Eelektross (Analysis)

Discussion in 'Uploaded Analyses' started by complete legitimacy, Jun 19, 2012.

  1. complete legitimacy

    complete legitimacy one for the future
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    Eelektross
    Credit to Zebraiken for getting this through QC.

    [Overview]

    <p>Before BW was released, there wasn't yet an Electric-type that had Levitate to negate its sole weakness to Ground-type attacks. Eelektross is the prototype of this new breed, and it's itching for a test run. In fact, it's the only NU Pokemon that has no weaknesses, with Sableye and Spiritomb locked up in higher tiers. Eelektross has a few more things going for it. Eelektross was blessed with great mixed attacking stats, as base 115 Attack and 105 Special Attack are more than enough to strike fear into the heart of your opponent. However, its lack of good high-powered physical STAB and coverage moves leave it passed over by other attackers with similar stats such as Emboar, Braviary, and Sawk. Eelektross's only real boosting move is Coil, which finds use on physical sets, but Eelektross wishes it had a recovery move to last longer, especially because of its low Speed.</p>

    <p>That being said, Eelektross is a fine Choice Specs user, and fits well on VoltTurn or Choice-based teams. This is largely due to its good bulk, as well as its coverage. 85/80/80 defenses are great for an offensive Pokemon in NU, since even without investment it retains a great deal of bulk. Once Eelektross gets in, it causes havoc by forcing multiple switches, and can take advantage of entry hazards mainly thanks to its fantastic coverage and access to Dragon Tail. However, its atrocious base 50 Speed holds Eelektross back from becoming a top-tier threat and cements its role as a bulky attacker. Unfortunately, Eelektross's bulk doesn't come with useful resistances, since outside of its Ground-type immunity its only important resistances are to Flying- and Electric-type moves. Though it may seem to have a lot of things going for it, Eelektross just isn't as good in practice as it may seem on paper.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Special Attacker
    move 1: Volt Switch
    move 2: Flamethrower
    move 3: Grass Knot
    move 4: Thunderbolt / Acid Spray
    item: Choice Specs / Leftovers
    ability: Levitate
    nature: Modest
    evs: 172 HP / 252 SpA / 84 Spe

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>A specially attacking set takes advantage of all of Eelektross's strengths: great coverage, power, and bulk. Its slow Volt Switch allows you to keep momentum while bringing in a frail sweeper free of charge and capitalizing on entry hazards immensely. Volt Switch, Acid Spray, and Eelektross's coverage moves all force out your opponent's Pokemon. This set is especially good at tearing apart defensive cores, since it has Acid Spray to become a special wall's worst nightmare, and can use its coverage moves to easily destroy physical walls such as Tangela and Amoonguss. Thunderbolt is usually superior to Acid Spray, though, since Eelektross poses a larger threat when equipped with Choice Specs and Thunderbolt doesn't force Eelektross to switch. It can be a great asset for Spikes-stacking teams, although it is useful on other types of offensive teams as well. This set can function as a momentum grabber, hazard abuser, and bulky attacker all in one. Levitate is very useful on this set as well, since even if your opponent manages to lay their own hazards down, Eelektross will only take damage from Stealth Rock.</p>

    <p>Volt Switch is the primary STAB move on this set, and is chosen for the reasons outlined above. Flamethrower is a great move for Eelektross, primarily used to hit the Grass-types that resist Volt Switch. Tangela, Amoonguss, and Sawsbuck can't be allowed to get a free switch-in, and Flamethrower puts them in their place. Grass Knot rounds out Eelektross's coverage by hitting Ground-types that try to come in for free on Volt Switch, specifically Golem and Camerupt since they resist Flamethrower as well. Thunderbolt is the preferred option in the last slot mainly because Eelektross enjoys having a powerful STAB move that doesn't force it to switch. However, Acid Spray is another great choice that also messes with your opponent, as it forces them to switch before they get destroyed. Note that Thunderbolt has more use when using Choice Specs, while Acid Spray is more effective when using Leftovers.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>The recommended EV spread emphasizes bulk and power as much as possible, with 84 Speed EVs to outrun minimum Speed Tangela. You could invest fully in HP, but in doing so, Eelektross isn't able to outspeed Tangela and avoid it's Sleep Powder. The choice of item is very important, as both listed items play with significant differences from each other. Choice Specs is the primary option to hit as hard as possible, turning Eelektross into a better wallbreaker and hazard abuser than Leftovers does. However, Leftovers does allow Eelektross to make better use of its incredible coverage, also providing slightly increased longevity. Life Orb or Expert Belt is a compromise, but Life Orb detracts from Eelektross's bulk significantly, and if Eelektross isn't locked into a move, it should be using Leftovers.</p>

    <p>This set can also make use of moves other than the ones listed above. In particular, Hidden Power Ice completes Eelektross's incredible coverage by forming a pseudo-BoltBeam combination. Specifically, it hits Altaria and Torterra harder than any of its other coverage options. However, it generally gets less use than either Thunderbolt or Acid Spray. Thunder Wave is also a viable option on this set, since it allows Eelektross to become a self-supporting sweeper that can also provide support for teammates. If using Thunder Wave, be sure to use Leftovers for the ability to switch moves. When running Choice Specs, using U-turn over Volt Switch can also work, and is especially useful when you don't want Eelektross to be trapped by Ground-types should you mispredict. Although Thunderbolt can be used so that Eelektross still has a STAB move, U-turn will be a lot less powerful than Volt Switch due to a lack of investment in Attack and since it is not boosted by Choice Specs. Charge Beam is worth considering as well, since it functions similarly to Acid Spray but isn't negated when your opponent switches, making it even more terrifying for defensive teams. However, it takes longer for it to work since Charge Beam can either miss, or fail to raise Eelektross's Special Attack.</p>

    <p>Spikes support is crucial when using Eelektross, as it can take advantage of entry hazards greatly because of the immense amount of switches that it forces. This support can be taken advantage of even more if Eelektross is used on a VoltTurn team, especially since Eelektross has access to both moves. If one wishes to go down this route, both Cacturne and Garbodor can set up Spikes, and Swellow is a good partner that can form a VoltTurn core with Eelektross. Although Eelektross can 2HKO most bulky Rock- and Ground-types, both Probopass and Bastiodon are exceptions to this because they are immune to Acid Spray and can hit Eelektross with Toxic to wear it down. Gurdurr is a good partner that can take care of them, and benefits from Toxic thanks to Guts. Either paralysis support or Trick Room support can be used if you want Eelektross to attempt a sweep; while Regirock or Gardevoir can be good partners, Eelektross doesn't absolutely require this type of support to be effective since it's not designed to be a sweeper. However, it does function as a great lure for many bulky Rock- and Ground-types such as Regirock, Golem, and Probopass. Pokemon that can take advantage of their absence, such as Swellow and Kangaskhan, are great partners.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Coil
    move 1: Coil
    move 2: Wild Charge
    move 3: Dragon Tail
    move 4: Substitute / Return
    item: Leftovers
    ability: Levitate
    nature: Careful
    evs: 252 HP / 4 Def / 252 SpD

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>This set functions differently to the special attacker set, since instead of trying to cause as much damage as possible over a few turns, this set aims to set up a sweep. Eelektross's only decent boosting move is put to good use in this set, and it complements Eelektross's naturally high Attack. This set is a great cleaner and is more effective against defensive teams, which find it very difficult to beat. Eelektross's immunity to both Spikes and Toxic Spikes really comes in handy here, and is one of the main things separating it from other Coil users, such as Arbok. This set is good on defensive teams mainly because it has great bulk, and is a great way for stall teams to destroy opposing stall teams. However, this set isn't as effective against offensive teams since it's rather weak without a couple of boosts and only has Leftovers recovery, which makes wearing it down rather easy. As such, the best way to defeat this set is to hit it hard with whatever you've got, as Eelektross will eventually die to powerful STAB moves.</p>

    <p>Eelektross has a poor physical movepool, and its only usable STAB option is Wild Charge. Although its power is decent once it has attained a couple of boosts, it comes with unappreciated recoil that can bring Eelektross to its death more quickly. However, its positives outweigh its negatives, as it is Eelektross's strongest physical STAB move. Dragon Tail is the best out of Eelektross's few coverage options, allowing it to slowly wear down Ground-types and other Pokemon that are immune to Wild Charge. It also has the great effect of phazing, preventing both slower Pokemon such as Bastiodon from phazing Eelektross and stopping opposing setup sweepers from boosting alongside it. Substitute allows Eelektross to avoid crippling status such as Toxic, and after a few boosts its Substitutes will be nearly impossible to break with physical attacks. Substitute also gives Eelektross more longevity, as it can slowly be worn down without the move by defensive Pokemon, but with Substitute its health will replenish at a faster rate. Return is a decent option over Substitute, as it gets good neutral coverage, especially against Tangela, who can take advantage of Dragon Tail's phasing effect to heal with Regenerator.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>Maximum investment in HP and Special Defense along with a Careful nature is typical of a bulky setup sweeper such as Eelektross, and aims to maximize its overall longevity by investing in the defensive stat that won't be boosted by Coil. However, it's worth using 84 Speed EVs to outspeed Tangela so Eelektross can use Substitute against it before it can hit Eelektross with Sleep Powder. Leftovers is Eelektross's only form of recovery, and greatly increases its longevity by enabling it to create more Substitutes. Thunder Wave is a good option over Substitute, since Eelektross is a great paralysis shuffler and its Dragon Tail will be truly fearsome after several boosts. However, Substitute is better if you want Eelektross to sweep, as Thunder Wave doesn't do anything for it in that department. Both Brick Break and Crunch are alternate coverage moves that can be used in place of Return, but their uses are few. Brick Break really only hits Absol and Golem, while Crunch finds little other use than to hit Musharna. While Dragon Claw may seem like a good option, it gets only slightly better coverage than Return and is weaker, and Dragon Tail, though weaker is important for phazing and racking up hazard damage.</p>

    <p> This set really appreciates hazards to take advantage of Dragon Tail's phasing effect, so Garbodor and Golem can be used for Spikes and Stealth Rock, respectively. This set has trouble with Tangela and Amoonguss, so powerful physical attackers that can break through them are appreciated, and can clean up once Eelektross has done its job. Braviary, Swellow, and Torterra are all good examples of these. Charizard is a great teammate that can take on Tangela, and Eelektross can mop the floor with Charizard's checks, such as Flareon. Charizard also appreciates the Spikes that should be partnered with Eelektross, wearing down each other's checks with entry hazard damage alone. Since Eelektross can deal heavy damage to most teams, having fast Pokemon such as the aforementioned Swellow as well as Cinccino to clean up can be very beneficial, especially since they can deal with offensive teams effectively. Paralysis support is always welcome from Pokemon such as Regirock, since it can give Eelektross the chance to get an extra boost or two, and one more unbroken Substitute equals one more chance to spread hazard damage. Also, it is a good idea to remove spinners before attempting to sweep, since they force you to make a difficult decision on whether to continue Eelektross's attempted sweep or keep your hazards intact. Frillish takes on Wartortle like a champ, and Misdreavus can spinblock effectively against Armaldo.</p>

    [Other Options]

    <p>Eelektross has a decent movepool that it can make use of, although no other set is quite as effective as the two listed above. Mixed sets are certainly a possibility, as Brick Break can be used to lure in Lickilicky and dispose of it while also beating physical walls. As such, a mixed set utilizing Coil is feasible too, with moves such as Thunder and Zap Cannon taking advantage of the accuracy boost that Coil provides. However, you lose out on much-needed bulk, and even with accuracy boosts Zap Cannon is still extremely unreliable. Eelektross is a reliable setter of Rain Dance, and can make use of perfectly accurate STAB Thunder, and its slow Volt Switch can bring in a rain sweeper unharmed. However, it faces stiff competition from Gardevoir in this department, who can set up Rain Dance multiple times and use Healing Wish to give a sweeper a second chance. Eelektross can run an offensive Coil set, utilizing a Chesto Berry along with Rest to set up a sweep. Similarly, Eelektross can use a Choice Band to boost the power of Wild Charge. However, Eelektross's coverage moves are mediocre and it can't break through physical walls with only Dragon Claw, Rock Slide, Return, Brick Break, and Crunch. Acrobatics is also a viable option, as with a Flying Gem intact it is a guaranteed 2HKO on Tangela. However, it doesn't grant coverage on any other notable threats.</p>

    [Checks and Counters]

    <p>While Eelektross's coverage, power, and ability to go either physical or special limit its number of checks and counters considerably, there are a few Pokemon who can claim to check it effectively. For special sets, Stunfisk, Lickilicky, and Probopass are arguably the best ways of dealing with Eelektross. Stunfisk is immune to Eelektross's STAB moves, and takes paltry damage from Grass Knot due its low weight. Stunfisk can then use Toxic to cripple Eelektross before slowly wearing it down with Scald. Lickilicky only fears an Acid Spray or two followed by Thunderbolt, otherwise it is a complete stop to special Eelektross. In fact, Lickilicky's Return has a small chance to 2HKO Eelektross after Stealth Rock, which is another way of dealing with it if you don't want to go down the Toxic stall route with Wish. Probopass is immensely bulky, and can paralyze Eelektross before wearing it down with Power Gem or Volt Switching out to a Pokemon that can take a predicted attack and dispose of it comfortably. Altaria can also take Eelektross's hits well, and with Roost can wall all of Eelektross's special attacks bar Acid Spray. Altaria can then either force it out with Perish Song or Toxic stall it to death.</p>

    <p>For physical sets, there are even fewer defensive Pokemon that can hope to take Eelektross on. Tangela is the best option for beating physical Eelektross, as it outspeeds Eelektross that don't invest in Speed, and can hit it with Sleep Powder before it can cause any damage. Also, Dragon Tail will heal Tangela because of Regenerator, while Eelektross will be slowly worn down. Bastiodon is also a good check to physical Eelektross, although it will struggle after Eelektross has attained a few boosts. It only takes minimal damage from Wild Charge before Eelektross has accumulated several boosts, but it must watch out for Dragon Tail if attempting to phaze. Once Eelektross's Substitute is broken, it must make a difficult choice between being phazed out by Roar or being hit by Toxic as it uses Dragon Tail.</p>

    <p>While there isn't really much else that can switch in to Eelektross very easily, it will fall to repeated powerful attacks, so for offensive teams that is the best option. Pinsir and Rampardos both get special mentions here, as they can take advantage of Mold Breaker to OHKO Eelektross with a super effective Earthquake. While Eelektross is extremely threatening on paper, in practice it is beaten by lots of threats, mainly due to its low Speed. Choice item users are usually the best way of dealing with it, especially those wielding Choice Band or Choice Specs. It's best to hit Eelektross hard right off the bat, lest it retaliate and sweep. Exeggutor, Absol, Sawk, and Charizard are among the strongest Pokemon in the tier, and many of them use Choice items to increase their power tremendously. For offensive teams, the best way to beat Eelektross is to keep attacking it, since it will die eventually.</p>
  2. Amarillo

    Amarillo Returned for now for X
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    [Overview]

    <p>Before BW was (I can see why you think it’s plural, being black and white, after all. But I think BW refers to the whole metagame, and like how GSC and DPP are singular (I think) BW is a singular noun?) released, there wasn't yet an Electric-type that had Levitate to negate its sole weakness to Ground-type attacks. Eelektross is the prototype of this new breed, and it's itching for a test run. In fact, it's the only NU Pokemon that has no weaknesses, with Sableye and Spiritomb being more useful locked up in higher tiers. However, Eelektross still has its fair share of, has few more things going for it. First, I don't think 'However' is appropriate. There is not really any contrast there. In fact, I’d say no weakness is a benefit. (Yes, Spiritomb's lack of resistances isn't, but that's not the point.) Eelektross was blessed with great mixed attacking stats, as base 115 Attack and 105 Special Attack are more than enough to strike fear into the heart of your opponent. However, its lack of good high-powered STAB and coverage moves leave it passed over by other attackers with similar stats such as Emboar, Magmortar, and Samurott. Thunderbolt isn't a low base powered move and it has good special coverage like you mentioned below. (mention physically or something) ?_?) Eelektross's only real boosting move is Coil, which finds use on physical sets but Eelektross instead wishes it had a move to boost its Special Attack so it could take advantage of its great special coverage. However, this means that Eelektross can go either physical or special without any trouble, leaving it difficult for your opponent to guess which set you're using. Its lack of boosting moves isn't its main issue; its main issue is that if it wants to boost it doesn't have a recovery move and is very slow to boot. If it had NP or something I still wouldn't use it. It’d be like using NP Slowking that doesn't have Regen, Slack Off, nor Trick Room, to put it in perspective. And you just said it has trouble pulling off a good physical set?</p>

    <p>That being said, Eelektross is a fine Choice Specs user, and fits well on VoltTurn or Choice-based teams. This is largely due to its good bulk, as well as its coverage. 85/80/80 defenses are great for an offensive Pokemon in NU, since even without investment it retains a great deal of bulk. Once Eelektross gets in it causes havoc by forcing switches, on a massive level, and can take advantage of hazards greatly due to its coverage and Dragon Tail. However, its atrocious base 50 Speed leaves it from accomplishing much, and is pretty much the only thing holding holds Eelektross back from becoming a top-tier threat . Look on the bright side, though. EVs that would've been used for Speed are now more useful in HP for Eelektross, cementing and cements its role as a bulky attacker. Unfortunately, Eelektross's bulk doesn't come with useful resistances, since outside of its Ground-type immunity the only important move its resists is Brave Bird. its only important resistances are to Flying- and Electric-type moves. Nevertheless, once Eelektross gets in it causes havoc by forcing switches on a massive level, and can take advantage of hazards greatly due to its coverage and Dragon Tail. Though it may seem to have a lot of things going for it, in practice Eelektross just isn't as good as it may seem on paper.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Special Attacker
    move 1: Volt Switch
    move 2: Flamethrower
    move 3: Grass Knot
    move 4: Thunderbolt / Acid Spray
    item: Choice Specs / Leftovers
    ability: Levitate
    nature: Modest
    evs: 172 HP / 252 SpA / 84 Spe

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>A specially attacking set comes to mind instantly when looking at Eelektross. Its takes advantage of all of Eelektross's strengths: great coverage, power, and bulk. are all taken advantage of in this set, and Eelektross is a very good bulky attacker. This set is also good for its Its slow Volt Switch allows you to keep momentum while bringing in a frail sweeper free of charge while capitalizing on hazards immensely. (add period) Is 'free of charge' supposed to be a pun? =P Volt Switch to its coverage moves to Acid Spray, all forcing your opponent's Pokemon out., Acid Spray, and its coverage moves all forces out your opponent's Pokemon. This set is especially good a tearing apart defensive cores, since it has Acid Spray to become a special wall's worst nightmare, and can easily destroy physical walls such as Tangela and Quagsire. It can be a great asset for Spikes-stacking teams, although it is useful on other types of offensive teams as well. This set can function as a momentum grabber, hazard abuser, and bulky attacker all in one. Therefore, it can be played like one, two, or all of the above. Levitate is very useful on this set as well, since even if your opponent manages to lay their own hazards down Eelektross will only take minimal damage from them.</p>

    The way you comment on the set, sounds as if Leftovers + Acid Spray sounds better?

    <p>Volt Switch is also the primary STAB move of this set, and is chosen for the reasons outlined above. Flamethrower is a great move for Eelektross, as it is primarily used to hit Grass-types that resist Volt Switch. Tangela, Amoonguss, and Sawsbuck can't be allowed to get a free switch-in, but Flamethrower puts them in their place. It is also very useful against Cryogonal, since with Choice Specs Eelektross has a chance to 2HKO it, although Leftovers versions can't accomplish this even with Stealth Rock in play. Grass Knot rounds out Eelektross's coverage by hitting Ground-types that try to come in for free on Volt Switch, specifically Golem and Quagsire since they resist Flamethrower as well. Thunderbolt is the preferred option in the last slot mainly because Eelektross likes having a powerful STAB move that doesn't force it to switch. (add period) , and adds to your opponent's difficulty with prediction even more. However, Acid Spray is another great choice that also messes with your opponent, as it forces your opponent to switch before they get destroyed. Note that Thunderbolt generally has more use when using Choice Specs, while Acid Spray is more effective when using Leftovers.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>The recommended EV spread emphasizes bulk and power as much as possible, while 84 Speed EVs are used to outrun minimum Speed Tangela. You could invest fully in HP, but otherwise Eelektross wouldn't be able to avoid Tangela's Sleep Powder. The choice of item is very important, as both listed items play with significant differences from each other. Choice Specs is the primary option to hit hard, and is a better wallbreaker and hazard abuser than Leftovers. turns Eelektross into a better wallbreaker and hazard abuser than Leftovers does. Choice Specs is not the wallbreaker, and Leftovers is not a wallbreaker either. The Pokemon is. However, Leftovers does allow Eelektross to make better use of its incredible coverage, and also provides slightly increased longevity. Both items have their pros and cons, but you could also go for a compromise in between them withLife Orb or Expert Belt is a compromise, but Life Orb detracts from Eelektross's bulk significantly. Life Orb plays more similarly to Choice Specs, while Expert Belt plays more similarly to Leftovers. Both detract from Eelektross's longevity greatly, especially the former, while if not being locked into a move Leftovers is appreciated more than an Expert Belt. The last bit doesn't make any sense…Ebelt doesn't take away health, and the very last bit is incomprehensible.</p>

    <p>This set can also make use of moves other than the ones listed above. In particular, Hidden Power Ice completes Eelektross's incredible coverage by forming a pseudo-BoltBeam combination. Specifically, Altaria, Rotom-S, and Torterra are all hit harder by it than any other move. Specifically, it hits Altaria, Rotom-S, and Torterra than any of its other coverage options. However, it generally gets less use than either Thunderbolt or Acid Spray. Thunder Wave is also a viable option on this set, since it allows Eelektross to become a self-supporting sweeper that can also provide support for teammates. If using Thunder Wave, be sure to use Leftovers for the ability to switch moves. If using Choice Specs, using U-turn over Volt Switch can also work, and is especially useful when you don't want Eelektross to be trapped by Ground-types if you mispredict. Thunderbolt can cover for a lack of a STAB move, although Volt Switch will be a lot more powerful than U-turn because of investment and Choice Specs. Charge Beam is worth considering too, since it functions similarly to Acid Spray but isn't negated when your opponent switches, making it even more terrifying for defensive teams. However, it takes longer for it to work, especially since Charge Beam can either miss, or fail to raise Eelektross's Special Attack.</p>

    <p>Spikes support is crucial when using Eelektross, as it can take advantage of hazards greatly because of the immense amount of switches that it forces. This is improved even further by using Eelektross on a VoltTurn team, and Eelektross has access to both moves. Both Cacturne and Garbodor can set up Spikes, and Swellow is a good partner that can form a VoltTurn core. Although Eelektross can break down most bulky Rock- and Ground-types by 2HKOing them, both Probopass and Bastiodon are exceptions to this because they are immune to Acid Spray and can hit Eelektross with Toxic to bring it down. Gurdurr is a good partner that can take care of them, and is only aided by Toxic. benefits from Toxic thanks to Guts. (add period) Either paralysis support or Trick Room support can be used if you want Eelektross to attempt a sweep; while Regirock or Gardevoir can be good partners, Eelektross doesn't require this type of support to be effective since it's not designed to be a sweeper. The phrase is either…or, or both…and. Both…and is wrong. I used either…or because both clearly doesn't make sense in the context. However, it does function as a great lure for many bulky Rock- and Ground-types such as Regirock, Golem, and Quagsire. Pokemon that can take advantage of their absence such as Swellow and Kangaskhan are great partners. (add period) that really appreciate Eelektross's presence.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Coil
    move 1: Coil
    move 2: Wild Charge
    move 3: Dragon Tail
    move 4: Substitute / Return
    item: Leftovers
    ability: Levitate
    nature: Careful
    evs: 252 HP / 4 Def / 252 SpD

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>This set functions vastly differently to the special attacker set, since instead of trying to cause as much damage as possible over a few turns, this set aims to set up a sweep by attaining many boosts. Eelektross's only real boosting move is put to good use in this set, and it complements Eelektross's naturally high Attack. This set is a great cleaner and is more effective against defensive teams, which find it very difficult to beat. Eelektross's immunity to hazards really comes in handy here, and is one of the main things separating it from other Coil users such as Arbok. This set is good on defensive teams mainly because it has great bulk with investment, and is a great way for stall to destroy opposing stall. However, this set isn't as effective against offensive teams, since it's rather weak without a couple of boosts and only has Leftovers recovery, making it worn down rather easily. As such, the best way to defeat this set is to hit it hard with whatever you've got, and Eelektross will eventually die to powerful STAB moves.</p>

    <p>Eelektross has a poor physical movepool, and its only usable STAB option is Wild Charge. While its power is only decent after a couple of boosts, it comes with unappreciated recoil that can bring Eelektross to its death more quickly. However, its positives outweigh its negatives, as it is literally Eelektross's only physical STAB move. Dragon Tail is the best out of Eelektross's few coverage options, and allows it to slowly wear down Ground-types that are immune to Wild Charge. It also has the great effect of phazing, so it prevents both slower Pokemon such as Bastiodon from phazing Eelektross as well as stop opposing setup sweepers from boosting alongside it. Substitute allows Eelektross to avoid crippling status such as Toxic, and after a few boosts its Substitutes will be nearly impossible to break. It also lets Eelektross more longevity, as it can slowly be worn down without the move by defensive Pokemon but with Substitute its health will replenish at a faster rate. Return is a decent option over Substitute, as it gets good neutral coverage especially against Tangela, which will only heal itself if it's phazed due to Regenerator.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>Maximum investment in HP and Special Defense along with a Careful nature is typical of a bulky setup sweeper such as Eelektross, and aims to maximize its overall longevity by investing in the defensive stat that won't be boosted by Coil. However, it's worth using 84 Speed EVs to outspeed Tangela so Eelektross can use Substitute against it before it can hit Eelektross with Sleep Powder. Leftovers is Eelektross's only form of recovery, and greatly increases its longevity by letting it create more Substitutes. Thunder Wave is a good option over Substitute, since Eelektross is a great paralysis shuffler and its Dragon Tails will be truly fearsome after several boosts. However, Substitute is better if you want Eelektross to sweep, as Thunder Wave doesn't do anything for it in that department. Both Brick Break and Crunch are alternate coverage moves that can be used in place of Return, but their uses are few. Brick Break really only hits Absol and Golem, while Crunch finds little other use than to hit Musharna. While Dragon Claw may seem like a good option, it gets almost the same coverage as Return but is weaker, and Dragon Tail is used to phaze and rack up hazard damage.</p>

    <p>Hazards are a necessity when using any Eelektross set, and this set is no exception. This set really appreciates hazards to take advantage of when phazing with Dragon Tail, so Garbodor and Golem can be used for Spikes and Stealth Rock, respectively. This set has trouble with Tangela and Quagsire, so powerful physical attackers that can break through them are appreciated, and can clean up once Eelektross has done its job. Braviary, Swellow, and Torterra are all good examples of these. Magmortar is a great teammate that is a perfect counter to Tangela, and Eelektross can mop the floor with Magmortar's checks, such as Flareon. Magmortar also appreciates the Spikes that are inevitably bound to Eelektross, and can wear down each other's checks with entry hazard damage alone. Since Eelektross can deal heavy damage to most teams, having fast Pokemon such as the aforementioned Swellow as well as Cinccino to clean up can be very beneficial, especially since they can deal with offensive teams effectively. Paralysis support is always welcome from Pokemon such as Regirock, since it can allow Eelektross to get an extra boost or two, and one more unbroken Substitute equals one more chance to spread hazard damage. Also, it is a good idea to remove spinners before attempting to sweep, since they force you to make a difficult decision whether to continue Eelektross's attempted sweep or keep your hazards intact. Skuntank is great for getting rid of Cryogonal, and Misdreavus can spinblock effectively against Armaldo.</p>

    [Other Options]

    <p>Eelektross has a decent movepool that it can make use of, although no other set is quite as effective as the two listed above. Mixed sets are certainly a possibility, as Brick Break can be used to lure in Lickilicky and dispose of it while also beating physical walls. As such, a mixed set utilizing Coil is feasible too, with moves such as Thunder and Zap Cannon taking advantage of the accuracy boost that Coil provides. However, you lose out on much-needed bulk, and even with accuracy boosts Zap Cannon is still extremely unreliable. Eelektross is a reliable setter of Rain Dance, and can abuse perfectly accurate STAB Thunder, and along with its slow Volt Switch can bring in a rain sweeper unharmed. However, it faces strict [color] I think strict might not be the word you're looking for there… competition from Gardevoir in this department, which can set up Rain Dance multiple times and use Healing Wish to give a sweeper a second chance. Eelektross can run an offensive Coil set, utilizing a Chesto Berry along with Rest to set up a sweep. Similarly, Eelektross can use a Choice Band to showcase the power of Wild Charge. However, its coverage moves are mediocre and Eelektross can't break through physical walls with only Dragon Claw, Rock Slide, Return, Brick Break, and Crunch. Acrobatics is also a viable option, as with a Flying Gem intact it is a guaranteed 2HKO on Tangela. However, it serves no other purpose.</p>

    [Checks and Counters]

    <p>While Eelektross's coverage, power, and ability to go either physical or special limit its number of checks and counters considerably, there are a few Pokemon that can claim to check it effectively. For special sets, Stunfisk, Lickilicky, and Probopass are arguably the best ways of dealing with Eelektross. Stunfisk is immune to Eelektross's STAB moves, and only takes paltry damage from Grass Knot due its low Base Power against Stunfisk. Stunfisk can then use Toxic to cripple Eelektross, and can then wear it down with Scald. Lickilicky only fears an Acid Spray or two followed by Thunderbolt, but otherwise is a complete stop to special Eelektross. In fact, Lickilicky's Return has a small chance to 2HKO Eelektross after Stealth Rock, which is another way of dealing with it if you don't want to go the Toxic stall route with Wish. Probopass is immensely bulky, and can paralyze Eelektross before wearing it down with Power Gem, or Volt Switching out to a Pokemon that can take a predicted attack and dispose of it comfortably. Altaria can also take Eelektross's hits well, and with Roost can resist all of Eelektross's special moveset bar Acid Spray. Altaria can then either force it out with Perish Song or Toxic it to its death.</p>

    <p>For physical sets, there are even fewer defensive Pokemon that can hope to take it on. Quagsire is by far the best counter to defensive sets, as Unaware lets it take minimal damage from any of Eelektross's moves. It can slowly wear it down with repeated Scalds or Waterfalls before going in for the kill with Toxic once Eelektross can no longer create Substitutes. Tangela is another good option for beating physical Eelektross, as it outspeeds Eelektross that don't invest in Speed, and can hit it with Sleep Powder before it can cause any damage. Also, Dragon Tail will only heal Tangela because of Regenerator, while Eelektross will be slowly worn down. Bastiodon is a good check to physical Eelektross, although it will struggle after Eelektross has attained a few boosts. It only takes minimal damage from Wild Charge before Eelektross has accumulated several boosts, but it must watch out for Dragon Tail if attempting to phaze. Once Eelektross's Substitute is broken, it must make a difficult choice between being phazed out by Roar or being hit by Toxic as it uses Dragon Tail.</p>

    <p>While there isn't really much else that can switch in to Eelektross very easily, it will fall to repeated powerful attacks, so for offensive teams that is the best option. Be careful however, as one of the strongest attacks in the tier, Choice Specs Magmortar's Fire Blast, is only an OHKO 50% of the time. Magmortar is still a good check though, as with Stealth Rock in play the OHKO is guaranteed on the special attacker set. Pinsir and Rampardos both get special mention here, as they can both take advantage of Mold Breaker to OHKO Eelektross with a super effective Earthquake. While Eelektross is extremely threatening on paper, in practice it is beaten by lots of threats mainly due to its low Speed. Choice item users are usually the best way of dealing with it, especially those wielding Choice Band or Choice Specs. It's best to hit Eelektross hard off the bat, lest it retaliate and beat you. Exeggutor, Torterra, Absol, Skuntank, Braviary, Sawk, Kangaskhan, Haunter, Charizard, and Swellow are among the strongest Pokemon in the tier, and many of them use Choice items to increase their power tremendously. For offensive teams, the best way to beat Eelektross is to keep attacking it, since it will die eventually.</p> That list looks a little excessive...
  3. Oglemi

    Oglemi #bananarepublic
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    c_l address Amarillo's am check and suggestions, and then I'll GP this.
  4. Amarillo

    Amarillo Returned for now for X
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    Now that Oglemi has brought this to my attention: I forgot to mention in the amcheck but Thunderbolt hits Rotom-S harder than Hidden Power Ice, so you should really mention only Altaria + Torterra as its main targets.
  5. Omicron

    Omicron
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    Eel learns Giga Drain via move tutor, so I'd say that's a much better alternative to Grass Knot since it provides healing and still grants the same koes on quaggy and golem.
  6. erisia

    erisia (macho) brace yourselves
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    Yeah, Eelektross gained a lot of shit with the release of the new games. Aqua Tail, Drain Punch, Fire Punch, Giga Drain, Signal Beam, Sleep Talk, Super Fang, Superpower and Thunderpunch all deserve discussion. The Coil sets at least are going to need some serious updates, as not only has Eelektross's coverage increased significantly, it can also use a Crotross set with Rest / Sleep Talk / Coil / Wild Charge or something.

    Unfortunately, I think we're going to need to put Eelektross through QC again unless we want to quickly upload this analysis in the meantime. In which case, no Giga Drain mention.
  7. complete legitimacy

    complete legitimacy one for the future
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    Ok, implemented Amarillo's check. Actually though, HP Ice does hit Rotom-S slightly harder than Thunderbolt (95 X 1.5 = 137.5, 70 X 2 = 140) so I kept that in. Derp.

    Yeah, I don't know what you guys want to do with this, but I'm fine either way (although I would prefer not having all this writing go to waste :P). In any case, I've removed all mentions of banned Pokemon if that's the way you all decide to go with this.
  8. Zebraiken

    Zebraiken with splinters in our teeth, we're driven from our parallels
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    I already posted about this a while back, and C_L decided to write his up before BW2. There's no need for us to delete the write-up and keep it offsite for longer, especially since it's been NU since January and hasn't had an analysis yet. Eelektross will simply be revamped sometime in the near future.
  9. Amarillo

    Amarillo Returned for now for X
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    95 * 1.5 = 142.5

    ?_?
  10. Django

    Django
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    ^STAB Thunderbolt is more powerful than SE HP Ice.
  11. Jukain

    Jukain literally jesus
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    am check incoming!!!!
    Add

    Remove

    <Comments>

    Check (open)

    [Overview]

    <p>Before BW was released, there wasn't yet an Electric-type that had Levitate to negate its sole weakness to Ground-type attacks. Eelektross is the prototype of this new breed, and it's itching for a test run. In fact, it's the only NU Pokemon that has no weaknesses, with Sableye and Spiritomb locked up in higher tiers. Eelektross has a few more things going for it. Eelektross was blessed with great mixed attacking stats, as base 115 Attack and 105 Special Attack are more than enough to strike fear into the heart of your opponent. However, its lack of good high-powered physical STAB and coverage moves leave it passed over by other attackers with similar stats such as Emboar, Braviary, and Sawk. Eelektross's only real boosting move is Coil, which finds use on physical sets,(add comma) but Eelektross wishes it had a recovery move to last longer, especially because of its low Speed.</p>

    <p>That being said, Eelektross is a fine Choice Specs user, and fits well on VoltTurn or Choice-based teams. This is largely due to its good decent bulk, as well as its coverage. 85/80/80 defenses are great for an offensive Pokemon in NU, since even without investment it retains a great deal of bulk. Once Eelektross gets in,(add comma) it causes havoc by forcing multiple switches,(add comma) mainly due to its great coverage.(add period) Since it is forcing switches,(add comma) it and can take advantage of entry hazards,(add comma) mainly greatly due to its fantastic coverage and Dragon Tail. However, its atrocious base 50 Speed holds Eelektross back from becoming a top-tier threat and cements its role as a bulky attacker. Unfortunately, Eelektross's bulk doesn't come with useful resistances, since outside of its Ground-type immunity its only important resistances are to Flying- and Electric-type moves. Though it may seem to have a lot of things going for it, in practice Eelektross just isn't as good as it may seem on paper.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Special Attacker
    move 1: Volt Switch
    move 2: Flamethrower
    move 3: Grass Knot
    move 4: Thunderbolt / Acid Spray
    item: Choice Specs / Leftovers
    ability: Levitate
    nature: Modest
    evs: 172 HP / 252 SpA / 84 Spe

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>A specially attacking set takes advantage of all of Eelektross's strengths: great coverage, power, and bulk. Its slow Volt Switch allows you to keep momentum while bringing in a frail sweeper free of charge while capitalizing on entry hazards immensely. Volt Switch, Acid Spray, and its coverage moves all force out your opponent's Pokemon. This set is especially good at tearing apart defensive cores, since it has Acid Spray to become a special wall's worst nightmare, and can use Eelektross's coverage moves to easily destroy physical walls such as Tangela and Amoonguss. Thunderbolt is usually superior to Acid Spray though, since Eelektross poses a larger threat when equipped with Choice Specs and Thunderbolt doesn't force Eelektross to switch. It can be a great asset for Spikes-stacking teams, although it is useful on other types of offensive teams as well. This set can function as a momentum grabber, hazard abuser, and bulky attacker all in one. Levitate is very useful on this set as well, since even if your opponent manages to lay their own hazards down,(add comma) Eelektross will only take minimal damage from them Stealth Rock.</p>

    <p>Volt Switch is the primary STAB move of this set, and is chosen for the reasons outlined above. Flamethrower is a great move for Eelektross, as it is primarily used to hit Grass-types that resist Volt Switch. Tangela, Amoonguss, and Sawsbuck can't be allowed to get a free switch-in, but and Flamethrower puts them in their place. Grass Knot rounds out Eelektross's coverage by hitting Ground-types that try to come in for free on Volt Switch, specifically Golem and Camerupt since they resist Flamethrower as well. Thunderbolt is the preferred option in the last slot mainly because Eelektross likes having a powerful STAB move that doesn't force it to switch. However, Acid Spray is another great choice that also messes with your opponent, as it forces your opponent them to switch before they get destroyed. Note that Thunderbolt generally has more use when using Choice Specs, while Acid Spray is more effective when using Leftovers.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>The recommended EV spread emphasizes bulk and power as much as possible, while with 84 Speed EVs are used to outrun minimum Speed Tangela. You could invest fully in HP, but otherwise in doing so,(add comma) Eelektross wouldn't isn't be able to avoid Tangela's Sleep Powder. The choice of item is very important, as both listed items play with significant differences from each other. Choice Specs is the primary option to hit the hardest possible, and turns turning Eelektross into a better wallbreaker and hazard abuser than Leftovers does. However, Leftovers does allow Eelektross to make better use of its incredible coverage, and also providesing slightly increased longevity. Life Orb or Expert Belt is a compromise, but Life Orb detracts from Eelektross's bulk significantly, and if Eelektross isn't locked into a move, it should be using Leftovers.</p>

    <p>This set can also make use of moves other than the ones listed above. In particular, Hidden Power Ice completes Eelektross's incredible coverage by forming a pseudo-BoltBeam combination. Specifically, it hits Altaria and Torterra harder than any of its other coverage options. However, it generally gets less use than either Thunderbolt or Acid Spray. Thunder Wave is also a viable option on this set, since it allows Eelektross to become a self-supporting sweeper that can also provide support for teammates. If using Thunder Wave, be sure to use Leftovers for the ability to switch moves. If using Choice Specs, using U-turn over Volt Switch can also work, and is especially useful when you don't want Eelektross to be trapped by Ground-types if you mispredict. Thunderbolt can cover for a lack of a STAB move, although Volt Switch will be a lot more powerful than U-turn because of investment and Choice Specs. Charge Beam is worth considering too as well, since it functions similarly to Acid Spray but isn't negated when your opponent switches, making it even more terrifying for defensive teams. However, it takes longer for it to work, especially since Charge Beam can either miss, or fail to raise Eelektross's Special Attack.</p>

    <p>Spikes support is crucial when using Eelektross, as it can take advantage of entry hazards greatly because of the immense amount of switches that it forces. This is improved even further by using Eelektross on a VoltTurn team, and Eelektross has access to both moves. Both Cacturne and Garbodor can set up Spikes, and Swellow is a good partner that can form a VoltTurn core with Eelektross. Although Eelektross can break down most bulky Rock- and Ground-types by 2HKOing them, both Probopass and Bastiodon are exceptions to this because they are immune to Acid Spray and can hit Eelektross with Toxic to bring wear it down. Gurdurr is a good partner that can take care of them, and benefits from Toxic thanks to Guts. Either paralysis support or Trick Room support can be used if you want Eelektross to attempt a sweep; while Regirock or Gardevoir can be good partners, Eelektross doesn't require this type of support to be effective since it's not designed to be a sweeper. However, it does function as a great lure for many bulky Rock- and Ground-types such as Regirock, Golem, and Probopass. Pokemon that can take advantage of their absence,(add comma) such as Swellow and Kangaskhan,(add comma) are great partners.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Coil
    move 1: Coil
    move 2: Wild Charge
    move 3: Dragon Tail
    move 4: Substitute / Return
    item: Leftovers
    ability: Levitate
    nature: Careful
    evs: 252 HP / 4 Def / 252 SpD

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>This set functions vastly differently to the special attacker set, since instead of trying to cause as much damage as possible over a few turns, this set aims to set up a sweep by attaining many boosts. Eelektross's only real boosting move is put to good use in this set, and it complements Eelektross's naturally high Attack. This set is a great cleaner and is more effective against defensive teams, which find it very difficult to beat. Eelektross's immunity to hazards really comes in handy here, and is one of the main things separating it from other Coil users,(add comma) such as Arbok. This set is good on defensive teams mainly because it has great bulk with investment, and is a great way for stall to destroy opposing stall. However, this set isn't as effective against offensive teams, since it's rather weak without a couple of boosts and only has Leftovers recovery, making it worn down rather easily. As such, the best way to defeat this set is to hit it hard with whatever you've got, and Eelektross will eventually die to powerful STAB moves.</p>

    <p>Eelektross has a poor physical movepool, and its only usable STAB option is Wild Charge. While its power is only decent after a couple of boosts, it comes with unappreciated recoil that can bring Eelektross to its death more quickly. However, its positives outweigh its negatives, as it is literally Eelektross's only physical STAB move. Dragon Tail is the best out of Eelektross's few coverage options, and allowsing it to slowly wear down Ground-types that are immune to Wild Charge. It also has the great effect of phazing, so it preventsing both slower Pokemon such as like Bastiodon from phazing Eelektross as well as stop opposing setup sweepers from boosting alongside it. Substitute allows Eelektross to avoid crippling status such as like Toxic, and after a few boosts,(add comma) its Substitutes will be nearly impossible to break. It also lets gives Eelektross more longevity, as it can slowly be worn down without the move by defensive Pokemon,(add comma) but with Substitute its health will replenish at a faster rate. Return is a decent option over Substitute, as it gets good neutral coverage,(add comma) especially against Tangela, which will only heal itself if it's phazed due to Regenerator.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>Maximum investment in HP and Special Defense along with a Careful nature is typical of a bulky setup sweeper such as Eelektross, and aims to maximize its overall longevity by investing in the defensive stat that won't be boosted by Coil. However, it's worth using 84 Speed EVs to outspeed Tangela so Eelektross can use Substitute against it before it can hit Eelektross with Sleep Powder. Leftovers is Eelektross's only form of recovery, and greatly increases its longevity by letting it create more Substitutes. Thunder Wave is a good option over Substitute, since Eelektross is a great paralysis shuffler and its Dragon Tails will be truly fearsome after several boosts. However, Substitute is better if you want Eelektross to sweep, as Thunder Wave doesn't do anything for it in that department. Both Brick Break and Crunch are alternate coverage moves that can be used in place of Return, but their uses are few. Brick Break really only hits Absol and Golem, while Crunch finds little other use than to hit Musharna. While Dragon Claw may seem like a good option, it gets almost the same coverage as Return but is weaker, and Dragon Tail is used to phaze and rack up hazard damage.</p>

    <p>Hazards are a necessity when using any Eelektross set, and this set is no exception. This set really appreciates hazards to take advantage of when phazing with Dragon Tail, so Garbodor and Golem can be used for Spikes and Stealth Rock, respectively. This set has trouble with Tangela and Amoonguss, so powerful physical attackers that can break through them are appreciated, and can clean up once Eelektross has done its job. Braviary, Swellow, and Torterra are all good examples of these. Charizard is a great teammate that can take on Tangela, and Eelektross can mop the floor with Charizard's checks, such as Flareon. Charizard also appreciates the Spikes that are inevitably bound to be partnered with Eelektross, and can wearing down each other's checks with entry hazard damage alone. Since Eelektross can deal heavy damage to most teams, having fast Pokemon such as the aforementioned Swellow as well as Cinccino to clean up can be very beneficial, especially since they can deal with offensive teams effectively. Paralysis support is always welcome from Pokemon such as Regirock, since it can allow Eelektross to get an extra boost or two, and one more unbroken Substitute equals one more chance to spread hazard damage. Also, it is a good idea to remove spinners before attempting to sweep, since they force you to make a difficult decision on whether to continue Eelektross's attempted sweep or keep your hazards intact. Frillish takes on Wartortle like a champ, and Misdreavus can spinblock effectively against Armaldo.</p>

    [Other Options]

    <p>Eelektross has a decent movepool that it can make use of, although no other set is quite as effective as the two listed above. Mixed sets are certainly a possibility, as Brick Break can be used to lure in Lickilicky and dispose of it while also beating physical walls. As such, a mixed set utilizing Coil is feasible too, with moves such as Thunder and Zap Cannon taking advantage of the accuracy boost that Coil provides. However, you lose out on much-needed bulk, and even with accuracy boosts Zap Cannon is still extremely unreliable. Eelektross is a reliable setter of Rain Dance, and can abuse perfectly accurate STAB Thunder, and its slow Volt Switch can bring in a rain sweeper unharmed. However, it faces stiff competition from Gardevoir in this department, which can set up Rain Dance multiple times and use Healing Wish to give a sweeper a second chance. Eelektross can run an offensive Coil set, utilizing a Chesto Berry along with Rest to set up a sweep. Similarly, Eelektross can use a Choice Band to showcase the power of Wild Charge. However, its coverage moves are mediocre and Eelektross can't break through physical walls with only Dragon Claw, Rock Slide, Return, Brick Break, and Crunch. Acrobatics is also a viable option, as with a Flying Gem intact it is a guaranteed 2HKO on Tangela. However, it serves no other purpose.</p>

    [Checks and Counters]

    <p>While Eelektross's coverage, power, and ability to go either physical or special limit its number of checks and counters considerably, there are a few Pokemon that can claim to check it effectively. For special sets, Stunfisk, Lickilicky, and Probopass are arguably the best ways of dealing with Eelektross. Stunfisk is immune to Eelektross's STAB moves, and only takes paltry damage from Grass Knot due its low Base Power against Stunfisk weight. Stunfisk can then use Toxic to cripple Eelektross, and can then after that slowly wearing it down with Scald. Lickilicky only fears an Acid Spray or two followed by Thunderbolt, but otherwise is being a complete stop to special Eelektross. In fact, Lickilicky's Return has a small chance to 2HKO Eelektross after Stealth Rock, which is another way of dealing with it if you don't want to go the Toxic stall route with Wish. Probopass is immensely bulky, and can paralyze Eelektross before wearing it down with Power Gem,(remove comma) or Volt Switching out to a Pokemon that can take a predicted attack and dispose of it comfortably. Altaria can also take Eelektross's hits well, and with Roost can resist wall of Eelektross's special moveset attacks bar Acid Spray. Altaria can then either force it out with Perish Song or Toxic stall it to its death.</p>

    <p>For physical sets, there are even fewer defensive Pokemon that can hope to take it on. Tangela is the best option for beating physical Eelektross, as it outspeeds Eelektross that don't invest in Speed, and can hit it with Sleep Powder before it can cause any damage. Also, Dragon Tail will only heal Tangela because of Regenerator, while Eelektross will be slowly worn down. Bastiodon is also a good check to physical Eelektross, although it will struggle after Eelektross has attained a few boosts. It only takes minimal damage from Wild Charge before Eelektross has accumulated several boosts, but it must watch out for Dragon Tail if attempting to phaze. Once Eelektross's Substitute is broken, it must make a difficult choice between being phazed out by Roar or being hit by Toxic as it uses Dragon Tail.</p>

    <p>While there isn't really much else that can switch in to Eelektross very easily, it will fall to repeated powerful attacks, so for offensive teams that is the best option. Pinsir and Rampardos both get special mentions here, as they can both take advantage of Mold Breaker to OHKO Eelektross with a super effective Earthquake. While Eelektross is extremely threatening on paper, in practice it is beaten by lots of threats,(add comma) mainly due to its low Speed. Choice item users are usually the best way of dealing with it, especially those wielding Choice Band or Choice Specs. It's best to hit Eelektross hard right off the bat, lest it retaliate and beat sweep you. Exeggutor, Absol, Sawk, and Charizard are among the strongest Pokemon in the tier, and many of them use Choice items to increase their power tremendously. For offensive teams, the best way to beat Eelektross is to keep attacking it, since it will die eventually.</p>
  12. Oglemi

    Oglemi #bananarepublic
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    Stamping the combination of Amarillo and pokemon0078's checks

    [​IMG]

    c_l be sure to address pokemon's check before this get it's last GP check
  13. complete legitimacy

    complete legitimacy one for the future
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    Thanks guys. Implemented most of pokemon0078's check, with notable exceptions being that rewording in the second paragraph of the Overview (ended up being extremely redundant) and such as > like.
  14. SkullCandy

    SkullCandy She Bangs The Drums
    is a Contributor Alumnus

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    for simplicity's sake implement melvni's check first and then mine. The diff version is assuming all of melvni's changes have been implemented.

    c/p (open)
    [Overview]

    <p>Before BW was released, there wasn't yet an Electric-type that had Levitate to negate its sole weakness to Ground-type attacks. Eelektross is the prototype of this new breed, and it's itching for a test run. In fact, it's the only NU Pokemon that has no weaknesses, with Sableye and Spiritomb locked up in higher tiers. Eelektross has a few more things going for it. Eelektross was blessed with great mixed attacking stats, as base 115 Attack and 105 Special Attack are more than enough to strike fear into the heart of your opponent. However, its lack of good high-powered physical STAB and coverage moves leave it passed over by other attackers with similar stats such as Emboar, Braviary, and Sawk. Eelektross's only real boosting move is Coil, which finds use on physical sets, but Eelektross wishes it had a recovery move to last longer, especially because of its low Speed.</p>

    <p>That being said, Eelektross is a fine Choice Specs user, and fits well on VoltTurn or Choice-based teams. This is largely due to its good bulk, as well as its coverage. 85/80/80 defenses are great for an offensive Pokemon in NU, since even without investment it retains a great deal of bulk. Once Eelektross gets in, it causes havoc by forcing multiple switches, and can take advantage of entry hazards mainly thanks to its fantastic coverage and access to Dragon Tail. However, its atrocious base 50 Speed holds Eelektross back from becoming a top-tier threat and cements its role as a bulky attacker. Unfortunately, Eelektross's bulk doesn't come with useful resistances, since outside of its Ground-type immunity its only important resistances are to Flying- and Electric-type moves. Though it may seem to have a lot of things going for it, Eelektross just isn't as good in practice as it may seem on paper.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Special Attacker
    move 1: Volt Switch
    move 2: Flamethrower
    move 3: Grass Knot
    move 4: Thunderbolt / Acid Spray
    item: Choice Specs / Leftovers
    ability: Levitate
    nature: Modest
    evs: 172 HP / 252 SpA / 84 Spe

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>A specially attacking set takes advantage of all of Eelektross's strengths: great coverage, power, and bulk. Its slow Volt Switch allows you to keep momentum while bringing in a frail sweeper free of charge and capitalizing on entry hazards immensely. Volt Switch, Acid Spray, and Eelektross's coverage moves all force out your opponent's Pokemon. This set is especially good at tearing apart defensive cores, since it has Acid Spray to become a special wall's worst nightmare, and can use its coverage moves to easily destroy physical walls such as Tangela and Amoonguss. Thunderbolt is usually superior to Acid Spray, though, since Eelektross poses a larger threat when equipped with Choice Specs and Thunderbolt doesn't force Eelektross to switch. It can be a great asset for Spikes-stacking teams, although it is useful on other types of offensive teams as well. This set can function as a momentum grabber, hazard abuser, and bulky attacker all in one. Levitate is very useful on this set as well, since even if your opponent manages to lay their own hazards down, Eelektross will only take damage from Stealth Rock.</p>

    <p>Volt Switch is the primary STAB move on this set, and is chosen for the reasons outlined above. Flamethrower is a great move for Eelektross, primarily used to hit the Grass-types that resist Volt Switch. Tangela, Amoonguss, and Sawsbuck can't be allowed to get a free switch-in, and Flamethrower puts them in their place. Grass Knot rounds out Eelektross's coverage by hitting Ground-types that try to come in for free on Volt Switch, specifically Golem and Camerupt since they resist Flamethrower as well. Thunderbolt is the preferred option in the last slot mainly because Eelektross enjoys having a powerful STAB move that doesn't force it to switch. However, Acid Spray is another great choice that also messes with your opponent, as it forces them to switch before they get destroyed. Note that Thunderbolt has more use when using Choice Specs, while Acid Spray is more effective when using Leftovers.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>The recommended EV spread emphasizes bulk and power as much as possible, with 84 Speed EVs to outrun minimum Speed Tangela. You could invest fully in HP, but in doing so, Eelektross isn't able to outspeed Tangela and avoid it's Sleep Powder. The choice of item is very important, as both listed items play with significant differences from each other. Choice Specs is the primary option to hit as hard as possible, turning Eelektross into a better wallbreaker and hazard abuser than Leftovers does. However, Leftovers does allow Eelektross to make better use of its incredible coverage, also providing slightly increased longevity. Life Orb or Expert Belt is a compromise, but Life Orb detracts from Eelektross's bulk significantly, and if Eelektross isn't locked into a move, it should be using Leftovers.</p>

    <p>This set can also make use of moves other than the ones listed above. In particular, Hidden Power Ice completes Eelektross's incredible coverage by forming a pseudo-BoltBeam combination. Specifically, it hits Altaria and Torterra harder than any of its other coverage options. However, it generally gets less use than either Thunderbolt or Acid Spray. Thunder Wave is also a viable option on this set, since it allows Eelektross to become a self-supporting sweeper that can also provide support for teammates. If using Thunder Wave, be sure to use Leftovers for the ability to switch moves. When running Choice Specs, using U-turn over Volt Switch can also work, and is especially useful when you don't want Eelektross to be trapped by Ground-types should you mispredict. Although Thunderbolt can be used so that Eelektross still has a STAB move, U-turn will be a lot less powerful than Volt Switch due to a lack of investment in Attack and since it is not boosted by Choice Specs. Charge Beam is worth considering as well, since it functions similarly to Acid Spray but isn't negated when your opponent switches, making it even more terrifying for defensive teams. However, it takes longer for it to work since Charge Beam can either miss, or fail to raise Eelektross's Special Attack.</p>

    <p>Spikes support is crucial when using Eelektross, as it can take advantage of entry hazards greatly because of the immense amount of switches that it forces. This support can be taken advantage of even more if Eelektross is used on a VoltTurn team, especially since Eelektross has access to both moves. If one wishes to go down this route, both Cacturne and Garbodor can set up Spikes, and Swellow is a good partner that can form a VoltTurn core with Eelektross. Although Eelektross can 2HKO most bulky Rock- and Ground-types, both Probopass and Bastiodon are exceptions to this because they are immune to Acid Spray and can hit Eelektross with Toxic to wear it down. Gurdurr is a good partner that can take care of them, and benefits from Toxic thanks to Guts. Either paralysis support or Trick Room support can be used if you want Eelektross to attempt a sweep; while Regirock or Gardevoir can be good partners, Eelektross doesn't absolutely require this type of support to be effective since it's not designed to be a sweeper. However, it does function as a great lure for many bulky Rock- and Ground-types such as Regirock, Golem, and Probopass. Pokemon that can take advantage of their absence, such as Swellow and Kangaskhan, are great partners.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Coil
    move 1: Coil
    move 2: Wild Charge
    move 3: Dragon Tail
    move 4: Substitute / Return
    item: Leftovers
    ability: Levitate
    nature: Careful
    evs: 252 HP / 4 Def / 252 SpD

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>This set functions differently to the special attacker set, since instead of trying to cause as much damage as possible over a few turns, this set aims to set up a sweep. Eelektross's only decent boosting move is put to good use in this set, and it complements Eelektross's naturally high Attack. This set is a great cleaner and is more effective against defensive teams, which find it very difficult to beat. Eelektross's immunity to both Spikes and Toxic Spikes really comes in handy here, and is one of the main things separating it from other Coil users, such as Arbok. This set is good on defensive teams mainly because it has great bulk, and is a great way for stall teams to destroy opposing stall teams. However, this set isn't as effective against offensive teams since it's rather weak without a couple of boosts and only has Leftovers recovery, which makes wearing it down rather easy. As such, the best way to defeat this set is to hit it hard with whatever you've got, as Eelektross will eventually die to powerful STAB moves.</p>

    <p>Eelektross has a poor physical movepool, and its only usable STAB option is Wild Charge. Although its power is decent once it has attained a couple of boosts, it comes with unappreciated recoil that can bring Eelektross to its death more quickly. However, its positives outweigh its negatives, as it is Eelektross's strongest physical STAB move. Dragon Tail is the best out of Eelektross's few coverage options, allowing it to slowly wear down Ground-types and other Pokemon that are immune to Wild Charge. It also has the great effect of phazing, preventing both slower Pokemon such as Bastiodon from phazing Eelektross and stopping opposing setup sweepers from boosting alongside it. Substitute allows Eelektross to avoid crippling status such as Toxic, and after a few boosts its Substitutes will be nearly impossible to break with physical attacks. Substitute also gives Eelektross more longevity, as it can slowly be worn down without the move by defensive Pokemon, but with Substitute its health will replenish at a faster rate. Return is a decent option over Substitute, as it gets good neutral coverage, especially against Tangela, who can take advantage of Dragon Tail's phasing effect to heal with Regenerator.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>Maximum investment in HP and Special Defense along with a Careful nature is typical of a bulky setup sweeper such as Eelektross, and aims to maximize its overall longevity by investing in the defensive stat that won't be boosted by Coil. However, it's worth using 84 Speed EVs to outspeed Tangela so Eelektross can use Substitute against it before it can hit Eelektross with Sleep Powder. Leftovers is Eelektross's only form of recovery, and greatly increases its longevity by enabling it to create more Substitutes. Thunder Wave is a good option over Substitute, since Eelektross is a great paralysis shuffler and its Dragon Tail will be truly fearsome after several boosts. However, Substitute is better if you want Eelektross to sweep, as Thunder Wave doesn't do anything for it in that department. Both Brick Break and Crunch are alternate coverage moves that can be used in place of Return, but their uses are few. Brick Break really only hits Absol and Golem, while Crunch finds little other use than to hit Musharna. While Dragon Claw may seem like a good option, it gets only slightly better coverage than Return and is weaker, and Dragon Tail, though weaker is important for phazing and racking up hazard damage.</p>

    <p> This set really appreciates hazards to take advantage of Dragon Tail's phasing effect, so Garbodor and Golem can be used for Spikes and Stealth Rock, respectively. This set has trouble with Tangela and Amoonguss, so powerful physical attackers that can break through them are appreciated, and can clean up once Eelektross has done its job. Braviary, Swellow, and Torterra are all good examples of these. Charizard is a great teammate that can take on Tangela, and Eelektross can mop the floor with Charizard's checks, such as Flareon. Charizard also appreciates the Spikes that should be partnered with Eelektross, wearing down each other's checks with entry hazard damage alone. Since Eelektross can deal heavy damage to most teams, having fast Pokemon such as the aforementioned Swellow as well as Cinccino to clean up can be very beneficial, especially since they can deal with offensive teams effectively. Paralysis support is always welcome from Pokemon such as Regirock, since it can give Eelektross the chance to get an extra boost or two, and one more unbroken Substitute equals one more chance to spread hazard damage. Also, it is a good idea to remove spinners before attempting to sweep, since they force you to make a difficult decision on whether to continue Eelektross's attempted sweep or keep your hazards intact. Frillish takes on Wartortle like a champ, and Misdreavus can spinblock effectively against Armaldo.</p>

    [Other Options]

    <p>Eelektross has a decent movepool that it can make use of, although no other set is quite as effective as the two listed above. Mixed sets are certainly a possibility, as Brick Break can be used to lure in Lickilicky and dispose of it while also beating physical walls. As such, a mixed set utilizing Coil is feasible too, with moves such as Thunder and Zap Cannon taking advantage of the accuracy boost that Coil provides. However, you lose out on much-needed bulk, and even with accuracy boosts Zap Cannon is still extremely unreliable. Eelektross is a reliable setter of Rain Dance, and can make use of perfectly accurate STAB Thunder, and its slow Volt Switch can bring in a rain sweeper unharmed. However, it faces stiff competition from Gardevoir in this department, who can set up Rain Dance multiple times and use Healing Wish to give a sweeper a second chance. Eelektross can run an offensive Coil set, utilizing a Chesto Berry along with Rest to set up a sweep. Similarly, Eelektross can use a Choice Band to boost the power of Wild Charge. However, Eelektross's coverage moves are mediocre and it can't break through physical walls with only Dragon Claw, Rock Slide, Return, Brick Break, and Crunch. Acrobatics is also a viable option, as with a Flying Gem intact it is a guaranteed 2HKO on Tangela. However, it doesn't grant coverage on any other notable threats.</p>

    [Checks and Counters]

    <p>While Eelektross's coverage, power, and ability to go either physical or special limit its number of checks and counters considerably, there are a few Pokemon who can claim to check it effectively. For special sets, Stunfisk, Lickilicky, and Probopass are arguably the best ways of dealing with Eelektross. Stunfisk is immune to Eelektross's STAB moves, and takes paltry damage from Grass Knot due its low weight. Stunfisk can then use Toxic to cripple Eelektross before slowly wearing it down with Scald. Lickilicky only fears an Acid Spray or two followed by Thunderbolt, otherwise it is a complete stop to special Eelektross. In fact, Lickilicky's Return has a small chance to 2HKO Eelektross after Stealth Rock, which is another way of dealing with it if you don't want to go down the Toxic stall route with Wish. Probopass is immensely bulky, and can paralyze Eelektross before wearing it down with Power Gem or Volt Switching out to a Pokemon that can take a predicted attack and dispose of it comfortably. Altaria can also take Eelektross's hits well, and with Roost can wall all of Eelektross's special attacks bar Acid Spray. Altaria can then either force it out with Perish Song or Toxic stall it to death.</p>

    <p>For physical sets, there are even fewer defensive Pokemon that can hope to take Eelektross on. Tangela is the best option for beating physical Eelektross, as it outspeeds Eelektross that don't invest in Speed, and can hit it with Sleep Powder before it can cause any damage. Also, Dragon Tail will heal Tangela because of Regenerator, while Eelektross will be slowly worn down. Bastiodon is also a good check to physical Eelektross, although it will struggle after Eelektross has attained a few boosts. It only takes minimal damage from Wild Charge before Eelektross has accumulated several boosts, but it must watch out for Dragon Tail if attempting to phaze. Once Eelektross's Substitute is broken, it must make a difficult choice between being phazed out by Roar or being hit by Toxic as it uses Dragon Tail.</p>

    <p>While there isn't really much else that can switch in to Eelektross very easily, it will fall to repeated powerful attacks, so for offensive teams that is the best option. Pinsir and Rampardos both get special mentions here, as they can take advantage of Mold Breaker to OHKO Eelektross with a super effective Earthquake. While Eelektross is extremely threatening on paper, in practice it is beaten by lots of threats, mainly due to its low Speed. Choice item users are usually the best way of dealing with it, especially those wielding Choice Band or Choice Specs. It's best to hit Eelektross hard right off the bat, lest it retaliate and sweep. Exeggutor, Absol, Sawk, and Charizard are among the strongest Pokemon in the tier, and many of them use Choice items to increase their power tremendously. For offensive teams, the best way to beat Eelektross is to keep attacking it, since it will die eventually.</p>


    [​IMG]

    GP approved 2/2
  15. melvni

    melvni
    is a Contributor to Smogonis a Site Staff Alumnusis a Forum Moderator Alumnus

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    Messages:
    1,147
    I haven't really used Eelektross enough to comment on the BW2 changes, but here are my thoughts on what's currently here (proposed additions in blue, proposed subtractions in red, and comments in green).

    Show Hide
    [​IMG]
    Eelektross
    Credit to Zebraiken for getting this through QC.

    [Overview]

    <p>Before BW was released, there wasn't yet an Electric-type that had Levitate to negate its sole weakness to Ground-type attacks. Eelektross is the prototype of this new breed, and it's itching for a test run. In fact, it's the only NU Pokemon that has no weaknesses, with Sableye and Spiritomb locked up in higher tiers. Eelektross has a few more things going for it. Eelektross was blessed with great mixed attacking stats, as base 115 Attack and 105 Special Attack are more than enough to strike fear into the heart of your opponent. However, its lack of good high-powered physical STAB and coverage moves leave it passed over by other attackers with similar stats such as Emboar, Braviary, and Sawk. Eelektross's only real boosting move is Coil, which finds use on physical sets, but Eelektross wishes it had a recovery move to last longer, especially because of its low Speed.</p>

    <p>That being said, Eelektross is a fine Choice Specs user, and fits well on VoltTurn or Choice-based teams. This is largely due to its good bulk, as well as its coverage. 85/80/80 defenses are great for an offensive Pokemon in NU, since even without investment it retains a great deal of bulk. Once Eelektross gets in, it causes havoc by forcing multiple switches, and can take advantage of entry hazards mainly due to its fantastic coverage and Dragon Tail. However, its atrocious base 50 Speed holds Eelektross back from becoming a top-tier threat and cements its role as a bulky attacker. Unfortunately, Eelektross's bulk doesn't come with useful resistances, since outside of its Ground-type immunity its only important resistances are to Flying- and Electric-type moves. Though it may seem to have a lot of things going for it, in practice Eelektross just isn't as good as it may seem on paper.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Special Attacker
    move 1: Volt Switch
    move 2: Flamethrower
    move 3: Grass Knot
    move 4: Thunderbolt / Acid Spray
    item: Choice Specs / Leftovers
    ability: Levitate
    nature: Modest
    evs: 172 HP / 252 SpA / 84 Spe

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>A specially attacking set takes advantage of all of Eelektross's strengths: great coverage, power, and bulk. Its slow Volt Switch allows you to keep momentum while bringing in a frail sweeper free of charge while capitalizing on entry hazards immensely. Volt Switch, Acid Spray, and its coverage moves all force out your opponent's Pokemon. This set is especially good at tearing apart defensive cores, since it has Acid Spray to become a special wall's worst nightmare, and can use Eelektross's coverage moves to easily destroy physical walls such as Tangela and Amoonguss. Thunderbolt is usually superior to Acid Spray though, since Eelektross poses a larger threat when equipped with Choice Specs and Thunderbolt doesn't force Eelektross to switch. It can be a great asset for Spikes-stacking teams, although it is useful on other types of offensive teams as well. This set can function as a momentum grabber, hazard abuser, and bulky attacker all in one. Levitate is very useful on this set as well, since even if your opponent manages to lay their own hazards down, Eelektross will only take damage from Stealth Rock.</p>

    <p>Volt Switch is the primary STAB move of on this set, and is chosen for the reasons outlined above. Flamethrower is a great move for Eelektross, primarily used to hit Grass-types that resist Volt Switch. Tangela, Amoonguss, and Sawsbuck can't be allowed to get a free switch-in, and Flamethrower puts them in their place. Grass Knot rounds out Eelektross's coverage by hitting Ground-types that try to come in for free on Volt Switch, specifically Golem and Camerupt since they resist Flamethrower as well. Thunderbolt is the preferred option in the last slot mainly because Eelektross likes having a powerful STAB move that doesn't force it to switch. However, Acid Spray is another great choice that also messes with your opponent, as it forces them to switch before they get destroyed. Note that Thunderbolt generally has more use when using Choice Specs, while Acid Spray is more effective when using Leftovers.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>The recommended EV spread emphasizes bulk and power as much as possible, with 84 Speed EVs to outrun minimum Speed Tangela. You could invest fully in HP, but in doing so, Eelektross isn't able to avoid Tangela's Sleep Powder. The choice of item is very important, as both listed items play with significant differences from each other. Choice Specs is the primary option to hit as hard as possible, turning Eelektross into a better wallbreaker and hazard abuser than Leftovers does. However, Leftovers does allow Eelektross to make better use of its incredible coverage, also providing slightly increased longevity. Life Orb or Expert Belt is a compromise, but Life Orb detracts from Eelektross's bulk significantly, and if Eelektross isn't locked into a move, it should be using Leftovers.</p>

    <p>This set can also make use of moves other than the ones listed above. In particular, Hidden Power Ice completes Eelektross's incredible coverage by forming a pseudo-BoltBeam combination. Specifically, it hits Altaria and Torterra harder than any of its other coverage options. However, it generally gets less use than either Thunderbolt or Acid Spray. Thunder Wave is also a viable option on this set, since it allows Eelektross to become a self-supporting sweeper that can also provide support for teammates. If using Thunder Wave, be sure to use Leftovers for the ability to switch moves. If using Choice Specs, using U-turn over Volt Switch can also work, and is especially useful when you don't want Eelektross to be trapped by Ground-types if you mispredict. However, although Thunderbolt can cover for a lack of be used so that Eelektross still has a STAB move, U-turn will be a lot less powerful than Volt Switch because of investment and Choice Specs although Volt Switch will be a lot more powerful than U-turn because of investment and Choice Specs. Charge Beam is worth considering as well, since it functions similarly to Acid Spray but isn't negated when your opponent switches, making it even more terrifying for defensive teams. However, it takes longer for it to work, especially at least twice as long to set up, possibly more since Charge Beam can either miss, or fail to raise Eelektross's Special Attack.</p>

    <p>Spikes support is crucial when using Eelektross, as it can take advantage of entry hazards greatly because of the immense amount of switches that it forces. This is improved even further by using support can be taken advantage of even more ifEelektross is used on a VoltTurn team, and especially since Eelektross has access to both moves. If one wishes to go this route, Both Cacturne and Garbodor can set up Spikes, and Swellow is a good partner that can form a VoltTurn core with Eelektross. Although Eelektross can break down most bulky Rock- and Ground-types by 2HKOing them, both Probopass and Bastiodon are exceptions to this because they are immune to Acid Spray and can hit Eelektross with Toxic to wear it down. Gurdurr is a good partner that can take care of them, and benefits from Toxic thanks to Guts. Either paralysis support or Trick Room support can be used if you want Eelektross to attempt a sweep; while Regirock or Gardevoir can be good partners, Eelektross doesn't require this type of support to be effective since it's not designed to be a sweeper. However, it does function as a great lure for many bulky Rock- and Ground-types such as Regirock, Golem, and Probopass. Pokemon that can take advantage of their absence, such as Swellow and Kangaskhan, are great partners.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Coil
    move 1: Coil
    move 2: Wild Charge
    move 3: Dragon Tail
    move 4: Substitute / Return
    item: Leftovers
    ability: Levitate
    nature: Careful
    evs: 252 HP / 4 Def / 252 SpD

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>This set functions vastly (Another word (maybe extremely?) might make more sense here) differently to the special attacker set, since instead of trying to cause as much damage as possible over a few turns, this set aims to set up a sweep by attaining (maybe obtaining?) many boosts. Eelektross's only real boosting move is put to good use in this set, and it complements Eelektross's naturally high Attack. This set is a great cleaner and is more effective against defensive teams, which find it very difficult to beat. Eelektross's immunity to hazards (While I agree that Eelektross isn't threatened by hazards very much, it does still take damage from Stealth Rock; maybe say immunity to Spikes?) really comes in handy here, and is one of the main things separating it from other Coil users, such as Arbok. This set is good on defensive teams mainly because it has great bulk with investment, and is a great way for stall to destroy opposing stall. However, this set isn't as effective against offensive teams, since it's rather weak without a couple of boosts and only has Leftovers recovery, making it worn down rather easily. As such, the best way to defeat this set is to hit it hard with whatever you've got, and as Eelektross will eventually die to powerful STAB moves.</p>

    <p>Eelektross has a poor physical movepool, and its only usable STAB option is Wild Charge. While its power is only decent after a couple of boosts, it comes with unappreciated recoil that can bring Eelektross to its death more quickly. (While doesn't make sense here, since these are both negatives, not a negative and a positive) However, its positives outweigh its negatives, as it is literally Eelektross's only strongest physical STAB move (Even before BW2, it technically did also learn Spark). Dragon Tail is the best out of Eelektross's few coverage options, allowing it to slowly wear down Ground-types that are immune to Wild Charge. It also has the great effect of phazing, both preventing both slower Pokemon such as Bastiodon from phazing Eelektross, as well as and stopping stop opposing setup sweepers from boosting alongside it. Substitute allows Eelektross to avoid crippling status such as Toxic, and after a few boosts its Substitutes will be nearly impossible to break with physical attacks. It also gives Eelektross more longevity, as it can slowly be worn down without the move by defensive Pokemon, but with Substitute its health will replenish at a faster rate. Return is a decent option over Substitute, as it gets good neutral coverage, especially against Tangela, which will only heal itself if it's phazed due to Regenerator.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>Maximum investment in HP and Special Defense along with a Careful nature is typical of a bulky setup sweeper such as Eelektross, and aims to maximize its overall longevity by investing in the defensive stat that won't be boosted by Coil. However, it's worth using 84 Speed EVs to outspeed Tangela so Eelektross can use Substitute against it before it can hit Eelektross with Sleep Powder. Leftovers is Eelektross's only form of recovery, and greatly increases its longevity by letting it create more Substitutes. Thunder Wave is a good option over Substitute, since Eelektross is a great paralysis shuffler and its Dragon Tails will be truly fearsome after several boosts. However, Substitute is better if you want Eelektross to sweep, as Thunder Wave doesn't do anything for it in that department. Both Brick Break and Crunch are alternate coverage moves that can be used in place of Return, but their uses are few. Brick Break really only hits Absol and Golem, while Crunch finds little other use than to hit Musharna (I know Brick Break is now pretty much outclassed by Drain Punch, but I feel like there are a few other things fighting or dark coverage hit). While Dragon Claw may seem like a good option, it gets almost the same only slightly better coverage as than Return but and is weaker, and Dragon Tail, though weaker is used to phaze and rack important for phazing and racking up hazard damage.</p>

    <p>Hazards are a necessity when using any Eelektross set, and this set is no exception. (This seems redundant with the next sentence) This set really appreciates hazards to take advantage of when phazing with Dragon Tail, so Garbodor and Golem can be used for Spikes and Stealth Rock, respectively. This set has trouble with Tangela and Amoonguss, so powerful physical attackers that can break through them are appreciated, and can clean up once Eelektross has done its job. Braviary, Swellow, and Torterra are all good examples of these. Charizard is a great teammate that can take on Tangela, and Eelektross can mop the floor with Charizard's checks, such as Flareon. Charizard also appreciates the Spikes that are inevitably bound to should be partnered with Eelektross, wearing down each other's checks with entry hazard damage alone. Since Eelektross can deal heavy damage to most teams, having fast Pokemon such as the aforementioned Swellow as well as Cinccino to clean up can be very beneficial, especially since they can deal with offensive teams effectively. Paralysis support is always welcome from Pokemon such as Regirock, since it can allow Eelektross to get an extra boost or two, and one more unbroken Substitute equals one more chance to spread hazard damage. Also, it is a good idea to remove spinners before attempting to sweep, since they force you to make a difficult decision on whether to continue Eelektross's attempted sweep or keep your hazards intact. Frillish takes on Wartortle like a champ, and Misdreavus can spinblock effectively against Armaldo.</p>

    [Other Options]

    <p>Eelektross has a decent movepool that it can make use of, although no other set is quite as effective as the two listed above. Mixed sets are certainly a possibility, as Brick Break can be used to lure in Lickilicky and dispose of it while also beating physical walls. As such, a mixed set utilizing Coil is feasible too, with moves such as Thunder and Zap Cannon taking advantage of the accuracy boost that Coil provides. However, you lose out on much-needed bulk, and even with accuracy boosts Zap Cannon is still extremely unreliable. Eelektross is a reliable setter of Rain Dance, and can abuse perfectly accurate STAB Thunder, and its slow Volt Switch can bring in a rain sweeper unharmed. However, it faces stiff competition from Gardevoir in this department, which can set up Rain Dance multiple times and use Healing Wish to give a sweeper a second chance. Eelektross can run an offensive Coil set, utilizing a Chesto Berry along with Rest to set up a sweep. Similarly, Eelektross can use a Choice Band to showcase the power of Wild Charge. However, its coverage moves are mediocre and Eelektross can't break through physical walls with only Dragon Claw, Rock Slide, Return, Brick Break, and Crunch. Acrobatics is also a viable option, as with a Flying Gem intact it is a guaranteed 2HKO on Tangela. However, it serves no other purpose.</p>

    [Checks and Counters]

    <p>While Eelektross's coverage, power, and ability to go either physical or special limit its number of checks and counters considerably, there are a few Pokemon that can claim to check it effectively. For special sets, Stunfisk, Lickilicky, and Probopass are arguably the best ways of dealing with Eelektross. Stunfisk is immune to Eelektross's STAB moves, and takes paltry damage from Grass Knot due its low weight. Stunfisk can then use Toxic to cripple Eelektross before slowly wearing it down with Scald. Lickilicky only fears an Acid Spray or two followed by Thunderbolt, otherwise being a complete stop to special Eelektross. In fact, Lickilicky's Return has a small chance to 2HKO Eelektross after Stealth Rock, which is another way of dealing with it if you don't want to go the Toxic stall route with Wish. Probopass is immensely bulky, and can paralyze Eelektross before wearing it down with Power Gem or Volt Switching out to a Pokemon that can take a predicted attack and dispose of it comfortably. Altaria can also take Eelektross's hits well, and with Roost can wall all of Eelektross's special attacks bar Acid Spray. Altaria can then either force it out with Perish Song or Toxic stall it to its death.</p>

    <p>For physical sets, there are even fewer defensive Pokemon that can hope to take it on. Tangela is the best option for beating physical Eelektross, as it outspeeds Eelektross that don't invest in Speed, and can hit it with Sleep Powder before it can cause any damage. Also, Dragon Tail will heal Tangela because of Regenerator, while Eelektross will be slowly worn down. Bastiodon is also a good check to physical Eelektross, although it will struggle after Eelektross has attained a few boosts. It only takes minimal damage from Wild Charge before Eelektross has accumulated several boosts, but it must watch out for Dragon Tail if attempting to phaze. Once Eelektross's Substitute is broken, it must make a difficult choice between being phazed out by Roar or being hit by Toxic as it uses Dragon Tail.</p>

    <p>While there isn't really much else that can switch in to Eelektross very easily, it will fall to repeated powerful attacks, so for offensive teams that is the best option. Pinsir and Rampardos both get special mentions here, as they can take advantage of Mold Breaker to OHKO Eelektross with a super effective Earthquake. While Eelektross is extremely threatening on paper, in practice it is beaten by lots of threats, mainly due to its low Speed. Choice item users are usually the best way of dealing with it, especially those wielding Choice Band or Choice Specs. It's best to hit Eelektross hard right off the bat, lest it retaliate and sweep you. Exeggutor, Absol, Sawk, and Charizard are among the strongest Pokemon in the tier, and many of them use Choice items to increase their power tremendously. For offensive teams, the best way to beat Eelektross is to keep attacking it, since it will die eventually.</p>
  16. complete legitimacy

    complete legitimacy one for the future
    is a Tiering Contributoris a Contributor to Smogon

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    Thanks SkullCandy and melvni! This is done.
  17. Zebraiken

    Zebraiken with splinters in our teeth, we're driven from our parallels
    is a member of the Site Staffis an official Team Rateris a Pokemon Researcheris a Tiering Contributoris a Contributor to Smogonis a Super Moderator Alumnus

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2011
    Messages:
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