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In-Battle Stats : The Ups and Downs (DP)

Discussion in 'Archives' started by Arseus, Aug 20, 2007.

  1. Arseus

    Arseus
    refuses to accept Contributor

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2006
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    The foe’s GARCHOMP used Swords Dance!
    The foe’s GARCHOMP’s Attack sharply rose!


    If you’ve seen the above scenario before, you probably know that stat boosts ... and drops, are a major part of Pokémon battles. Most “sweepers” cannot sweep without a boost to their relevant attacking stat(s), and without a move like Calm Mind, Pokémon such as Suicune would have a much harder time taking hits.

    Sections in this guide :

    Why do I need to mess with the stats?
    Stat Modifiers
    Affecting the Stat Modifier
    Ability Modifiers
    Item Modifiers
    [Special] Defensive Modifiers
    Putting it all together


    Why do I need to mess with the stats?

    Is a question commonly asked by players new to the competitive scene. Why can’t you just attack outright, while your opponent is wasting their time boosting their stats? Well, most Pokémon simply can’t plow through an average team without a boost in their stats. That makes them easier to be stopped, and taken down. More defensive Pokémon would have a much harder time staying in the battle if they didn’t use moves such as Calm Mind to lower the amount of damage done by the opponent.

    The majority of Pokémon have one or two stat-enhancing moves available to them. The vast majority of Pokémon use at least one method to affect stats in their standard movesets. Whether it is in the form of a Dragon Dancing Gyarados, or a Choice Band-wielding Tyranitar, all attackers must have a method of enhancing their stats to be effective. If you do not want to use a moveslot or item on the attacker itself, there is always the option of using the move Baton Pass to pass stat boosts onto the desired recipient.

    It is more arguable that messing with the foe’s Pokémon’s stats is less than a good use of time. The Ability Intimidate is great for lowering the foe’s stat’s when switching in. Burns are great with their Attack cutting property, as is Paralysis with Speed, and both last until they are cured via a Berry, an Ability, or a specific move. The other methods of lowering stats last only as long as the foe is in battle. Given the fact that competitive battles are chock-full of switching in and out, it doesn’t make much of a difference. Sure, you may force a switch, but threats like a Swords Dancing Garchomp can do this anyway.

    The rule of thumb is, unless the effect lasts even after the foe has switched out, it is not the most effective use of a move on most Pokémon to use stat-lowering moves. That’s not to say these moves are worthless in every situation (a good example of this would be Metal Sound Zapdos), but it is wise to take extra careful thought when using a stat-lowering move on a Pokémon. Another good rule is only to use a move if it raises, or lowers a stat by at least two stages. What exactly does that mean? Read the next section to find out.

    Stat Modifiers

    When a Pokémon has its stats affected, it is generally referred to in stages or modifiers such as +2 Attack, or even +4 or +6. What this means is the stat has been raised, or lowered by that many modifiers. The levels themselves add on to each other, but the stat modifiers do not. What this means is each time a stat reaches a different level, there is only that level’s modifier in effect, rather than the combined modifiers from previous levels. The modifiers work as follows :

    - 6 : Stat x 2/8 (0.25)

    - 5 : Stat x 2/7 (0.2857)

    - 4 : Stat x 2/6 (0.3333)

    - 3 : Stat x 2/5 (0.4)

    - 2 : Stat x 2/4 (0.5)

    - 1 : Stat x 2/3 (0.6667)

    0: Stat

    + 1 : Stat x 3/2 (1.5)

    + 2 : Stat x 4/2 (2)

    + 3 : Stat x 5/2 (2.5)

    + 4 : Stat x 6/2 (3)

    + 5 : Stat x 7/2 (3.5)

    + 6 : Stat x 8/2 (4)

    A stat will never go any higher or lower than +6 or - 6. Some Abilities or Items may add on to the stat regardless of level. Boost listed in italics are skipped by Pokémon with the Ability Simple. If this is the case, the Stat would take the next available boost; note that it does not actually skip the level.

    This applies to all stats except for Hit Points (which do not get any boosts or drops; a Pokémon simply loses and restores HP in battle), Accuracy, and Evasion. The formula to figure out what the stat would be after x number of boosts is actually pretty simple, provided the Ability or Item of the Pokémon do not affect stats. Say you have an Arcanine with 319 Attack, that uses the move Howl, and raises its Attack one stage.


    Final [Special] Attack Stat = Current Stat x Stat Modifier x Ability Modifier x Item Modifier


    With Arcanine, you are dealing with the Attack stat. In this particular case, Arcanine isn’t holding an item that affects its stats, and it does not have an Ability that affects its stats. So these modifers stay at 1.

    319 x 1.5 x 1 x 1 = 478.5

    Uh-oh! There’s a decimal, now what? Well, in Pokémon, multiplication with decimals simply isn’t done. So, we eliminate the decimal, and round down to 478. Just pretend the decimal isn’t there, and you have your stat number! Keep in mind, that if an Item, or Ability is in effect, they must be incorporated. More on this is in the Ability Modifier and Item Modifier section.


    For the Defense and Special Defense stats, a slightly different formula is used.


    Final [Special] Defense Stat = Current Stat x Stat Modifier x [Special] Defensive Modifier x Boom Modifier

    The Stat Modifier still conforms to the aforementioned levels; the [Special] Defensive Modifier can be a number of different modifiers. For more on this, see the [Special] Defensive Modifer section. The Boom Modifier is very simple, and not often used.

    If the foe is using the move Selfdestruct or Explosion against your Pokémon, the Boom Modifier is 0.5. That means Defense is effectively halved ... but only when those moves are being used. This does not apply to Special Defense in any way; both Selfdestruct and Explosion are Physical moves. If neither moves are being used, the mod is a neutral 1, and not necessary in the equation.

    For Speed, the formula is different once again :


    Final Speed Stat = Current Stat x Stat Modifier x Ability Modifier x Item Modifier x Paralysis Modifier


    The Paralysis Modifier applies if a Pokemon is Paralyzed, and does not have the Ability Quick Feet. In this case, it gives a Modifier of 0.25. If the Pokemon is not Paralyzed, or is Paralyzed with the Ability Quick Feet, the Paralysis Modifier is a neutral 1. Other than this, the Speed formula is essentially the same as the one for [Special] Attack.


    Now, a lot of players either forget, or don’t know about the “hidden” stats. These are Accuracy and Evasion. Accuracy is lowered by the foe, and raised by yourself. Evasion can be raised and lowered by both parties. Luckily, in battle, they are referred to as Accuracy and Evasiveness, so it’s not as confusing.

    The modifiers for Accuracy works as follows :

    -6 : (Move Accuracy) x 3/9 (0.3333)

    -5 : (Move Accuracy) x 3/8 (0.375)

    -4 : (Move Accuracy) x 3/7 (0.4285)

    -3 : (Move Accuracy) x 3/6 (0.5)

    -2 : (Move Accuracy) x 3/5 (0.6)

    -1 : (Move Accuracy) x 3/4 (0.75)

    0 : Move Accuracy

    +1 : (Move Accuracy) x 4/3 (1.3333)

    +2 : (Move Accuracy) x 5/3 (1.6666)

    +3 : (Move Accuracy) x 6/3 (2)

    +4 : (Move Accuracy) x 7/3 (2.3333)

    +5 : (Move Accuracy) x 8/3 (2.6666)

    +6 : (Move Accuracy) x 9/3 (3)

    Evasion is very similar, except the chart works in reverse :

    -6 : (Move Accuracy) x 9/3 (3)

    -5 : (Move Accuracy) x 8/3 (2.6666)

    -4 : (Move Accuracy) x 7/3 (2.3333)

    -3 : (Move Accuracy) x 6/3 (2)

    -2 : (Move Accuracy) x 5/3 (1.6666)

    -1 : (Move Accuracy) x 4/3 (1.3333)

    0 : Move Accuracy

    +1 : (Move Accuracy) x 3/4 (0.75)

    +2 : (Move Accuracy) x 3/5 (0.6)

    +3 : (Move Accuracy) x 3/6 (0.5)

    +4 : (Move Accuracy) x 3/7 (0.4285)

    +5 : (Move Accuracy) x 3/8 (0.375)

    +6 : (Move Accuracy) x 3/9 (0.3333)


    Accuracy and Evasion can each only reach +6 or -6. They are separate stats. Once again, the boosts in italics are ignored by Pokémon with the Ability Simple.

    Now, here’s where it gets a little tricky. Not only are the numbers much harder to work with, but the application is as well. Move Accuracy, is, in the event that either Evasion or Accuracy are in effect, the actual Accuracy of the move. Accuracy of the move is easy to see, most of which are 100. There also moves like Hydro Pump or Stone Edge with 80. So if only one “hidden” modifier is in effect, you can just plug in the numbers and see how often the move will hit.

    If both are in effect, you’re going to have a bit more difficulty. You must use a longer formula, which looks like this :

    Chance of a hit : Move Accuracy x Accuracy Mod x Evasion Mod x Accuracy Item Mod x Evasion Item Mod x Accuracy Ability Mod x Evasion Ability Mod

    Wow, that sure looks complex doesn’t it? In truth, it isn’t really. In this formula, you don’t round anything up or down. This means that the order of which you multiply doesn’t have any effect on the outcome. It is recommended you use the above formula though, to make sure you account for everything.

    So say Tyranitar was trying to hit its foe with Crunch, but its foe had lowered Tyranitar’s Accuracy to -1, and raised its own evasion to +2. Tyranitar does not have an Ability that affects its Accuracy or Evasion, and in this instance, neither does its foe.

    Chance of a hit : 80 x 0.75 x 0.6

    = 60 x 0.6

    = 36 %

    So Tyranitar would only have a 36 % chance of landing a hit with Crunch, one of its more reliable moves. Yikes!

    In general, you will not be calculating Accuracy and Evasion, due to the fact that it is simply not as important to know how often moves will hit, as opposed to how hard you can hit the foe, or if you can outrun it. Accuracy and Evasion are often claused or even banned outright in competitive play.

    Now, keep in mind, these are not the only modifiers to stats; the aforementioned Ability Modifiers, Item Modifiers, [Special] Defensive Modifiers are still major factors. However, they are much more specific in how to apply; there are tons of moves that affect the Stat Modifier! These are covered in the following section.

    Affecting the Stat Modifier

    Move NameType, Effect, Effect % if applicable,

    If a move is not exclusively for raising stats, it will often have an effect rate, which is the % of the time the described effects occur. Note that these are often damaging moves. If the effect is not listed, it always occurs if the move hits. If a rate is listed, Pokémon with the Ability Serene Grace have double the chance listed. The % will never go over 100.

    Attack

    Boosts

    Ancientpower(Rock, Raises all the user’s visible stats one stage, 10%)
    Acupressure(Normal, Raises a random stat of the user’s two stages, 14.2857%)
    Belly Drum(Normal, Raises Attack to +6, taking off 50% HP)
    Bulk Up(Fighting, Raises user’s Attack and Defense one stage)
    Curse(???, If user is not the Ghost type, raises Attack and Defense one stage, and lowers Speed)
    Dragon Dance(Dragon, Raises user’s Attack and Speed one stage)
    Howl(Normal, Raises user’s Attack one stage)
    Meditate(Psychic, Raises user’s Attack one stage)
    Metal Claw(Steel, Raises user’s Attack by one stage, 10%)
    Meteor Mash(Steel, Raises user’s Attack by one stage, 20%)
    Ominous Wind(Ghost, Raises all the user’s visible stats one stage, 10%)
    Rage(Normal, Raises user’s Attack one stage if hit before selecting the next move)
    Sharpen(Normal, Raises user’s Attack one stage)
    Silver Wind(Bug, Raises all user’s visible stats one stage, 10%)
    Swagger(Normal, Confuses target and raises its Attack two stages)
    Swords Dance(Normal, Raises user’s Attack two stages)

    If a Pokémon is holding a #53 Liechi Berry, its Attack will be raised one stage once its health reaches 25% or less, or 50% or less if the Pokémon has the Ability Gluttony. If a #59 Starf Berry is activated, it raises a visible stat two stages, with a 20% chance of picking Attack. The effects of the Berry can also be obtained by using Pluck or Bug Bite against a Pokémon that is holding one.

    Bulk Up, Curse, Dragon Dance, and Swords Dance are your best bets for raising Attack here. Swords Dance and Dragon Dance are primarily to be used on a Pokémon setting up for a sweep, whereas Curse and Bulk Up are more suited on bulkier Pokémon that would like an extra punch. Dragon Dance has the added advantage of raising Speed one stage as well; Bulk Up and Curse each raise Defense as well, albeit Curse comes with the side effect of lowering Speed. Most non-Ghost Pokémon that learn Curse are slow enough not to mind anyway.

    Belly Drum is very risky, due to taking away half your Pokémon’s health, but it also brings Attack to the maximum level. That means even if your Poliwrath is at -6 Attack, it can still use Belly Drum and end up at +6. It is certainly usable if you are wiling to take the risk, and have good prediction skills. Acupressure is not the most effective choice, as it can raise any stat, and Attack must be randomly chosen.


    Drops

    Aurora Beam(Ice, Lowers target’s Attack one stage, 10%)
    Charm(Normal, Lowers target’s Attack two stages)
    Featherdance(Flying, Lowers target’s Attack two stages)
    Growl(Normal, Lowers target’s Attack one stage)
    Memento(Dark, Lowers target’s Attack and Special Attack two stages, causes user to faint)
    Secret Power(Normal, Lowers target’s Attack one stage when used at Gateway Colosseum, 30%)
    Superpower(Fighting, Lowers users Attack and Defense one stage after successfully using the move)
    Tickle(Normal, Lowers target’s Attack and Defense one stage)

    Pokémon with the Ability Intimidate lower the Attack of all foes by one stage when it first switches in.

    Intimidate is a very useful Ability, as it makes switching in to Physical threats much easier for certain Pokémon, as well as forcing the opponent to switch in many cases. Outside of this, Superpower is really the only Attack drop you’ll see, and it’s a move not learned by many Pokémon in the first place. In general, it is best to Burn a physical threat.

    Defense

    Boosts

    Acid Armor(Poison, Raises user’s Defense two stages)
    Ancientpower(Rock, Raises all the user’s visible stats one stage, 10%)
    Acupressure(Normal, Raises a random stat of the user’s two stages, 14.2857%)
    Barrier(Psychic, Raises user’s Defense two stages)
    Bulk Up(Fighting, Raises user’s Attack and Defense one stage)
    Cosmic Power(Psychic, Raises user’s Defense and Special Defense one stage)
    Curse(???, If user is not the Ghost type, raises Attack and Defense one stage, and lowers Speed)
    Defend Order(Bug, Raises user’s Defense and Special Defense one stage)
    Defense Curl(Normal, Raises user’s Defense one stage)
    Harden(Normal, Raises user’s Defense one stage)
    Iron Defense(Steel, Raises user’s Defense two stages)
    Ominous Wind(Ghost, Raises all the user’s visible stats one stage, 10%)
    Silver Wind(Bug, Raises all the user’s visible stats one stage, 10%)
    Skull Bash(Normal, Two turn attack, raises user’s Defense one stage on the first turn)
    Steel Wing(Steel, Raises user’s Defense one stage, 10%)
    Stockpile(Normal, Raises Defense and Special Defense one stage, can be used for a maximum of three boosts, lost if the user uses the moves Spit Up or Swallow)
    Withdraw(Normal, Raises user’s Defense one stage)

    If a Pokémon is holding a #54 Ganlon Berry, its Defense will be raised one stage once its health reaches 25% or less, or 50% or less if the Pokémon has the Ability Gluttony. If a #59 Starf Berry is activated, it raises a visible stat two stages, with a 20% chance of picking Defense. The effects of the Berry can also be obtained by using Pluck or Bug Bite against a Pokémon that is holding one.

    Barrier, Bulk Up, Curse, most effective here. Barrier is handy with its two stage boost, and while Acid Armor does the exact same thing, very few Pokémon learn it, and those that do will want to have the moveslot used for something else. Bulk Up and Curse are good choices, due to the fact that they both raise Attack one stage as well, albeit Curse will also lower Speed. Cosmic Power and Stockpile both raise Defense and Special Defense, though Cosmic Power is not unlike Acid Armor, in that Pokémon that actually learn it would rather do something else. Stockpile is limited in its boosts, but is learned by a few more Pokémon, namely Drifblim, who can use Baton Pass to give the boosts to another Pokémon.

    Defense Curl is interesting, because it provides a boost in power to the moves Ice Ball and Rollout, should the user attack with them after using the move. While the Defense boost from Defense Curl can be Baton Passed, the boost to the aforementioned moves cannot.

    Drops

    Close Combat(Fighting, Lowers user’s Defense and Special Defense one stage after successfully using the move)
    Crunch(Dark, Lowers target’s Defense one stage, 20%)
    Crush Claw(Normal, Lowers target’s Defense one stage, 50%)
    Iron TailSteel, Lowers target’s Defense one stage, 30%
    Leer(Normal, Lowers target’s Defense one stage)
    Rock Smash(Fighting, Lowers target’s Defense one stage, 50%)
    Screech(Normal, Lowers target’s Defense two stages, Pokémon with the Ability Soundproof are immune)
    Superpower(Fighting, Lowers user’s Attack and Defense one stage after successfully using the move)
    Tail Whip(Normal, Lowers target’s Defense one stage)
    Tickle(Normal, Lower’s target’s Attack and Defense one stage)

    Close Combat is a common attacking move, but it does lower both defensive stats by one stage. Crunch is fairly common as well, but the chance of lowering the target’s Defense is slim. Superpower, while a fairly powerful move, is not seen very much. The other most notable move is Screech, which, while very capable of forcing a switch, isn’t used very much.


    Special Attack

    Boosts

    Ancientpower(Rock, Raises all the user’s visible stats one stage, 10%)
    Acupressure(Normal, Raises a random stat of the user’s two stages, 14.2857%)
    Calm Mind(Psychic, Raises user’s Special Attack and Special Defense one stage)
    Charge Beam(Electric, Raises user’s Special Attack one stage, 70%)
    Flatter(Dark, Confuses target and raises its Special Attack two stages)
    Growth(Grass, Raises user’s Special Attack one stage)
    Nasty Plot(Dark, Raises user’s Special Attack two stages)
    Ominous Wind(Ghost, Raises all the user’s visible stats one stage, 10%)
    Silver Wind(Bug, Raises all the user’s visible stats one stage, 10%)
    Tail Glow(Bug, Raises user’s Special Attack two stages)

    If a Pokémon is holding a #56 Petaya Berry, its Special Attack will be raised one stage once its health reaches 25% or less, or 50% or less if the Pokémon has the Ability Gluttony. If a #59 Starf Berry is activated, it raises a visible stat two stages, with a 20% chance of picking Special Attack. The effects of the Berry can also be obtained by using Pluck or Bug Bite against a Pokémon that is holding one.

    Calm Mind and Nasty Plot are your best bets for raising Special Attack, followed up by Charge Beam and Tail Glow. Calm Mind has the added bonus of raising Special Defense one stage as well, allowing the user to take more Special abuse, as well as give it. Tail Glow is second in line to Nasty Plot, but is only learned by two Pokémon. Charge Beam could be viable, however, it can be somewhat unreliable, and it is an attacking move with a weak base power, plus the opponent could resist Electric.

    Drops

    Captivate(Normal, Lowers the target’s Special Attack two stages if it is of the opposite gender of the user)
    Draco Meteor(Dragon, Lowers the user’s Special Attack two stages after successfully using the attack)
    Leaf Storm(Grass, Lowers the user’s Special Attack two stages after successfully using the attack)
    Memento(Dark, Lowers target’s Attack and Special Attack two stages, and causes the user to faint)
    Mist Ball(Psychic, Lowers target’s Special Attack one stage, 50%)
    Overheat(Fire, Lowers the user’s Special Attack two stages after successfully using the attack)
    Psycho Boost(Psychic, Lowers the user’s Special Attack two stages after successfully using the attack)

    Chances are you’ll lower your own Pokémon’s Special Attack much more than the foe will. Each of the moves that lower the user’s Special Attack by two stages are feasible options for some Pokémon; such as SpecsMence and its Draco Meteor. It is wise to use an item to boost your Special Attack while using these moves, as they will often cause you to switch out, and it is best to do as much damage in one go as possible.

    Special Defense

    Boosts

    Amnesia(Psychic, Raises user’s Special Defense two stages)
    Ancientpower(Rock, Raises all the user’s visible stats one stage, 10%)
    Acupressure(Normal, Raises a random stat of the user’s two stages, 14.2857%)
    Calm Mind(Psychic, Raises user’s Special Attack and Special Defense one stage)
    Charge(Electric, Raises user’s Special Defense one stage, also doubles the power of the next move if it is Electric type)
    Cosmic Power(Psychic, Raises user’s Defense and Special Defense one stage)
    Defend Order(Bug, Raises user’s Defense and Special Defense one stage)
    Ominous Wind(Ghost, Raises all the user’s visible stats one stage, 10%)
    Silver Wind(Bug, Raises all the user’s visible stats one stage, 10%)
    Stockpile(Normal, Raises Defense and Special Defense one stage, can be used for a maximum of three boosts, lost if the user uses the moves Spit Up or Swallow)

    If a Pokémon is holding a #57 Apicot Berry, its Special Defense will be raised one stage once its health reaches 25% or less, or 50% or less if the Pokémon has the Ability Gluttony. If a #59 Starf Berry is activated, it raises a visible stat two stages, with a 20% chance of picking Special Attack. The effects of the Berry can also be obtained by using Pluck or Bug Bite against a Pokémon that is holding one.

    Calm Mind and Charge are your best bets for raising Special Defense. They each offer bonuses as well; Calm Mind boosts Special Attack, and Charge Electric attacks. Calm Mind is in general a good move; Charge is listed because Electric Pokémon often have little more to do. Cosmic Power and Stockpile both raise Defense and Special Defense, though with Cosmic Power, Pokémon that actually learn it would often rather do something else. Stockpile is limited in its boosts, but is learned by a few more Pokémon, namely Drifblim, who can use Baton Pass to give the boosts to another Pokémon. Amnesia is great if you can fit it into a moveset, but not many Pokémon will use it.

    Drops

    Acid(Poison, Lowers target’s Special Defense one stage, 10%)
    Bug Buzz(Bug, Lowers target’s Special Defense one stage, 10%)
    Close Combat(Fighting, Lowers user’s Defense and Special Defense one stage after successfully using the move)
    Earth Power(Ground, Lowers target’s Special Defense one stage, 10%)
    Energy Ball(Grass, Lowers target’s Special Defense one stage, 10%)
    Fake Tears(Dark, Lowers target’s Special Defense two stages)
    Flash Cannon(Steel, Lowers target’s Special Defense one stage, 10%)
    Focus Blast(Fighting, Lowers target’s Special Defense one stage, 10%)
    Luster Purge(Psychic, Lowers target’s Special Defense one stage, 50%)
    Metal Sound(Steel, Lowers target’s Special Defense two stages, Pokémon with the Ability Soundproof are immune)
    Psychic(Psychic, Lowers target’s Special Defense one stage, 10%)
    Shadow Ball(Ghost, Lowers target’s Special Defense one stage, 20%)
    Seed Flare(Grass, Lowers target’s Special Defense two stages, 40%)

    Close Combat is a common attacking move, but it does lower both defensive stats by one stage. Many of the Special Defense drops you’ll see come randomly from moves such as Psychic and Shadow Ball. Metal Sound and Fake Tears can have their uses on certain movesets, probably forcing a switch, but are not seen much.


    Speed

    Boosts

    Agility(Psychic, Raises user’s Speed two stages)
    Ancientpower(Rock, Raises all the user’s visible stats one stage, 10%)
    Acupressure(Normal, Raises a random stat of the user’s two stages, 14.2857%)
    Dragon Dance(Dragon, Raises user’s Attack and Speed one stage
    Ominous Wind(Ghost, Raises all the user’s visible stats one stage, 10%)
    Rock Polish(Rock, Raises user’s Speed two stages)
    Silver Wind(Bug, Raises all the user’s visible stats one stage, 10%)
    Tailwind(Flying, Raises the user’s team’s Speed two stages, lasts for three turns)*

    Pokémon with the Ability Speed Boost raise their Speed by one stage at the end of each turn.

    Pokémon with the Ability Steadfast raise their Speed by one stage after they flinch.

    If a Pokémon is holding a #55 Salac Berry, its Speed will be raised one stage once its health reaches 25% or less, or 50% or less if the Pokémon has the Ability Gluttony. If a #59 Starf Berry is activated, it raises a visible stat two stages, with a 20% chance of picking Speed. The effects of the Berry can also be obtained by using Pluck or Bug Bite against a Pokémon that is holding one.

    Agility, Dragon Dance, and Rock Polish are your best options here, move-wise. The Ability Speed Boost is still very useful, though the Speed boost is most effective if Baton Passed onto another Pokémon. Holding a Salac Berry is a viable option as well.

    * There is currently some confusion about Tailwind, and it may or may not be a Stat Modifier.

    Drops

    Bubble(Water, Lowers the target’s Speed one stage, 10%)
    Bubblebeam(Water, Lowers the target’s Speed one stage, 10%)
    Constrict(Normal, Lowers the target’s Speed one stage, 10%)
    Cotton Spore(Grass, Lowers the target’s Speed one stage)
    Curse(???, Lowers user’s Speed one stage, raises Attack and Defense)
    Hammer Arm(Fighting, Lowers user’s Speed one stage)
    Icy Wind(Ice, Lowers target’s Speed one stage)
    Mud Shot(Ground, Lowers target’s Speed one stage)
    Rock Tomb(Rock, Lowers target’s Speed one stage)
    Scary Face(Normal, Lowers target’s Speed two stages)
    String Shot(Bug, Lowers target’s Speed one stage)

    Like with raising Speed, lowering Speed doesn’t leave you with a lot of options either. Despite their Speed-lowering side effects, Curse and Hammer Arm are mostly learned by slower Pokémon, which don’t mind losing their Speed. As for lowering Speed, Cotton Spore and Scary Face are not the best use of a moveslot, and inaccurate. Generally, if there is a speedy threat, it’s best to Paralyze it.

    Accuracy

    Boosts

    Acupressure(Normal, Raises a random stat of the user’s two stages, 14.2857%)

    Once again, you should not rely on Acupressure to raise any given stat. It is not a damaging move, and there is only a 14.2857% chance Accuracy will be chosen over the other stats.

    Drops

    Mirror Shot(Steel, Lowers target’s Accuracy one stage, 30%)
    Mud Bomb(Ground, Lowers target’s Accuracy one stage, 30%
    Flash(Normal, Lowers target’s Accuracy one stage)
    Kinesis(Psychic, Lowers target’s Accuracy one stage)
    Muddy Water(Water, Lowers target’s Accuracy one stage, 30%)
    Mud Slap(Ground, Lowers target’s Accuracy one stage)
    Octazooka(Water, Lowers target’s Accuracy one stage, 50%)
    Sand Attack(Ground, Lowers target’s Accuracy one stage)
    Secret Power(Normal, Lowers target’s Accuracy one stage if used at Sunset Colosseum)
    Smokescreen(Normal, Lowers target’s Accuracy one stage)

    These moves can only give a one stage drop at most, and many are either inaccurate, or very weak offensively and unreliable. It is best to leave the foe's Accuracy alone, and raise your own Pokémon's Evasion if you wish to avoid hits.

    Evasion

    Boosts

    Acupressure(Normal, Raises a random stat of the user’s two stages, 14.2857%)
    Double Team(Normal, Raises user’s Evasion one stage)
    Minimize(Normal, Raises user’s Evasion one stage)

    Double Team is learnt by most everything, but you’ll have to tailor a moveset around it to make it work, as well as use an appropriate Pokémon. With the move Minimize, is learnt by fewer Pokémon, and has the side effect of giving Stomp increased power against the user. While the Evasion boosts from Minimize can be Baton Passed, the extra damage from Stomp cannot. Watch that Evasion isn’t claused or banned in the match you are playing.

    Drops

    Defog(Flying, Lower’s target’s Evasion one stage)
    Gravity(Psychic, Lowers opposing team’s Evasion two stages for five turns, and disables moves that involve rising into the air)
    Sweet Scent(Grass, Lowers target’s Evasion one stage)

    Gravity is the most viable of these options, as it has a useful side effect, and lowers Evasion by more than one stage. Defog and Sweet Scent are not reccomended over Gravity.


    Multiple Stats

    The following moves raise more than one stat at a time. They are listed above in the section of each stat they raise, but here they are in one section, for convenience :

    Ancientpower(Rock, Raises all the user’s visible stats one stage, 10%)
    Bulk Up(Fighting, Raises user’s Attack and Defense one stage)
    Calm Mind(Psychic, Raises user’s Special Attack and Special Defense one stage)
    Close Combat(Fighting, Lowers user’s Defense and Special Defense one stage after successfully using the move)
    Cosmic Power(Psychic, Raises user’s Defense and Special Defense one stage)
    Curse(???, If user is not the Ghost type, raises Attack and Defense one stage, and lowers Speed)
    Defend Order(Bug, Raises user’s Defense and Special Defense one stage)
    Dragon Dance(Dragon, Raises user’s Attack and Speed one stage)
    Ominous Wind(Ghost, Raises all the user’s visible stats one stage, 10%)
    Silver Wind(Bug, Raises all the user’s visible stats one stage, 10%)
    Stockpile(Normal, Raises Defense and Special Defense one stage, can be used for a maximum of three boosts, lost if the user uses the moves Spit Up or Swallow)
    Superpower(Fighting, Lowers user’s Attack and Defense one stage after successfully using the move)
    Tickle(Normal, Lower’s target’s Attack and Defense one stage)


    Miscellaneous

    If a Pokémon has set up a Substitute, it is not affected by any stat-altering moves that it does not use itself. It is also unaffected by Intimidate.

    Pokémon with the Ability Clear Body and White Smoke are not affected by any stat-lowering moves that they do not use themselves, such as Curse or Superpower. They are unaffected by Intimidate. Burns and Paralysis still affect these Pokémon.

    Pokémon with the Ability Keen Eye cannot have their accuracy lowered.

    Pokémon with the Ability Hyper Cutter cannot have their Attack lowered by any stat-lowering moves that they do not use themselves, such as Superpower. They are unaffected by Intimidate. Burns still affect these Pokémon.

    If a Pokémon scores a critical hit against its foe, certain Stat Modifier boosts and drops are ignored. If the attacker has drops in its Attack or Special Attack, the stat is set to level 0 for calculating the damage of the hit. If the victim of the critical hit has boosts in the Defense or Special Defense stat, the stat is automatically set to level 0 as well. Reflect and Light Screen are also ignored. This only applies for the critical hit, and reverts back to whatever boosts and drops the Pokémon had before after the hit’s damage has been calculated.

    The move Haze eliminates all Stat Modifier boosts and drops from all Pokémon on the field. This move is to be used strategically, as it can prevent some of your own Pokémon from being successful as well! Haze is not blocked by Clear Body, Hyper Cutter, Keen Eye, or White Smoke, even if it does lower the Ability possessor’s stats. Haze does not eliminate any other Modifiers, nor the drops from Burn or Paralysis.

    If a Pokémon with the Ability Unaware is in battle against a Pokémon that has modified its stats, the foe’s Stat Modifier level is set to 0, and cannot be changed until the Unaware Pokémon leaves battle. This does not apply to Speed boosts and drops.

    The move Psych Up copies all of the foe’s Stat Modifier changes, but at the cost of losing any changes the Pokémon had previous to using the move.

    Using the move Snatch can steal many Stat Modifier boosts and drops on the turn that the foe tries to use them.

    The move Heart Swap swaps all Stat Modifier boosts and drops with the user and targeted Pokémon.

    The move Guard Swap swaps Defense and Special Defense Stat Modifier boosts and drops with the target. Similarly, the move Power Swap swaps Attack and Special
    Attack Stat Modifier boosts and drops with the target.

    The move Mist prevents any moves that lower stats from working for 5 turns. Moves that have a side effect of lowering stats can still be used, albeit the side effect cannot occur.

    The move Punishment gains power with the more stat-ups the target uses. Note that stat drops are ignored.

    A Pokémon that uses the move Transform will copy any Stat Modifiers the target had at the time of the user Transforming. The Transforming Pokémon will lose any Stat Modifiers it had possessed prior to Transforming into its target.

    While there are quite a few miscellaneous moves to take note of, they are not seen very often in most metagames.



    Ability Modifiers

    Every Pokémon has an Ability. Many species only have one to choose from, yet others may have one of two. Certain Abilities affect the stats of the Pokémon! Note that these are separate modifiers from Stat Modifers, and there can be only one in effect. A Pokémon can switch its Ability, and potentially its Ability Modifier using the move Skill Swap. This will switch the Abilities of the Pokemon and its target. The move Role Play will simply give the user the Ability of its target, and the target's Ability remains the same. A Pokémon that has the Ability Trace will gain the Ability of (one of) its foe(s) when it first enters battle.

    Unlike Stat Modifiers, Ability Modifiers do not conform to a certain chart. Instead, the number listed is actually the number that the stat is multiplied by.

    Final [Special] Attack Stat = Current Stat x Stat Modifier x Ability Modifier x Item Modifier

    Say there is a Medicham with 240 Attack. Upon looking at Medicham’s SmogonDex entry, you would discover Medicham has the Ability Pure Power, which doubles the Attack stat. Assuming Medicham does not have any Stat Modifiers in effect, and is not holding an Item that affects its Attack (say it is holding a Focus Sash), it is ridiculously simple to find its final Attack. The irrelevant Modifiers are a neutral 1.

    Final [Special] Attack Stat = 240 x 1 x 2 x 1 = 480

    Wow, Medicham sure isn’t lacking in power, now is it? It’s a good thing Medicham has very frail defensive stats, else it would be a nightmare to face. As you’ll probably discover from reading below however, there aren’t that many Abilities that give an Ability Modifier.

    Attack

    Flower Gift Gives an Ability Modifier of 1.5 if the sun is bright)
    Guts (Gives an Ability Modifier of 1.5 if the possessor of the Ability is Asleep, Paralyzed, Burned, or Poisoned)
    Huge Power (Gives an Ability Modifier of 2)
    Hustle (Gives an Ability Modifier of 1.5, but moves running off the Attack stat have an Accuracy Ability Modifier of 0.8)
    Pure Power (Gives an Ability Modifier of 2)
    Slow Start (Gives an Ability Modifer of 0.5 to Attack and Speed each time the possessor of the Ability switches in for five turns, cannot be Skill Swapped away in Japanese versions of the game)

    All other Abilities have an Ability Modifier of 1. If the requirements for Flower Gift or Guts are not met, they too give a Modifier of 1.

    Special Attack

    Minus (Gives an Ability Modifier of 1.5 if in a Double Battle, the partner’s Ability is Plus)
    Plus (Gives an Ability Modifier of 1.5 if in a Double Battle, the partner’s Ability is Minus)
    Solar Power (Gives an Ability Modifier of 1.5 if the sun is bright, but loses 12.5% of max HP each turn)

    All other Abilities have an Ability Modifier of 1. If the requirements for the aforementioned are not met, they too give a Modifier of 1.


    Speed

    Chlorophyll (Gives an Ability Modifier of 2 if the sun is bright)
    Motor Drive (Gives an Ability Modifier of 1.5 if the possessor of the Ability would be hit by an Electric-type attack. The attack has no effect)
    Quick Feet (Gives an Ability Modifier of 1.5 if the possessor of the Ability is given a status condition. The Speed drop from Paralysis is nullified)
    Slow Start (Gives an Ability Modifer of 0.5 to Attack and Speed each time the possessor of the Ability switches in, cannot be Skill Swapped away in Japanese versions of the game)
    Swift Swim (Gives an Ability Modifier of 2 if it is raining)
    Unburden (Gives an Ability Modifier of 2 if the possessor of the Ability loses its item in battle)

    All other Abilities have an Ability Modifier of 1. If the requirements for the aforementioned Abilities are not met, they too give a Modifier of 1.


    Accuracy

    Compoundeyes (Gives an Ability Modifier of 1.3)
    Hustle (Gives an Ability Modifier of 0.8, if the move used is Physical, but gives an Attack Ability Modifier of 1.5)

    All other Abilities have an Ability Modifier of 1. If a Pokémon with the Ability Hustle does not use a Physical move, Hustle’s Ability Modifier is 1 as well.

    Evasion

    Snow Cloak (Gives an Ability Modifier of 0.8 if it is hailing)
    Sand Veil (Gives an Ability Modifier of 0.8 if there is a sandstorm)
    Tangled Feet (Gives an Ability Modifier of 0.5 if the possessor of the Ability is confused)

    All other Abilities have an Ability Modifier of 1. If the requirements for the aforementioned Abilities are not met, they too give a Modifier of 1.


    Item Modifiers

    In battle, every Pokémon should be holding an item of some sort. In some cases, that item will boost a stat.

    Attack

    Choice Band (Gives an Item Modifier of 1.5, but the holder cannot switch moves until they leave the field)
    Light Ball (Gives Pikachu an Item Modifier of 2 for Attack and Special Attack)
    Thick Club (Gives Cubone or Marowak an Item Modifier of 2)

    All other items give an Item Modifier of 1. If Light Ball is not held by a Pikachu, or Thick Club not by Cubone or Marowak, they also give an Item Modifier of 1. Now wait, you may say. Don’t items like Life Orb and Muscle Band boost Attack as well? In reality, any other items that claim to boost Attack actually boost the Base Power of Physical moves. Interesting, no?

    Special Attack

    Choice Specs (Gives an Item Modifier of 1.5, but the holder cannot switch moves until they leave the field)
    Deepseatooth (Gives Clamperl an Item Modifier of 2)
    Light Ball (Gives Pikachu an Item Modifier of 2 for Attack and Special Attack)
    Soul Dew (Gives Latias or Latios an Item Modifier of 1.5 for Special Attack, and a Special Defensive Modifier of 1.5)

    All other items give an Item Modifier of 1. Keep in mind, that bar Choice Specs, these items must be held by the aforementioned Pokémon to give their boosts, else their Item Modifiers are 1 as well. You might be thinking that items like Life Orb and Wise Glasses boost Special Attack as well. In reality, any other items that are said to boost Special Attack actually boost the Base Power of Special moves.

    Speed

    Choice Scarf (Gives an Item Modifier of 1.5, but the holder cannot switch moves until they leave the field)
    Iron Ball (Gives an Item Modifier of 0.5, and the holder is vulnerable to Ground attacks, Spikes, and Toxic Spikes no matter what their typing and Ability)
    Macho Brace (Gives an Item Modifier of 0.5, doubles EVs gained in-game)
    Power Anklet (Gives an Item Modifier of 0.5, gives 4 extra Speed EVs in-game)
    Power Band (Gives an Item Modifier of 0.5, gives 4 extra Special Defense EVs in-game)
    Power Belt (Gives an Item Modifier of 0.5, gives 4 extra Defense EVs in-game)
    Power Bracer (Gives an Item Modifier of 0.5, gives 4 extra Attack EVs in-game)
    Power Lens (Gives an Item Modifier of 0.5, gives 4 extra Special Attack EVs in-game)
    Power Weight (Gives an Item Modifier of 0.5, gives 4 extra HP EVs in-game)
    Quick Powder (Gives an unTransformed Ditto and Item Modifier of 2)

    All other items give an Item Modifier of 1. If the requirements for Quick Powder are not met, it will also give an Item Modifier of 1. Note that the Power items give 8 extra EVs in-game if the holder has Pokérus.

    Accuracy

    Wide Lens (Gives an Item Modifier of 1.1)
    Zoom Lens (Gives an Item Modifier of 1.2 if the holder goes last in a turn)

    All other items give an Item Modifier of 1. If the requirements for Zoom Lens are not met, it too gives an Item Modifier of 1.

    Evasion

    BrightPowder (Gives an Item Modifier of 0.9)
    Lax Incense (Gives an Item Modifier of 0.95)

    All other items give an Item Modifier of 1.


    [Special] Defensive Modifiers

    The [Special] Defensive Modifiers are essentially the same as Ability and Item Modifiers for the other stats, only in one category. This is due to the fact that as of Diamond and Pearl, no two of these can be used together. Thus, it is much easier to bunch these all in one category.

    Defensive Modifiers

    Marvel Scale (Gives a Defensive Modifier of 1.5 if the possessor of the Ability has a visible status condition)
    Metal Powder (If held by an unTransformed Ditto, gives a Defensive Modifier of 1.5)

    All other Abilities and items give a Defensive Modifier of 1. If the requirements for the aforementioned item and Ability are not met, they too give a Defensive Modifier of 1.

    Special Defensive Modifiers

    Deepseascale (If held by Clamperl, gives a Special Defensive Modifier of 2)
    Flower Gift (If the sun is bright, gives the possessor of the Ability a Special Defensive Modifier of 1.5)
    Metal Powder (If held by an unTransformed Ditto, gives a Special Defensive Modifier of 1.5)
    Sandstorm (If a sandstorm is raging, all Rock types gain a Special Defensive Modifier of 1.5)
    Soul Dew (If held by Latias or Latios, gives an Item Modifier of 1.5 to Special Attack, and a 1.5 Special Defensive Modifier)

    All other Abilities and items give a Special Defensive Modifier of 1. If the requirements for the aforementioned Abilities and items are not met, they too give a Special Defensive Modifier of 1.


    Putting It All Together

    Wow, there sure are a lot of things that can affect a Pokémon’s stats, aren’t there? So now it’s time to revisit the formulas for calculating the stats :


    [Special] Attack :

    Final [Special] Attack Stat = Current Stat x Stat Modifier x Ability Modifier x Item Modifier

    It’s time to see the entire formula in action! For this example, Tropius has had the move Flatter used against it, the Ability Solar Power in effect, and is holding Choice Specs. This Tropius has a Special Attack stat of 267. Upon looking up Flatter, it ups the Stat Modifier two stages, and looking at the Stat Modifier chart, this means Tropius has a Stat Modifier of 2. Solar Power is in effect, giving Tropius an Ability Modifier of 1.5, but Tropius will also lose 12.5% of its maximum HP each turn. Lastly, upon looking up Choice Specs, it can be seen that they give an Item Modifier of 1.5, but Tropius cannot switch from the move it is currently using until it leaves battle.

    Final Special Attack Stat = 267 x 2 x 1.5 x 1.5

    Final Special Attack Stat = 534 x 1.5 x 1.5
    Final Special Attack Stat = 801 x 1.5
    Final Special Attack Stat = 1201.5

    Of course, the final answer cannot have a decimal, so it ends up ...

    Final Special Attack Stat = 1201

    Wow, this Tropius sure packs a serious punch! However, this massive Special Attack stat would come at the cost of being locked into one move, and losing a portion of HP each turn. Not to mention the chances of the foe using Flatter on a Pokémon that inherently has higher Special Attack than Attack, and the sun being out are slim. However, Tropius has helped show you how the In-Battle [Special] Attack stat is calculated!

    As a final note, if a Pokémon is Burned, and does not have the Ability Guts, Attack is effectively halved until the Burn is healed. While Pokémon with the Ability Magic Guard do not suffer from the 12.5% of HP taken off at the end of each turn, they still have the Attack Drop. This only applies to the Attack stat, not Special Attack.


    [Special] Defense

    The defensive stats are very useful; they reduce the damage done to your Pokémon, causing less Hit Points to be lost.

    Final [Special] Defense Stat = Current Stat x Stat Modifier x [Special] Defensive Modifier x Boom Modifier

    Today, Milotic is going to be in an interesting situation. She has been previously Burned, activating Marvel Scale, and she also used the move Psych Up to take the foe’s Swampert’s Curse. Now, only the Defense stat will be calculated here, but it might be useful to know Milotic has an extra Attack boost, and a drop in her Speed.

    This Milotic begins with 279 Defense. Upon looking up Curse, it can be seen that it will up the Stat Modifier of Defense by one stage, making it 1.5. The Defensive Modifier from activated Marvel Scale can be seen as 1.5 as well. Swampert is not using Selfdestruct or Explosion, so there is no issue there.

    Final Defense Stat = 279 x 1.5 x 1.5 x 1

    Remember, multiplying by 1 does not do anything to the equation.

    Final Defense Stat = 418.5 x 1.5

    No decimals should be in solved numbers so....

    Final Defense Stat = 418 x 1.5
    Final Defense Stat = 627

    Wow, Milotic is going to be taking a lot of hits from the Defensive side isn’t she? Now, keep in mind that Milotic is rarely going to come across a Defensive boost, so the actual Defense most Milotic will have will be lower. This was just an example to show how the equation works.

    One last note on Defense and Special Defense is that Reflect and Light Screen effectively double them, respectively. In Double Battles, they are effectively increased by two thirds.


    Speed

    The Speed stat is very important, as in a pinch, having the faster Pokémon could very well turn a sure loss into victory!

    Final Speed Stat = Current Stat x Stat Modifier x Ability Modifier x Item Modifier x Paralysis Modifier

    For today’s lesson, a Ninjask has passed three Speed boosts onto a Manectric. However, Manectric was Baton Passed into an Umbreon, which attacked it, activating Manactric’s Static and was Paralyzed! Umbreon’s Synchronize Ability caused poor Manectric to become Paralyzed as well! What will become of Manectric’s Speed stat?

    This particular Manectric starts out with 309 Speed. The +3 Speed for Manectric gives it a Stat Modifier of 2.5. Manectric does not have an Ability that affects its stats, nor is it holding an item that does so. However, the Paralysis gives a Modifier of 0.25.

    Final Speed Stat = 309 x 2.5 x 1 x 1 x 0.25

    Multiplying a number by 1 does not change it, so any multiplications by 1 can be omitted from the equation.

    Final Speed Stat = 309 x 2.5 x 0.25
    Final Speed Stat = 772.5 x 0.25

    Remember to get rid of those pesky decimals!

    Final Speed Stat = 772 x 0.25
    Final Speed Stat = 193

    Ouch! Even though Manectric had gained three Stat Modifier levels, it still ended up with less Speed than it started with after Paralysis kicked in. This story does have a happy ending however; Umbreon was the only Pokémon left on the foe’s team, and the Manectric beat it one on one.

    Note that some moves have priority over others, meaning the Pokémon that uses them will go first, regardless of the Speed stat. Quick Claw can sometimes make the holder go first, and Lagging Tail will always make the holder go last, as will the Ability Stall.


    Accuracy and Evasion

    Accuracy and Evasion aren’t calculated very often at all, but if you want to know how to do so, it’s explained in full here.

    Chance of a hit = Move Accuracy x Accuracy Mod x Evasion Mod x Accuracy Item Mod x Evasion Item Mod x Accuracy Ability Mod x Evasion Ability Mod

    Today, Articuno is going to try and use Ice Beam against Gliscor. However, this Gliscor has used Double Team twice, and has Sand Veil in effect! Luckily, this Articuno is holding a Wide Lens, for whatever reason.

    Ice Beam starts out with 100 Accuracy. Gliscor’s two Double Teams give it two Stat Modifier levels, making the Stat Modifier 0.6. Articuno’s Wide Lens will give an Accuracy Item Modifier of 1.1. Lastly, Gliscor’s Sand Veil ability provides it with an Evasion Ability Modifier of 0.8.

    Chance of a hit = 100 x 1 x 0.6 x 1.1 x 1 x 1 x 0.8

    It’s best to get rid of all those 1s that are clogging up the equation. Now remember, it is okay to have decimals this time around.

    Chance of a hit = 100 x 0.6 x 1.1 x 0.8

    Chance of a hit = 60 x 1.1 x 0.8
    Chance of a hit = 66 x 0.8
    Chance of a hit = 52.8%

    So Ice Beam, a 100% Accuracy move, will only have a 52.8% chance of nailing Gliscor. Bringing Accuracy and Evasion into play certainly brings a lot more luck into the game.

    Pokémon with the Ability No Guard make all moves used by them, or directly against them have 100% Accuracy. The formula is not used.

    Using the moves Lock-On or Mind Reader will assure the next move to hit, unless the target switches out via means other than Baton Pass, or uses Protect or Detect.

    Moves that are made to OHKO the foe, such as Sheer Cold, are unaffected by Accuracy and Evasion boosts and drops. They still work with the aforementioned Lock-On and Mind Reader. Also, they will give a higher Accuracy if the target is of a lower level than the user. This does not apply in most competitive battles however; Pokémon are typically all set to level 50 or 100.

    Lastly, there are some moves which ignore the formula whenever they are used. These moves are listed with --% Accuracy. Again, they cannot reliably penetrate Protect or Detect. The exceptions are Thunder and Blizzard, when it is raining or hailing respectively. These have a 25% chance to break through Protect and Detect, as well as moves that are made to do so.


    Hopefully now you have an idea of how stats work in-battle with Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. Calculating how much Attack Garchomp will have after a Swords Dance can help you see what you will and won’t hit hard, and you can see how much Metagross will outrun with an Agility. Remember, stat boosts and drops can turn the tide of any battle!
  2. Arseus

    Arseus
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    Okay, wow, this one took a long time to do. Please leave any comments/corrections here as usual. Also, huge credit goes to X-Act for all the help, and I got a lot of information from X-Act and Peterko's Damage Formula.

    This might end up being the last guide I do for a little while, but I don't know. This last one wasn't as enjoyable, but I think it was worth it.

    After the main site and Diamond/Pearl Pokédex are up, I plan to add links to all the moves and Abilities that are bolded. This will not happen right away though; I can easily see it taking around two week for everything to be linked, with all the content and monotony involved. And the fact that Metroid Prime 3 is coming out soon :P In short, because I sort of have a life too.

    To-Do List

    This is mainly for me, but it's stuff that's not in the guide, so if it's listed, I plan to do something about it at some point.

    - Find out 100% what the deal is with Failwind. It may be another seperate modifier to the Speed formula. Luckily, my arse is saved because so few people use Tailwind XD

    - Update with Critical Hit stuff (Thanks Great Sage ... not twice did Critical Hits cross my mind. If anybody can PM me with stuff on this would be excellent though, cause I know very little about CHs)

    - Update with fractions over decimals (Thanks Max, but I hate fractions so this could take a little bit :P)
  3. Sir Spanky

    Sir Spanky

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    This is magnificent work - wow! It may be a bit wordy/extended for your average/new Pokemoner, but makes an excellent read (ok I only skimmed it) for someone who wants a more in depth look into mechanics.
  4. Max

    Max yadig
    is a Tutor Alumnusis a Site Staff Alumnusis a Super Moderator Alumnusis a Contributor Alumnusis a Battle Server Moderator Alumnus

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    Hmm, I'd suggest that you put the decimals into fractions because mulitiplying by the decimal can give you a diffent answer from multiplying by the fraction. Not sure if there are any cases where the difference would matter, but its better to be safe than sorry. ;) Otherwise, excellent work!
  5. Arseus

    Arseus
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    I hope it's not too much of a tl;dr, as a lot of new players could learn a lot from this I think. I tried to make it as interesting as I could as well (See : Manectric vs. Umbreon in "Putting it all together" XD) Thank you for the kind words :)

    I was trying to convert it all to decimals for sake of being uniform. I suppose I can change this though; not at the moment however, as I need a bit of a break from seeing this guide to be honest!
  6. Great Sage

    Great Sage

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    The Important Stuff:

    You forgot to include Power Swap, which is Guard Swap's counterpart. Power Swap switches Attack and Special Attack modifiers.

    I disagree with your saying that Memento is a waste of a moveslot. It can be used to help Belly Drummers set up; I've seen this between Jumpluff and Charizard.

    Consider including critical hit stages in this guide.

    Don't say that it is advisable to use a Special Attack boosting item in the Special Attack drops section. Salamence and company never do.

    Picky, picky:

    In the Milotic section: "Milotic is rarely going to come across a Defensive boost, so the actual Defense most Milotic will have will me lower. This was just an example to show how the equation works."

    In Misc., you spelled Punishment incorrectly.

    I believe that there's research that says Seed Flare lowers Special Defense 2 stages.

    Check on the italic coding in Special Attack drops.

    Hustle decreases accuracy by 20% of the original accuracy. I think it's nice to list numbers.

    Psychic/Shadow Ball in Special Defense drops are missing a close parentheses.

    Mist Ball in Special Attack drops is missing its 50% effect chance.

    Growth in Special Attack boosts has inconsistent formatting.

    In the Speed items section, might as well include Macho Brace and the Power items along with Iron Ball.

    Might want to mention Role Play in the Abilities section, since you have Skill Swap.

    In the Speed item modifier section, mention Quick Powder. It doubles Ditto's Speed.

    Silver Wind in the Attack boosts section is missing an opening parenthesis.
  7. Sciz

    Sciz

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    looks great. Just one think I noticed:
    that is in the paragraphs for SA and SD. You forgot to change after copying and pasting the first paragraph. I think all of the others are changed.
    I'll have to take some time to read the whole thing. :D
  8. Arseus

    Arseus
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    Please do! I'll fix the Starf Berry thing ... yes, you got me, I copy and pasted the Starf Berry part (like anybody uses Starf Berry)....

    A few things I found on my own ....

    According to me, Tail Glow is of the "Buy" type.

    There wasn't a space in one of the charts.

    There was a double period in the "Punshment" Misc. section.

    --% was in there as - -% because I typed this up in WordPerfect, and it didn't like doing two dashes in a row. It's over than 20 pages in its original format fyi :P
  9. TCoZ

    TCoZ

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    I may be a new player, but I read the whole thing - it'll come in handy when I'm working out a pokémon's usefulness.

    Question; however - I did hear a rumour that Belly Drum was +10 levels; was I right about this - and also; do BP boosts effect Choice Item users?
  10. Arseus

    Arseus
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    Belly Drum always maxes Attack. So you can be -6 or +4, and you will always end up at +6. So I guess, it's really a +12 boost.

    Also BP boosts do affect Choice Item users, but it's not really advisable to make them the recipients. This is because if you Baton Pass say, +4 Speed onto a Choice Specs Salamence that gets locked into Draco Meteor against say ... Empoleon, you would have to switch out in order to use a better attack, thus losing any boosts you were baton passed. As I said, it is indeed possible.

    I'm glad to hear you liked my guide, and actually read the whole thing too!
  11. Reflect Suicune

    Reflect Suicune

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    *insert ridiculously long quote of Arseus' guide here*
    Arseus, great work, it is a good guide that I would imagine quite a few people will benefit from. However, there are several parts of it that are written... awkwardly, for lack of a better word. Also I feel you should reduce/elminate occurances of words/phrases like "Obvious(ly)" or "Not worth your time".

    Oh and you spelled 'Calm Mind' as "Clam Mind" somewhere

    Considering your interest in writing guides for Smogon, I think you should take a look at some guidelines (no pun intended) and a... whatever it is... on bias, tone, and perspective

    --

    This is just totally incorrect. Choice item users never attack more than once per appearance anyway, so there is never a reason not to use a move with a temporary negative effect. See Draco Mence and Overheatran (lol) there are plenty of other examples (I guess) I'm sure, but I'm tired and on vacation
  12. david stone

    david stone Fast-moving, smart, sexy and alarming.
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  13. Arseus

    Arseus
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    If you could point out any parts that sound "awkward", that would be great; see, most of the time, when I read my own writing, it sounds fine in my head. Also, thank you for posting those links; the first was only posted last night, and I've never seen the latter before, even if it mostly applies to analyses. On "Clam" Mind, I kept typing it as such, and had to constantly correct myself. I'll try and see which one slipped through the cracks.

    On the "Obviously" and such, I'll do my best to fix this ... but honestly, I've got to steer people away from stuff like Acupressure; you can't rely on a 14.....% chance to raise a certain stat. I can see one part I may have to fix though; the Accuracy and Evasion comments seem a little ... unprofessional now that I look at them again.


    Obi, on Shield Dust, I have no idea whatsoever. I would doubt it, but I guess you're not really using it on yourself. A good way to test would be to use Charge Beam against something with Shield Dust. I can post in the research thread I suppose. As for Mist, I am not 100% sure, but I to am inclined to think no.

    As for Speed, am I to assume we are making a change from HP/Att/Def/Spd/SpA/Spd for the new site? This is just something I'm wondering; I've always liked Speed last, I just figured it was "wrong" in a guide. I'll try and clear up, or fix anything you mentioned that I can. Also, I was sort of planning on adding the links you had suggested; but for obvious reasons, they cannot be added until the site is up.
  14. david stone

    david stone Fast-moving, smart, sexy and alarming.
    is a Site Staff Alumnusis a Smogon IRC AOp Alumnusis a Programmer Alumnusis a Super Moderator Alumnusis a Researcher Alumnusis a Contributor Alumnusis a Battle Server Moderator Alumnus

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    Yes, HP / Attack / Defense / Special Attack / Special Defense / Speed is the official order (and, aside from HP, which is always the oddball stat, anyway, it's alphabetical).
  15. Umbreon Of Sorrows

    Umbreon Of Sorrows

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2007
    Messages:
    71
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but dosen't Agility raise the speed two stages
  16. Unknown Warrior

    Unknown Warrior

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2007
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    201
    You forgot Chlorophyll's Rain counterpart - Swift Swim.


    Other than that, good read. I learned a few things.
  17. david stone

    david stone Fast-moving, smart, sexy and alarming.
    is a Site Staff Alumnusis a Smogon IRC AOp Alumnusis a Programmer Alumnusis a Super Moderator Alumnusis a Researcher Alumnusis a Contributor Alumnusis a Battle Server Moderator Alumnus

    Joined:
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    5,150
    I'm working on getting this updated.
  18. david stone

    david stone Fast-moving, smart, sexy and alarming.
    is a Site Staff Alumnusis a Smogon IRC AOp Alumnusis a Programmer Alumnusis a Super Moderator Alumnusis a Researcher Alumnusis a Contributor Alumnusis a Battle Server Moderator Alumnus

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    The foe’s GARCHOMP used Swords Dance!
    The foe’s GARCHOMP’s Attack sharply rose!


    If you’ve seen the above scenario before, you probably know that stat boosts and drops, are a major part of Pokémon battles. Most “sweepers” cannot sweep without a boost to their relevant attacking stat(s), and without a move like Calm Mind, Pokémon such as Suicune would have a much harder time taking hits.

    Sections in this guide:

    Why do I need to mess with the stats?
    Stat Modifiers
    Affecting the Stat Modifier
    Ability Modifiers
    Item Modifiers
    [Special] Defensive Modifiers
    Putting it all together


    Why do I need to mess with the stats?

    This is a question commonly asked by players new to the competitive scene. Why can’t you just attack outright, while your opponent is wasting their time boosting their stats? Well, most Pokémon simply can’t plow through an average team without a boost in their stats. That makes them easier to be stopped and taken down. More defensive Pokémon would have a much harder time staying in the battle if they didn’t use moves such as Calm Mind to lower the amount of damage done by the opponent.

    The majority of Pokémon have one or two stat-enhancing moves available to them. The vast majority of Pokémon use at least one method to affect stats in their standard movesets. Whether it is in the form of a Dragon Dancing Gyarados, or a Choice Band-wielding Tyranitar, all attackers must have a method of enhancing their stats to be effective. If you do not want to use a moveslot or item on the attacker itself, there is always the option of using the move Baton Pass to pass stat boosts onto the desired recipient.

    It is more arguable that messing with the foe’s stats is less than a good use of time. The ability Intimidate is great for lowering the foe’s stats when switching in. Paralysis is great with its Speed-cutting property and lasts until are cured via a Berry, an ability, or a specific move. The other methods of lowering stats last only as long as the foe is in battle. Given the fact that competitive battles are chock-full of switching in and out, it doesn’t make much of a difference. Sure, you may force a switch, but threats like a Swords Dancing Garchomp can do this anyway.

    The rule of thumb is, unless the effect lasts even after the foe has switched out, it is not the most effective use of a move on most Pokémon to use stat-lowering moves. That’s not to say these moves are worthless in every situation (a good example of this would be Metal Sound Zapdos), but it is wise to take extra careful thought when using a stat-lowering move on a Pokémon. Another good rule is only to use a move if it raises, or lowers a stat by at least two stages. What exactly does that mean? Read the next section to find out.

    Stat Modifiers

    When a Pokémon has its stats affected, it is generally referred to in stages or modifiers such as +2 Attack, or even +4 or +6. What this means is the stat has been raised, or lowered by that many modifiers. The levels themselves add on to each other, but the stat modifiers do not. What this means is each time a stat reaches a different level, there is only that level’s modifier in effect, rather than the combined modifiers from previous levels. The formula for stat modifiers for Attack, Defense, Special Attack, Special Defense, and Speed is as follows:

    +6 = Stat x 8/2 (4)
    +5 = Stat x 7/2 (3.5)
    +4 = Stat x 6/2 (3)
    +3 = Stat x 5/2 (2.5)
    +2 = Stat x 4/2 (2)
    +1 = Stat x 3/2 (1.5)
    ±0 = Stat x 2/2 (1)
    -1 = Stat x 2/3 (0.6667)
    -2 = Stat x 2/4 (0.5)
    -3 = Stat x 2/5 (0.4)
    -4 = Stat x 2/6 (0.3333)
    -5 = Stat x 2/7 (0.2857)
    -6 = Stat x 2/8 (0.25)

    A stat will never go any higher or lower than +6 or - 6. Some abilities or items may add on to the stat regardless of level.

    This applies to all stats except for HP (which do not get any boosts or drops; a Pokémon simply loses and restores HP in battle), accuracy, and evasion. The formula to figure out what the stat would be after x number of boosts is actually pretty simple, provided the ability or item of the Pokémon do not affect stats.

    Final [Special] Attack Stat = Stat x Stat Modifier x Attack Ability Modifier x Attack Item Modifier

    "Attack Ability Modifier" and "Attack Item Modifier" apply to the relevant attacking stat.

    Note that the burn status actually does not lower Attack (and thus anything that interacts with Attack modifiers will not have an interaction with burn, unless specifically mentioned). Burn is its own modifier in the damage formula (that halves damage for physical attacks).

    Say you have an Arcanine with 319 Attack that uses the move Howl, thus raising its Attack one stage. With Arcanine, you are dealing with the Attack stat. In this particular case, Arcanine isn’t holding an item that affects its stats, and it does not have an Ability that affects its stats. So these modifiers stay at 1.

    319 x 1.5 x 1 x 1 = 478.5

    Uh-oh! There is a decimal, now what? Well, in Pokémon, multiplication with decimals simply isn’t done. So, we eliminate the decimal, and round down to 478. Just pretend the decimal isn’t there, and you have your stat number! Keep in mind that if an item or ability is in effect, they must be incorporated. More on this is in the Ability Modifier and Item Modifier sections.

    For the Defense and Special Defense stats, a slightly different formula is used.

    Final [Special] Defense Stat = Stat x Stat Modifier x Defense Ability Modifier x Defense Item Modifier x Sandstorm Modifier x Boom Modifier

    The Stat Modifier still conforms to the aforementioned levels.

    "Defense Ability Modifier" and "Defense Item Modifier" apply to the relevant defending stat.

    The Sandstorm Modifier is 1.5 only for Special Defense and only if the defender is a Rock-type and the weather is a Sandstorm. Otherwise, it is 1.

    The Boom Modifier is very simple, and not often used. If the foe is using the move Selfdestruct or Explosion against your Pokémon, the Boom Modifier is 0.5. That means Defense is effectively halved, but only when those moves are being used. This does not apply to Special Defense in any way; both Selfdestruct and Explosion are physical moves. If neither moves are being used, the mod is a neutral 1, and not necessary in the equation.

    For Speed, the formula is different once again:

    Final Speed Stat = Current Stat x Stat Modifier x Speed Ability Modifier x Speed Item Modifier x Paralysis Modifier x Tailwind Modifier

    The Paralysis Modifier applies if a Pokemon is paralyzed, and does not have the Ability Quick Feet. In this case, it gives a Modifier of 0.25. If the Pokemon is not paralyzed, or is paralyzed with the Ability Quick Feet, the Paralysis Modifier is a neutral 1. The Tailwind Modifier is 2 if Tailwind is active on the Pokemon's side, and 1 otherwise. Other than this, the Speed formula is essentially the same as the one for [Special] Attack.

    Now, a lot of players either forget, or don’t know about the “hidden” stats. These are Accuracy and Evasion. Accuracy is lowered by the foe, and raised by yourself. Evasion can be raised and lowered by both parties. Luckily, in battle, they are referred to as Accuracy and Evasiveness, so it’s not as confusing.

    The modifiers for Accuracy works as follows:

    +6 = (Move Accuracy) x 9/3 (3)
    +5 = (Move Accuracy) x 8/3 (2.6666)
    +4 = (Move Accuracy) x 7/3 (2.3333)
    +3 = (Move Accuracy) x 6/3 (2)
    +2 = (Move Accuracy) x 5/3 (1.6666)
    +1 = (Move Accuracy) x 4/3 (1.3333)
    ±0 = (Move Accuracy) x 3/3 (1)
    -1 = (Move Accuracy) x 3/4 (0.75)
    -2 = (Move Accuracy) x 3/5 (0.6)
    -3 = (Move Accuracy) x 3/6 (0.5)
    -4 = (Move Accuracy) x 3/7 (0.4285)
    -5 = (Move Accuracy) x 3/8 (0.375)
    -6 = (Move Accuracy) x 3/9 (0.3333)

    Evasion is identical, except the chart works in reverse:

    +6 = (Move Accuracy) x 3/9 (0.3333)
    +5 = (Move Accuracy) x 3/8 (0.375)
    +4 = (Move Accuracy) x 3/7 (0.4285)
    +3 = (Move Accuracy) x 3/6 (0.5)
    +2 = (Move Accuracy) x 3/5 (0.6)
    +1 = (Move Accuracy) x 3/4 (0.75)
    ±0 = (Move Accuracy) x 3/3 (1)
    -1 = (Move Accuracy) x 4/3 (1.3333)
    -2 = (Move Accuracy) x 5/3 (1.6666)
    -3 = (Move Accuracy) x 6/3 (2)
    -4 = (Move Accuracy) x 7/3 (2.3333)
    -5 = (Move Accuracy) x 8/3 (2.6666)
    -6 = (Move Accuracy) x 9/3 (3)

    Accuracy and Evasion can each only reach +6 or -6. They are separate stats.

    Now, here’s where it gets a little tricky. Not only are the numbers much harder to work with, but the application is as well. Move Accuracy, is, in the event that either Evasion or Accuracy are in effect, the actual Accuracy of the move. Accuracy of the move is easy to see, most of which are 100. There also moves like Hydro Pump or Stone Edge with 80. So if only one “hidden” modifier is in effect, you can just plug in the numbers and see how often the move will hit.

    If both are in effect, you’re going to have a bit more difficulty. You must use a longer formula, which looks like this:

    Chance to hit: Move Accuracy x Accuracy Mod x Evasion Mod x Accuracy Item Mod x Evasion Item Mod x Accuracy Ability Mod x Evasion Ability Mod x Gravity Modifier

    Wow, that sure looks complex doesn’t it? The order of multiplication is currently unknown, however, which may make the calculations off by a % or two thanks to rounding. It is recommended you use the above formula though, to make sure you account for everything.

    So say Tyranitar was trying to hit its foe with Crunch, but its foe had lowered Tyranitar’s Accuracy to -1, and raised its own evasion to +2. Tyranitar does not have an Ability that affects its Accuracy or Evasion, and in this instance, neither does its foe.

    Chance to hit: 100% x 0.75 x 0.6

    = 45%

    So Tyranitar would only have a 45% chance of landing a hit with Crunch, one of its more reliable moves. Yikes!

    In general, you will not be calculating Accuracy and Evasion, due to the fact that it is rarely used. Moves that raise evasion are usually banned in competitive play.

    Affecting the Stat Modifier

    Attack

    Boosts

    AncientPower
    Acupressure
    Belly Drum
    Bulk Up
    Curse
    Dragon Dance
    Howl
    Meditate
    Metal Claw
    Meteor Mash
    Ominous Wind
    Rage
    Sharpen
    Silver Wind
    Swagger
    Swords Dance

    If a Pokémon is holding a Liechi Berry, its Attack will be raised one stage once its health reaches 25% or less, or 50% or less if the Pokémon has the Ability Gluttony. If a Starf Berry is activated, it raises a visible stat two stages, with a 20% chance of picking Attack. The effects of the Berry can also be obtained by using Pluck or Bug Bite against a Pokémon that is holding one.

    Bulk Up, Curse, Dragon Dance, and Swords Dance are your best bets for raising Attack here. Swords Dance and Dragon Dance are primarily to be used on a Pokémon setting up for a sweep, whereas Curse and Bulk Up are more suited on bulkier Pokémon that would like an extra punch. Dragon Dance has the added advantage of raising Speed one stage as well; Bulk Up and Curse each raise Defense as well, albeit Curse comes with the side effect of lowering Speed. Most non-Ghost Pokémon that learn Curse are slow enough not to mind anyway.

    Belly Drum is very risky, due to taking away half your Pokémon’s health, but it also brings Attack to the maximum level. That means even if your Poliwrath is at -6 Attack, it can still use Belly Drum and end up at +6. It is certainly usable if you are wiling to take the risk, and have good prediction skills. Acupressure is not the most effective choice, as it can raise any stat, and Attack must be randomly chosen.


    Drops

    Aurora Beam
    Charm
    FeatherDance
    Growl
    Memento
    Secret Power
    Superpower
    Tickle

    Pokémon with the ability Intimidate lower the Attack of all foes by one stage when it first switches in.

    Intimidate is a very useful Ability, as it makes switching in to physical threats much easier for certain Pokémon, as well as forcing the opponent to switch in many cases. Outside of this, Superpower is really the only Attack drop you’ll see, and it’s a move not learned by many Pokémon in the first place. In general, it is better to burn a physical threat than lower their Attack.

    Defense

    Boosts

    Acid Armor
    AncientPower
    Acupressure
    Barrier
    Bulk Up
    Cosmic Power
    Curse
    Defend Order
    Defense Curl
    Harden
    Iron Defense
    Ominous Wind
    Silver Wind
    Skull Bash
    Steel Wing
    Stockpile
    Withdraw

    If a Pokémon is holding a Ganlon Berry, its Defense will be raised one stage once its health reaches 25% or less, or 50% or less if the Pokémon has the ability Gluttony. If a Starf Berry is activated, it raises a visible stat two stages, with a 20% chance of picking Defense. The effects of the Berry can also be obtained by using Pluck or Bug Bite against a Pokémon that is holding one.

    Barrier, Bulk Up, Curse, most effective here. Barrier is handy with its two stage boost, and while Acid Armor does the exact same thing, very few Pokémon learn it, and those that do will want to have the moveslot used for something else. Bulk Up and Curse are good choices, due to the fact that they both raise Attack one stage as well, albeit Curse will also lower Speed. Cosmic Power and Stockpile both raise Defense and Special Defense, though Cosmic Power is not unlike Acid Armor, in that Pokémon that actually learn it would rather do something else. Stockpile is limited in its boosts, but is learned by a few more Pokémon, namely Drifblim, who can use Baton Pass to give the boosts to another Pokémon.

    Defense Curl is interesting, because it provides a boost in power to the moves Ice Ball and Rollout, should the user attack with them after using the move. While the Defense boost from Defense Curl can be Baton Passed, the boost to the aforementioned moves cannot.

    Drops

    Close Combat
    Crunch
    Crush Claw
    Iron Tail
    Leer
    Rock Smash
    Screech
    Superpower
    Tail Whip
    Tickle

    Close Combat is a common attacking move, but it does lower both defensive stats by one stage. Crunch is fairly common as well, but the chance of lowering the target’s Defense is slim. Superpower, while a fairly powerful move, is not seen very much. The other most notable move is Screech, which, while very capable of forcing a switch, isn’t used very much.


    Special Attack

    Boosts

    AncientPower
    Acupressure
    Calm Mind
    Charge Beam
    Flatter
    Growth
    Nasty Plot
    Ominous Wind
    Silver Wind
    Tail Glow

    If a Pokémon is holding a Petaya Berry, its Special Attack will be raised one stage once its health reaches 25% or less, or 50% or less if the Pokémon has the ability Gluttony. If a Starf Berry is activated, it raises a visible stat two stages, with a 20% chance of picking Special Attack. The effects of the Berry can also be obtained by using Pluck or Bug Bite against a Pokémon that is holding one.

    Calm Mind and Nasty Plot are your best bets for raising Special Attack, followed up by Charge Beam and Tail Glow. Calm Mind has the added bonus of raising Special Defense one stage as well, allowing the user to take more Special abuse, as well as give it. Tail Glow is second in line to Nasty Plot, but is only learned by two Pokémon. Charge Beam could be viable, however, it can be somewhat unreliable, and it is an attacking move with a weak base power, plus the opponent could resist Electric.

    Drops

    Captivate
    Draco Meteor
    Leaf Storm
    Memento
    Mist Ball
    Overheat
    Psycho Boost

    Chances are you’ll lower your own Pokémon’s Special Attack much more than the foe will. Each of the moves that lower the user’s Special Attack by two stages are feasible options for some Pokémon; such as "SpecsMence" and its Draco Meteor. It is wise to use an item to boost your Special Attack while using these moves, as they will often cause you to switch out, and it is best to do as much damage in one go as possible.

    Special Defense

    Boosts

    Amnesia
    AncientPower
    Acupressure
    Calm Mind
    Charge
    Cosmic Power
    Defend Order
    Ominous Wind
    Silver Wind
    Stockpile

    If a Pokémon is holding an Apicot Berry, its Special Defense will be raised one stage once its health reaches 25% or less, or 50% or less if the Pokémon has the ability Gluttony. If a Starf Berry is activated, it raises a visible stat two stages, with a 20% chance of picking Special Attack. The effects of the Berry can also be obtained by using Pluck or Bug Bite against a Pokémon that is holding one.

    Calm Mind is your best bet for raising Special Defense. It offers another bonus as well: Calm Mind boosts Special Attack. Cosmic Power and Stockpile both raise Defense and Special Defense, though with Cosmic Power, Pokémon that actually learn it would often rather do something else. Stockpile is limited in its boosts, but is learned by a few more Pokémon, namely Drifblim, who can use Baton Pass to give the boosts to another Pokémon. Amnesia is great if you can fit it into a moveset, but not many Pokémon will use it.

    Drops

    Acid
    Bug Buzz
    Close Combat
    Earth Power
    Energy Ball
    Fake Tears
    Flash Cannon
    Focus Blast
    Luster Purge
    Metal Sound
    Psychic
    Shadow Ball
    Seed Flare

    Close Combat is a common attacking move, but it does lower both defensive stats by one stage. Many of the Special Defense drops you’ll see come randomly from moves such as Psychic and Shadow Ball. Metal Sound and Fake Tears can have their uses on certain movesets, probably forcing a switch, but are not seen much.


    Speed

    Boosts

    Agility
    AncientPower
    Acupressure
    Dragon Dance
    Ominous Wind
    Rock Polish
    Silver Wind
    Tailwind

    Pokémon with the ability Motor Drive raise their Speed by one stage when hit by an Electric move.

    Pokémon with the ability Speed Boost raise their Speed by one stage at the end of each turn.

    Pokémon with the ability Steadfast raise their Speed by one stage after they flinch.

    If a Pokémon is holding a Salac Berry, its Speed will be raised one stage once its health reaches 25% or less, or 50% or less if the Pokémon has the ability Gluttony. If a Starf Berry is activated, it raises a visible stat two stages, with a 20% chance of picking Speed. The effects of the Berry can also be obtained by using Pluck or Bug Bite against a Pokémon that is holding one.

    Agility, Dragon Dance, and Rock Polish are your best options here, move-wise. The ability Speed Boost is still very useful, though the Speed Boost is most effective if Baton Passed onto another Pokémon. Holding a Salac Berry is a viable option as well.

    Drops

    Bubble
    BubbleBeam
    Constrict
    Cotton Spore
    Curse
    Hammer Arm
    Icy Wind
    Mud Shot
    Rock Tomb
    Scary Face
    String Shot

    Like with raising Speed, lowering Speed doesn’t leave you with a lot of options either. Despite their Speed-lowering side effects, Curse and Hammer Arm are mostly learned by slower Pokémon, which don’t mind losing their Speed. As for lowering the opponent's Speed, Cotton Spore and Scary Face are not the best use of a moveslot, and they are inaccurate. Generally, if there is a speedy threat, it’s best to Paralyze it.

    Accuracy

    Boosts

    Acupressure

    Once again, you should not rely on Acupressure to raise any given stat. It is not a damaging move, and there is only a 14.2857% chance Accuracy will be chosen over the other stats.

    Drops

    Mirror Shot
    Mud Bomb
    Flash
    Kinesis
    Muddy Water
    Mud Slap
    Octazooka
    Sand Attack
    Secret Power
    Smokescreen

    These moves can only give a one stage drop at most, and many are either inaccurate, or very weak offensively and unreliable. It is best to leave the foe's Accuracy alone, and raise your own Pokémon's Evasion if you wish to avoid hits.

    Evasion

    Boosts

    Acupressure
    Double Team
    Minimize

    Double Team is learned by most everything, but you’ll have to tailor a moveset around it to make it work, as well as use an appropriate Pokémon. Minimize is learned by fewer Pokémon, and has the side effect of giving Stomp increased power against the user. While the Evasion boosts from Minimize can be Baton Passed, the extra damage from Stomp cannot. Note that Double Team and Minimize are banned in most competitive venues.

    Drops

    Defog
    Gravity
    Sweet Scent

    Gravity is the most viable of these options, as it has a useful side effect, and lowers Evasion by more than one stage. Defog and Sweet Scent are not recommended over Gravity.
    Multiple Stats

    The following moves raise more than one stat at a time. They are listed above in the section of each stat they raise, but here they are in one section, for convenience:

    AncientPower
    Bulk Up
    Calm Mind
    Close Combat
    Cosmic Power
    Curse
    Defend Order
    Dragon Dance
    Ominous Wind
    Silver Wind
    Stockpile
    Superpower
    Tickle


    Miscellaneous

    If a Pokémon has set up a Substitute, it is not affected by any stat-altering moves that it does not use itself. It is also unaffected by Intimidate.

    Pokémon with the ability Clear Body and White Smoke are not affected by any stat-lowering moves that they do not use themselves, such as Curse or Superpower. They are unaffected by Intimidate. Paralysis's Speed drop still affects these Pokémon.

    Pokémon with the ability Keen Eye cannot have their accuracy lowered.

    Pokémon with the ability Hyper Cutter cannot have their Attack lowered by any stat-lowering moves that they do not use themselves. They are unaffected by Intimidate.

    If a Pokémon scores a critical hit against its foe, certain Stat Modifier boosts and drops are ignored. If the attacker has drops in its Attack or Special Attack, the stat is set to level 0 for calculating the damage of the hit. If the victim of the critical hit has boosts in the Defense or Special Defense stat, the stat is automatically set to level 0 as well. Reflect and Light Screen are also ignored. This only applies for the critical hit, and reverts back to whatever boosts and drops the Pokémon had before after the hit’s damage has been calculated.

    The move Haze eliminates all Stat Modifier boosts and drops from all Pokémon on the field. This move is to be used strategically, as it can prevent some of your own Pokémon from being successful as well! Haze is not blocked by Clear Body, Hyper Cutter, Keen Eye, or White Smoke, even if it does lower the ability possessor’s stats. Haze does not eliminate any other modifiers, nor does it eliminate the drop from Paralysis.

    If a Pokémon with the ability Unaware is in battle against a Pokémon that has modified its stats, the foe’s Stat Modifier level is set to 0, and cannot be changed until the Unaware Pokémon leaves battle. This does not apply to Speed boosts and drops.

    The move Psych Up copies all of the foe’s Stat Modifier changes, but at the cost of losing any changes the Pokémon had previous to using the move.

    Using the move Snatch can steal many Stat Modifier boosts on the turn that the foe tries to use them.

    The move Heart Swap swaps all Stat Modifier boosts and drops with the user and targeted Pokémon.

    The move Guard Swap swaps Defense and Special Defense Stat Modifier boosts and drops with the target. Similarly, the move Power Swap swaps Attack and Special Attack Stat Modifier boosts and drops with the target.

    The move Mist prevents any moves that lower stats from working for 5 turns. Moves that have a side effect of lowering stats can still be used, although the side effect cannot occur.

    The move Punishment gains power with the more stat-ups the target uses. Note that stat drops are ignored.

    A Pokémon that uses the move Transform will copy any Stat Modifiers the target had at the time of the user Transforming. The Transforming Pokémon will lose any Stat Modifiers it had possessed prior to Transforming into its target.

    While there are quite a few miscellaneous moves to take note of, they are not seen very often in most games.


    Ability Modifiers

    Every Pokémon has an ability. Many species only have one to choose from, yet others may have one of two. Certain abilities affect the stats of the Pokémon. Note that these are separate modifiers from Stat Modifers, and there can be only one in effect. A Pokémon can switch its ability, and potentially its Ability Modifier using the move Skill Swap. This will switch the abilities of the Pokemon and its target. The move Role Play will simply give the user the ability of its target, and the target's ability remains the same. A Pokémon that has the ability Trace will gain the ability of (one of) its foe(s) when it first enters battle.

    Unlike Stat Modifiers, Ability Modifiers do not conform to a certain chart. Instead, the number listed is actually the number that the stat is multiplied by.

    Final [Special] Attack Stat = Current Stat x Stat Modifier x Attack Ability Modifier x Attack Item Modifier

    Once again, "Attack Ability Modifier" and "Attack Item Modifier" apply to the relevant attacking stat.

    Say there is a Medicham with 240 Attack. Upon looking at Medicham’s SmogonDex entry, you would discover Medicham has the ability Pure Power, which doubles the Attack stat. Assuming Medicham does not have any Stat Modifiers in effect, and is not holding an item that affects its Attack (say it is holding a Focus Sash), it is ridiculously simple to find its final Attack. The irrelevant Modifiers are a neutral 1.

    Final Attack Stat = 240 x 1 x 2 x 1 = 480

    Wow, Medicham sure isn’t lacking in power, now is it? It’s a good thing Medicham has very frail defensive stats, else it would be a nightmare to face. As you’ll probably discover from reading below however, there aren’t that many abilities that give an Ability Modifier.

    Attack

    Flower Gift Gives an Attack Ability Modifier of 1.5 if the sun is bright)
    Guts (Gives an Attack Ability Modifier of 1.5 if the attacker is statused)
    Huge Power (Gives an Attack Ability Modifier of 2)
    Hustle (Gives an Attack Ability Modifier of 1.5)
    Pure Power (Gives an Attack Ability Modifier of 2)
    Slow Start (Gives an Attack Ability Modifier of 0.5 for the first five turns this Pokemon is out each time it's sent out)

    All other abilities have an Attack Ability Modifier of 1. If the requirements for Flower Gift or Guts are not met, they too give a Modifier of 1.

    Defense

    Marvel Scale (Gives a Defensive Modifier of 1.5 if the defender is statused)

    All other abilities give a Defense Ability Modifier of 1. If the requirements for Marvel Scale aren't met, it gives a Defense Ability Modifier of 1.

    Special Attack

    Minus (Gives an Attack Ability Modifier of 1.5 if the partner’s ability is Plus)
    Plus (Gives an Attack Ability Modifier of 1.5 if the partner’s ability is Minus)
    Solar Power (Gives an Attack Ability Modifier of 1.5 if the sun is bright)

    All other Abilities have an Ability Modifier of 1. If the requirements for the aforementioned abilities are not met, they, too give a Modifier of 1.

    Special Defense

    Flower Gift (Gives a Defense Ability Modifier of 1.5 if the sun is bright)

    All other abilities give a Defense Ability Modifier of 1. If the requirements for Flower Gift are not met, it gives a Defense Ability Modifier of 1.

    Speed

    Chlorophyll (Gives a Speed Ability Modifier of 2 if the sun is bright)
    Quick Feet (Gives a Speed Ability Modifier of 1.5 if this Pokemon is statused. The Speed drop from paralysis is nullified)
    Slow Start (Gives a Speed Ability Modifier of 0.5 for the first five turns this Pokemon is out each time it's sent out)
    Swift Swim (Gives a Speed Ability Modifier of 2 if it is raining)
    Unburden (Gives a Speed Ability Modifier of 2 if this Pokemon loses its item)

    All other abilities have a Speed Ability Modifier of 1. If the requirements for the aforementioned abilities are not met, they too give a Modifier of 1.


    Accuracy

    CompoundEyes (Gives a Accuracy Ability Modifier of 1.3)
    Hustle (Gives an Accuracy Ability Modifier of 0.8 if the move used is physical)

    All other abilities have an Accuracy Ability Modifier of 1. If a Pokémon with the ability Hustle does not use a physical move, Hustle’s Accuracy Ability Modifier is 1 as well.

    Evasion

    Snow Cloak (Gives an Evasion Ability Modifier of 0.8 if it is hailing)
    Sand Veil (Gives an Evasion Ability Modifier of 0.8 if there is a sandstorm)
    Tangled Feet (Gives an Evasion Ability Modifier of 0.5 if this Pokemon is confused)

    All other abilities have an Evasion Ability Modifier of 1. If the requirements for the aforementioned abilities are not met, they too give a Modifier of 1.


    Item Modifiers

    In battle, every Pokémon should be holding an item of some sort. In some cases, that item will boost a stat. Again, "Attack Item Modifier" applies to the relevant attacking stat; "Defense Item Modifier" applies to the relevant defending stat.

    Attack

    Choice Band (Gives an Attack Item Modifier of 1.5)
    Light Ball (Gives Pikachu an Attack Item Modifier of 2)
    Thick Club (Gives Cubone and Marowak an Attack Item Modifier of 2)

    All other items give an Item Modifier of 1. If Light Ball is not held by a Pikachu, or Thick Club not by Cubone or Marowak, they also give an Item Modifier of 1. "Now wait!", you may say. "Don’t items like Life Orb and Muscle Band boost Attack as well?" In reality, any other items that claim to boost Attack actually boost the base power of physical moves, or are their own modifier in the damage formula. Interesting, no?

    Defense

    Metal Powder (If held by an un-Transformed Ditto, gives a Defense Item Modifier of 1.5)

    All other items give a Defense Item Modifier of 1. If the requirements for Metal Powder are not met, it gives a Defense Item Modifier of 1.

    Special Attack

    Choice Specs (Gives an Attack Item Modifier of 1.5)
    DeepSeaTooth (Gives Clamperl an Attack Item Modifier of 2)
    Light Ball (Gives Pikachu an Attack Item Modifier of 2)
    Soul Dew (Gives Latias or Latios an Attack Item Modifier of 1.5)

    All other items give an Attack Item Modifier of 1. Keep in mind, that bar Choice Specs, these items must be held by the aforementioned Pokémon to give their boosts, else their Attack Item Modifiers are 1 as well. You might be thinking that items like Life Orb and Wise Glasses boost Special Attack as well. In reality, any other items that claim to boost Special Attack actually boost the base power of special moves, or are their own modifier in the damage formula.

    Special Defense

    DeepSeaScale (If held by Clamperl, gives a Defense Item Modifier of 2)
    Metal Powder (If held by an un-Transformed Ditto, gives a Defense Item Modifier of 1.5)
    Soul Dew (If held by Latias or Latios, gives a Defense Item Modifier of 1.5)

    All other abilities and items give a Defense Item Modifier of 1. If the requirements for the aforementioned items are not met, they give a Defense Item Modifier of 1.

    Speed

    Choice Scarf (Gives a Speed Item Modifier of 1.5)
    Iron Ball (Gives a Speed Item Modifier of 0.5)
    Macho Brace (Gives a Speed Item Modifier of 0.5)
    Power Anklet (Gives a Speed Item Modifier of 0.5)
    Power Band (Gives a Speed Item Modifier of 0.5)
    Power Belt (Gives a Speed Item Modifier of 0.5)
    Power Bracer (Gives a Speed Item Modifier of 0.5)
    Power Lens (Gives a Speed Item Modifier of 0.5)
    Power Weight (Gives a Speed Item Modifier of 0.5)
    Quick Powder (Gives an un-Transformed Ditto a Speed Item Modifier of 2)

    All other items give an Item Modifier of 1. If the requirements for Quick Powder are not met, it will also give an Item Modifier of 1.

    Accuracy

    Wide Lens (Gives an Accuracy Item Modifier of 1.1)
    Zoom Lens (Gives an Accuracy Item Modifier of 1.2 if the holder goes after its target)

    All other items give an Accuracy Item Modifier of 1. If the requirements for Zoom Lens are not met, it too gives an Accuracy Item Modifier of 1.

    Evasion

    BrightPowder (Gives an Evasion Item Modifier of 0.9)
    Lax Incense (Gives an Evasion Item Modifier of 0.95)

    All other items give an Evasion Item Modifier of 1.


    Putting It All Together

    Wow, there sure are a lot of things that can affect a Pokémon’s stats, aren’t there? So now it’s time to revisit the formulas for calculating the stats:


    [Special] Attack:

    Final [Special] Attack Stat = Current Stat x Stat Modifier x Attack Ability Modifier x Attack Item Modifier

    It’s time to see the entire formula in action! For this example, Tropius has had the move Flatter used against it, the ability Solar Power in effect, and is holding Choice Specs. This Tropius has a Special Attack stat of 267. Upon looking up Flatter, it ups the Stat Modifier two stages, and looking at the Stat Modifier chart, this means Tropius has a Stat Modifier of 2. Solar Power is in effect, giving Tropius an Attack Ability Modifier of 1.5. Lastly, upon looking up Choice Specs, it can be seen that they give an Attack Item Modifier of 1.5.

    Final Special Attack Stat = 267 x 2 x 1.5 x 1.5

    Final Special Attack Stat = 534 x 1.5 x 1.5
    Final Special Attack Stat = 801 x 1.5
    Final Special Attack Stat = 1201.5

    Of course, the final answer cannot have a decimal, so it ends up...

    Final Special Attack Stat = 1201

    Wow, this Tropius sure packs a serious punch! However, this massive Special Attack stat would come at the cost of being locked into one move, and losing a portion of HP each turn. Not to mention the chances of the foe using Flatter on a Pokémon that inherently has higher Special Attack than Attack, and the sun being out are slim. However, Tropius has helped show you how the In-Battle [Special] Attack stat is calculated!

    [Special] Defense

    The defensive stats are very useful; they reduce the damage done to your Pokémon, causing less HP to be lost.

    Final [Special] Defense Stat = Stat x Stat Modifier x Defense Ability Modifier x Defense Item Modifier x Sandstorm Modifier x Boom Modifier

    Today, Milotic is going to be in an interesting situation. She has been previously burned, activating Marvel Scale, and she also used the move Psych Up to take the foe Swampert’s Curse.

    This Milotic begins with 279 Defense. Upon looking up Curse, it can be seen that it will up the Stat Modifier of Defense by one stage, making it 1.5. The Defense Ability Modifier from activated Marvel Scale can be seen as 1.5 as well. Swampert is not using Selfdestruct or Explosion, so there is no issue there.

    Final Defense Stat = 279 x 1.5 x 1.5 x 1

    Remember, multiplying by 1 does not do anything to the equation.

    Final Defense Stat = 418.5 x 1.5

    No decimals should be in solved numbers so....

    Final Defense Stat = 418 x 1.5
    Final Defense Stat = 627

    Wow, Milotic is going to be taking a lot of hits from the physical side isn’t she? Now, keep in mind that Milotic is rarely going to come across a Defensive boost, so the actual Defense most Milotic will have will be lower. This was just an example to show how the equation works.

    One last note on Defense and Special Defense is that Reflect and Light Screen effectively double them, respectively. In Double Battles, they are effectively increased by two thirds.

    Speed

    The Speed stat is very important, as in a pinch, having the faster Pokémon could very well turn a sure loss into victory!

    Final Speed Stat = Current Stat x Stat Modifier x Speed Ability Modifier x Speed Item Modifier x Paralysis Modifier x Tailwind Modifier

    For today’s lesson, a Ninjask has passed three Speed boosts onto a Manectric. However, Manectric was Baton Passed into an Umbreon, which attacked it, activating Manectric’s Static and was paralyzed! Umbreon’s Synchronize ability caused poor Manectric to become paralyzed as well! What will become of Manectric’s Speed stat?

    This particular Manectric starts out with 309 Speed. The +3 Speed for Manectric gives it a Stat Modifier of 2.5. Manectric does not have an ability that affects its stats, nor is it holding an item that does so. However, the Paralysis gives a Paralysis Modifier of 0.25.

    Final Speed Stat = 309 x 2.5 x 1 x 1 x 0.25

    Multiplying a number by 1 does not change it, so any multiplications by 1 can be omitted from the equation.

    Final Speed Stat = 309 x 2.5 x 0.25
    Final Speed Stat = 772.5 x 0.25

    Remember to get rid of those pesky decimals!

    Final Speed Stat = 772 x 0.25
    Final Speed Stat = 193

    Ouch! Even though Manectric had gained three Stat Modifier levels, it still ended up with less Speed than it started with after Paralysis kicked in. This story does have a happy ending however; Umbreon was the only Pokémon left on the foe’s team, and the Manectric beat it one on one.

    Note that some moves have priority over others, meaning the Pokémon that uses them will go first, regardless of the Speed stat. Quick Claw can sometimes make the holder go first, and Lagging Tail will always make the holder go last, as will the Ability Stall.


    Accuracy and Evasion

    Accuracy and Evasion aren’t calculated very often at all, but if you want to know how to do so, it’s explained in full here.

    Chance to hit: Move Accuracy x Accuracy Mod x Evasion Mod x Accuracy Item Mod x Evasion Item Mod x Accuracy Ability Mod x Evasion Ability Mod x Gravity Mod

    Today, Articuno is going to try and use Ice Beam against Gliscor. However, this Gliscor has used Double Team twice, and has Sand Veil in effect! Luckily, this Articuno is holding a Wide Lens, for whatever reason.

    Ice Beam starts out with 100 Accuracy. Gliscor’s two Double Teams give it two Stat Modifier levels, making the Stat Modifier 0.6. Articuno’s Wide Lens will give an Accuracy Item Modifier of 1.1. Lastly, Gliscor’s Sand Veil ability provides it with an Evasion Ability Modifier of 0.8.

    Chance to hit = 100 x 1 x 0.6 x 1.1 x 1 x 1 x 0.8

    It’s best to get rid of all those 1s that are clogging up the equation. Now remember, it is okay to have decimals this time around.

    Chance to hit = 100 x 0.6 x 1.1 x 0.8

    Chance to hit = 60 x 1.1 x 0.8
    Chance to hit = 66 x 0.8
    Chance to hit = 52.8%

    So Ice Beam, a 100% Accuracy move, will only have a 52.8% chance of nailing Gliscor. Bringing Accuracy and Evasion into play certainly brings a lot more luck into the game.

    Pokémon with the ability No Guard make all moves used by them, or directly against them have 100% Accuracy. The formula is not used.

    Using the moves Lock-On or Mind Reader will assure the next move to hit, unless the target switches out via means other than Baton Pass, or uses Protect or Detect.

    Moves that are made to OHKO the foe, such as Sheer Cold, are unaffected by Accuracy and Evasion boosts and drops. They still work with the aforementioned Lock-On and Mind Reader. Also, they will give a higher Accuracy if the target is of a lower level than the user. This does not apply in most competitive battles however; Pokémon are typically all set to level 50 or 100.

    Lastly, there are some moves which ignore the formula whenever they are used. These moves are listed with --% Accuracy. Again, they cannot penetrate Protect or Detect. The exceptions are Thunder and Blizzard, when it is raining or hailing respectively. These have a 30% chance to break through Protect and Detect.

    Hopefully now you have an idea of how stats work in-battle with Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. Calculating how much Attack Garchomp will have after a Swords Dance can help you see what you will and won’t hit hard, and you can see how much Metagross will outrun with an Agility. Remember, stat boosts and drops can turn the tide of any battle!
  19. david stone

    david stone Fast-moving, smart, sexy and alarming.
    is a Site Staff Alumnusis a Smogon IRC AOp Alumnusis a Programmer Alumnusis a Super Moderator Alumnusis a Researcher Alumnusis a Contributor Alumnusis a Battle Server Moderator Alumnus

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    I'm not sure how to go about formatting the move list of everything that can alter stats. Apparently, it's easy to link all the moves to their dex entries, so that's not an issue. I'm just not sure if I should make it just a link or leave his descriptions there.
  20. Arseus

    Arseus
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    It's probably just clutter to have all of the descriptions if you can link to the move entries on the site itself. The only reason I had put all those there when I first wrote the guide is because, at the time, the main site was not up and running. There was nothing to reference, but it's pretty redundant now. Just my two cents.
  21. david stone

    david stone Fast-moving, smart, sexy and alarming.
    is a Site Staff Alumnusis a Smogon IRC AOp Alumnusis a Programmer Alumnusis a Super Moderator Alumnusis a Researcher Alumnusis a Contributor Alumnusis a Battle Server Moderator Alumnus

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    I decided to delete the decriptions. I'm going to add a much more condensed version, or possibly sort them somewhat differently.
  22. chaos

    chaos
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    If there are no descriptions, you can just format it as a <ul>. If there are descriptions, your best bet is either a <dl> or a <table>.
  23. ryubahamut

    ryubahamut
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    what is the status on this one?
  24. Arseus

    Arseus
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    If I knew, I'd tell you. I just wanted to point out that Serebii has released a guide of sorts very similar to this one. I'd like to think that this one is a bit more in-depth though.

    I had plans to integrate Critical Hits into this, I'm pretty sure I stopped being active on Smogon before that could happen though. If you want Obi, I could write up something for those, to further distinguish this guide from Serebii's. Unless you took care of that and haven't posted it, or want to do it yourself.
  25. RBG

    RBG It feels like a perfect night to dress up like hipsters
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    Just as a note, the tailwind and Unburden order in the speed formula (to my knowledge) have not been determined yet. When i get some time later I will figure out the order of those. I just have had trouble trying tailwind cause i have to use a linked battle for that one and i havent had time to test unburden yet

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