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Guide to BW UU Offense [WIP]

Discussion in 'Locked / Outdated Analyses' started by Mazz, Jul 1, 2012.

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  1. Mazz

    Mazz Might make a comeback
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    A Guide to BW Underused Offense
    Written by Pokemazter and hilarious

    1. Introduction
    2. Styles of Offense
    • Standard Offense
      • Example Pokemon
      • Example Team
    • Bulky Offense
      • Example Pokemon
      • Example Team
    • Hyper Offence
      • Example Pokemon
      • Example Team
    3. Other things found on offensive teams
    • Choice Users
      • Choice Band
      • Choice Specs
      • Choice Scarf
    • Setup Sweepers
      • Agility
      • Nasty Plot
      • Rock Polish
      • Shell Smash
      • Swords Dance
      • Curse
      • Quiver Dance
      • Bulk Up
      • Calm Mind
      • Dragon Dance
      • Hone Claws
      • Download
      • Moxie
      • Speed Boost
    • Stallbreakers
    • Priority Abusers
      • Extremespeed
      • Sucker Punch
      • Aqua Jet
      • Bullet Punch
      • Ice Shard
      • Mach Punch
    • Support Pokemon
      • Hazards
        • Stealth Rock
        • Spikes
        • Toxic Spikes
      • Trappers
      • Dual Screens
      • Spinblocking
      • Rapid Spin
    • Trick Room
    • Baton Pass
    4. Teambuilding
    • Checklist
    5. Conclusion

    Introduction

    Why play offensively?
    Playing offensively gives you much more momentum than playing passively or defensively ever would. In this type of play-style, you’re direct goal is to crush the opponent and win, whether it be via careful and deviant strategy or downright brute force.

    What makes offense superior to other play-styles?
    Besides creating momentum, offensive teams tend to also maintain momentum better than a Stall team would, as you’re not relying on secondary effects and entry hazards to win you the match, but rather the capabilities of your own Pokemon and how you play the game. Offense can be much harder to stop than Stall because it’s so much more direct; set-up isn’t necessary, and if it happens to be, it lasts a turn or two.


    Styles of Offense

    Standard Offense
    Standard offense is one of the most common playstyles in BW UU, and for good reason. It is perhaps the simplest type of offense to execute, as well as the easiest to build teams for. Most standard offensive teams consist of one or two walls that provide hazard support, a few wallbreakers to weaken the opposing team, a revenge killer, and one or two sweepers whose purpose is to sweep late game. Standard offense often utilize entry hazards, because many sweepers can become nigh unstoppable with Spikes support. Though standard offense is often too much for common teams to handle, it does have its share of weaknesses. Many full stall teams are able to wall standard offense, because it often lacks the firepower to break through six defensive pokes. Hyper offense is also a huge threat, because standard offense often lacks the bulk or speed to take repeated hits from six violent sweepers and retaliate. Nevertheless, standard offense remains one of the most consistent and effective playstyles in UU.

    Example Pokemon

    [pimg]34[/pimg]
    Nidoking
    • With a Life Orb and the ability Sheer Force, Nidoking is one of the most immediately powerful Pokemon in the UU tier. With moves such as Earth Power, Thunderbolt, and Ice Beam that take advantage of its ability, Nidoking is usually able to knock out one or two Pokemon before falling. Nidoking also has a reliable base 85 Speed stat to fall back on, making it hard for the majority of the tier to stop. Nidoking is a great early-game and mid-game Pokemon, busting holes in the opposing team to allow for its teammates to clean up house.

    [pimg]59[/pimg]
    Arcanine
    • As the only Pokemon in the UU tier with access to Extremespeed, Arcanine has the fastest priority move in all of UU. This allows it to function as a great revenge-killer and life Orb sweeper, as it can outspeed most threats and hit them back hard. With a base 110 attack stat, strong Fire-Type STAB, and access to attacks like Close Combat, Wild Charge, and Crunch, Arcanine becomes a great physical sweeper in the UU tier and an excellent asset to have. Arcanine works great in the early game, and can continue to be a force throughout a game by tearing down walls and pulling off a sweep.

    [pimg]497[/pimg]
    Shaymin
    • By virtue of its high base stat total, actually tying for highest of all in the UU tier, Shaymin can function as a bulky, strong, and fast attacker. With Seed Flare exclusive to Shaymin it is the only special sweeper that can routinely break through Snorlax and Umbron with a couple of special defense drops. Although Shaymin faces great competition from roserade it is usually seen as the superior attacker because it has more reliable STAB and bulk which can be stressed even further with Natural Cure+Rest which allows it to work in any part of the game, although it is usually used best early game to break down special walls with Leech Seed and Seed Flare.

    [pimg]655[/pimg]
    Bisharp
    • With unique STAB and access to Swords Dance and Substitute, Bisharp can be a very potent sweeper. As the opponent is forced to break the Substitute, Bisharp can use a +2 or +4 Sucker Punch to prevent the opponent from breaking the Substitute, and ultimately KO the opponent. Bisharp tends to do better in the later stages of the game, simply because the Dark-Steel typing is not the greatest defensive typing, as it carries a x4 weakness to Fighting-Types.

    Example Team

    Bulky Offense
    If Stall and Standard Offense were to have a love-child, this would be it. It tends to carry much bulkier sweepers than Standard Offense, such as Snorlax and Rhyperior, and tends to feature all three forms of hazards to help break the opposing team down. The main difference from Standard Offense is that Bulky Offense does not rely on powerful sweepers to break through teams, but generally lighter attacks and residual damage through status and entry hazards. Much like Standard Offense, it does not go without its weaknesses. The loss of the spinner or spin-blocker can mean death for a Bulky Offense team. A combination of status, spinning away the Bulky Offense team’s entry hazards, and maintaining your entry hazards will quickly wear down a Bulky Offense team.

    Example Pokemon

    [pimg]143[/pimg]
    Snorlax
    • Snorlax is unarguably one of the titans molding the UU metagame because an unrivalved combination of special bulk and power. As a bulky tank Snorlax can slowly boost its way to victory with Curse after the opponents Fighting Pokemon are gone late game or he can simply blast powerful attacks with a more offensively inclined EV spread with either Leftovers or Choice Band, doing damage early game. Snorlax's large coverage means few walls are safe, Gligar is overcome with Ice Punch and Ghosts will usually die to Crunch. Earthquake hits Rock and Steel Pokemon. If your opponent has powerful special attackers like Raikou and Chandelure it is generally wiser to play Snorlax conservatively to keep them in check.

    [pimg]245[/pimg]
    Suicune
    • Suicune is one of the bulkiest UU Pokemon with a good support move pool but now functions best as a special attacker with Calm Mind and three attacks. Because of her bulk Suicune finds it easy to set up one or two Calm Minds and proceed to use its good 85 base speed to sweep unprepared teams. After just a single Calm Mind Suicune has enough power to OHKO most of UU's relevant offensive threats including Raikou with Hydro Pump. As with Snorlax it is usually best to save Suicune until late game if you need to use her to counter opposing Fire types like Chandelure or Darmanitan. By late game though if Suicune has managed to stay healthy she usually sweeps by taking in a couple moves from the faster part of the opponents team and then promptly OHKOing back.

    [pimg]260[/pimg]
    Swampert
    • Swampert's combination of bulk, power and general utility makes it a favorite on many bulky offensive teams. He can set up Stealth Rocks and phaze threatening set up sweepers such as opposing Snorlax while still maintaining enough power to OHKO frail sweepers like Mienshao. Swampert does not often take the boosting route its fellow bulky offense Pokemon may choose, rather it likes to stick around to counter huge threats like Raikou and uses its already stellar attack and typing to threaten everything. Because of Swampert's general utility it is best to use it early game, where Stealth Rock will have its greatest impact and where it will have many opportunities to come in, on things like opposing Victini. Unfortunately to hit hard Swampert loses much of its physical bulk being unable to counter Flygon and Kingdra well if it chooses an offense EV spread so its important not to overestimate Swampert's bulk.

    [pimg]469[/pimg]
    Rhyperior
    • Rhyperior is a fantastic addition to bulky offense teams that need a reliable check to any physical attacker. Because of Rhyperior's huge physical bulk, dwarfing the likes of even Hippowdon if properly EVd, as well as his Solid Rock ability, he finds it easy to take even occasional Earthquakes and Superpowers and to retaliate properly. Rhyperior has as much utility as Swampert by its move pool which includes Stealth Rock and Dragon Tail and Roar while he can also sweep in a flash with Swords Dance and Rock Polish. With so many options its not easy to find the best Rhyperior set but generally for bulky offense teams Rhyperior works amazingly when using a tanking set. Even Rhyperior's special defense is somewhat salvageable with high investment in it and HP so it can take Hidden Powers from Raikou and Zapdos. In general Rhyperior works as an attacking tank best late game where it can happily spam Earthquakes fortified by the highest Attack stat in UU and a defending tank mid game where it can absorb physical assaults with the second highest defense stat.

    Example Team

    Hyper Offense
    Arguably the most potent of all the offenses, Hyper Offense, also called Heavy Offense, is the most difficult to use. Typically, the team is led off by a Dual-Screens Pokemon, and is followed by 5 set-up sweepers. Hyper Offense generally tends to stick to one spectrum of the offensive range, whether it be Physical or Special. The theory is, even if they have a dedicated wall to that part of the spectrum, it can’t survive an onslaught from 5 Pokemon, and will then just proceed to break through said dedicated wall, and the rest of the team. Synergy is not typically required for this type of team. Generally faster Pokemon and Brick Break tend to trouble Hyper Offense teams, as well as ludicrously strong Pokemon, such as Choice Band Darmanitan or Choice Specs Chandelure. Prankster Sableye also handles HO Teams very well, especially those attacking from the physical side of the spectrum.

    Example Pokemon

    [pimg]230[/pimg]
    Kingdra
    • Kingdra is probably the most versatile Pokemon in UU being able to attack from the physical or special side and being able to run defensive UU boosting sets to very offensive boosting sets or just a Choice Specs set. Hyper offense will usually favor a variant of Rain Dance Kingdra which gives it the most immediate power and speed boost, it can outrun the entire UU metagame after single boost and proceed to OHKO almost every attacker in UU with special Rain Dance. Physical Rain Dance is less common but has the luxury of using more reliable moves accuracy wise and further boosting with a double dance set consisting of both Dragon and Rain Dance. Both sets are best played late game to ensure a clean sweep when things like opposing bulky waters and Roserade are heavily weakened. Kingdra can also make use of Substitute and Dragon Dance as well as Rest and Dragon Dance both of which can get past physical walls like Slowbro and Suicune with good prediction, especially in a last Pokemon scenario. These Kingdra may be played in mid game to wreck plenty of havoc and to gain an advantage by just having more Pokemon to work with than you opponent afterwards.

    [pimg]435[/pimg]
    Honchkrow
    • Honchkrow is one of those Pokemon that can get a clean sweep in the first few turns of the game if your opponent lacks a very solid response to it. His ability Moxie further boosts his already high 125 base Attack to levels that OHKO anything that doesn't resist his STAB except the bulkiest of physical walls. Honchkrow also has no coverage problems with Superpower and Moxie being legal together with the release of BW2 move tutors so Honchkrow can effectively target some of his old counters such as Bronzong and Rhyperior for very good damage. Honchkrow also has the most powerful priority in all of UU, STAB Sucker Punch, which has the ability to KO even Pokemon that resist it like Mienshao after a Moxie boost. Despite his low bulk and unsavory speed, Honchkrow can still be a menace anywhere from early to late game with the ability to use strong STAB moves off a strong Attack stat.

    [pimg]469[/pimg]
    Rhyperior
    • Rhyperior despite often one of the hall marks of a bulky offense team can also find a comfy place on hyper offensive teams. Here he wants to focus on his mammoth attack over the ability to absorb hits, emphasizing this by holding a Life Orb with max Attack. Instead of working to salvage his special defense stat here he rather work with his low speed with Rock Polish, allowing him to outspeed fast threats up to Weavile which does pittance damage with Ice Shard despite the lack of bulk investment. Crobat outspeeds RHyperior but has little effect on him. Rhyperior can lure in checks like Zapdos and Raikou who were hoping to out speed and OHKO Rhyperior only to be out sped and OHKOd themselves. Do not be fooled into thinking a Choice Band set works on hyper offense teams; using its STAB and coverage moves allows many Pokemon to set up on Rhyperior which often leads to the death of a purely offensive team. Hyper Offense does not distinguish much between late game and early game, it just tries to seize the opportunity to set up and sweep, but Rhyperior generally works better late game as then it has a good chance to achieve a clean sweep.

    [pimg]668[/pimg]
    Cobalion
    • Hyper offense does not always require high Attacking stats to deal damage, speed and quick boosting can be just effective as using powerful attacks. Cobalion can be one of those speedy attackers, having 108 base speed and a powerful move pool that allows it to take down most physical walls after boosting. His high defense makes setting up Swords Dance very simple and allows it to absorb Earthquakes from Gligar and promptly dispatch it. Fighting STAB is very important to Cobalion and allows him to take down most bulky waters that think defense alone is enough to wall Cobalion. Thanks to its movepool, Slowbro, a Pokemon that would have no issues stomaching a Close Combat, can be lured out with X-Scissors if it threatens your team. One of Cobalion's main niches on a hyper offense team is its many resistances which allows you to set up on things that had to lock themselves in a move to revenge kill one of your Pokemon. For example, a Flygon locked into Outrage is set-up bait for Cobalion. Because of Cobalion's rather low initial power before a Swords Dance boost, Cobalion works best mid game.

    Example Team

    Choice Users
    A common staple on offense teams, choice users function as powerful wallbreakers and revenge killers. They provide momentum and offensive support to their teammates, knocking down bulky Pokemon that inhibit a sweep or picking off speedy threats that would otherwise hurt the team. With the use of a Choice Band, Choice Specs, or Choice Scarf, the user will see a x1.5 increase on their Attack, Special Attack, or Speed stat, depending on the item. However, the user is locked into a single move, so choice users need to be cautious if they are weak to Pursuit.

    Users of Choice Band

    [pimg]214[/pimg]
    Heracross

    [pimg]260[/pimg]
    Swampert

    [pimg]584[/pimg]
    Darmanitan


    Users of Choice Specs

    [pimg]230[/pimg]
    Kingdra

    [pimg]479[/pimg]
    Porygon-Z

    [pimg]639[/pimg]
    Chandelure


    Users of Choice Scarf

    [pimg]243[/pimg]
    Raikou
    • Choice Scarf users tend to high have a high attacking stat and reliable STABs, and Raikou is no exception. It has no coverage issues with the addition of Aura Sphere in its move pool which along Thunderbolt and Hidden Power Ice. The pseudo BoltBeam coverage allows Raikou to hit everything in the Underused tier for at least neutral damage, which stings coming off of 115 base Special Attack. Raikou is one of the faster Choice Scarf users exclusive to UU, outpacing even Jolly Scarf Flygon if it uses a Modest nature and outpaces Swift Swim Kingdra and Choice Scarf Mienshao with a timid nature, something no other common scarfer can boast. Because Raikou is very strong it puts pressure on the opponent, Raikou can easily gain momentum with Volt Switch. Raikou is best used early game but should always be conserved for the mid- to late-game as you may need to rely on it for revenge killing purposes.

    [pimg]330[/pimg]
    Flygon
    • Flygon makes for a reliable Choice Scarf user thanks to its excellent dual STAB and base 100 Attack and Speed stats, especially coupled with the fact it takes almost no entry hazard damage so switching in and out is not a problem. Flygon's dual STAB hits everything in UU for neutral damage bar Bronzong. Much like Raikou, Flygon can abuse his good coverage and power to force switches and use U-Turn to gain momentum. Flygon is a natural fit on almost any offensive team, being especially devastating during the late-game when it can easily clean up opposing teams with its strong Outrage.

    [pimg]650[/pimg]
    Mienshao
    • Mienshao is one of the strongest abusers of Choice Scarf due to its high Attack stat and powerful STAB Hi Jump Kick. Mienshao is also the fastest common user of Choice Scarf, as he outpaces Modest Choice Scarf Raikou. Mienshao too can use its power to force switches with U-Turn but with an added twist; Mienshao takes no real residual damage thanks to Regenerator healing it whenever it switches out. Mienshao thrives closer towards the late-game when the opponent lacks Ghost-types and Protect users so it can freely spam STAB Hi Jump Kicks.


    Setup Sweepers
    Another frequent staple on offensive teams, setup sweepers are the Pokemon that boost their offensive stats, Attack, special Attack and or Speed, in order to beat down the opposing team. With 16 different types of setup available to UU, a vast amount of Pokemon available to the UU tier are capable of performing as a setup sweeper.

    [pimg]398[/pimg][pimg]479[/pimg]
    Agility

    [pimg]473[/pimg][pimg]487[/pimg][pimg]601[/pimg]
    Nasty Plot

    [pimg]469[/pimg][pimg]668[/pimg]
    Rock Polish

    [pimg]139[/pimg][pimg]368[/pimg][pimg]588[/pimg]
    Shell Smash

    [pimg]466[/pimg][pimg]650[/pimg][pimg]655[/pimg]
    Swords Dance

    [pimg]143[/pimg]
    Curse

    [pimg]49[/pimg][pimg]577[/pimg]
    Quiver Dance

    [pimg]590[/pimg]
    Bulk Up

    [pimg]80[/pimg][pimg]243[/pimg][pimg]245[/pimg]
    Calm Mind

    [pimg]230[/pimg][pimg]590[/pimg]
    Dragon Dance

    [pimg]662[/pimg]
    Hone Claws

    [pimg]233[/pimg][pimg]479[/pimg]
    Download

    [pimg]214[/pimg][pimg]582[/pimg]
    Moxie

    [pimg]319[/pimg][pimg]474[/pimg]
    Speed Boost

    Stall Breakers

    [pimg]169[/pimg]
    Crobat

    [pimg]302[/pimg]
    Sableye

    [pimg]473[/pimg]
    Togekiss

    Priority Abusers

    [pimg]59[/pimg]
    Extremespeed

    [pimg]229[/pimg][pimg]435[/pimg][pimg]655[/pimg]
    Sucker Punch

    [pimg]184[/pimg][pimg]319[/pimg]
    Aqua Jet

    [pimg]68[/pimg][pimg]237[/pimg]
    Bullet Punch

    [pimg]466[/pimg]
    Ice Shard

    [pimg]107[/pimg][pimg]237[/pimg]
    Mach Punch

    Conclusion
    In short, the offensive play-style is one of the best available in UU, and should always be considered when building a team. Backed by a strong support core, an offensive team can quite easily overthrow any opponent. With a plethora of attacking options, and numerous opportunities to generate its own momentum, offensive teams are here to stay in the UU metagame.
  2. Paux

    Paux

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    I don't think there's a single pokeman on there not described as a monster
  3. Mazz

    Mazz Might make a comeback
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    Only two were really.
  4. TrollFreak

    TrollFreak (╮°-°)╮┳━┳ (╯°□°)╯ ┻━┻
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    Looks good, just remove Ambipom, almost everyone who plays UU will tell you it sucks chode
  5. Mazz

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    I know it's terrible in general, but as a lead, it excels. I'll keep it there simply because it's a half-assed lead and really is one of two users of Fake Out in the tier.
  6. Adamant Zoroark

    Adamant Zoroark formerly LucaroarkZ

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    Honestly, I'm not sure if the example team can even be considered an offensive team. You have one set-up sweeper and one revenge killer, and everything else is a support Pokemon. When I build offensively-oriented teams, I only really think to include Stealth Rock, a couple of set-up sweepers, a revenge killer, a stallbreaker, and then one more Pokemon depending on what I feel the team needs most. If I feel that I need a Wish supporter, I'll add one in. If I feel that I need Rapid Spin support, I'll chuck a Hitmontop on the team. If I feel I need something to just hit hard right off the bat with Choice Band/Specs, I'll put one of those in. If I need something to trap Steels, I'll use Magneton. If I want dual screens, I'll use Xatu. The team in the example looks more like a balanced team intended to support a Dragon Dance Scrafty sweep.

    Looking at everything else, I feel that some threats shouldn't be mentioned here. Ambipom is bad, so that should probably be removed. Literally all it does is use Fake Out and U-turn, so it's really predictable. Dusclops just outright isn't good on offensive teams. Hell, it's barely good at all, every time I saw one I set up on it with Zoroark and won. I also don't think Spiritomb should be mentioned. I have used it, and honestly it's not really that good. When I used a support set, I wished I was using Sableye, and when I used a CB set, I wished I was using something better like Heracross.
  7. Sayonara

    Sayonara don't forget

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    Scrafty deserves a mention in set-up sweepers imo, as it can use Dragon Dance and then sweep with Hi-Jump Kick, Crunch and Ice Punch.
  8. Mazz

    Mazz Might make a comeback
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    I don't really think everyone seems to understand what I've got going here. Hopefully this helps.

    The Pokemon seen above are simply examples that show a user of indicated bold word above them. I know Ambipom and Dusclops are bad, but people still use them, and they work as a Fake Out user and Spinblocker respectively, no? There are so few users of Fake Out available to UU, so I just put the one that has the strongest there. Dusclops is there simply because Chandelure is occupying another role on the guide and as is Cofagrigus.

    I can't list every single threat on this guide, simply because it would become a debreifing of UU. Scrafty doesn't really deserve a mention anyways, as Kingdra is already a better Dragon Dancer and doesn't require three boosts to guarantee it outspeeds some of the most common Pokemon, and in general, it's really only another physical sweeper.

    In regards to the team "not being an offensive team", it is actually. It's Bulky Offense, which makes up for a lot of the offensive teams in the tier. It's sure as hell not stall, and actually has synergy unlike a lot of offensive teams running around on Showdown. I even have something entailing Bulky Offense on the guide

    I'm not trying to come off as a prick that won't listen to ideas, it's just that things are there to provide examples and highlight what's available in UU.
  9. Adamant Zoroark

    Adamant Zoroark formerly LucaroarkZ

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    I don't think you get it. Specially Defensive Empoleon can't really be considered "offensive" at all. Bulky? Yes. Offensively oriented? No, it's support-oriented. Cofagrigus is also more of a support Pokemon unless it is running a Nasty Plot + Trick Room set, which the one in the example isn't. The given Roserade is also a very support-oriented Pokemon. I guess you could argue that the given Hitmontop could be considered more of a tank, but with Rapid Spin, it is also a supporter. So, it cannot be considered an offensive team. It has too many support Pokemon, none of which can be considered tanks except maybe Hitmontop. You argued that it's "bulky offense", but bulky offense should be using Pokemon that can take a hit and hit hard back. Think things like Swampert, Choice Band Snorlax, and Bulk Up Scrafty.

    Honestly, if you're seriously suggesting Dusclops as an option for offensive teams, which it isn't, I don't think people will actually take you seriously. Also, neither Scrafty nor Kingdra are "better" than one or the other. Does Kingdra have Moxie? No. Does Kingdra have Shed Skin? No. Is Kingdra faster? Yes. Both have their advantages over the other. They are entirely different Pokemon and should be treated as such.

    Let me make it more clear. Offensive teams should focus on putting offensive pressure on teams. The team in the example borders on putting more defensive pressure on the opponent, and the only truly offensive Pokemon on the team are Scrafty and Rotom-H. When looking at it, four out of six of the Pokemon are defensive or specially defensive. If anything, the team puts more defensive pressure on the opponent than it does offensive pressure. Of course you're going to need support Pokemon because you need things like Stealth Rock, but when you have too many, it becomes difficult to consider a team "offensive" anymore.
  10. Mazz

    Mazz Might make a comeback
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    I'm going to take into the considerations above by replacing the team and adding a few other example teams (one for H.O and maybe B.O). Also going to add Scrafty as a Bulk Up user.

    Should be done by tomorrow.
  11. Omicron

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    Mienshao really needs a mention somewhere; it's one of the most common and powerful Pokemon in UU atm! Not to mention it gets Baton Pass and Swords Dance and can utilize Hidden Power Ice to get past Gligar... Also, where the hell is Flygon? It definitely needs a big mention in the choice users section. Rhyperior also needs a big heads up in the support section, it's a great Pokemon. Likewise, Sableye needs a mention in the Stallbreakers section, it's literally the definition of Stallbreaker, and having only Crobat in that section makes it look very inadequate. I understand that you cannot include everything, but for such a comprehensive guide, you should really include more than what you have now. I also second replacing the example team. It's almost entirely defensive, and hardly showcases offense at all.

    In all honesty, this guide is really lacking what I would expect from a complete guide to offensive UU. You have one measly paragraph discussing bulky offense, yet very few of the Pokemon you listed are commonly found on bulky offense teams. There is no rush to get this done, so I recommend that you make completely separate sections for bulky offense and standard offense / hyper offense. You also need to talk more about threats to offense, and how to deal with stall. Simply building a team out of offensive Pokemon won't get you anywhere against good stall teams. Maybe a section like "how to deal with stall" or something like that I don't really know.

    Overall, this really needs a lot more information for it to truly reflective of the UU metagame. I'd be happy to give suggestions if you'd so incline, and I'm sure many others are willing as well. I'd much rather have a complete, in-depth article put on-site at a later date rather than a mediocre article rushed on-site.

    I'm sorry if I'm coming off as abrasive or too critical, but this is my honest opinion, and having experience with C&C, I can tell you that this isn't adequate enough.
  12. Mazz

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    Just mentioning I haven't forgotten about this. My plate's been full with work, a summer course for school, and about a dozen other things. Work on this guide should resume fairly soon.
  13. Mazz

    Mazz Might make a comeback
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    EDIT:

    I've just decided to limit the sprites to 3 max per topic. Makes it look neater. I've also got hilarious helping me write this up, so expect to see this completed soon.

    Should I make a Fake Out section? It's a bad move really, and Mienshao and Ambipom are the only users of it (and if Mien runs it, its a waste of a moveslot really, and Ambipom is just terrible). I probably will just to include everything, but if someone feels against this, let me know.
  14. Mazz

    Mazz Might make a comeback
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    Time for that monthly bump to post about the status of the guide. Unfortunately, I don't have a lot of spare time to be working on this any more. I'm currently involved with other on-site projects, which have been a priority over this guide. The same goes for my social life, which has taken a huge turn from being nearly non-existent to me actually existing. I have a recommendation regarding this guide, as I personally believe it is much to large and should be broken up into the following categories:

    • A guide to choice users in UU
    • A guide to UU trick room teams
    • A guide to UU weather
    • A guide to UU support (hazards, etc. can be divided into multiple guides)

    I just believe that the fundamentals of a whole guide to offense is relatively redundant, as the principles of offense tend to remain the same for every tier. If someone wants to know in-depth specifics, I personally know resources found throughout the UU subforum that would handily answer their questions, and that the folks at #genvuu are typically always able to help.

    If hilarious wants to carry on with this entire project, I advise that he find someone to help him, as it's a very painstaking task. If the C&C people weigh in that separating the guide into smaller and more efficient guides, then I would be more than obliged to take on one or two of them. As I mentioned, offense is offense, and it doesn't change a whole hell of a lot throughout the tiers.

    I'm sorry that it took me this long to come to this consensus, but seeing it in my subscription box everyday and knowing that next to nothing was being done to progress this guide left me bitter. I knew I couldn't maintain this on my own or with only one other person at my disposal, even after trying to find additional help.
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