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A short guide on how to create a Pokemon's movepool

Discussion in 'Create-A-Pokémon Project' started by X-Act, May 1, 2008.

  1. sbc

    sbc

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    no:

    unown, metagross, starmie all do not.
  2. Deck Knight

    Deck Knight Well-shuffled and flush
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    I had an incident where I copied over my data, so I've had to spend the last few days getting re-motivated and doing it over again.

    I still have the TMs Section to do, but I figure I'll post these articles for your review.

    From the Movepool Guide(WIP)


    Type Diversity Matrix:

    This section will go over which types tend to always have or deliberately exclude other attacking types in their movepools. After a brief overview, morphological categories listed above will be used to highlight newly available movepool options. For example, if they have Wings, Normal types usually get Flying moves and Heat Wave.

    Methodology:
    What I tried to do in the essential morphology section is get a consensus on what type of pokemon get which moves based on their body parts. Electric is a good example of my discretion. There are 3 Electrics with punches. Raichu only gets Thunderpunch, Ampharos gets Fire Punch and Thunderpunch, and Electivire gets all 3 elemental Punches. Thus I split the difference and went with Fire Punch and Thunderpunch. Brick Break and Focus Punch were unanimous.

    With the exceptions of Normal and Flying, most types only had one pokemon with a beak or wings, so I copied down that pokemon’s whole relevant move list as a template.

    [...]

    Interpreting the Matrix

    The Type Diversity Matrix is all about creating a pokemon’s initial allowable movepool.

    For example. If CAP were to create an Electric/Grass type, its initial allowable competitive movepool would start with the “Always” moves. Take the type descriptions and go from there:

    Grass
    Grass acts as a primary type most of the time.

    Always: Grass, Growth, Sunny Day, Swords Dance
    Rare attack types: Electric, Fire, Ghost, Ice, Psychic, Water

    Electric
    Electric generally acts as a primary type.

    Always: Electric, Signal Beam, Rain Dance, Light Screen
    Rare attack types: Dragon, Ghost, Grass, Ground, Poison, Psychic, Rock, Water

    Offensive:

    Allowable:
    -Discharge
    -Spark
    -Thunder
    -Thunder Fang
    -Thunderbolt
    -Thunderpunch
    -Volt Tackle
    -Zap Cannon

    -Energy Ball
    -Frenzy Plant
    -Giga Drain
    -Grass Knot
    -Leaf Blade
    -Leaf Storm
    -Magical Leaf
    -Petal Dance
    -Power Whip
    -Seed Bomb
    -Seed Flare
    -Solarbeam
    -Wood Hammer

    -Signal Beam

    Support:

    Allowable:
    -Charge
    -Magnet Rise
    -Thunder Wave

    -Aromatherapy
    -Cotton Spore
    -Ingrain
    -Leech Seed
    -Sleep Powder
    -Spore
    -Stun Spore
    -Synthesis

    -Growth
    -Swords Dance
    -Light Screen
    -Sunny Day
    -Rain Dance

    The initial disallowed movepool will be more contentious. It would look at the rare attack types to determine unlikely damaging attacks. Grass and Electric both rarely see Ghost, Psychic, and Water moves, so those would be the first to go. Follow through and it would be along the lines of the following:

    Offensive:

    Disallowed:
    -Ominous Wind
    -Shadow Ball
    -Shadow Claw
    -Shadow Force
    -Shadow Sneak

    -Extrasensory
    -Psychic
    -Psycho Boost
    -Psycho Cut
    -Zen Headbutt

    -Aqua Jet
    -Aqua Tail
    -Brine
    -Clamp
    -Crabhammer
    -Dive
    -Hydro Cannon
    -Hydro Pump
    -Muddy Water
    -Surf
    -Water Pulse
    -Water Spout
    -Waterfall
    -Whirlpool

    Support Moves are foggier territory than attack moves. For example, despite rarely having Water or Psychic attacks, the theoretical Electric/Grass is already assumed to be eligible for Rain Dance and Light Screen.

    Finally, there are what some often call “flavor” moves. This is why we have the Essential Morphology breakdown. For example, if our Electric/Grass CAP Artist comes up with a design that has usable arms, one could, since Electric and Grass are both primary types, have a good discussion on whether or not it should get Fire Punch. Electrics with punches tend to get it, Grass types rarely get Fire moves at all. Ice Punch, however, seems to curry no favor with either Grass or Electric generally. That being said, both Ludicolo and Electivire get Ice Punch, so the argument against Ice Punch is not canonically bulletproof.
  3. Deck Knight

    Deck Knight Well-shuffled and flush
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    This could use a good update. I'm still working on it, but its been going pretty slowly.

    I'll post up the first 26 TMs for feedback.

    TM Trends:

    This section goes over the general trends in TMs, type by type, including relevant features and exceptions. Pokemon that are unable to learn TMs are inherently excluded.

    TM 01: Focus Punch

    Focus Punch is learned by every single pokemon with physically attached, extendable arms. This excludes disembodied arms such as Haunter’s or Raticate’s footlike claws.

    Exceptions: Tyrogue, Hitmontop, Whismur line.

    Oddball learners: Sandslash

    TM 02: Dragon Claw

    Dragon Claw has no particular trend among types, save it is learned among the Dragon type and what Gamefreak seems to hold as pseudo-dragons. Generally they are in the Dragon Egg Group. Phyical attributes of most learners: large, bipedal, fully evolved reptilian style pokemon.

    TM 03: Water Pulse


    Water Pulse is learned by all Water pokemon, and all Ice pokemon with the exception of the Swinub line. Many Pure Normal pokemon also get it, with no particularly common feature. Anorith seems to be based on an ancient aquatic vertebrate, so it also learns Water Pulse.

    Odd learners: Nidoran lines, Aron line. Volbeat, Illumise.

    TM 04: Calm Mind


    Calm Mind is learned by all except two psychic pokemon lines and roughly half of Ghost pokemon learn it. It is common among special-attack oriented Normal types and a few Dark types. All GSC Era legendaries possess it.

    Exceptions: Starmie, Metagross, Gengar, Rotom.

    Oddball learners: Sudowoodo, Relicanth, Infernape.

    TM 05: Roar


    Roar is learned by most fully evolved pokemon based on mammalian or reptilian design. Pokemon outside that general description are noted as being territorial, as in the case of Skarmory and Sharpedo.

    TM 06: Toxic


    Every pokemon capable of learning TMs learns Toxic.

    TM 07: Hail


    Hail is learned only by Water pokemon, Ice pokemon, pokemon with dex entries claiming they can change weather patterns such as Dratini line and Castform, and scattered legendaries.

    Exceptions: Bibarel.

    TM 08: Bulk Up

    Bulk Up is learned by every fighting type, then dispersed upon bipedal pokemon with access to Close Combat via Breeding.

    Oddball learners: Buizel line.

    TM 09: Bullet Seed

    Bullet Seed is learned by all Grass types, plus Remoraid line and Mantine.

    TM 10: Hidden Power

    Every pokemon capable of learning TMs learns Hidden Power.

    TM 11: Sunny Day

    Sunny Day is learned by every pokemon except for Water and Ice types.

    Oddball learners: Slowpoke lines, Remoraid line, Corsola, Vaporeon, Glaceon, Lotad line.

    TM 12: Taunt

    Taunt is learned by every Dark, and Ghost pokemon, and a majority of Poison and Psychic types. Ape-themed and Normal-typed feline pokemon also get it.

    Grass types do not learn Taunt.

    TM 13: Ice Beam

    Ice Beam is learned by every Water and Ice Type. It is a generic filler move among most other types, with a wide dispersal.

    Fire types do not learn Ice Beam
    Grass and Electric types do not learn Ice Beam unless they are part Water or Ice.

    TM 14: Blizzard

    Blizzard is only slightly more exclusive than Ice Beam. It is learned by every Water and Ice type. It is generic filler for other types, with a wide dispersal.

    Fire types do not learn Blizzard
    Grass and Electric types do not learn Blizzard unless they are part Water or Ice.

    TM 15: Hyper Beam


    Hyper Beam is learned by every fully evolved pokemon, with only a few rare single stage exceptions.

    TM 16: Light Screen

    Light Screen is learned by every Psychic and Electric type. It is learned by most non-Poison Grass types.

    Dark and Ghost Pokemon do not learn Light Screen.
    With rare exception, Non-Psychic/Electric Fire, Fighting, Ground, Poison, Rock, and Steel pokemon do not learn Light Screen.

    TM 17: Protect

    Every pokemon capable of learning TMs learns Protect, except Regigas.

    TM18: Rain Dance

    Rain Dance is learned by every pokemon except Non-Water/Ice Fire, Grass, Ground, and Rock pokemon.

    Oddball learners: Rhyhorn line, Larvitar line, Aron line, and Budew line learn Rain Dance.

    TM 19: Giga Drain

    Giga Drain is learned by every Grass type. A majority of Bug Poison types learn it. It is otherwise highly exclusive.

    TM 20: Safeguard

    Safeguard is learned by almost every Psychic type and non-Poison Grass type.

    Dark, Ghost, and Poison Pokemon do not learn Safeguard.
    With rare exception, Non-Psychic Electric, Fire, Fighting, Ground, Rock, and Steel pokemon do not learn Safeguard

    TM 21: Frustration

    Every pokemon capable of learning TMs learns Frustration.

    TM 22: Solarbeam

    Every Fire and Grass pokemon learns Solarbeam A majority of Bugs learn it, and most pure Normal types. Psychic types occasionally learn it.

    Exceptions: Snowver line and Flareon do not learn Solarbeam

    TM 23: Iron Tail

    Every pokemon with a usable tail somewhere along the line (Kadabra, Mankey) learns Iron Tail.

    TM 24: Thunderbolt

    Thunderbolt is learned by every electric type. Most Ghost types learn it. It is generic filler for other types, with wide dispersal.

    Fire, Fighting, Grass, and Ground types do not learn Thunderbolt
    Most Water types do not learn Thunderbolt.

    Oddball learners: Mankey line and Magmortar, learn Thunderbolt.

    TM 25: Thunder

    Thunder is more exclusive than Thunderbolt. It is learned by every electric type. It is generic filler for other types.

    Fire, Fighting, Grass, and Ground types do not learn Thunderbolt
    Most Water types do not learn Thunderbolt.

    TM 26: Earthquake


    Earthquake is learned by every Fighting, Ground, Rock, and Steel type. Most fully evolved pokemon learn it.

    Electric types do not learn Earthquake. Most Non-Ground/Rock/Steel Psychic types do not learn it.

    Exceptions: Skarmory does not learn Earthquake

    Oddball learners: Electivire learns Earthquake.

    This is a brief sampling of what is to come. I'm only a little bit farther than this. Post Christmas really screwed with my life.
  4. X-Act

    X-Act np: Biffy Clyro - Shock Shock
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    Looks good. Here are some additions:

    Arghonaut is also an oddball. :)

    Flygon and Gengar are oddball learners of this move.

    Another oddball is Lapras, being a Water type that learns Thunderbolt.

    Fixed.
  5. tennisace

    tennisace brock you like a hurricane
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    Staryu/Starmie also get Thunderbolt/Thunder.
  6. billymills

    billymills
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    As does gyarados?

    There's a reason he said most, and not all. The same reason that he did not include any water types in exceptions.
  7. petrie911

    petrie911

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    Vaporeon and Glaceon aren't really exceptions, as they inherit the ability from Eevee. Lotad line isn't an exception at all, being Grass-type.

    Notable exception to Giga Drain is Kabutops. This was largely how we justified putting it on Stratagem. Additionally, Xatu and Uxie get it with no real explanation. Lastly, I assume by "Bug Poison types", you mean "Bug and Poison types", as both bug-types and poison-types tend to get the move.
  8. Deck Knight

    Deck Knight Well-shuffled and flush
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    A few notes:

    The Guide is supposed to be a general guideline for setting up movepools. I didn't feel the need to be that exhaustive. It's supposed to be a trend analysis, not a rehash of Serebii, which is why it focuses primarily on types/traits rather than individual pokemon. If you want to make an argument for Giga Drain on a Psychic type, that would be the time to bring up Xatu. Most people would probably abide it anyway, since Psychic types always get either Energy Ball or Grass Knot to begin with.

    I should perhaps mention that I ignore things like Legendaries because they generally have bloated movepools far beyond most of their type. I also try to avoid using the "super filler" pokemon (Aggron/Rhyperior/Nidos etc.) if I can, since generally speaking they also get the most abnormal stuff. Basically its a judgement call.
  9. Deck Knight

    Deck Knight Well-shuffled and flush
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    Alright, so I think this needs a kickstart for one simple reason:

    I've decided a while ago that doing the TMs was a fruitless effort. People will always complain about flavor vs. non-flavor, and additionally it was too hairy and subjective process to ever have been deemed credible coming from only one user (ie me.)

    However what has disturbed me is that we always complain about the poor quality of Attacking/Non-Attack move posts when the literally start out with a blank slate.

    We can address the specific policy after CAP8 is finished (I will craft a PR thread), but for now I'll post the sections that are relevant, specifically those moves that are attached specifically to types in large enough quantities to be allowed without extenuating circumstances.

    I will edit the full guide in shortly, I'm working on it now.

    Use Ctrl + F to find a type:

    Pokemon initial Allowable/Unallowable moves.

    These moves are initially allowed and have the following properties:

    1. Non-Pokemon Exclusive (Aeroblast, Sacred Fire, etc.)
    2. Found on a majority of their type considering only that type’s pokemon.
    3. Exceptions made for non-legendary “exclusives” (Twineedle, Megahorn)
    4. At least plausibly competitive.

    If a CAP has two types, include the initial options of both types.

    Format:

    Always: Moves pokemon always get. If it lists a type, it means all the moves in that type, give or take a few small exceptions like legendary moves etc.

    Rare Attack types: While not unallowed, they generally aren't seen on that type.

    Allowed:

    Attacking:

    Non-Attacking:


    Bug:

    Always: Bug, Giga Drain
    Rare attack types: Fire, Water, Psychic, Dragon

    Allowed:

    Attacking:
    Fury Cutter
    Pin Missile
    Leech Life
    Twineedle
    Bug Bite
    Silver Wind
    U-turn
    Signal Beam
    X-Scissor .
    Attack Order
    Bug Buzz
    Megahorn
    Giga Drain

    Non-Attacking:
    Defend Order
    Heal Order
    Spider Web
    String Shot
    Moonlight
    Morning Sun

    Dark:

    Always: Dark
    Rare attack types: Dragon

    Allowed:

    Attacking:
    Beat Up
    Pursuit
    Thief
    Assurance
    Payback
    Punishment
    Bite
    Faint Attack
    Night Slash
    Crunch
    Dark Pulse
    Sucker Punch

    Non-Attacking:
    Embargo
    Fling
    Snatch
    Taunt
    Torment
    Mean Look
    Moonlight


    Dragon:

    Always: Dragon, Flamethrower, Fire Blast, Earthquake
    Rare attack types: Ice, Poison

    Allowed:

    Attacking:
    Twister
    Dragon Rage
    DragonBreath
    Dragon Claw
    Dragon Pulse
    Dragon Rush
    Outrage
    Draco Meteor
    Flamethrower
    Fire Blast
    Earthquake

    Non-Attacking:
    Dragon Dance

    Electric

    Always: Electric, Signal Beam, Rain Dance, Light Screen
    Rare attack types: Dragon, Ghost, Grass, Ground, Poison, Psychic, Rock, Water

    Allowed:

    Attacking:
    Charge Beam
    Shock Wave
    Thunder Fang
    Spark
    ThunderPunch
    Discharge
    Thunderbolt
    Zap Cannon
    Volt Tackle
    Thunder
    Signal Beam


    Non-Attacking:
    Charge
    Magnet Rise
    Thunder Wave
    Rain Dance
    Light Screen

    Fighting:

    Always: Fighting, Fire/Ice/ThunderPunch and Blaze Kick unless secondary type overrides.
    Rare attack types: Psychic, Bug, Dragon

    Allowed:

    Attacking:
    Triple Kick
    Arm Thrust
    Double Kick
    Mach Punch
    Rock Smash
    Vacuum Wave
    Drain Punch
    Force Palm
    Revenge
    Rolling Kick
    Wake-Up Slap
    Low Kick
    Vital Throw
    Brick Break
    Submission
    Jump Kick
    Sky Uppercut
    Aura Sphere
    Cross Chop
    Seismic Toss
    DynamicPunch
    Hi Jump Kick
    Reversal
    Close Combat
    Focus Blast
    Superpower
    Focus Punch
    Fire Punch
    Blaze Kick
    Ice Punch
    ThunderPunch

    Non-Attacking:
    Bulk Up
    Counter
    Detect

    Fire

    Always: Fire, Solarbeam
    Rare attack types: Bug, Poison, Water

    Allowed:

    Attacking:
    Fire Spin
    Flame Wheel
    Fire Fang
    Fire Punch
    Lava Plume
    Blaze Kick
    Flamethrower
    Heat Wave
    Sacred Fire
    Fire Blast
    Flare Blitz
    Overheat
    Blast Burn
    Eruption
    Solarbeam

    Non-Attacking:
    Sunny Day
    Will-O-Wisp

    Flying

    Always: Flying, Steel Wing, 2-3 of Heat Wave, Ominous Wind, Icy Wind
    Rare attack types: Grass, Fighting, Poison

    Allowed:

    Attacking:
    Air Cutter
    Aerial Ace
    Chatter
    Pluck
    Wing Attack
    Air Slash
    Drill Peck
    Fly
    Brave Bird
    Sky Attack
    Steel Wing
    Heat Wave
    Ominous Wind
    Icy Wind

    Non-Attacking:
    Featherdance
    Mirror Move
    Roost
    Tailwind
    Whirlwind

    Ghost

    Always: Ghost, Sucker Punch, Psychic, Dream Eater, Will-O-Wisp
    Rare attack types: Bug, Dragon, Ground, Poison, Rock, Steel, Water

    Allowed:

    Attacking:
    Shadow Sneak
    Ominous Wind
    Shadow Punch
    Shadow Claw
    Shadow Ball
    Night Shade
    Psychic
    Dream Eater
    Sucker Punch

    Non-Attacking:
    Confuse Ray
    Destiny Bond
    Grudge
    Memento
    Mean Look
    Pain Split
    Spite
    Will-O-Wisp
    Trick
    Trick Room

    Grass

    Always: Grass, Growth, Sunny Day, Swords Dance
    Rare attack types: Electric, Fire, Ghost, Ice, Psychic, Water

    Allowed:

    Attacking:
    Razor Leaf
    Giga Drain
    Magical Leaf
    Needle Arm
    Energy Ball
    Seed Bomb
    Leaf Blade
    Petal Dance
    Grass Knot
    Power Whip
    SolarBeam
    Wood Hammer
    Leaf Storm
    Frenzy Plant

    Non-Attacking:
    Aromatherapy
    Cotton Spore.
    Ingrain
    Leech Seed
    Sleep Powder
    Spore
    Stun Spore
    Synthesis
    Worry Seed
    Nature Power
    Growth
    Swords Dance
    Sunny Day

    Ground

    Always: Ground, Rock
    Rare attack types: None

    Allowed:

    Attacking:
    Sand Tomb
    Bone Rush
    Bonemerang
    Mud Shot
    Dig
    Earth Power
    Earthquake
    Rock Blast
    Rock Tomb
    AncientPower
    Rock Slide
    Stone Edge

    Non-Attacking:
    Sandstorm
    Stealth Rock

    Ice

    Always: Ice, Water Pulse, Signal Beam
    Rare attack types: Dark, Dragon, Fire, Grass, Poison

    Allowed:

    Attacking:
    Ice Shard
    Icy Wind
    Avalanche
    Ice Fang
    Ice Punch
    Ice Beam
    Blizzard
    Water Pulse
    Signal Beam

    Non-Attacking:
    Hail
    Haze
    Mist

    Normal

    Always: Normal, Sunny Day, Rain Dance
    Rare attack types: Dragon

    Allowed:

    Attacking:
    Double Hit
    Fake Out
    Covet
    Quick Attack
    Dizzy Punch
    Façade
    Secret Power
    Crush Claw
    Extremespeed
    Hyper Fang
    Mega Punch
    Tri Attack
    Body Slam
    Hyper Voice
    Super Fang
    Return
    Frustration
    Mega Kick
    Double-Edge
    Hyper Beam
    Giga Impact

    Non-Attacking:
    Charm
    Encore
    Softboiled
    Magic Coat
    Role Play
    Switcheroo
    Sunny Day
    Rain Dance

    Poison

    Always: Poison, Giga Drain
    Rare attack types: None

    Allowed:

    Attacking:
    Poison Fang
    Poison Tail
    Cross Poison
    Poison Jab
    Sludge Bomb
    Gunk Shot
    Giga Drain

    Non-Attacking:
    Acid Armor
    Gastro Acid
    Toxic Spikes

    Psychic:

    Always: Psychic, Signal Beam, Energy Ball and/or Grass Knot
    Rare attack types: Dark, Dragon, Poison

    Allowed:

    Attacking:
    Confusion
    Psycho Cut
    Future Sight
    Zen Headbutt
    Psychic
    Dream Eater

    Non-Attacking:
    Calm Mind
    Cosmic Power
    Guard Swap
    Heal Block
    Imprison
    Light Screen
    Healing Wish
    Miracle Eye
    Reflect
    Power Swap
    Psycho Shift

    Rock

    Always: Rock, Ground
    Rare attack types: Grass, Poison

    Allowed:

    Attacking:
    Rock Blast
    Rock Tomb
    AncientPower
    Power Gem
    Rock Slide
    Stone Edge
    Head Smash
    Rock Wrecker
    Mud Shot
    Dig
    Earth Power
    Earthquake

    Non-Attacking:
    Rock Polish
    Sandstorm
    Stealth Rock

    Steel

    Always: Steel, Rock Slide, Earthquake, Magnet Rise
    Rare attack types: None

    Allowed:

    Attacking:
    Bullet Punch
    Metal Claw
    Iron Head
    Flash Cannon
    Gyro Ball
    Metal Burst
    Iron Tail
    Meteor Mash
    Rock Slide
    Earthquake

    Non-Attacking:
    Metal Sound
    Sandstorm
    Stealth Rock
    Magnet Rise

    Water:

    Always: Water, Ice
    Rare attack types: Fire, Grass, Psychic

    Allowed:

    Attacking:
    Whirlpool
    Aqua Jet
    Water Pulse
    Brine
    Dive
    Waterfall
    Aqua Tail
    Crabhammer
    Muddy Water
    Surf
    Hydro Pump
    Hydro Cannon
    Water Spout
    Ice Shard
    Icy Wind
    Avalanche
    Ice Fang
    Ice Punch
    Ice Beam
    Blizzard

    Non-Attacking:
    Aqua Ring
    Rain Dance
    Hail
    Haze
    Mist
    Mirror Coat
  10. R S E FR LG

    R S E FR LG

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    I know that this doesn't matter, but all the more reason for a nobody like me to post it.

    Levels of Level-Up Moves:

    For the first Pokemon of an evolutionary line, all the levels have some sort of pattern associated with it that is kept consistant for all moves (exceptions include when a Pokemon learns 2 or 3 of Poisonpowder, Sleep Powder, and Stun Spore consecutively, which are learned 1 or 2 levels of each other regardless of the pattern for the rest of the moves). Level 1 moves are considered Level 1 or Level 0 for the pattern of these moves, depending on Pokemon.

    Chimchar
    -- Scratch (treated as Level 1 in this case)
    -- Leer (treated as Level 1 in this case)
    7 Ember (+6)
    9 Taunt (+2)
    15 Fury Swipes (+6)
    17 Flame Wheel (+2)
    23 Nasty Plot (+6)
    25 Torment (+2)
    31 Facade (+6)
    33 Fire Spin (+2)
    39 Slack Off (+6)
    41 Flamethrower (+2)

    As we can see, the pattern is +6/+2/+6/+2, etc. These are usually the addition of 1 or 2 numbers (which alternate in the case of 2 numbers).


    When a Pokemon evolves by Leveling Up to a specified level, then all moves after that level must be the same levels as their pre-evolution, plus a number which can either be constant or part of a pattern in itself. Also, a new move may be added at the exact level as the level the Pokemon evolved at.

    Monferno
    -- Scratch
    -- Leer
    -- Ember
    7 Ember
    9 Taunt
    14 Mach Punch (Evolution Level)
    16 Fury Swipes (Level 15 + 1)
    19 Flame Wheel (Level 17 + 2)
    26 Feint (Level 23 + 3; replaces Nasty Plot)
    29 Torment (Level 25 + 4)
    36 Close Combat (Level 31 + 5; replaces Facade)
    39 Fire Spin (Level 33 + 6)
    46 Slack Off (Level 39 + 7)
    49 Flare Blitz (Level 41 + 8; replaces Flamethrower)

    The level change pattern is +1/+2/+3, etc. which it usually is or something similar. It is rarely more complicated than a simple increase.

    Infernape
    -- Scratch
    -- Leer
    -- Ember
    -- Taunt
    7 Ember
    9 Taunt
    14 Mach Punch
    16 Fury Swipes
    19 Flame Wheel
    26 Feint
    29 Punishment (replaces Torment)
    36 (Evolution Level)
    41 Close Combat (Level 36 + 5)
    45 Fire Spin (Level 39 + 6)
    53 Calm Mind (Level 46 + 7; replaces Slack Off)
    57 Flare Blitz (Level 49 + 8)

    Here, the levels go up from Monferno's levels by the same pattern as the same moves did for Monferno from Chimchar. This isn't always the case.


    Levels for Pokemon which have evolved using an Evolutionary Stone must be the same as a level that their pre-evolved form* learned a move or must be one of those levels +10 or -10 (-10 is for Poliwrath and Politoad only for real Pokemon, so far). Usually, Pokemon learn later moves (if at all) at the same level as their pre-evolution learned their final move, and then higher (if they learn more moves), although they can also be comparatively low as well.

    * If they are part of a split evolution, it must be a level that the other evolution of their pre-evolution learned a move (or +/-10).


    Whenever a Pokemon evolves by a method other than Leveling Up at a specific level or via Evolutionary Stone, that Pokemon retains the level pattern as their pre-evolved form, unless that Pokemon is part of a spilt evolution (where the Pokemon will instead get the level pattern as the other evolution of their pre-evolved form). If these Pokemon get new moves, then the pattern continues with the level where it was last left off.

    TO BE CONTINUED

    EDIT: There is no difference between a Level 1 move and a Heart Scale move. Heart Scale moves are just Level 1 moves that that Pokemon's pre-evolutions can't learn at Level 1.
  11. familyguyman

    familyguyman

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2009
    Messages:
    499
    Woah Infernape can learn Slack Off!?

    Nice find too!

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