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Introduction to Competitive Pokemon

Discussion in 'Site Projects' started by Tangerine, Jan 25, 2009.

  1. Tangerine

    Tangerine Where the Lights Are
    is a Smogon IRC SOPis a Team Rater Alumnusis a Forum Moderator Alumnusis a Smogon Media Contributor Alumnusis a Tiering Contributor Alumnusis a Contributor Alumnus

    Joined:
    May 4, 2007
    Messages:
    3,155
    Initial Draft!

    Initial Draft - comments in red on what we need.

    We need sections for

    - Status
    - Stats
    - Competitive Clauses.
    - Transition into the Forums/Terminology

    I also want comments! Tell me what we should be adding, what we should be removing, what we can phrase better, etc. The shorter and more personal the better - we want this to be a fun read for the users really.

    We also need links - links to other useful articles and such that explain certain concepts "better" - since they are supposed to be brief, etc. There are a lot of articles/good threads - we should be using them for this guide.

    EDIT1: Added a transition regarding "Perfect Pokemon". Thanks DJD!
    EDIT2: Reorganized a few sections.
    ----------

    Introduction


    Hello, my friend.

    If you’re a dedicated trainer, you’ve probably battled the Elite Four so many times they sound like boring class lectures. You endured this for the sake of training your loyal Pokémon, and after turning them into the fullest they could be, maybe you wanted more. So you decided to battle your friends on Wi-Fi, but after pounding them mercilessly (or having cried “Uncle!” one too many times), maybe Pokémon began to get stale.

    But there is more to this game. Something bigger.

    This is the world of competitive Pokémon, the art of playing Pokémon to win. In this world, that 999 attack Pelipper you hacked as a joke to sweep your friend’s team isn’t allowed. Competitive Pokémon emphasizes an understanding of game mechanics, team organization, and battle tactics, rather than cramming four moves of differing types on your Pokémon and picking whichever one is super effective.

    Now that we’ve gotten you interested, you’ll want to examine just what competitive Pokémon is about in more detail. You will first learn about the finer details of the game you may not have noticed, and then we will give you a brief overview of the competitive world.

    Game Mechanics

    "Mechanics" is the term we use to refer to the way Pokemon works internally. Up until now, you have probably been able to ignore most of the detailed mechanics of the game, and still be successful. But in competitive Pokemon, there is a very fine line between success and failure. You must understand the subtle mechanics of the game, and exploit them to their maximum effectiveness. If you don't, you can be sure that your opponent will.

    In order to win a battle, you must faint all of your opponent's Pokemon before they do it to you. As such, the entirety of competitive Pokemon strategy is focused on damage -- the ability to deal damage, withstand damage, and avoid damage. Since damage is the end-all-be-all of battling, you must become familiar with the various game mechanics that affect damage.

    Move Mechanics

    These are mechanics that affect the damage of a given move in battle.
    Type Effectiveness
    You are probably familiar with this from ingame play. Certain types of moves do more or less damage to certain types of pokemon. For example, Ground moves are "super-effective" against Electric pokemon, doing twice as much damage to them. A Pokemon's type, and the type of moves it uses is the single biggest factor determining how much damage it can give and take. The ability for an individual pokemon or a team of pokemon to give and take damage across a variety of types is called "Type Coverage" or simply "Coverage".​
    Same Type Attack Bonus (STAB)
    If a Pokemon uses a move that matches its type, that move will be 50% stronger. For example, Earthquake has a base power of 100. If it is used by a Ground-type, it will be 50% stronger and have a base power of 150.

    Physical and Special moves
    All damaging moves are either physical or special. Physical moves use the Attack stat while Special moves use the Special Attack stat.
    For the first three generations, these moves were based on type. All Bug, Flying, Fighting, Ground, Normal, Poison, Rock, and Steel moves were physical. All Dark, Dragon, Electric, Fire, Ghost, Grass, Ice, Psychic, and Water moves were special.

    It wasn't until the 4th generation that moves were categorized based on their style of attacking. This information can be found under your Pokemon's Battle Moves page on their Summary screen. Physical moves have a red and yellow box while special moves have a purple box. Moves that deal no direct damage have a gray and white box.

    It's important to keep this in mind when building your Pokemon's movesets. You do not want to give a move like Psycho Cut to a Pokemon like Alakazam. Even though Psycho Cut would be STABed, it is a physical move and will not deal much damage due to Alakazam's horrible Attack stat.
    Stat Mechanics

    These are mechanics that affect the statistics of a Pokemon, and thus affect it's ability to give, take, and avoid damage.
    Natures
    Every Pokemon can have 1 out of 25 different natures. Most natures will raise one stat by 10% and lower another stat by 10%. In competitive battling, every Pokemon has one or two preferred natures depending on the moveset they are using. For example, a Pokemon meant to use only physical attacks would most likely benefit from an Adamant Nature, which raises Attack by 10% and lowers Special Attack by 10%.

    There are 5 Natures out there which do not have an effect on any stat. They are Hardy, Serious, Bashful, Quirky, and Docile. These natures should not be used in a competitive setting since they provide no beneficial stat boosts to the Pokemon.

    For a list of natures and what stats they affect, check here. (Link to Smogon's Natures section)

    Effort Values (EVs)

    EVs are "invisible" numbers that
    can increase a Pokemon's stats. Every 4 EVs in a particular stat is equal to 1 point in that stat. Every Pokemon is capable of having a maximum of 510 EVs with a maximum of 255 EVs in any one stat. Note that neither 510 nor 255 are numbers that are divisible by 4. This means you only need 508 EVs total (252 EVs in any one stat) to have a completely EV-trained Pokemon. The remaining 2 EVs are useless.

    For more information on EV's and how to EV train pokemon in the cartridge games, see here.

    Individual Values (IVs)
    Two untrained Pokemon of the same species with the same level and nature may still have slightly different stats. The reason behind this is that the two Pokemon have different IVs. IVs are "invisible" numbers that range from 0 to 31 and tell you the quality of a Pokemon's stats. 0 means that particular Pokemon's stat is the lowest it can be. 31 means that stat is at its best and is considered a perfect IV.

    Unlike EVs, IVs cannot be changed and are permanent when you obtain the Pokemon. There is no guaranteed way of obtaining the exact IVs you want. The best way to get a Pokemon with good IVs is by breeding. More information on IV breeding can be found in the Breeding Guide. (Link to the Breeding Guide)​
    Competitive Pokemon battling is based on the assumption that all players have perfect Pokemon. Much like professional athletes have near limitless access to state-of-the-art sports equipment, competitive Pokemon strategy assumes you have access to perfect Pokemon. This is often a difficult concept for players of the cartridge games to understand. But, it is essential to forget about that "awesome level 78 Charizard" you used to beat the Elite Four in FireRed. In competitive Pokemon, all players use level 100 Pokemon exclusively, they use only the most powerful species of Pokemon, AND the Pokemon are perfectly EV trained with perfect IVs, with perfect moves.

    You may wonder, "How it is possible to get completely perfect pokemon for competitive play?" In most cases, it is only possible to obtain perfect pokemon through the use of a Battle Simulator -- which is a program built for the express purpose of allowing competitive players to quickly and easily assemble entire teams of perfect pokemon, and then battle against others. It's also possible to acquire perfect pokemon through trading networks of competitive breeders, and thus use perfect pokemon and competitive strategies in wifi battles and real-life tournaments.


    Simulators


    The majority of competitive Pokemon battling is done over simulators. This was very important in the first three generations, as it was the only possible method of battling competitively against a large variety of opponents. The fourth generation brought Wi-Fi capability with it, but the most competitive play still exists on simulators, as they allow users to fine tune teams much more easily than they can in-game. On simulators, battles can also be conducted faster, rules can be enforced more strictly, and rating systems can be more easily implemented than would be possible by simply using Wi-Fi.

    Shoddy Battle
    The most popular Pokemon battle simulator is Shoddy Battle, which simulates the DPP generation. The program can be downloaded from the “downloads” section of their website. You must connect to a server to battle, but remember that different servers have different aims, and may not always be what you are looking for. The most popular server for playing standard Pokemon is the Smogon server. All servers have their own rules and are moderated. Reading the rules is vital, as it is possible to be banned from any server. Shoddy Battle is an open source program, meaning that users can submit patches to help improve the program, although server owners can choose whether to implement them or not.

    Loading the application brings up the welcome window; from there the team builder can be used to create a team. The team builder loads in a separate window and allows users to choose Pokemon and their items, nicknames, level, Individual Values (and corresponding Hidden Power type), Effort Values, ability, and nature. Once the team is built, to start battling, one must connect to a server. Clicking on the Smogon server and pressing “connect” opens up another, server specific, welcome screen. It is possible to register a username and password by clicking on the register tab, clicking back on “Log In” connects the user to the server, using the username and password they just created. Either rated battles or unrated battles can be found by using the “find” tab. The ladder is a good skill test, as it runs a rating system, allowing users to compare their rating to those of other users. Unrated battles are more casual and do not carry any weight in terms of ranking points. The Smogon Shoddy Battle server provides a ladder for Uber, OU and UU tier battling and also allows users to conduct unrated battles with their own custom rules. It is also used to conduct suspect tests, which are vital to ensure that tiers are as balanced as possible.

    Other Simulators
    There are many old Pokemon simulations that are now out of commission, dating back to the days of RBY play. The most common of these old simulators were the bots and Pokemon NetBattle. Bot stands for robot and were run in IRC. There were popular bots for the first three generations, RBY (#rbystadium), GSC (#battlearena) and RSE (#rsarena). They had no graphical interface, so they attracted only the more serious battlers. These bots are no longer in use.

    NetBattle allowed users to play all of the first three generations of Pokemon and had an attractive graphical interface. This meant that it attracted a wider userbase, helping the competitive Pokemon community to grow. It was similar to Shoddy Battle in some respects, one could create teams in the team builder, connect to a server, and conduct battles from there. NetBattle is still usable, but finding an active server on NetBattle is hard, as not many people run them.
    (Netbattle DP?)

    What To Expect


    We also need a section here regarding "playing to win" and not "playing for fun" - emphasizing if you're not serious about it you probably won't be winning too many games. Maybe a link to Sirlin's Playing to Win book in the end to top it off. Expect others to be "playing to win".

    The competitive Pokemon environment is drastically different from what most new players are used to. Unlike in the Gameboy and DS games, you play against human opponents. Outsmarting a handheld machine is one thing, but outsmarting a real person is something else entirely. As such, there are a few key things to expect in competitive battling.

    One of the most surprising aspects to new players is the idea of switching. No longer will an opponent leave in a Pokemon until it faints; they can--and will--take advantage of switching. They may switch a Lucario into a Stone Edge, in order to take minimal damage; players can even predict when their opponent will switch and attempt to use a move that can hurt the switch-in, like using Earthquake when they switch in that same Lucario. Opponents will make any move necessary to make their victory more certain, however, remember that nothing in Pokemon is completely certain.

    The aspect of luck in Pokemon is something else that is sometimes surprising. Luck manifests itself in Pokemon in several ways. The most widespread is the 6.25% chance of a critical hit on every attack; some attacks, like Night Slash or Psycho Cut, have increased chances of landing a critical hit. Another common form of luck is the fact that not every move has perfect accuracy. Some of the most common moves, for example Stone Edge or Draco Meteor, aren't the most reliable and often be great letdowns in crunch time. At the end of the day, new players should realize that while winning is important, an individual win is near meaningless. As in American Football, any given player can win on any given ladder match. More important is winning in the long run. The best player in the world will still lose, sometimes even to newcomers. But if he or she maintains an 80% winrate, there is really no doubt that he or she is the best.

    Writing can be trimmed down a bit.

    Code:
    All people are unique and play in unique ways. There are, however, a couple of main divisions that teams can be divided into. The three primary types of play include Offense, Stall, and Balanced.
    
    ~ Offense: Offensive teams rely on outspeeding and outdamaging the opponent directly. Players using this style of play will often utilize hard-hitting Pokemon and use resistances and immunities to switch into attacks as opposed to defined walls to take hits. Tactics include lures to eliminate counters, using stat boosters, and utilizing a quick Stealth Rock in order to facilitate kills. The suicide lead is an expansion of the quick Stealth Rock concept and is often used by offensive teams. A suicide lead is essentially a Pokemon in the lead position whose role is to stop the opponent from setting up Stealth Rock and at the same time set up its own Stealth Rock. 
    
    ~ Stall: Stall teams are based off of residual damage. This damage can come in many forms, including sandstorm, hail, Toxic Spikes, Spikes, and Stealth Rock. The majority of Pokemon on a team like this will have good defenses and contribute to the overall goal of indirectly fainting the opponent's team. Tactics include using Ghosts to block Rapid Spin (a move which can eliminate entry hazards like Toxic Spikes, Spikes, Stealth Rock), setting up those entry hazards as fast as possible, and using Pseudo-Hazing (PHazing) moves such as Perish Song, Whirlwind, and Roar. 
    
    ~ Balanced: This type of team does not rely on any single type of Pokemon. Generally speaking, balanced teams have a couple of sweepers, backed up by a number of walls and/or tanks. Most teams of this type will utilize a form or two of entry hazard. The most successful balanced teams often center around a certain threat, while the other teammates seek to help guarantee a sweep by said threat.
    (Potentially Unnecessary)

    And then finally, you may be shocked to know that many people will refuse to play with you because you are using a specific move or Pokemon in your team. This is because competitive Pokemon enforces clauses and divides Pokemon into tiers. This is done to promote competitive play.


    Competitive Clauses
    In competitive Pokemon, there are several standard rules used in every match. These rules are called clauses, and they serve to stop some over-powerful strategies, reduce the role that luck can play in a match, and overall just make the game more enjoyable. If you are playing on a simulator, these rules will be enforced automatically; in wi-fi play, activating any one of these clauses will usually result in disqualification.

    Evasion Clause
    Moves that boost evasion (i.e. Double Team and Minimize) are not allowed.

    Freeze Clause

    Two or more Pokemon on a team cannot be frozen at the same time.

    Sleep Clause
    Two or more Pokemon on a team cannot be asleep at the same time. Self-induce sleep via rest does not activate Sleep Clause.

    OHKO Clause
    One-Hit KO moves are not allowed.

    Species Clause
    Two or more of the same Pokemon may not be used on the same team.

    Self KO Clause
    If both players have only one Pokemon left, moves which KO both the user and the opponent are not allowed (e.g. Explosion, Destiony Bond). If recoil damage would cause a tie, Self KO Clause does not activate, and the player who last attacked is the winner.

    Item Clause
    All Pokemon on a team must hold different items. This is not a standard clause in competitive play, but it is used in Nintendo tournaments.

    Tiers

    The tiers serve a dual purpose. The first is to promote balanced gameplay and the second is to create an environment where weaker Pokemon can be used. A Pokemon may only be used in a tier equal or above its situated tier.

    Uber
    Ubers are Pokémon that are considered too powerful for the OU metagame. The Uber tier is not meant to be a balanced tier, and therefore isn't the main metagame. Every Pokemon is allowed in this tier.

    OU
    OverUsed is the main metagame and used for most competitive battles and tournaments. It is the balanced tier that bans as few Pokémon as possible. However, placement in OU is based on usage rather than power, because power is difficult to gauge objectively. A Pokemon is OU if it shows up in 1 out of every 20 teams in the standard metagame.

    BL

    Borderline is a non-competitive tier that has a function similar to that of Ubers. It is to include Pokémon that aren't used sufficiently to be considered OU, but are too powerful to be used in UU.

    UU
    UnderUsed is a lower competitive metagame than OU and is generally composed of Pokémon that aren't powerful enough to compete in OU. It is also based on usage.

    Limbo
    Limbo serves the same purpose as Uber and BL, except for the NU tier.

    NU

    NeverUsed is the lowest tier in the system and denoted Pokémon that are extremely weak. It is based on usage and doesn't exist in RBY or GSC, due to there not being enough Pokémon.

    Common Mistakes

    Prediction is key into playing a successful game, but should it be relied upon? It should not be overly relied upon, as relying on it too much can easily lead to your demise as the opponent can outpredict you. We’ll take Focus Punch, for example. Focus Punch is a move with 150 base power, and will only succeed if the user is not hit by an attack move. Suppose you’re using Choice Band Medicham, and you feel that another fighting move is a waste of a moveslot because you think everything that you can destroy with a fighting move will switch anyways. Relying on this type of prediction every time can be fatal, as all the opponent has to do is stay in and attack it and Medicham will receive damage and lose two turns (one on the Focus Punch turn, two on the turn it is forced to switch out).

    Gimmicks, or novelty Pokemon or sets, are self defining. They can be created for comical purposes, but rarely will they ever succeed in competitive battling. A great example of a gimmick set is Choice Specs Blissey. What are some qualities of Choice Specs Blissey? Well she can switch in many times to special attacks due to her massive HP and Special Defense, and her respectable special movepool in Flamethrower, Ice Beam, Thunderbolt, and Focus Blast. Blissey can also switch in or out of status with Natural Cure. So why, exactly is this a gimmick? Her Special Attack stat is too low to deal any significant damage to a large portion of the metagame, and ultimately also fails to perform what she can do best due to the restrictive effect of Choice Specs: the ability to wall special attacks. The amount of surprise you can receive from running this set is far outweighed by the qualities Blissey have lost.

    Perhaps the toughest concept to understand for many people is that countering everything in the game is impossible. It is quite likely that your counter to a given Pokemon in your opponent’s field will not be the perfect counter, and due to such you should not attempt to counter everything in the game. Pokemon is more than just countering, and there are more ways to play it without resorting to always be one step behind your opponent. Even if your counter is perfect, if it can’t use the free turn to countered Pokemon is switching to perform a significant move or pose a threat, then it’s almost like a waste of turn for you. If your goal is to win, make every free turn you receive, and every team member count. If your approach is to counter perfectly, you will be thrown off when people use strange EV spreads and movesets against you. Pokemon is about seizing up your situation, finding the best moves to deal with the situation and how that affects your long term strategy, not solely focusing on what your opponent has out right now. Rather than reacting to what your opponent does every time, why not find other restrictive ways to prevent a certain threat from prevailing against you?

    The writing here can be trimmed down a bit i think.

    Where to Go From Here

    At this point, you're probably feeling pretty confident in the direction you're headed - you have a rough idea of how everything works and you can now begin to settle into our competitive battling community. That's great! You might find that as time goes by, however, you still need a bit of help every now and then. That’s natural, and rest assured, the community is here for you - there are a number of places and people you can turn to when you're having trouble getting to the "next level".

    If you're still new to the battling scene, or perhaps need help jumping into a new tier, Smogon's Battling 101 program is very much worth checking out! Every three weeks, a new teaching period begins. All you need to do is sign up when a new round thread is posted, and if you’re quick enough to get in, you’ll be assigned a tutor for the duration of the teaching period. Keep in mind that it might take a few attempts to get in – the program is very popular and we only have so many tutors! However, once you’ve gotten your foot in the door, your tutor will be an invaluable contact! They will be there for you, and not only pass on their competitive battling knowledge. Many tutor and apprentice pairs become great friends, and you’ll often find that contact with your tutor will carry on long after your time in the Battling 101 program.

    Battling 101 also runs apprentice tournaments every two rounds. The first 16 applicants to declare their interest in the tournament will be eligible, and pitted against 16 competitors from another round! The last men standing from each teaching round are inducted into the Battling 101 Hall of Fame! If you intend on taking part in these tournaments, make sure you put in the necessary preparation time with your tutor, as competition has been known to be very fierce indeed!

    You might feel that you don’t need tutoring, but have still arrived at bit of a roadblock with that team you were working on. Whether it be that you’re just not as winning as much anymore, or you just need a bit of advice, you should head over to Stark Mountain and check out the Rate My Team board. It is here that you can get advice from all sorts of other users, including our expert Team Raters (signified by the Fist badge in their profiles). Having a fresh set of eyes look over your team never hurts, so if you’re after a different perspective, look no further!

    (TRANSITION NEEDED - I think it is a good idea for the guide to "Transition" the user into the forums - and the following info afterwards (Generations/Terminology) are tools that help users understand what is going on in the forums better.)

    Code:
    [U][B]Generations[/B][/U]
    
    In competitive play, the cartridge games are segregated into generations, or groups of games with similar game mechanics. Generations generally correspond to Nintendo's handhelds and are named after the initial two games released on the platform. Here are the currently recognized generations:
    
    [B]R/B (also known as RBY)[/B]
     The games Red, Green, Blue and Yellow make up the first generation. The first generation is defined by its heavy centralization around a few Pokemon, due to the small number of available Pokemon and unbalanced mechanics. The generation was largely Speed oriented, which lead to the popularity of paralysis-inflicting moves such as Thunder Wave and Body Slam. RBY also had many glitches that may be implemented in a battling simulator.
        
    [B]G/S (also known as GSC)[/B]
     Gold / Silver / Crystal is the second generation, most notable for its splitting of the Special stat into Special Attack and Special Defense, in addition to adding two new types of Pokemon. The generation also introduced items, such as Leftovers, which helped promote the slow pace and defensively oriented nature it is famous for. Despite the stall-ish nature of the game, Stall Breaking tactics may still be effective.
        [B]
    R/S (also known as Advance, ADV, and RSE)[/B]
    The games Ruby / Sapphire / Emerald / FireRed / LeafGreen make up the third generation generation; it introduced abilities, natures, revamped the IV system, and made stat experience into Effort Values. The introduction of items such as Choice Band led to more varied strategies. Introduction of many new Pokemon also made it more difficult to cover every threat. The metagame never truly stabilized despite the heavy usage of certain key Pokemon such as Blissey, Skarmory, Tyranitar, Celebi, and Swampert. 
    
    [B]D/P (also known as DPPt)[/B]
     Diamond, Pearl, and Platinum make up the current generation and it is famous for changing attacking mechanics so that physical and special moves were differentiated individually rather than by its type. It introduced a particularly large number of quality Pokemon by giving many lackluster Pokemon new evolutions, while introducing many new attacks that gave many Pokemon from previous generations a chance to shine. This large number of Pokemon to choose from also meant that there were too many threats to prepare for, making it impossible to counter everything your opponent attempts to do. Team advantage also became more significant, with many players gaining advantages before the battle even begins.
    (Potentially completely unnecessary - it doesn't really flow with the guide)

    Code:
    Commonly Used Terms and Abbreviations
    
    BST
    Refers to the total of a Pokemon's base stats.
    
    STAB
    Same Type Attack Bonus, which increases the power of a direct attack by 50% if the one of the user's types is the same as attack's type.
    
    Hax
    An event which has a low probability of happening which critically affects a match. Also used to refer to luck in general.
    
    Priority
    Any attack which will always move first (e.g. Fake Out, ExtremeSpeed, Ice Shard)
    
    OHKO
    Short for "One-Hit Knockout", though it can also refer to moves that KO the opponent in one hit like Horn Drill.
    
    NFE
    Not Fully Evolved, a Pokemon that is not in it's final evolution stage. Most don't see competitive usage outside of Little Cup.
    
    NVE
    Not Very Effective, a move that does lowered damage due to resistances.
    
    Trapper
    A Pokemon which can either stop an opponent from switching out - via Arena Trap or Magnet Pull - or can KO them even if they due - via Pursuit.
    
    Sweeper
    A Pokémon that uses offensive moves to do damage and bring down an opponent's team. Many carry boosting moves like Swords Dance. Usually physical or special-oriented.
    
    Mixed Sweeper
    A sweeper that uses both physical and special offensive moves to do damage. Mixed sweepers are referred to with the Mix- prefix. 
    
    Supporter
    A Pokémon that uses non-offensive moves which benefit the team.
    
    Tank
    A Pokémon intended to take attacks, usually one side of the spectrum, and hit back
    
    Wall
    A Pokémon intended to take attacks, usually one side of the spectrum, extremely effectively
    
    Wall-Breaker
    An offensively oriented pokemon meant specifically for crushing walls rather than sweeping. This is usually done with extra powerful offense (even at the expense of continued sweeping abilities or using a pokemon with low speed), and often with physical and special moves.
    
    Revenge Kill
    KOing an opposing Pokemon immediately after one of your own Pokemon has fainted, therefore avoiding the risk of switching into an attack.
    
    Revenge Killer
    A Pokemon whose main purpose on a team is to revenge kill certain threats, usually those who your team lacks a solid defense against. Generally characterized by high speed and frailty. May also be a Trapper.
    
    Status-absorber
    A Pokemon that can avoid, remove, or use to its advantage one or more Status effects through means like Rest Talk or the ability Guts.
    
    Entry Hazards
    Any of the attacks which deal damage as a Pokemon switches in - Stealth Rock, Spikes, and Toxic Spikes
    
    Residual damage
    Damage taken by a pokemon without having been attacked, whether by recoil (life orb or otherwise), weather (hail or sandstorms), statis effects,(toxic or burn) and entry hazards.
    
    Pinch Berry
    Stat-boosting berry that activates when the holder falls below 25% health. Often used in conjunction with Substitute, as subbing 3 times activates the berry. The most common ones are: Salac (boosts Speed), Petaya (boosts Special Attack), and Liechi (boosts Attack).
    
    Pseudo Passer/Dual Screen
    A Pokemon which uses moves like Reflect, Light Screen, and Wish with the intent of passing them to another pokemon.
    
    Auto-Weather.
    A Pokemon whose ability creates a weather effect such as sand, rain, hail, or sun when they are brought into play.
    
    Suicide lead
    A lead Pokemon that tries to set up entry hazards quickly and prevent opponents from doing the same (with Taunt) before dying.
    
    Aromatherapist / Cleric
    A Pokémon that uses Aromatherapy or Heal Bell
    
    Phazer / Pseudo-hazer / Shuffler
    A Pokémon that uses Roar or Whirlwind
    
    Spinner
    A Pokemon with Rapid Spin
    
    Restalker / Rest Talk
    A Pokemon who uses the moves Rest and Sleeptalk
    
    Specific Sets and Combinations
    
    Agiligross
    A Metagross with Agility.
    
    Bulkygyara
    A Gyarados with defensive EVs, aimed to take hits.
    
    Crocune
    A Suicune with Surf, Sleep Talk, Calm Mind, and Rest
    
    Mixpert 
    Swampert with Earthquake, Ice Beam, Surf/Hydro Pump and Stealth Rock/Roar
    
    TechniTop
    A Hitmontop with the ability Technician and a set with low base power priority moves such as Bullet Punch, Fake Out, and Mach Punch.
    
    Tyraniboah / Boah
    A Tyranitar with Substitute, Focus Punch, Crunch or Dark Pulse, and Thunderbolt or Ice Beam
    
    Stallrein
    A Walrein using Substitute + Protect under Hail to stall for up to 32 turns, using Leftovers + Ice Body to fully replenish the HP lost during each two-turn cycle.
    
    Bellyzard
    A Charizard with Belly Drum
    
    Curselax
    A Snorlax with Curse
    
    Lati@s
    Latias and Latios collectively
    
    Skarmbliss
    Skarmory and Blissey used on the same team. Also called Blisskarm.
    
    GyaraVire
    Gyarados and Electivire.
    
    GyaraJolt.
    Gyarados and Jolteon.
    
    CeleTran
    Using Celebi and Heatran as a Defensive Core.
    
    General Movesets
    
    Paraflinch
    Utilizing both paralysis and flinches to keep an enemy Pokemon from being able to attack.
    
    BoltBeam
    Thunderbolt and Ice Beam
    
    SubPunch
    Substitute and Focus Punch
    
    SubSalac
    Substitute and item Salac Berry
    
    SubSeed
    Substitute and Leech Seed
    
    SubCM
    Substitute and Calm Mind
    
    SubRoost
    Substitute and Roost
    
    EndFlail
    Endure and Flail
    
    EndRev
    Endure and Reversal
    
    EndSalac
    Endure and item Salac Berry
    
    ChestoRest
    Using a Chesto Berry and Rest in tandem to wake up instantly after a Rest.
    
    Paraflinch
    Utilizing both paralysis and flinches to keep an enemy Pokemon from being able to attack.
    
    Abbreviations of Moves and Items
    
    SD
    Swords Dance
    
    WW
    Whirlwind
    
    EQ
    Earthquake
    
    QA
    Quick Attack
    
    DT
    Double Team
    
    LK
    Lovely Kiss
    
    HP
    Hidden Power
    
    ES
    ExtremeSpeed
    
    WoW
    Will-O-Wisp
    
    BB
    Brick Break or Brave Bird
    
    AA
    Aerial Ace
    
    CM
    Calm Mind
    
    DD
    Dragon Dance
    
    CC
    Close Combat or Cross Chop
    
    TSpikes or TS
    Toxic Spikes
    
    NP
    Nasty Plot
    
    DM
    Draco Meteor
    
    SE
    Stone Edge
    
    SR
    Stealth Rock
    
    GK
    Grass Knot
    
    BP
    Short for either Bullet Punch or Baton Pass, depending on the context.
    
    FP
    Short for either Focus Punch or Full Paralysis, depending on the context.
    
    STalk
    Sleep Talk
    
    MM
    Meteor Mash
    
    T-Wave
    Thunder Wave
    
    CB/Band
    Choice Band, an item that increases the power of physical attacks by roughly 50% but locks the holder into one move (CB is a very common prefix)
    
    Specs
    Choice Specs, an item that increases the power of special attacks by roughly 50% but locks the holder into one move
    
    Scarf
    Choice Scarf, an item that increases the holder's Speed by 50% but locks the holder into one move 
    
    Lefties
    Leftovers, an item that restores 6% of the users health each turn.
    
    LO
    Life Orb, an item that increases the power of the holder's attacks by roughly 30% but takes 10% health each time it issues a direct attack
    
    Dual Screen
    Light Screen and Reflect
    (This entire section is probably best off in a guide by itself - I don't think it's really worth it to stick it here - I think we can link to it at the end)

    (Overall this entire thing looks just a little bit bulky - it's like 13 pages, lol. We might need to cut it down! Great Job everyone though, and much thanks to everyone who wrote the initial rough drafts!)
  2. jumpluff

    jumpluff you stare right through me
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    Work in progress corrections

  3. TAY

    TAY You and I Know
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    Wrote the competitive clauses section.


    Competitive Clauses


    In competitive Pokemon, there are several standard rules used in every match. These rules are called clauses, and they serve to stop some over-powerful strategies, reduce the role that luck can play in a match, and overall just make the game more enjoyable. If you are playing on a simulator, these rules will be enforced automatically; in wi-fi play, activating any one of these clauses will usually result in disqualification.

    Evasion Clause
    Moves that boost evasion (i.e. Double Team and Minimize) are not allowed.

    Freeze Clause
    Two or more Pokemon on a team cannot be frozen at the same time.

    Sleep Clause
    Two or more Pokemon on a team cannot be asleep at the same time. Self-induce sleep via rest does not activate Sleep Clause.

    OHKO Clause
    One-Hit KO moves are not allowed.

    Species Clause
    Two or more of the same Pokemon may not be used on the same team.

    Self KO Clause
    If both players have only one Pokemon left, moves which KO both the user and the opponent are not allowed (e.g. Explosion, Destiony Bond). If recoil damage would cause a tie, Self KO Clause does not activate, and the player who last attacked is the winner.

    Item Clause
    All Pokemon on a team must hold different items. This is not a standard clause in competitive play, but it is used in Nintendo tournaments.
  4. Imran

    Imran
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    I feel it would be good to have that EV training guide on site, just to "round off" the whole effect. If no-one objects, I will look over the two drafts (that and Gandhi's one) and tidy them up a bit to create a guide that can be put on-site. I daresay it will be a nice thing to have on-site independant of whether this thing goes up.
  5. DougJustDoug

    DougJustDoug Knows the great enthusiasms
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    I thought the introduction was fantastic, but the guide did not transition well into the more detailed stuff. Here are some suggested changes to the first few parts of the guide (my changes marked in red).

    ---------------------------------



    Introduction

    Hello, my friend.

    If you’re a dedicated trainer, you’ve probably battled the Elite Four so many times they sound like boring class lectures. You endured this for the sake of training your loyal Pokémon, and after turning them into the fullest they could be, maybe you wanted more. So you decided to battle your friends on Wi-Fi, but after pounding them mercilessly (or having cried “Uncle!” one too many times), maybe Pokémon began to get stale.

    But there is more to this game. Something bigger.

    This is the world of competitive Pokémon, the art of playing Pokémon to win. By "win", we mean "winning battles". We don't care about completing our pokedex, winning ribbons in contests, collecting badges, or any other ingame pursuits. In this world, that 999 attack Pelipper you hacked as a joke to sweep your friend’s team isn’t allowed. Competitive Pokémon emphasizes an understanding of game mechanics, team organization, and battle tactics, rather than cramming four moves of differing types on your Pokémon and picking whichever one is super effective.

    Now that we’ve gotten you interested, you’ll want to examine just what competitive Pokémon is about in more detail. You will first learn about the finer details of the game you may not have noticed, and then we will give you a brief overview of the competitive world.


    Game Mechanics

    "Mechanics" is the term we use to refer to the way Pokemon works internally. Up until now, you have probably been able to ignore most of the detailed mechanics of the game, and still be successful. But in competitive Pokemon, there is a very fine line between success and failure. You must understand the subtle mechanics of the game, and exploit them to their maximum effectiveness. If you don't, you can be sure that your opponent will.

    In order to win a battle, you must faint all of your opponent's Pokemon before they do it to you. As such, the entirety of competitive Pokemon strategy is focused on damage -- the ability to deal damage, withstand damage, and avoid damage. Since damage is the end-all-be-all of battling, you must become familiar with the various game mechanics that affect damage.

    Move Mechanics

    These are mechanics that affect the damage of a given move in battle.

    Type Effectiveness
    You are probably familiar with this from ingame play. Certain types of moves do more or less damage to certain types of pokemon. For example, Ground moves are "super-effective" against Electric pokemon, doing twice as much damage to them. A Pokemon's type, and the type of moves it uses is the single biggest factor determining how much damage it can give and take. The ability for an individual pokemon or a team of pokemon to give and take damage across a variety of types is called "Type Coverage" or simply "Coverage".​
    Same Type Attack Bonus (STAB)
    If a Pokemon uses a move that matches its type, that move will be 50% stronger. For example, Earthquake has a base power of 100. If it is used by a Ground-type, it will be 50% stronger and have a base power of 150.

    Physical and Special moves
    All damaging moves are either physical or special. Physical moves use the Attack stat while Special moves use the Special Attack stat.
    For the first three generations, these moves were based on type. All Bug, Flying, Fighting, Ground, Normal, Poison, Rock, and Steel moves were physical. All Dark, Dragon, Electric, Fire, Ghost, Grass, Ice, Psychic, and Water moves were special.

    It wasn't until the 4th generation that moves were categorized based on their style of attacking. This information can be found under your Pokemon's Battle Moves page on their Summary screen. Physical moves have a red and yellow box while special moves have a purple box. Moves that deal no direct damage have a gray and white box.

    It's important to keep this in mind when building your Pokemon's movesets. You do not want to give a move like Psycho Cut to a Pokemon like Alakazam. Even though Psycho Cut would be STABed, it is a physical move and will not deal much damage due to Alakazam's horrible Attack stat.​


    Stat Mechanics

    These are mechanics that affect the statistics of a Pokemon, and thus affect it's ability to give, take, and avoid damage.

    Natures
    Every Pokemon can have 1 out of 25 different natures. Most natures will raise one stat by 10% and lower another stat by 10%. In competitive battling, every Pokemon has one or two preferred natures depending on the moveset they are using. For example, a Pokemon meant to use only physical attacks would most likely benefit from an Adamant Nature, which raises Attack by 10% and lowers Special Attack by 10%.

    There are 5 Natures out there which do not have an effect on any stat. They are Hardy, Serious, Bashful, Quirky, and Docile. These natures should not be used in a competitive setting since they provide no beneficial stat boosts to the Pokemon.

    For a list of natures and what stats they affect, check here. (Link to Smogon's Natures section)

    Effort Values (EVs)

    EVs are "invisible" numbers that can increase a Pokemon's stats. Every 4 EVs in a particular stat is equal to 1 point in that stat. Every Pokemon is capable of having a maximum of 510 EVs with a maximum of 255 EVs in any one stat. Note that neither 510 nor 255 are numbers that are divisible by 4. This means you only need 508 EVs total (252 EVs in any one stat) to have a completely EV-trained Pokemon. The remaining 2 EVs are useless.

    For more information on EV's and how to EV train pokemon in the cartridge games, see here. (link to EV article or guide)

    - deleted lots of EV stuff -
    (I think EV's should only be mentioned in the context of how they affect a pokemon's stats. How to get EV's is outside the scope of this guide IMO)


    Individual Values (IVs)
    Two untrained Pokemon of the same species with the same level and nature may still have slightly different stats. The reason behind this is that the two Pokemon have different IVs. IVs are "invisible" numbers that range from 0 to 31 and tell you the quality of a Pokemon's stats. 0 means that particular Pokemon's stat is the lowest it can be. 31 means that stat is at its best and is considered a perfect IV.

    Unlike EVs, IVs cannot be changed and are permanent when you obtain the Pokemon. There is no guaranteed way of obtaining the exact IVs you want. The best way to get a Pokemon with good IVs is by breeding. More information on IV breeding can be found in the Breeding Guide. (Link to the Breeding Guide)​


    Competitive Pokemon battling is based on the assumption that all players have perfect Pokemon. Much like professional athletes have near limitless access to state-of-the-art sports equipment, competitive Pokemon strategy assumes you have access to perfect Pokemon. This is often a difficult concept for players of the cartridge games to understand. But, it is essential to forget about that "awesome level 78 Charizard" you used to beat the Elite Four in FireRed. In competitive Pokemon, all players use level 100 Pokemon exclusively, they use only the most powerful species of Pokemon, AND the Pokemon are perfectly EV trained with perfect IVs, with perfect moves.

    You may wonder, "How it is possible to get completely perfect pokemon for competitive play?" In most cases, it is only possible to obtain perfect pokemon through the use of a Battle Simulator -- which is a program built for the express purpose of allowing competitive players to quickly and easily assemble entire teams of perfect pokemon, and then battle against others. It's also possible to acquire perfect pokemon through trading networks of competitive breeders, and thus use perfect pokemon and competitive strategies in wifi battles and real-life tournaments.

    Simulators...
  6. Jimbo

    Jimbo take me anywhere
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    I will edit this post with more serious suggestions later if I have the time, but I think this

    could be changed to something mentioning sticking multiple moves of the same type and picking the one that feels the coolest (I know a lot of new players will use things like Swampert with Surf, Waterfall, Hydro Pump, and Muddy Water because they don't know otherwise).

    Like I said, that change is kind of just my personal preference, will edit this later hopefully/maybe! Great job though guys.
  7. Hipmonlee

    Hipmonlee Have a rice day
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    The things I noticed:
    It says stab increases base power, that is not strictly true.

    Also not all damaging moves are special or physical.

    Also it has a section about not countering everything, but I am not sure it explained what the concept of a counter even is..

    Have a nice day.
  8. Arseus

    Arseus
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    Sorry I haven't been able to get to this sooner, but my "easier" semester has given me a fair bit of work lately...

    Unfortunately, I can't take an in-depth look at this right now, but here are two things I picked out while skimming the draft.

    I really think the "Hello, my friend." line should be omitted. It doesn't seem like a very strong opening; the paragraph that follows would function better, in my opinion.

    Has this been settled? I like DPPt myself, but the posters in C&C'sStandards for Grammar, Spelling, etc. thread seem to lean towards DPP.
  9. darkie

    darkie mfw i see alison brie
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    I like DPPt, too.
  10. RBG

    RBG It feels like a perfect night to dress up like hipsters
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    I prefer DPP because it keeps with the 3 letter acronyms that are used for every other generation.
  11. Blue Kirby

    Blue Kirby Never back down.
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    For the record, I prefer DPP too.
  12. Misty

    Misty oh
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    If you say "DPP" I don't think it matters which P is the Pearl and which is the Platinum. The t is extraneous.
  13. QibingZero

    QibingZero

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    Someone else might need to back me up on this, but I think that seems a bit too condescending, especially this early in the article. There are a few other remarks which may 'assume too much', but this is the only one that I think might drive some readers away. If a mention of hacking is really needed, it would probably work best mentioned near the game mechanics.

    Maybe 'console' over 'cartridge'? It's used a few times overall, and even though it might be nitpicking, cartridge makes it sound like we're talking about 8-bit systems here.

    This could be added later, if Netbattle actually gains a decent amount of support.
    I did quite a bit of editing here. Some was obvious, but a lot of it was my attempt at clarity.

    I think this section could really do with a bit less exclamation!
  14. TAY

    TAY You and I Know
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    I have redone the common mistakes section. I will be using this post for future updates as well.

    Got some more done!

  15. darkie

    darkie mfw i see alison brie
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    I prefer 'handheld' over both 'console' and 'cartridge'.
  16. Caelum

    Caelum qibz official stalker
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    Anyone have any objection to me putting this on-site in the next 2-3 days?

    I cleaned up the grammar / spelling in spots, added in TAY's parts, and I set up a table of contents did the html bit etc. I also just removed the Pokemon dictionary bit at the end and created a seperate article for it since it's quite long and breaks the flow a bit. I also eliminated the underlining / bold indentation stuff and just used <h2>, <h3>, etc.


    Oh, who should the authors be listed as ? (should I list all of you or what?)
  17. TAY

    TAY You and I Know
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    Oh I was going to do this after class today but I guess you have saved me the time....

    Anyway, would you mind sending me the final version in PM? I would like to give it a final once-over before it goes on site, and I can check html stuff too (not that I don't trust you <3)

    I think that everyone who wrote part of it should be listed as author.
  18. Caelum

    Caelum qibz official stalker
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    I'll just post them both here later tonight. Can I get confirmation this is the correct author list though, this thread is so scattered and I don't know if I got everyone

    List Of Authors:
    aragornbird
    Blue Kirby
    darkie
    Imran
    Jibaku
    Sarenji
    Tangerine
    TAY

    (edit: An no I didn't list every stark user who contributed to the pokemon dictionary in that article lol. I just mentioned Tang but let me know if I should list anyone else as authors).
  19. Tangerine

    Tangerine Where the Lights Are
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    DougJustDoug should be listed
  20. Caelum

    Caelum qibz official stalker
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    Okie. I also added chaos to authors of poke. dictionary too since he had the base bit on linear cc. Here's the finalized / revised versions.

    I'll leave these up for about 12-24 hours and then put them on-site. We all have SCMS access anyway so it shouldn't be a big deal if anyone catches minor errors down the road.

    I still have to check over the html script again since I probably messed up (Tangerine's formatting made it harder than usual grrr >:O)/ forgot to close a tag so if anyone catches that it would be great to point it out to me (or if your a supermod/admin just edit it in please ^__^) in case I miss it on the 2nd look through (hey ryu - where the hell are you ????). Also, any grammar corrections as well - still have to do one more run through on that as well.

    edit: An of course if anyone has last minute additions chime in!

    blurb
    Code:
    <dt><a href="intro_comp_pokemon">Introduction To Competitive Pokémon</a></dt>
    <dd>An introduction to competitive Pokémon.</dd>
    stuff
    Code:
    [title]
    Introduction To Competitive Pokémon 
    [head]
    <meta name="description" content="An introduction to the world of competitive Pok&eacute;mon ." />
    [page]
    <div class="author">By <a href="/forums/member.php?u=921">aragornbird<a/>, <a href="/forums/member.php?u=15147">Blue Kirby</a>, <a href="/forums/member.php?u=1923">darkie</a>, <a href="/forums/member.php?u=10787">DougJustDoug</a>, <a href="/forums/member.php?u=20194">Imran</a>, <a href="/forums/member.php?u=1779">Jibaku</a>, <a href="/forums/member.php?u=597">Sarenji</a>, <a href="/forums/member.php?u=8840">Tangerine<a>, and <a href="/forums/member.php?u=15305">TAY</a>.</div>
    
    <h2>Table Of Contents</h2>
    
    <ol class="toc">
    <li><a href="#intro">Introduction</a></li>
    <li><a href="#mechanics">Game Mechanics</a>
          <ul>
    		<li><a href="#move_mech">Move Mechanics</a></li>
    		<li><a href="#stat_mech">Stat Mechanics</a></li>
          </ul>
    </li>
    <li><a href="#sim">Simulators</a>
          <ul>
    		<li><a href="#shoddy">Shoddy Battle</a></li>
    		<li><a href="#other_sim">Other Simulators</a></li>
          </ul>
    </li>
    <li><a href="#expect">What To Expect</a></li>
    <li><a href="#clause">Competitive Clauses</a></li>
    <li><a href="#tiers">Tiers</a></li>
    <li><a href="#mistakes">Common Mistakes</a></li>
    <li><a href="#where">Where To Go From Here</a></li>
    </ol>
    
    
    <h2><a name="intro">Introduction</a></h2>
    
    <p>If you’re a dedicated trainer, you’ve probably battled the Elite Four so many times they sound like boring class lectures. You endured this for the sake of training your loyal Pok&eacute;mon, and after turning them into the fullest they could be, maybe you wanted more. So you decided to battle your friends on Wi-Fi, but after pounding them mercilessly (or having cried “Uncle!” one too many times), maybe Pok&eacute;mon began to get stale.</p>
    
    <p>But there is more to this game. Something <em>bigger.</em></p>
    
    <p>This is the world of <strong>competitive Pok&eacute;mon</strong>, the art of playing Pok&eacute;mon to win. In this world, that 999 attack Pelipper you hacked as a joke to sweep your friend’s team isn’t allowed. Competitive Pok&eacute;mon emphasizes an understanding of game mechanics, team organization, and battle tactics, rather than cramming four moves of differing types on your Pok&eacute;mon and picking whichever one is super effective.</p>
    
    <p>Now that we’ve gotten you interested, you’ll want to examine just what competitive Pok&eacute;mon is about in more detail. You will first learn about the finer details of the game you may not have noticed, and then we will give you a brief overview of the competitive world.</p>
    
    <h2><a name="mechanics">Game Mechanics</a></h2>
    
    <p>"Mechanics" is the term we use to refer to the way Pok&eacute;mon works internally. Up until now, you have probably been able to ignore most of the detailed mechanics of the game, and still be successful. But in competitive Pok&eacute;mon, there is a very fine line between success and failure. You must understand the subtle mechanics of the game, and exploit them to their maximum effectiveness. If you don't, you can be sure that your opponent will.</p>
    
    <p>In order to win a battle, you must faint all of your opponent's Pok&eacute;mon before they do it to you. As such, the entirety of competitive Pok&eacute;mon strategy is focused on <strong>damage</strong> -- the ability to deal damage, withstand damage, and avoid damage. Since damage is the end-all-be-all of battling, you must become familiar with the various game mechanics that affect damage.</p>
    
    <h3><a name="move_mech">Move Mechanics</a></h3>
    
    <p>These are mechanics that affect the damage of a given move in battle.</p>
    
    <h4>Type Effectiveness</h4>
    <p>You are probably familiar with this from ingame play. Certain types of moves do more or less damage to certain types of Pok&eacute;mon. For example, Ground moves are "super-effective" against Electric Pok&eacute;mon, doing twice as much damage to them. A Pok&eacute;mon's type, and the type of moves it uses is the single biggest factor determining how much damage it can give and take. The ability for an individual Pok&eacute;mon or a team of Pok&eacute;mon to give and take damage across a variety of types is called "Type Coverage" or simply "Coverage".</p>
    
    <h4>Physical and Special moves</h4>
    <p>All damaging moves are either physical or special. Physical moves use the Attack stat while Special moves use the Special Attack stat.</p>
    
    <p>For the first three generations, these moves were based on type. All Bug, Flying, Fighting, Ground, Normal, Poison, Rock, and Steel moves were physical. All Dark, Dragon, Electric, Fire, Ghost, Grass, Ice, Psychic, and Water moves were special.</p>
    
    <p>It wasn't until the 4th generation that moves were categorized based on their style of attacking. This information can be found under your Pok&eacute;mon's Battle Moves page on their Summary screen. Physical moves have a red and yellow box while special moves have a purple box. Moves that deal no direct damage have a gray and white box.</p>
    
    <p>It's important to keep this in mind when building your Pok&eacute;mon's movesets. You do not want to give a move like Psycho Cut to a Pok&eacute;mon like Alakazam. Even though Psycho Cut would be STABed, it is a physical move and will not deal much damage due to Alakazam's horrible Attack stat.</p>
    
    <h3><a name="stat_mech">Stat Mechanics</a></h3>
    
    <p>These are mechanics that affect the statistics of a Pok&eacute;mon, and thus affect its ability to give, take, and avoid damage.</p>
    
    <h4>Natures</h4>
    <p>Every Pok&eacute;mon can have 1 out of 25 different natures. Most natures will raise one stat by 10% and lower another stat by 10%. In competitive battling, every Pok&eacute;mon has one or two preferred natures depending on the moveset they are using. For example, a Pok&eacute;mon meant to use only physical attacks would most likely benefit from an Adamant Nature, which raises Attack by 10% and lowers Special Attack by 10%.</p>
    
    <p>There are 5 Natures out there which do not have an effect on any stat. They are Hardy, Serious, Bashful, Quirky, and Docile. These natures should not be used in a competitive setting since they provide no beneficial stat boosts to the Pok&eacute;mon.</p>
    
    <p>For a list of natures and what stats they affect, <a href="/dp/natures/">check here</a>.</p>
    
    <h4>Effort Values (EVs)</h4>
    
    <p>EVs are "invisible" numbers that can increase a Pok&eacute;mon's stats. Every 4 EVs in a particular stat is equal to 1 point in that stat. Every Pok&eacute;mon is capable of having a maximum of 510 EVs with a maximum of 255 EVs in any one stat. Note that neither 510 nor 255 are numbers that are divisible by 4. This means you only need 508 EVs total (252 EVs in any one stat) to have a completely EV-trained Pok&eacute;mon. The remaining 2 EVs are useless.</p>
    
    <p>For more information on EV's and how to EV train Pok&eacute;mon in the cartridge games, <a href="/forums/showthread.php?t=33832">see here.</a></p>
    
    <h4>Individual Values (IVs)</h4>
    
    <p>Two untrained Pok&eacute;mon of the same species with the same level and nature may still have slightly different stats. The reason behind this is that the two Pok&eacute;mon have different IVs. IVs are "invisible" numbers that range from 0 to 31 and tell you the quality of a Pok&eacute;mon's stats. 0 means that particular Pok&eacute;mon's stat is the lowest it can be. 31 means that stat is at its best and is considered a perfect IV.</p>
    
    <p>Unlike EVs, IVs cannot be changed and are permanent when you obtain the Pok&eacute;mon. There is no guaranteed way of obtaining the exact IVs you want. The best way to get a Pok&eacute;mon with good IVs is by breeding. More information on IV breeding can be found in the <a href="/dp/articles/breeding_guide_part1">Breeding Guide.</a></p>
    
    <p>Competitive Pok&eacute;mon battling is based on the assumption that all players have perfect Pok&eacute;mon. Much like professional athletes have near limitless access to state-of-the-art sports equipment, competitive Pok&eacute;mon strategy assumes you have access to perfect Pok&eacute;mon. This is often a difficult concept for players of the cartridge games to understand. But, it is essential to forget about that "awesome level 78 Charizard" you used to beat the Elite Four in FireRed. In competitive Pok&eacute;mon, all players use level 100 Pok&eacute;mon exclusively, they use only the most powerful species of Pok&eacute;mon, AND the Pok&eacute;mon are perfectly EV trained with perfect IVs, with perfect moves.</p>
    
    <p>You may wonder, "How it is possible to get completely perfect Pok&eacute;mon for competitive play?" In most cases, it is only possible to obtain perfect Pok&eacute;mon through the use of a Battle Simulator - which is a program built for the express purpose of allowing competitive players to quickly and easily assemble entire teams of perfect Pok&eacute;mon, and then battle against others. It's also possible to acquire perfect Pok&eacute;mon through trading networks of competitive breeders, and thus use perfect Pok&eacute;mon and competitive strategies in wifi battles and real-life tournaments.</p>
    
    <h2><a name="sim">Simulators</a></h2>
    
    <p>The majority of competitive Pok&eacute;mon battling is done over simulators. This was very important in the first three generations, as it was the only possible method of battling competitively against a large variety of opponents. The fourth generation brought Wi-Fi capability with it, but the most competitive play still exists on simulators, as they allow users to fine tune teams much more easily than they can in-game. On simulators, battles can also be conducted faster, rules can be enforced more strictly, and rating systems can be more easily implemented than would be possible by simply using Wi-Fi.</p>
    
    <h3><a name="shoddy">Shoddy Battle<a/></h3>
    
    <p>The most popular Pok&eacute;mon battle simulator is Shoddy Battle, which simulates the DPP generation. The program can be downloaded from the “downloads” section of their website. You must connect to a server to battle, but remember that different servers have different aims, and may not always be what you are looking for. The most popular server for playing standard Pok&eacute;mon is the Smogon server. All servers have their own rules and are moderated. Reading the rules is vital, as it is possible to be banned from any server. Shoddy Battle is an open source program, meaning that users can submit patches to help improve the program, although server owners can choose whether to implement them or not.</p>
    
    <p>Loading the application brings up the welcome window; from there the team builder can be used to create a team. The team builder loads in a separate window and allows users to choose Pok&eacute;mon and their items, nicknames, level, Individual Values (and corresponding Hidden Power type), Effort Values, ability, and nature. Once the team is built, to start battling, one must connect to a server. Clicking on the Smogon server and pressing “connect” opens up another, server specific, welcome screen. It is possible to register a username and password by clicking on the register tab, clicking back on “Log In” connects the user to the server, using the username and password they just created. Either rated battles or unrated battles can be found by using the “find” tab. The ladder is a good skill test, as it runs a rating system, allowing users to compare their rating to those of other users. Unrated battles are more casual and do not carry any weight in terms of ranking points. The Smogon Shoddy Battle server provides a ladder for Uber, OU and UU tier battling and also allows users to conduct unrated battles with their own custom rules. It is also used to conduct suspect tests, which are vital to ensure that tiers are as balanced as possible.</p>
    
    <h3><a name="other_sim">Other Simulators</a></h3>
    
    <p>There are many old Pok&eacute;mon simulations that are now out of commission, dating back to the days of RBY play. The most common of these old simulators were the bots and Pok&eacute;mon NetBattle. Bot stands for robot and were run in IRC. There were popular bots for the first three generations, RBY (#rbystadium), GSC (#battlearena) and RSE (#rsarena). They had no graphical interface, so they attracted only the more serious battlers. These bots are no longer in use.</p>
    
    <p>NetBattle allowed users to play all of the first three generations of Pok&eacute;mon, and in limited capacity the fourth generation, and has an attractive graphical interface. This meant that it attracted a wider userbase, helping the competitive Pok&eacute;mon community to grow. It was similar to Shoddy Battle for previous generations in some respects, one could create teams in the team builder, connect to a server, and conduct battles from there. NetBattle is still usable, but finding an active server on NetBattle is hard, as not many people run them.</p>
    
    <h2><a name="expect">What To Expect</a></h2>
    
    <p>The competitive Pok&eacute;mon environment is drastically different from what most new players are used to. Unlike in the Gameboy and DS games, you play against human opponents. Outsmarting a handheld machine is one thing, but outsmarting a real person is something else entirely. As such, there are a few key things to expect in competitive battling.</p>
    
    <p>The first thing you need to know is that people will play to win. Although it was enough to get by in the cartridge games, using Pok&eacute;mon because they are cool or your favorites is the fastest way to lose. Your opponents will be using whatever Pok&eacute;mon they feel give them the best chance of winning, and in order to be competitive, you should do the same.</p>
    
    <p>One of the most surprising aspects to new players is the idea of switching. No longer will an opponent leave in a Pok&eacute;mon until it faints; they can-and will-take advantage of the ability to bring in a new Pok&eacute;mon with a better matchup. Also, do not be surprised if your opponent predicts your switch to hit you incoming Pok&eacute;mon with a super effective attack, as most players will take advantage of obvious plays in order to gain some sort of advantage.</p>
    
    <p>The role of luck in Pok&eacute;mon comes as an unpleasant surprise to many new players. Between critical hits, chance effects such as burn and flinch, and attacks with less than perfect accuracy, the potential for lucky wins and losses is everywhere. At the end of the day, new players should realize that, while winning is important, any individual win is near meaningless. As in American Football, any given player can win on any given ladder match; what is more important is winning in the long run. The best player in the world can still lose, even to newcomers, but will likely be able to maintain a much higher win-loss ratio.</p>
    
    <h2><a name="clause">Competitive Clauses</a></h2>
    
    <p>In competitive Pok&eacute;mon, there are several standard rules used in every match. These rules are called clauses, and they serve to stop some over-powerful strategies, reduce the role that luck can play in a match, and overall just make the game more enjoyable. If you are playing on a simulator, these rules will be enforced automatically; in wi-fi play, activating any one of these clauses will usually result in disqualification.</p>
    
    <dl>
    <dt>Evasion Clause</dt>
    <dd>Moves that boost evasion (i.e. Double Team and Minimize) are not allowed.</dd>
    
    <dt>Freeze Clause</dt>
    <dd>Two or more Pok&eacute;mon on a team cannot be frozen at the same time.</dd>
    
    <dt>Sleep Clause</dt>
    <dd>Two or more Pok&eacute;mon on a team cannot be asleep at the same time. Self-induce sleep via rest does not activate Sleep Clause.</dd>
    
    <dt>OHKO Clause</dt>
    <dd>One-Hit KO moves are not allowed.</dd>
    
    <dt>Species Clause</dt>
    <dd>Two or more of the same Pok&eacute;mon may not be used on the same team.</dd>
    
    <dt>Self KO Clause</dt>
    <dd>If both players have only one Pok&eacute;mon left, moves which KO both the user and the opponent are not allowed (e.g. Explosion, Destiony Bond). If recoil damage would cause a tie, Self KO Clause does not activate, and the player who last attacked is the winner.</dd>
    
    <dt>Item Clause</dt>
    <dd>All Pok&eacute;mon on a team must hold different items. This is not a standard clause in competitive play, but it is used in Nintendo tournaments.</dd>
    </dl>
    
    <h2><a name="tiers">Tiers</a></h2>
    
    <p>The tiers serve a dual purpose. The first is to promote balanced gameplay and the second is to create an environment where weaker Pok&eacute;mon can be used. A Pok&eacute;mon may only be used in a tier equal or above its situated tier.</p>
    
    <dl>
    <dt><a href="/dp/tiers/uber">Uber</a></dt>
    <dd>Ubers are Pok&eacute;mon that are considered too powerful for the OU metagame. The Uber tier is not meant to be a balanced tier, and therefore isn't the main metagame. Every Pok&eacute;mon is allowed in this tier.</dd>
    
    <dt><a href="/dp/tiers/ou">OU</a></dt>
    <dd>OverUsed is the main metagame and used for most competitive battles and tournaments. It is the balanced tier that bans as few Pok&eacute;mon as possible. However, placement in OU is based on usage rather than power, because power is difficult to gauge objectively. A Pok&eacute;mon is OU if it shows up in 1 out of every 20 teams in the standard metagame.</dd>
    
    <dt><a href="/dp/tiers/bl">BL</a></dt>
    <dd>Borderline is a non-competitive tier that has a function similar to that of Ubers. It is to include Pok&eacute;mon that aren't used sufficiently to be considered OU, but are too powerful to be used in UU.</dd>
    
    <dt><a href="/dp/tiers/uu">UU</a></dt>
    <dd>UnderUsed is a lower competitive metagame than OU and is generally composed of Pok&eacute;mon that aren't powerful enough to compete in OU. It is also based on usage.</dd>
    
    <dt><a href="/dp/tiers/nu">NU</a></dt>
    <dd>NeverUsed is the lowest tier in the system and denoted Pok&eacute;mon that are extremely weak. It is based on usage and doesn't exist in RBY or GSC, due to there not being enough Pok&eacute;mon.</dd>
    
    <dt><a href="/dp/tiers/limbo">Limbo</a></dt>
    <dd>Limbo serves as a place where Pok&eacute;mon that do not have a decided tier yet are put.</dd>
    </dl>
    
    <h2><a name="mistakes">Common Mistakes</a></h2>
    
    <p>Prediction is one of the keys to a successful game, but it should not be heavily relied upon. No one can predict with even close to perfect accuracy, and even a single missed prediction often means that one of your Pok&eacute;mon will be KOed. That is not to say that you should never take risks, but it is important to weigh the rewards and the potential consequences of each decision that you make. To take a very basic example: Let’s say you have a Choice Band Tyranitar (moveset: Stone Edge, Crunch, Earthquake, Pursuit) in play against your opponent’s Heatran. It may seem like the best attack is Earthquake, which will hit Heatran for super effective damage and easily take it down in a single hit. However, Choice Band will force Tyranitar to continually attack with Earthquake, which is a very risky play due to the frequency and power of sweepers which are immune to Ground-type attacks. Stone Edge only has 80% accuracy, but it is Tyranitar’s most powerful attack, and will prevent most sweepers from setting up safely. Additionally, Heatran will likely lose somewhere between 80% and 95% of its health even if it does stay in.</p>
    
    <p>Gimmicks, or novelty Pok&eacute;mon or sets, are common among newer players. They can be fun for comical purposes, but will rarely serve any significant purpose in a competitive metagame. Once you get to more advanced levels of play you can start creating custom Pok&eacute;mon sets, but until then, the best way to get started is to use the common, tried and true sets until you get down the basics.</p>
    
    <p>Although it may be difficult to comprehend at first, it is important to remember that directly countering every threat in the game is impossible. Even if the Diamond/Pearl was not filled with more powerful sweepers than in any previous generation, the metagame is constantly changing, and players will quickly find ways to abuse common trends. For this reason, there are in fact very few Pok&eacute;mon that can always be directly countered at all! But fear not; Pok&eacute;mon is more than just countering, and with experience you will learn that it is possible to play around any kind of threat with a well built team, through planning, prediction, and custom sets.</p>
    
    <p>Always try to think in the long term. A large part of competitive Pok&eacute;mon deals with the ability to analyze situations and form a plan to deal with both short and long term threats, while at the same time executing your own strategy. It is easy to focus only on the Pok&eacute;mon you are currently facing, but it is imperative that you learn to consider all of your opponent’s possible plays in both the short and long term.</p>
    
    <h2><a name="where">Where To Go From Here</a></h2>
    
    <p>At this point, you are probably feeling pretty confident in the direction you are headed - you have a rough idea of how everything works and you can now begin to settle into our competitive battling community. As time goes by, however, you may find that you still need a bit of help every now and then. That is natural, and you can rest assured that the community is here for you.</p>
    
    <p>There are a number of places and people you can turn to when you are having trouble getting to the "next level". If you are still new to the battling scene, or perhaps need help jumping into a new tier, Smogon's <a href="/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=42">Battling 101 program</a> will be a perfect fit. Every three weeks, a new round of tutoring begins, and all you need to do is sign up in the Battling 101 forum when a new thread is posted. Although space in the tutoring program is limited, if you sign up quickly enough you will be assigned a tutor for the duration of the teaching period. It may take a few attempts to get in – the program is very popular and we only have so many tutors – but do not be discouraged, as the Smogon tutoring program is well worth the wait. Your tutor will be an invaluable contact, not only to pass on their competitive battling knowledge, but also to help introduce you to the community and help you fit in. Many tutor and apprentice pairs become great friends, and you’ll often find that contact with your tutor will carry on long after your time in the Battling 101 program.</p>
    
    <p>Battling 101 also runs apprentice tournaments every two rounds. The first 16 applicants to declare their interest in the tournament will be eligible, and pitted against 16 competitors from another round. The last men standing from each teaching round are inducted into the Battling 101 Hall of Fame. If you intend to take part in one of these tournaments, make sure you put in the necessary preparation time with your tutor, as competition has been known to be quite fierce!</p>
    
    <p>You might feel that you do not need tutoring, but still have arrived at bit of a roadblock with that team you were working on. Whether you are just not as winning as much anymore, or you just need a bit of advice, you should head over to <a href="/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=43">Stark Mountain</a> and check out the <a href="/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=52">Rate My Team forum</a>. It is here that you can get advice from all sorts of other users, including our expert Team Raters (signified by the Fist badge in their profiles). Having a fresh set of eyes look over your team never hurts, so if you are after a different perspective, look no further!</p>
    
    <p>Of course, in order to make use of both the Battling 101 program and the RMT forum, you must be a member of the forum. Signing up is easy, and should not take more than a few minutes. If you get tired of thinking about Pok&eacute;mon, or just want to chat about something else, you should make your way to the <a href="/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=24">Socialization in the Empire</a> section of the forums, where you can discuss anything from politics, to sports, or even the arts. However, before posting in any forum you should be sure that you are familiar with the forum rules, as well as any rules specific to the subforum which you are visiting (which can be found in a “sticky” thread at the top of the list of threads).</p>
    
    <p>If you find that you are having trouble understanding the abbreviations, acronyms, and general terms used in competitive Pok&eacute;mon, we have you covered. Here is a list of the more common ones: <a href="/dp/articles/pokemon_dictionary">Pok&eacute;mon Dictionary</a>. Be sure to check out our other <a href="/dp/articles/">helpful articles</a> as well!</p>
    
    blurb
    Code:
    <dt><a href="pokemon_dictionary">The Pokémon Dictionary</a></dt>
    <dd>An explanation on the commonly used terminology by competitive Pokémon players, thanks to chaos and Tangerine.</dd>
    stuff

    Code:
    [title]
    The Pokémon Dictionary
    [head]
    <meta name="description" content="A guide to commonly seen abbreviations and terms in competitive Pok&eacute;mon." />
    [page]
    <div class="author">By <a href="/forums/member.php?u=1">chaos</a> and <a href="/forums/member.php?u=8840">Tangerine<a>.</div>
    
    <h2>Table Of Contents</h2>
    <ul>
    <li><a href="#gens">Generations</a></li>
    <li><a href="#play_styles">Styles Of Play</a></li>
    <li><a href="#terms">Commonly Used Terms and Abbreviations</a></li>
    <li><a href="#sets">Specific Sets and Combinations</a></li>
    <li><a href="#gen_sets">General Movesets</a></li>
    <li><a href="#moves_items">Abbreviations of Moves and Items</a></li>
    </ul>
    
    <h2><a name="gens">Generations</a></h2>
    
    <p>In competitive play, the cartridge games are segregated into generations, or groups of games with similar game mechanics. Generations generally correspond to Nintendo's handhelds and are named after the initial two games released on the platform.</p>
    
    <p>Here are the currently recognized generations:</p>
    
    <h3>R/B (also known as RBY)</h3>
    <p>The games Red, Green, Blue and Yellow make up the first generation. The first generation is defined by its heavy centralization around a few Pok&eacute;mon, due to the small number of available Pok&eacute;mon and unbalanced mechanics. The generation was largely Speed oriented, which lead to the popularity of paralysis-inflicting moves such as Thunder Wave and Body Slam. RBY also had many glitches that may be implemented in a battling simulator.</p>
       
    <h3>G/S (also known as GSC)</h3>
    <p>Gold / Silver / Crystal is the second generation, most notable for its splitting of the Special stat into Special Attack and Special Defense, in addition to adding two new types of Pok&eacute;mon. The generation also introduced items, such as Leftovers, which helped promote the slow pace and defensively oriented nature it is famous for. Despite the stall-ish nature of the game, Stall Breaking tactics may still be effective.</p>
        
    <h3>R/S (also known as Advance, ADV, and RSE)</h3>
    <p>The games Ruby / Sapphire / Emerald / FireRed / LeafGreen make up the third generation generation; it introduced abilities, natures, revamped the IV system, and made stat experience into Effort Values. The introduction of items such as Choice Band led to more varied strategies. Introduction of many new Pok&eacute;mon also made it more difficult to cover every threat. The metagame never truly stabilized despite the heavy usage of certain key Pok&eacute;mon such as Blissey, Skarmory, Tyranitar, Celebi, and Swampert.</p>
    
    <h3>D/P (also known as DPP, DPPt)</h3>
    <p>Diamond, Pearl, and Platinum make up the current generation and it is famous for changing attacking mechanics so that physical and special moves were differentiated individually rather than by its type. It introduced a particularly large number of quality Pok&eacute;mon by giving many lackluster Pok&eacute;mon new evolutions, while introducing many new attacks that gave many Pok&eacute;mon from previous generations a chance to shine. This large number of Pok&eacute;mon to choose from also meant that there were too many threats to prepare for, making it impossible to counter everything your opponent attempts to do. Team advantage also became more significant, with many players gaining advantages before the battle even begins.</p>
    
    <h2><a name="play_styles">Styles Of Play</a></h2>
    
    <h3>Offense</h3>
    <p>Offensive teams rely on outspeeding and outdamaging the opponent directly. Players using this style of play will often utilize hard-hitting Pok&eacute;mon and use resistances and immunities to switch into attacks as opposed to defined walls to take hits. Tactics include lures to eliminate counters, using stat boosters, and utilizing a quick Stealth Rock in order to facilitate kills. The suicide lead is an expansion of the quick Stealth Rock concept and is often used by offensive teams. A suicide lead is essentially a Pok&eacute;mon in the lead position whose role is to stop the opponent from setting up Stealth Rock and at the same time set up its own Stealth Rock.</p>
    
    <h3>Stall</h3>
    <p>Stall teams are based off of residual damage. This damage can come in many forms, including: sandstorm, hail, Toxic Spikes, Spikes, and Stealth Rock. The majority of Pok&eacute;mon on a team like this will have good defenses and contribute to the overall goal of indirectly fainting the opponent's team. Tactics include using Ghosts to block Rapid Spin (a move which can eliminate entry hazards like Toxic Spikes, Spikes, Stealth Rock), setting up those entry hazards as fast as possible, and using Pseudo-Hazing (PHazing) moves such as Perish Song, Whirlwind, and Roar.</p>
    
    <h3>Balance</h3>
    <p>This type of team does not rely on any single type of Pok&eacute;mon. Generally speaking, balanced teams have a couple of sweepers, backed up by a number of walls and/or tanks. Most teams of this type will utilize a form or two of entry hazard. The most successful balanced teams often center around a certain threat, while the other teammates seek to help guarantee a sweep by said threat.</p>
    
    <h2><a name="terms">Commonly Used Terms and Abbreviations</a></h2>
    
    <dl>
    <dt>Aromatherapist / Cleric</dt>
    <dd>A Pok&eacute;mon that uses Aromatherapy or Heal Bell.</dd>
    
    <dt>Auto-Weather</dt>
    <dd>A Pok&eacute;mon whose ability creates a weather effect such as sand, rain, hail, or sun when they are brought into play.</dd>
    
    <dt>BST</dt>
    <dd>Refers to the total of a Pok&eacute;mon's base stats.</dd>
    
    <dt>Entry Hazards</dt>
    <dd>Any of the attacks which deal damage as a Pok&eacute;mon switches in - Stealth Rock, Spikes, and Toxic Spikes</dd>
    
    <dt>Hax</dt>
    <dd>An event which has a low probability of happening which critically affects the outcome of a match. Also used to refer to luck in general.</dd>
    
    <dt>Mixed Sweeper</dt>
    <dd>A sweeper that uses both physical and special offensive moves to do damage. Mixed sweepers are referred to with the Mix- prefix.</dd>
    
    <dt>NFE</dt>
    <dd>Not Fully Evolved, a Pok&eacute;mon that is not in it's final evolution stage. Most don't see competitive usage outside of Little Cup.</dd>
    
    <dt>NVE</dt>
    <dd>Not Very Effective, a move that does lowered damage due to resistances.</dd>
    
    <dt>OHKO</dt>
    <dd>Short for "One-Hit Knockout", though it can also refer to moves that KO the opponent in one hit like Horn Drill.</dd>
    
    <dt>Phazer / Pseudo-hazer / Shuffler</dt>
    <dd>A Pok&eacute;mon that uses Roar or Whirlwind.</dd>
    
    <dt>Pinch Berry</dt>
    <dd>Stat-boosting berry that activates when the holder falls below 25% health. Often used in conjunction with Substitute, as subbing 3 times activates the berry. The most common ones are: Salac (boosts Speed), Petaya (boosts Special Attack), and Liechi (boosts Attack).</dd>
    
    <dt>Priority</dt>
    <dd>Any attack which will always move first (e.g. Fake Out, ExtremeSpeed, Ice Shard).</dd>
    
    <dt>Pseudo Passer / Dual Screen</dt>
    <dd>A Pok&eacute;mon which uses moves like Reflect, Light Screen, and Wish with the intent of passing them to another Pok&eacute;mon.</dd>
    
    <dt>Residual damage</dt>
    <dd>Damage taken by a Pok&eacute;mon without having been attacked, whether by recoil (life orb or otherwise), weather (hail or sandstorms), status effects(toxic or burn), and entry hazards.</dd>
    
    <dt>Restalker / Rest Talk</dt>
    <dd>A Pok&eacute;mon who uses the moves Rest and Sleeptalk.</dd>
    
    <dt>Revenge Kill</dt>
    <dd>KOing an opposing Pok&eacute;mon immediately after one of your own Pok&eacute;mon has fainted, therefore avoiding the risk of switching into an attack.</dd>
    
    <dt>Revenge Killer</dt>
    <dd>A Pok&eacute;mon whose main purpose on a team is to revenge kill certain threats, usually those who your team lacks a solid defense against. Generally characterized by high speed and frailty. May also be a Trapper.</dd>
    
    <dt>Spinner</dt>
    <dd>A Pok&eacute;mon with Rapid Spin.</dd>
    
    <dt>STAB</dt>
    <dd>Same Type Attack Bonus, which increases the power of a direct attack by 50% if the one of the user's types is the same as attack's type.</dd>
    
    <dt>Status-absorber</dt>
    <dd>A Pok&eacute;mon that can avoid, remove, or use to its advantage one or more Status effects through means like Rest Talk or the ability Guts.</dd>
    
    <dt>Suicide lead</dt>
    <dd>A lead Pok&eacute;mon that tries to set up entry hazards quickly and prevent opponents from doing the same (with Taunt) before dying.</dd>
    
    <dt>Supporter</dt>
    <dd>A Pok&eacute;mon that uses non-offensive moves which benefit the team.</dd>
    
    <dt>Sweeper</dt>
    <dd>A Pok&eacute;mon that uses offensive moves to do damage and bring down an opponent's team. Many carry boosting moves like Swords Dance. Usually physical or special-oriented.</dd>
    
    <dt>Tank</dt>
    <dd>A Pok&eacute;mon intended to take attacks, usually one side of the spectrum, and hit back.</dd>
    
    <dt>Trapper</dt>
    <dd>A Pok&eacute;mon which can either stop an opponent from switching out - via Arena Trap or Magnet Pull - or can KO them even if they do - via Pursuit.</dd>
    
    <dt>Wall</dt>
    <dd>A Pok&eacute;mon intended to take attacks, usually one side of the spectrum, extremely effectively.</dd>
    
    <dt>Wall-Breaker</dt>
    <dd>An offensively oriented Pok&eacute;mon meant specifically for crushing walls rather than sweeping. This is usually done with extra powerful offense (even at the expense of continued sweeping abilities or using a Pok&eacute;mon with low speed), and often with physical and special moves.</dd>
    </dl>
    
    <h2><a name="sets">Specific Sets and Combinations</a></h2>
    
    <dl>
    <dt>Agiligross</dt>
    <dd>A Metagross with Agility.</dd>
    
    <dt>Bellyzard</dt>
    <dd>A Charizard with Belly Drum.</dd>
    
    <dt>Bulkygyara</dt>
    <dd>A Gyarados with defensive EVs, aimed to take hits.</dd>
    
    <dt>CeleTran</dt>
    <dd>Using Celebi and Heatran as a Defensive Core.</dd>
    
    <dt>Crocune</dt>
    <dd>A Suicune with Surf, Sleep Talk, Calm Mind, and Rest.</dd>
    
    <dt>Curselax</dt>
    <dd>A Snorlax with Curse</dd>
    
    <dt>GyaraJolt.</dt>
    <dd>Gyarados and Jolteon.</dd>
    
    <dt>GyaraVire</dt>
    <dd>Gyarados and Electivire.</dd>
    
    <dt>Lati@s</dt>
    <dd>Latias and Latios collectively.</dd>
    
    <dt>Mixpert</dt>
    <dd>Swampert with Earthquake, Ice Beam, Surf/Hydro Pump and Stealth Rock/Roar.</dd>
    
    <dt>TechniTop</dt>
    <dd>A Hitmontop with the ability Technician and a set with low base power priority moves such as Bullet Punch, Fake Out, and Mach Punch.</dd>
    
    <dt>Tyraniboah / Boah</dt>
    <dd>A Tyranitar with Substitute, Focus Punch, Crunch or Dark Pulse, and Thunderbolt or Ice Beam.</dd>
    
    <dt>Skarmbliss</dt>
    <dd>Skarmory and Blissey used on the same team. Also called Blisskarm.</dd>
    
    <dt>Stallrein</dt>
    <dd>A Walrein using Substitute + Protect under hail to stall for up to 32 turns, using Leftovers + Ice Body to fully replenish the HP lost during each two-turn cycle.</dd>
    </dl>
    
    <h2><a name="gen_sets">General Movesets</a></h2>
    
    <dl>
    <dt>BoltBeam</dt>
    <dd>Thunderbolt and Ice Beam.</dd>
    
    <dt>ChestoRest</dl>
    <dd>Using a Chesto Berry and Rest in tandem to wake up instantly after a Rest.</dd>
    
    <dt>EndFlail</dt>
    <dd>Endure and Flail.</dd>
    
    <dt>EndRev</dt>
    <dd>Endure and Reversal.</dd>
    
    <dt>EndSalac</dt>
    <dd>Endure and item Salac Berry.</dd>
    
    <dt>Paraflinch</dt>
    <dd>Utilizing both paralysis and flinches to keep an enemy Pok&eacute;mon from being able to attack.</dd>
    
    <dt>SubCM</dt>
    <dd>Substitute and Calm Mind.</dd>
    
    <dt>SubRoost</dt>
    <dd>Substitute and Roost.</dd>
    
    <dt>SubPunch</dt>
    <dd>Substitute and Focus Punch.</dd>
    
    <dt>SubSalac</dt>
    <dd>Substitute and item Salac Berry.</dd>
    
    <dt>SubSeed</dt>
    <dd>Substitute and Leech Seed.</dd>
    </dl>
    
    <h2><a name="moves_items">Abbreviations of Moves and Items</a></h2>
    
    <dl>
    <dt>AA</dt>
    <dd>Aerial Ace.</dd>
    
    <dt>BB</dt>
    <dd>Brick Break or Brave Bird</dd>
    
    <dt>BP</dt>
    <dd>Short for either Bullet Punch or Baton Pass, depending on the context.</dd>
    
    <dt>CB/Band</dt>
    <dd>Choice Band, an item that increases the power of physical attacks by roughly 50% but locks the holder into one move (CB is a very common prefix).</dd>
    
    <dt>CC</dt>
    <dd>Close Combat or Cross Chop.</dd>
    
    <dt>CM</dt>
    <dd>Calm Mind.</dd>
    
    <dt>DD</dt>
    <dd>Dragon Dance.</dd>
    
    <dt>DM</dt>
    <dd>Draco Meteor.</dd>
    
    <dt>DT</dt>
    <dd>Double Team.</dd>
    
    <dt>Dual Screen</dt>
    <dd>Light Screen and Reflect.</dd>
    
    <dt>EQ</dt>
    <dd>Earthquake.</dd>
    
    <dt>ES</dt>
    <dd>ExtremeSpeed.</dd>
    
    <dt>FP</dt>
    <dd>Short for either Focus Punch or Full Paralysis, depending on the context.</dd>
    
    <dt>GK</dt>
    <dd>Grass Knot.</dd>
    
    <dt>HP</dt>
    <dd>Hidden Power.</dd>
    
    <dt>Lefties</dt>
    <dd>Leftovers, an item that restores 6.25% of the users health each turn.</dd>
    
    <dt>LK</dt>
    <dd>Lovely Kiss.</dd>
    
    <dt>LO</dt>
    <dd>Life Orb, an item that increases the power of the holder's attacks by roughly 30% but takes 10% health each time it issues a direct attack.</dd>
    
    <dt>MM</dt>
    <dd>Meteor Mash.</dd>
    
    <dt>NP</dt>
    <dd>Nasty Plot.</dd>
    
    <dt>QA</dt>
    <dd>Quick Attack.</dd>
    
    <dt>Scarf</dt>
    <dd>Choice Scarf, an item that increases the holder's Speed by 50% but locks the holder into one move.</dd>
    
    <dt>SD</dt>
    <dd>Swords Dance.</dd>
    
    <dt>SE</dt>
    <dd>Stone Edge.</dd>
    
    <dt>Specs</dt>
    <dd>Choice Specs, an item that increases the power of special attacks by roughly 50% but locks the holder into one move.</dd>
    
    <dt>SR</dt>
    <dd>Stealth Rock.</dd>
    
    <dt>STalk</dt>
    <dd>Sleep Talk.</dd>
    
    <dt>TSpikes or TS</dt>
    <dd>Toxic Spikes.</dd>
    
    <dt>T-Wave</dt>
    <dd>Thunder Wave.</dd>
    
    <dt>WoW</dt>
    <dd>Will-O-Wisp.</dd>
    
    <dt>WW</dt>
    <dd>Whirlwind.</dd>
    </dl>
    Edit 2: BTW, Great job everyone! Hope this helps to recruit some new members / help ease in some new guys :D
  21. Doomsday

    Doomsday
    is a Forum Moderator Alumnus

    Joined:
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    Messages:
    6,166
    posting to say i read 80% of this and it's a very entertaining read. this makes me wanna start pokemoning again
  22. Caelum

    Caelum qibz official stalker
    is a Site Staff Alumnusis a Smogon IRC AOp Alumnusis a Forum Moderator Alumnusis a Tiering Contributor Alumnusis a Contributor Alumnusis a Battle Server Moderator Alumnus

    Joined:
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    Messages:
    1,656
    Eh, I read it over and it looked good to me so I just put it on site. All the links should be working and the html all seems right so I thought why not? Anyway, direct all corrections towards there. And for the Pokemon Dictionary, if you think something should be added just find the appropriate section and place it in alphabetical order for that section.

    For those that don't know (although it should be obvious if you look at the document but whatever) you can't just use the paragraph tags (<p> </p>) if you want to add something to the dictionary use the definition list tags for that:

    <dt>word(s)</dt>
    <dd>description</dd>

    Anyway, here are the links

    http://www.smogon.com/dp/articles/intro_comp_pokemon

    http://www.smogon.com/dp/articles/pokemon_dictionary

    Great job everyone =).


    (btw, should the thread be moved to c&c otherwise I don't think anyone is going to know this was done? Although, darkie does c&c news so it should come up there in a week or so anyway).
  23. Imran

    Imran
    is a Team Rater Alumnus

    Joined:
    May 3, 2008
    Messages:
    1,292
    Yes, this was a great effort by everyone, well done!

    Seeing as this guide is generation neutral I feel that it should go in /articles/ not /dp/articles/ and such, changing the link on the front page may not be such a bad idea.

    EDIT: Also mention in the news would be cool too. I doubt many users check the articles that frequently.

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