immune to both Thunder Wave and Toxic, making him less prone to being crippled. His usable 75 Attack stat is decent enough to utilize Earthquake and U-turn to deal decent damage, as well as switch out in the latter's case. Just be careful that Gligar's lack of offensive presence makes him massive setup fodder, so as he sets up Stealth Rock, he may attract some dangerous Pokemon such as Abomasnow and Slowbro or give dangerous setup opportunities.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/653.png" alt="Golurk"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/golurk/uu">Golurk</a></strong><br />
    Type: Ground / Ghost<br />
    Base Stats: 89 HP / 124 Atk / 80 Def / 55 SpA / 80 SpD / 55 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Klutz / Iron Fist / <em>No Guard</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock</p>
    
    <p>Golurk does a fairly solid job when it comes to setting up Stealth Rock. Golurk is unique in that it is the only Ghost-type with access to Stealth Rock, which means it can set up Stealth Rock and prevent the opponent from spinning it away. Golurk packs great resistances to Rock and Bug while it also has immunities to Normal, Fighting, and Electric. This, along with its usable 89 / 80 / 80 defenses grant Golurk many opportunities to set up Stealth Rock against common threats such as Snorlax, Raikou, and Mienshao. Golurk isn't a sitting duck either; it has a great 124 Attack stat to put pressure on the opposition. That said, Golurk does sport numerous exploitable weaknesses which, besides making it bait for common threats such as Roserade and Weavile, give Golurk a hard time against UU's most popular spinner, Blastoise, which can make spinblocking hard. Therefore, it is advisable to pair Golurk up with a second Ghost-type such as Cofagrigus if you want to keep Stealth Rock on the field for long.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/651.png" alt="Druddigon"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/druddigon/uu">Druddigon</a></strong><br />
    Type: Dragon<br />
    Base Stats: 77 HP / 120 Atk / 90 Def / 60 SpA / 90 SpD / 48 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Rough Skin / Sheer Force / <em>Mold Breaker</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock</p>
    
    <p>If you can overlook Druddigon's horrible design, you can find that it has quite a lot of unique qualities for a Stealth Rock user. The first thing that stands out is that Druddigon has the rare Dragon type, which gives it some useful resistances. Combine this with its good 77 / 90 / 90 defenses and it can set up Stealth Rock reliably throughout the match. Rough Skin is an extremely useful ability, which aside from wearing down physical attackers, especially Darmanitan, also chips HP away when the opponent uses Rapid Spin, meaning Blastoise and Claydol can be worn down to the point where they cannot spin. Druddigon also has access to both Roar and Dragon Tail, so it can shuffle the team and rack up damage from the Stealth Rock it sets up. 120 Attack is no pittance either and can hit for solid damage, so Druddigon isn't just about residual damage. Overall, Druddigon is a great Stealth Rock user who can wear the team down with residual damage.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/485.png" alt="Uxie"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/uxie/uu">Uxie</a></strong><br />
    Type: Psychic<br />
    Base Stats: 75 HP / 75 Atk / 130 Def / 75 SpA / 130 Def / 95 Spe<br />
    Ability: Levitate<br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock</p>
    
    <p>Although Uxie is generally overlooked by other Stealth Rock users, such as his brother Azelf for his higher speed and offenses, Claydol with its access to Rapid Spin, and Bronzong who sports the coveted Steel typing, Uxie does have his perks. Uxie has strong 75 / 130 / 130 defenses, and when combined with a Psychic typing and Levitate, make him a great check to threats such as Nidoqueen and Mienshao. This grants Uxie many opportunities to set up Stealth Rock throughout the match. Uxie's support movepool is a boon as well, as he has access to Thunder Wave to cripple opponents, as well as Yawn to force switches (and rack up hazard damage). U-turn is Uxie's biggest selling point and allows him to switch out so he can come in later to set up Stealth Rock again if needed. However, Uxie's pitiful offenses are his ultimate downfall, often causing Uxie to kill offensive momentum, something you must keep in mind before using Uxie as a Stealth Rock user.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/142.png" alt="Aerodactyl"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/aerodactyl/uu">Aerodactyl</a></strong><br />
    Type: Rock / Flying<br />
    Base Stats: 80 HP / 105 Atk / 65 Def / 60 SpA / 75 SpD / 130 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Rock Head / Pressure / <em>Unnerve</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock</p>
    
    <p>Once a popular suicide lead in DPP OU, Aerodactyl now finds itself in BW RU. Despite this, Aerodactyl can still effectively perform its former duties in the UU tier. It has an extremely high Speed, outpacing even Azelf, meaning it will always set Stealth Rock up early in the match. Its access to Taunt also helps out in this too, as Aerodactyl can stop other entry hazard leads from setting up. And its 105 Attack means it is never useless outside of simply quick Stealth Rock. However, Aerodactyl is frail, vulnerable to priority, and faces stiff competition in its role from Azelf, who is generally more useful. Despite this, Aerodactyl can still be a useful asset to those in need of a quick Stealth Rock early in the match.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/647.png" alt="Accelgor"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/accelgor/uu">Accelgor</a></strong><br />
    Type: Bug<br />
    Base Stats: 80 HP / 70 Atk / 40 Def / 100 SpA / 60 SpD / 145 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Hydration / Sticky Hold / <em>Unburden</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Spikes</p>
    
    <p>True to his name, Accelgor is the second fastest Pokemon legal in UU, outpaced only by Ninjask. His quick Speed along with his access to Spikes make him an excellent suicide lead, quickly getting up Spikes before the opponent can react. Accelgor isn't a sitting duck either, as it has a solid 100 Special Attack stat and great moves in Bug Buzz, Focus Blast, and Giga Drain to make good use of it. Accelgor also has Final Gambit to sacrifice itself, denting an opposing spinner while setting up a couple layers of Spikes in the process. Overall, Accelgor is an excellent Pokemon when it comes to Spikes stacking.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/588.png" alt="Crustle"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/crustle/uu">Crustle</a></strong><br />
    Type: Bug / Rock<br />
    Base Stats: 70 HP / 95 Atk / 125 Def / 65 SpA / 75 SpD / 45 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Sturdy / Shell Armor / <em>Weak Armor</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock, Spikes</p>
    
    <p>Although Crustle might seem outclassed by other hazard users, it has one unique trait that makes it worth using; access to both Spikes and Stealth Rock. This makes Crustle an excellent hazard setter, as it can set up both hazards and is bulky enough to do so. It also has Sturdy, which means even if something hits it too hard, it can still guarantee a layer of hazards. It can be an effective lead with Custap Berry thanks to this. It also has a solid 95 Attack, which, in conjunction with its STABs, allow it to pack a punch, and also allow it to defeat most anti-leads such as Azelf, Sableye, and Xatu.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/627.png" alt="Ferroseed"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/ferroseed/uu">Ferroseed</a></strong><br />
    Type: Grass / Steel<br />
    Base Stats: 44 HP / 50 Atk / 91 Def / 24 SpA / 86 SpD / 10 Spe<br />
    Ability: Iron Barbs<br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock, Spikes</p>
    
    <p>Don't let Ferroseed's small size, low stats, and NFE status drive you away; Ferroseed is a solid choice for a hazard user in UU. Ferroseed has access to Eviolite, giving it solid bulk overall and allowing it to take enough hits to be able to set up Stealth Rock and Spikes. Its typing is another big boon to this, granting it many resistances that allow it to take on plenty of threats, giving it many opportunities to set up hazards. It also has Iron Barbs and Leech Seed to be able to wear down the opponent, while Thunder Wave allows Ferroseed to further support the team. While it has a pitiful Attack stat, Gyro Ball gives it some decent offensive power. Ferroseed is unfortunately slow and its power is sometimes very lacking, but despite this, Ferroseed is still a solid hazard user that can wall and support.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/34.png" alt="Nidoking"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/nidoking">Nidoking</a></strong><br />
    Type: Poison / Ground<br />
    Base Stats: 81 HP / 92 Atk / 77 Def / 85 SpA / 75 SpD / 85 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Poison Point / Rivalry / <em>Sheer Force</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock, Toxic Spikes</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/31.png" alt="Nidoqueen"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/nidoqueen">Nidoqueen</a></strong><br />
    Type: Poison / Ground<br />
    Base Stats: 90 HP / 82 Atk / 87 Def / 75 SpA / 85 SpD / 76 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Poison Point / Rivalry / <em>Sheer Force</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock, Toxic Spikes</p>
    
    <p>Two of the pinnacles of wallbreaking, Nidoking and Nidoqueen are some of the best hazard users available in UU. They have an easy time setting up Stealth Rock, mostly because of the number of switches they force. Their incredible power makes them no sitting ducks, putting massive dents in the opposing team, thanks to Sheer Force and Life Orb as well as excellent coverage moves. Nidoking is the faster one of the two, and mostly aims for the raw power, whereas Nidoqueen is bulkier and slower. Their typing is quite ideal defensively as well, giving them useful resistances to take on the common Fighting- and Electric-types in UU, giving them even more chances to set up. The duo also have access to Toxic Spikes to go for residual damage; Nidoqueen especially could go the defensive route and run Toxic Spikes and Dragon Tail, though it is often an inferior choice to Stealth Rock.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/410.png" alt="Roserade"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/roserade">Roserade</a></strong><br />
    Type: Grass / Poison<br />
    Base Stats: 60 HP / 70 Atk / 55 Def / 125 SpA / 105 SpD / 90 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Natural Cure / Poison Point / <em>Technician</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Spikes, Toxic Spikes</p>
    
    <p>Roserade functions as one of the best Spikes users in UU thanks to its many positive qualities. Aside from its cool appearance, Roserade has a high Special Defense and a typing decent enough to allow it to take on Water-types and Shaymin, giving it numerous opportunities to set up Spikes. Roserade also has access to Natural Cure, which when paired with its typing, makes it a viable weapon against Water-types, and can use them as setup fodder for Spikes. This also makes it the only Spikes user capable of defeating Blastoise, UU's premier spinner, one-on-one. It also beats Claydol, which is another plus in terms of hazard setting. Roserade has useful support moves in Leech Seed, Sleep Powder, and Aromatherapy, allowing it to provide even more support to the team. It even has reliable recovery in either Rest or Synthesis as well, meaning it can stay healthy to repeatedly set up Spikes. To top it off it has an excellent 125 Special Attack, and with Giga Drain and Sludge Bomb, Roserade can put some real hurt on the opposing team. However, Sleep Powder is illegal with Spikes, which means Roserade will always have to run Toxic Spikes if you want Sleep Powder, although this is still a usable hazard for more defensive teams. Overall, Roserade is always a choice to consider for a Spiker, whether on a defensive team or for those in need of a weapon against bulky Water-types.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/211.png" alt="Qwilfish"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/qwilfish/uu">Qwilfish</a></strong><br />
    Type: Water / Poison<br />
    Base Stats: 65 HP / 95 Atk / 75 Def / 55 SpA / 55 SpD / 85 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Poison Point / Swift Swim / <em>Intimidate</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Spikes, Toxic Spikes</p>
    
    <p>Like Roserade, Qwilfish is one of UU's best Spikes users. Although his stats scream "mediocrity," Qwilfish has an excellent ability in Intimidate, making his mediocre physical bulk great, while he has an excellent defensive typing to back it up. This makes Qwilfish an excellent check to many of UU's top physical attackers such as Mienshao, Heracross, and Darmanitan. As such, Qwilfish can find multiple opportunities to set up Spikes throughout the match. He has decent recovery in Pain Split, which, aside from dealing decent damage, will be able to keep Qwilfish at enough HP to repeatedly do his job. He can support the team even further as well, with Thunder Wave, Haze, and Taunt being useful supportive options. Alternatively, you could also run Toxic Spikes on Qwilfish, although the popularity of Poison-types such as Roserade, Nidoqueen, and Qwilfish himself make this a lesser option. Qwilfish's many positive qualities make it a choice you must consider when looking for a Spiker in UU.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/573.png" alt="Scolipede"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/scolipede/uu">Scolipede</a></strong><br />
    Type: Bug / Poison<br />
    Base Stats: 60 HP / 90 Atk / 89 Def / 55 SpA / 69 SpD / 112 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Poison Point / Swarm / <em>Quick Feet</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Spikes, Toxic Spikes</p>
    
    <p>Although generally overlooked in favor of other Spikers such as Qwilfish, Scolipede is still a solid choice, especially for offensive teams. Scolipede has an excellent 112 Speed, which means he can set up Spikes quickly before the opponent can react. He also poses a solid offensive threat with his decent 90 Attack, and a powerful STAB Megahorn is fairly brutal, while Earthquake and Rock Slide allow him to hurt anything that resists his Megahorn. With a Focus Sash, Scolipede can not only guarantee two layers of Spikes most of the time, but also activates his ability Swarm to power up Megahorn to even more brutal levels, meaning Scolipede can deal extreme damage to the opponent before going down. Despite the competition from Roserade as a fast Spiker, Scolipede still makes an excellent Pokemon for offensive Spike-stacking teams.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/235.png" alt="Smeargle"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/smeargle/uu">Smeargle</a></strong><br />
    Type: Normal<br />
    Base Stats: 55 HP / 20 Atk / 35 Def / 20 SpA / 45 SpD / 75 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Own Tempo / Technician / <em>Moody</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock, Spikes, Toxic Spikes</p>
    
    <p>At first glance, Smeargle looks like a complete joke; it has laughable stats in all areas and has only one move in Sketch. However, its signature move has granted it the widest movepool in the game, which makes Smeargle unique among the many hazard setters in that it is capable of setting up all three kinds of entry hazards. Smeargle also has access to Spore, which means it can put an opponent to sleep, and proceed to use the free turns to set up many hazards. Alongside a Focus Sash, Smeargle is almost always guaranteed to set up at least two layers of hazards in a match. It has Magic Coat and Whirlwind, meaning it can stop Taunt or prevent itself from being setup fodder. Its low stats, however, do haunt it, as Smeargle has no use outside of setting up entry hazards. However, this is usually enough for Smeargle to leave its mark in the match.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/139.png" alt="Omastar"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/omastar/uu">Omastar</a></strong><br />
    Type: Rock / Water<br />
    Base Stats: 70 HP / 60 Atk / 125 Def / 115 SpA / 70 SpD / 55 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Swift Swim / Shell Armor / <em>Weak Armor</em><br />
    Usable entry hazards: Stealth Rock, Spikes, Toxic Spikes</p>
    
    <p>Omastar is one of the only two Pokemon that can set up all three entry hazards, the other being Smeargle. Unlike Smeargle however, Omastar boasts actual defensive stats as well as a typing with some use defensively. Omastar can take on some common threats such as Darmanitan, Victini, and Snorlax, which alongside its physical bulk, gives it a number of opportunities to set up entry hazards. Omastar also can run a decently powerful Scald coming off of its high Special Attack stat, and its burn chance is excellent in weakening physical attackers, allowing Omastar to give some extra support to the team.</p>
    
    <h2>Preventing Hazards</h2>
    
    <p>Luckily, there are numerous ways to stop entry hazards from being on your field. The following are all great to have on your team to prevent its members from being worn down over time.</p>
    
    <h3>Rapid Spin</h3>
    
    <p>The most popular way to remove entry hazards is the move Rapid Spin. This move is the sole reason some Pokemon, particularly Blastoise and Claydol, see usage in UU, as many of UU's spinners have little use outside of this move. All of the viable spinners in UU have their own advantages that make them worth using.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/9.png" alt="Blastoise"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/blastoise">Blastoise</a></strong><br />
    Type: Water<br />
    Base Stats: 79 HP / 83 Atk / 100 Def / 85 SpA / 105 SpD / 78 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Torrent / <em>Rain Dish</em></p>
    
    <p>A fan favorite from RBY, Blastoise sees usage as UU's best Rapid Spin user. It has a solid Water type, giving it something useful defensively. It also has solid bulk, meaning it can take a number of hits. Blastoise can take on a number of UU's spinblockers with its decently powerful Scald as well as Toxic, preventing them from being safe. It also has Roar to constantly force them out, and rack up entry hazard damage. Its Scald can also weaken physical attackers, which can help out the team pretty decently. Blastoise is also capable of guaranteeing Rapid Spins with Foresight. However, Blastoise lacks recovery, which can sometimes get in its way of repeatedly pulling off Rapid Spin. Also note that if Blastoise is not used for spinning, it is outclassed by the other Water-types available in UU.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/344.png" alt="Claydol"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/claydol">Claydol</a></strong><br />
    Type: Ground / Psychic<br />
    Base Stats: 60 HP / 70 Atk / 105 Def / 70 SpA / 120 SpD / 75 Spe<br />
    Ability: Levitate</p>
    
    <p>Claydol also has membership in UU's Rapid Spin club, and has some useful qualities to let it stand out from the rest. Although Claydol has a number of weaknesses, it also sports excellent resistances, and alongside its good 60 / 105 / 120 defenses, it's able to pull off a Rapid Spin whenever it needs to. One of Claydol's biggest selling points is its excellent ability in Levitate, which makes it indifferent to all three entry hazards, meaning it can repeatedly come in to spin throughout the match. Claydol can support its team well with Stealth Rock and dual screens, making it a decent choice for a supportive Pokemon. It also has Toxic to wear down spinblockers that try to come in, meaning they are not always safe. It can run a gimmicky set with Trick and Ring Target as well, removing incoming Ghost-types' ability to spinblock. However, Claydol's main problem is its nonexistent offensive stats, which make it hard to spin against bulkier Ghost-types.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/645.png" alt="Cryogonal"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/cryonogal/uu">Cryogonal</a></strong><br />
    Type: Ice<br />
    Base Stats: 70 HP / 50 Atk / 30 Def / 95 SpA / 135 SpD / 105 Spe<br />
    Abilty: Levitate</p>
    
    <p>Cryogonal is a unique Pokemon in UU's group of Rapid Spinners. Like its friend Claydol, Cryogonal also has access to Levitate, meaning it is immune to Spikes and Toxic Spikes; however, it has a Stealth Rock weakness. That said, it also has an excellent Special Defense, meaning it can take many special hits and pull off a spin in the process. Cryogonal's biggest selling point is its access to reliable recovery in Recover, meaning it can heal itself to pull off multiple Rapid Spins. It can also go the offensive route thanks to its 95 Special Attack, and with Ice Beam and Hidden Power, it can pose a solid offensive threat on its own. It often finds itself a spot on hail teams to remove entry hazards and spam Blizzard on its own. Overall, Cryogonal is a decent choice on certain teams looking for its qualities.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/237.png" alt="Hitmontop"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/hitmontop/uu">Hitmontop</a></strong><br />
    Type: Fighting<br />
    Base Stats: 50 HP / 95 Atk / 95 Def / 35 SpA / 110 SpD / 70 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Intimidate / Technician / <em>Steadfast</em></p>
    
    <p>Hitmontop has quite a bit going for it in terms of Rapid Spin. It has Intimidate, allowing it to check common physical threats such as Mienshao and Darmanitan. This means Hitmontop can pull off a spin quite often. Its access to Foresight also allows it to spin even against Ghost-types, which makes it quite a solid choice. It also has a decently powerful Close Combat, coming off of its 95 Attack, meaning it is never going to be a complete sitting duck. Overall, Hitmontop may be outclassed by Blastoise at spinning, but it is still a pretty solid choice.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/141.png" alt="Kabutops"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/kabutops/uu">Kabutops</a></strong><br />
    Type: Rock / Water<br />
    Base Stats: 60 HP / 115 Atk / 105 Def / 65 SpA / 70 SpD / 80 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Swift Swim / Battle Armor / <em>Weak Armor</em></p>
    
    <p>Kabutops is a solid choice for an offensive spinner thanks to its excellent 115 Attack and access to Swords Dance, making it a powerful offensive threat. Its access to Aqua Jet and Stone Edge allow it to put the hurt on opposing spinblockers, pulling off a Rapid Spin afterwards. Its priority Aqua Jet also comes in handy to pace faster threats such as Mienshao and Cinccino, meaning Kabutops can also revenge kill and sweep, making it more useful. It can also run Stealth Rock to provide decent support to the team.</p>
    
    <h3>Taunt</h3>
    
    <p>Although not as reliable a way to prevent entry hazards as Rapid Spin, Taunt is still a decent way to stop hazards from going down on your side of the field. There a a number of fast Taunt users in UU, all of them being good options for this move.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/302.png" alt="Sableye"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/sableye">Sableye</a></strong><br />
    Type: Dark / Ghost<br />
    Base Stats: 50 HP / 75 Atk / 75 Def / 65 SpA / 65 SpA / 50 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Keen Eye / Stall / <em>Prankster</em></p>
    
    <p>Sableye was once one of the worst Pokemon in the game, but now thanks to its ability Prankster, it packs a priority Taunt, which ensures that it can quickly stop the use of entry hazards. It also has Recover, keeping itself healthy to Taunt entry hazard users multiple times in the match.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/487.png" alt="Azelf"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/azelf">Azelf</a></strong><br />
    Type: Psychic<br />
    Base Stats: 75 HP / 125 Atk / 70 Def / 125 SpA / 70 SpD / 115 Spe<br />
    Ability: Levitate</p>
    
    <p>Azelf has a fast Taunt, which means he can quickly stop entry hazards unless the opponent has the rare Aerodactyl or Accelgor. He can also set up Stealth Rock himself, and can be a good anti-lead in general thanks to his blistering Speed. He also poses a powerful offensive threat with his high offensive stats, putting dents in the opposing team before going down.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/169.png" alt="Crobat"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/crobat">Crobat</a></strong><br />
    Type: Poison / Flying<br />
    Base Stats: 85 HP / 90 Atk / 80 Def / 70 SpA / 80 SpD / 130 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Inner Focus / <em>Infiltrator</em></p>
    
    <p>Crobat has the fastest Taunt in UU aside from Aerodactyl. It can quickly fire off a Taunt before anything can react and then U-turn to a teammate to deal with the opponent. It has access to Roost to keep itself healthy to be able to repeatedly use Taunt. Overall, Crobat is a great choice to stop entry hazards from being on your side of the field.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/142.png" alt="Aerodactyl"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/aerodactyl/uu">Aerodactyl</a></strong><br />
    Type: Rock / Flying<br />
    Base Stats: 80 HP / 105 Atk / 65 Def / 60 SpA / 75 SpD / 130 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Rock Head / Pressure / <em>Unnerve</em></p>
    
    <p>Like Crobat, Aerodactyl also has the fastest Taunt in UU, meaning it will stop hazards from going up most of the time. It also poses a solid offensive threat thanks to its base 105 Attack, and can run Stone Edge and Earthquake to be able to put dents in the team. It also sets up Stealth Rock on its own, making it a decent choice for a Taunt user. It is, however, often outclassed by Azelf as an anti-lead.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/671.png" alt="Tornadus"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/tornadus">Tornadus</a></strong><br />
    Type: Flying<br />
    Base Stats: 79 HP / 115 Atk / 70 Def / 125 SpA / 80 SpD / 111 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Pranster / <em>Defiant</em></p>
    
    <p>Tornadus has priority Taunt, like Sableye, but it also has great stats, meaning it can be an offensive threat with Hurricane and Superpower, decimating teams on its own while stopping entry hazards. It also has a higher Speed than Sableye, making it less prone to opposing priority. Tornadus can be a very good choice to Taunt entry hazards users overall.</p>
    
    <h3>Magic Bounce</h3>
    
    <p>Magic Bounce is a pretty solid way to stop the use of entry hazards from going onto the field, while also bouncing it back to the opponent, leaving them in a lethal situation. Magic Bounce has limited distribution, but the one user has its uses in UU for the move.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/178.png" alt="Xatu"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/xatu">Xatu</a></strong><br />
    Type: Psychic / Flying<br />
    Base Stats: 65 HP / 75 Atk / 70 Def / 95 SpA / 70 SpD / 95 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Synchronize / Early Bird / <em>Magic Bounce</em></p>
    
    <p>Xatu is a Pokemon that can block the use of entry hazards, and bounce them back to the opponent, which can be useful to stop Spikes and Stealth Rock from threatening your team. It also can bounce back status moves such as Toxic and Thunder Wave, making it useful to stop paralysis spreading or poison. Xatu also has reliable recovery in Roost, which means it can repeatedly come in to bounce hazards back to the opponent. It can also support its team with Thunder Wave, Light Screen, and Reflect, making it a decent team supporter. It even has U-turn to switch out whenever needed. It pairs up well with a spinner or a Taunt user, such as Sableye, to be sure entry hazards stay off the field.</p>
    
    <h2>Spinblocking</h2>
    
    <p>Rapid Spin has become such a common sight that a strategy has arisen to counter the move; spinblocking. Since Rapid Spin is a damaging Normal-type move, Ghost-types effectively stop the move from working. A number of Ghost-types in UU are effective at spinblocking, and each one has their own qualities that make them worth using as spinblockers.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/593.png" alt="Cofagrigus"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/cofagrigus">Cofagrigus</a></strong><br />
    Type: Ghost<br />
    Base Stats: 58 HP / 50 Atk / 145 Def / 95 SpA / 105 SpD / 30 Spe<br />
    Ability: Mummy</p>
    
    <p>Cofagrigus is the premier spinblocker in the UU environment, as it holds many positive qualities that make it wonderful on any team in need. It has a titanic base 145 Defense and a solid base 105 Special Defense, and its typing allows it to take on all of the tier's spinners one-on-one. It has Will-O-Wisp to cripple Pokemon and wear them down, while it packs a decently powerful Shadow Ball to bring the hurt. It also has Mummy to negate common abilities of the spinners. Cofagrigus can also pose a solid offensive threat on its own thanks to Trick Room and Nasty Plot, allowing it to set up and proceed to destroy the opposing spinner with powerful Shadow Balls. It can beat Blastoise and Claydol with relative ease thanks to these qualities. Overall, Cofagrigus is the best spinblocker in the tier.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/302.png" alt="Sableye"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/sableye">Sableye</a></strong><br />
    Type: Dark / Ghost<br />
    Base Stats: 50 HP / 75 Atk / 75 Def / 65 SpA / 65 SpD / 50 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Keen Eye / Stall / <em>Prankster</em></p>
    
    <p>Despite its terrible stats, Sableye is an excellent spinblocker in UU thanks to its Dream World ability, Prankster. It can quickly use Taunt to prevent Foresight from Hitmontop and Blastoise, while it has Will-O-Wisp to cripple offensive spinners. It has Recover to keep itself healthy, and its typing grants it no weaknesses, aiding in its ability to stall the opponent. While its bulk leaves a lot to be desired, it's enough to handle the spinblockers. It can constantly be an annoyance to the opposing spinners as many of them are defensively oriented. Although Sableye is fairly limited in what it can do, it still makes for a solid spinblocker.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/356.png" alt="Dusclops"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/dusclops">Dusclops</a></strong><br />
    Type: Ghost<br />
    Base Stats: 40 HP / 70 Atk / 130 Def / 60 SpA / 130 Def / 25 Spe<br />
    Ability: Pressure</p>
    
    <p>Dusclops was a big winner of the fifth generation, as due to its NFE status, it can bolster its already good defenses to formidable levels with Eviolite, making it one of the only Pokemon that cannot be OHKOed by nearly any move. This helps Dusclops in its role as a spinblocker immensely, as it can take many hits from any of the spinners in the tier while crippling them with Will-O-Wisp and Curse. This means it can slowly chip away at their HP combined with entry hazard damage. It can run Pain Split and Rest as decent forms of recovery, keeping it at enough HP to constantly take on spinblockers. Be careful, however, as Dusclops lacks Leftovers recovery, which can sometimes get in its way at performing its spinblocking duties. However, despite this, Dusclops can make for a useful defensive spinblocker.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/434.png" alt="Mismagius"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/mismagius">Mismagius</a></strong><br />
    Type: Ghost<br />
    Base Stats: 60 HP / 60 Atk / 60 Def / 105 SpA / 105 SpD / 105 Spe<br />
    Ability: Levitate</p>
    
    <p>Mismagius is a more offensive spinblocker, which makes it a good fit on the fast offensive teams looking into the use of a fast Ghost-type. Mismagius has access to Thunderbolt, which allows it to deal with the premier spinner, Blastoise. Its Shadow Ball allows it to handle Claydol and Hitmontop as well. Mismagius also has Nasty Plot and Calm Mind, allowing it to boost its Special Attack to become even more threatening to opposing spinners. It can avoid Toxic with Substitute, while it also has access to other moves such as Taunt and Will-O-Wisp. Mismagius is also quite fast, allowing it to move before opposing spinners can react. Mismagius can overall find itself a spot as a more offensive spinblocker compared to the other Ghost-types.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/639.png" alt="Chandelure"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/chandelure">Chandelure</a></strong><br />
    Type: Ghost / Fire<br />
    Base Stats: 60 HP / 55 Atk / 90 Def / 145 SpA / 90 SpD / 80 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Flash Fire / Flame Body</p>
    
    <p>Chandelure is not that great of a spinblocker on its own, mostly due to being weak to Blastoise's Scald and Claydol's Earthquake. This makes it advisable to pair Chandelure up with another spinblocker to make full use of spinblocking. That said, Chandelure can come in and use its extreme Special Attack to scorch opposing spinners with Fire Blast and Shadow Ball. It can also run Substitute to avoid a stray Toxic, while running Pain Split is usable to heal itself and deal damage. Chandelure can also run a Choice Specs set to make its damage more brutal. Outside of that, Chandelure is limited to mostly being an offensive spinblocker, as its defensive capabilities are lacking.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/484.png" alt="Rotom"><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/rotom/uu">Rotom</a></strong><br />
    Type: Electric / Ghost<br />
    Base Stats: 50 HP / 50 Atk / 77 Def / 95 SpA / 77 SpD / 91 Spe<br />
    Ability: Levitate</p>
    
    <p>Rotom is a rather unique choice for a spinblocker. Its main selling point is its Electric STAB; which means it can deal with Blastoise fairly easily, and it also takes on Claydol rather well. The other unique thing about Rotom is its access to Volt Switch, which means it can grab momentum as opposing spinners switch out of the match. It has a solid Special Attack and a decent Speed to deal some strong and fast damage, which makes it decent on offensive teams. Although it may not seem like it, Rotom is also capable of going on the defensive despite its low defenses, as it has some excellent resistances, and can take a number of hits from opposing spinners and cripple them with Will-O-Wisp. Overall, Rotom is a very unique choice for a spinblocker.</p>
    
    <p><img src="/download/sprites/bw/653.png" alt="Golurk">><br />
    <strong><a href="/bw/pokemon/golurk/uu">Golurk</a></strong><br />
    Type: Ground / Ghost<br />
    Base Stats: 89 HP / 124 Atk / 80 Def / 55 SpA / 80 SpD / 55 Spe<br />
    Abilities: Klutz / Iron Fist / <em>No Guard</em></p>
    
    <p>Golurk is also capable of spinblocking and setting up hazards at the same time. It can set up Stealth Rock to support its team, and has decent bulk to take on opposing spinners. It has a high 124 Attack and a STAB Earthquake to deal heavy damage to Blastoise and Hitmontop, while its STAB Shadow Punch also puts the hurt on Claydol. This makes Golurk a pretty solid choice to set up Stealth Rock and spinblock at the same time. Golurk could also run No Guard along with DynamicPunch to annoy opposing spinners with confusion, although this is rather gimmicky.</p>
    
    <h2>Phazing</h2>
    
    <p>Phazing, short for "pseudo-Hazing," is a common way to take advantage of hazards. This is done by the moves Roar, Whirlwind, Dragon Tail, and Circle Throw, which can force the Pokemon out of the field, racking up entry hazard damage. Common defensive Pokemon such as Snorlax, Blastoise, Empoleon, and Slowking often run these moves in their sets. One of the most well-known examples of phazers is Prankster Riolu, being able to use priority Roar thanks to its access to Copycat, and Prankster gives the move +1 priority.</p>
    
    <h2>Conclusion</h2>
    
    <p>Like in any tier, entry hazards are a dominant force in UU, and hopefully you now have an understanding of entry hazards, including the viable users, ways to counter them, and how to make use of them. When making a team, be sure to fit at least one kind of hazard onto your team; they are vital to victory. Always be sure to pack a spinblocker as well, as maintaining the entry hazards can make a big difference in the match. Always pack something that can take advantage of entry hazards, whether by phazing or just sweeping teams outright. And since hazards are so important, make sure that that Blastoise or Claydol of yours stays alive throughout the match; if they go down before they spin, you can be in trouble. There is always a risk to entry hazards, so plan carefully for them.</p>
    uploaded http://www.smogon.com/bw/articles/uu_hazards

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