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Mew (Update) (QC 3/3) [GP 2/2]

Discussion in 'Uploaded Analyses' started by PK Gaming, Aug 4, 2013.

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  1. PK Gaming

    PK Gaming Pursuing My True Self
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    [Overview]

    <p>With its balanced stats, solid level-up movepool, and access to literally every tutor move and TM in the game, it's no surprise that Mew is an easy contender for the title of "most versatile Pokemon." Access to some of the most sought-after support moves, including Will-O-Wisp and Taunt, makes Mew one of the most impressive support Pokemon. However, it's not just the threat of top-notch support that makes Mew so difficult to deal with. Mew's versatility gives it so many different and viable sets to choose from—ranging from support to Baton Pass user, sweeper, and even lead—that Mew has plenty of viable sets, each of which requires the correct answer to prevent it from just taking over the game. Mew is a Pokemon that tests your opponent's reactions first and foremost, and if they react poorly, there will be hell to pay.</p>

    <p>However, where it shines in versatility it lacks in focus. Its mediocre Speed stat puts it at the mercy of several notable Pokemon, including Keldeo and Latias, and its rather average offensive stats make it difficult to sweep. Still, the threat of these options means that even just seeing Mew puts the opponent on the back foot, and with the right followup, it's easy to ride that advantage to victory.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Support
    move 1: Taunt
    move 2: Will-O-Wisp
    move 3: Softboiled
    move 4: Ice Beam / Psychic
    item: Leftovers
    nature: Bold
    evs: 252 HP / 148 Def / 108 Spe

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>Support Mew functions as a top-notch supporting Pokemon with access to effective tools to help it in almost any given scenario. Taunt puts slower defensive Pokemon in an unfavorable position by forcing them to attack, and it can occasionally prevent faster Pokemon from setting up. Will-O-Wisp can burn foes, which constantly saps them of their health and utterly cripples physical attackers. Both moves have wonderful synergy with each other, as the combination of Taunt and burn typically renders a slower Pokemon completely useless. Ice Beam targets a large proportion of OU Pokemon for super effective damage. It's particularly effective against the likes of Garchomp, Dragonite, Landorus-T, and Thundurus-T, who number among the best setup sweepers in the tier. On the other hand, Psychic is more effective against Substitute users and is stronger against the likes of Terrakion, Toxicroak, and Conkeldurr. That said, Ice Beam is usually the better choice, as it's useful for dealing with a wider range of threats. You'll want to maximize Mew's effectiveness by bringing it on the field as quickly and efficiently as possible. Keeping it near max HP at all times is imperative to succeeding with Mew, as it is usually only capable of checking powerful threats when it's healthy.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>A specially defensive spread can be used to improve Mew's effectiveness against special attackers. This in turn makes it more useful against a wider variety of Pokemon, as Mew can already somewhat deal with incoming physical attackers with Will-O-Wisp, and it can now keep up with strong special attackers. Keep in mind that Will-O-Wisp is not a substitute for physical defense, however, and thus this spread is ineffective against powerful, fast physical attacking Pokemon. Maxing out Mew'd Defense EVs can noticeably increase Mew's physical defense, but you're better off sticking with listed spread as it ensures that Mew is capable of outrunning Jolly Breloom, Adamant Dragonite, and Adamant Gyarados. Night Shade grants Mew the ability to deal consistent damage and is very useful against Substitute users, such as Latias, who would ordinarily set up on Mew. Light Screen strengthens Mew's Special Defense, making it all the more difficult for your opponent to break through Mew, but it comes at the cost of a precious moveslot.</p>

    <p>Despite having terrific prowess on the physically defensive side, Mew is somewhat vulnerable on the special side; special attackers (especially ones whose attacks are boosted in the rain) are by far the biggest threats to Mew. Pokemon that can deal with Heatran are almost mandatory teammates, as Heatran can effortlessly switch into Mew and turn into a liability for as long as it is active. Tyranitar makes for a good partner as it can usually take on most special attackers, as well as Heatran, and it comes with the added bonus of being able to defeat Latios and Latias, both of whom are strong checks to Mew in their own right. Starmie is a decent partner, as it can also check Heatran and has utility against the likes of Keldeo, who can decimate Mew with Hydro Pump.</p>

    <p>Mew stands tall as one of the best stallbreakers in the tier, as it is capable of dismantling the most common stall cores on its own. It struggles mightily against rain stall, however, as the prevalence of Scald makes it difficult for Mew to stay on the field. As such, you should strongly consider carrying anti-rain stall measures, such as specially defensive Hippowdon, Celebi, and Starmie.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Lead
    move 1: Stealth Rock
    move 2: Taunt / Magic Coat
    move 3: Explosion
    move 4: Tailwind
    item: Normal Gem
    nature: Jolly
    evs: 108 HP / 252 Atk / 148 Spe

    <p>Mew's near-limitless movepool and balanced stats make it an effective lead, especially on hyper offensive teams that cannot afford to make room for a Ghost-type Pokemon. With access to Taunt and Magic Coat, Mew beats nearly every other lead in the game and has the advantage of bulk over lead Azelf, whose frailty mandates use of a Focus Sash. Mew's solid bulk allows it to carry a Normal Gem, which secures more significant KOs, such as the near-guaranteed OHKO on defensive Xatu.</p>

    <p>Taunt shuts down slower opponents, preventing them from setting up their own entry hazards or boosting their stats. Magic Coat, on the other hand, bounces back Stealth Rock and Taunt from faster leads such as Terrakion, Aerodactyl, Azelf, Infernape, and opposing Mew. Taunt gets priority over Magic Coat because it doesn't necessarily stop hazards from being set up; it merely blocks them for a turn. This means that an opponent can continuously use Stealth Rock until Mew runs out of Magic Coat PP. In addition, Taunt is invaluable for completely shutting down opposing suicide leads, such as Forretress and Skarmory. Tailwind is handy for momentum, particularly if Mew is used as a suicide lead. It can set up Stealth Rock quickly, use Tailwind to increase its Speed, and follow up with an Explosion to clear the way for your next switch-in to use the remaining two-turn Speed boost.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>Zen Headbutt is a decent alternative to Tailwind; it's the strongest physical STAB move in Mew's repertoire and serves as a deterrent to Gengar or Terrakion attempting to switch in and absorb an Explosion.</p>

    <p>Care must be taken with this particular set. If your opponent has Espeon, Xatu, or Starmie, it is best to save Mew and lead with something else. Explosion is a high-risk high-reward move, especially if your opponent has a Ghost-type on their team. Though a free switch-in might retain you momentum, do not forget Explosion's huge Base Power.</p>

    <p>Checks to this set include Life Orb Gengar, Choice Specs Latios, and Choice Band Garchomp and Terrakion, all of whom outspeed Mew and threaten it with high-powered STAB attacks. Scizor makes quick work of opposing Gengar and can also handily check Starmie, who is notoriously hard to deal with. Though it shares a Bug-type weakness with Mew, Tyranitar can be a handy partner. In addition to setting up permanent sand, Tyranitar is a good counter to Espeon and Xatu while being a reasonable check to Starmie and Latios so long as it avoids a Water-type move, trapping all four with Pursuit or outright KOing them with Crunch. Gengar also falls prey to Tyranitar, but Tyranitar must be wary of Focus Blast. Dragonite—and just about any other sweeper—appreciates Mew's ability to set up Stealth Rock; additionally, Dragonite can switch into opposing Landorus-T's Ground-type attacks should you wish to save Mew's Explosion. Rotom-W is another Pokemon who appreciates a free switch-in on Earthquake and makes quick work of Landorus-T with its STAB Hydro Pump.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Nasty Plot
    move 1: Nasty Plot
    move 2: Psyshock / Psychic
    move 3: Aura Sphere
    move 4: Fire Blast / Dark Pulse
    item: Leftovers / Lum Berry
    nature: Timid
    evs: 4 HP / 252 SpA / 252 Spe

    <p>Mew is capable of taking the offensive with Nasty Plot, and it is difficult for opponents to outright counter due to its excellent coverage and high power. Nasty Plot boosts Mew's Special Attack to 598, which gives Mew enough power to OHKO or 2HKO most of the metagame. Psyshock allows Mew to take out special walls such as Chansey and Blissey, as well as other Pokemon that invest in Special Defense. Keep in mind, however, that because it targets Defense, physically defensive Pokemon such as Landorus-T and physically defensive Hippowdon are capable of surviving a boosted Psyshock. Psychic, on the other hand, OHKOes both the aforementioned defensive Grounds, and its higher Base Power allows it to score more OHKOs in general. Aura Sphere provides Mew with good coverage, as very few Pokemon resist both Psychic and Fighting. In particular, Aura Sphere allows Mew to beat Tyranitar, one of the most common and prominent special tanks in the metagame.</p>

    <p>The final slot is up to you and mainly dependent on what your team can handle. Dark Pulse lets Mew take down opposing Psychic-types, such as Latias, Latios, Starmie, and Reuniclus, while Fire Blast lets Mew KO Steel-types neutral to Fighting-type moves. Jirachi, Forretress, Scizor, and Skarmory are all OHKOed by +2 Fire Blast. Fire Blast also lets Mew OHKO standard Landorus-T after Stealth Rock and deal heavy damage to physically defensive Hippowdon after a boost, which effectively eliminates Psyshock's weakness. The biggest advantage to using Nasty Plot Mew over any other special sweeper is its unpredictability. Its counters are mainly based on its final coverage move. For example, Latias and Starmie can check Mew if it's using Fire Blast, while bulky Steel-types, particularly Scizor and Jirachi, can just as easily counter Mew if it's using Dark Pulse.</p>

    <p>To show the power that Mew can bring to the table, here are some calculations. Unless stated otherwise, assume Mew has a Life Orb and one Nasty Plot boost:</p>

    <ul class="damage_calculation">
    <li>Psyshock vs 252/252+ Blissey 72% - 84.9%</li>
    <li>Psyshock vs 252/252+ Chansey 53.3% - 62.8%</li>
    <li>Aura Sphere vs 252/252+ Tyranitar 101% - 118.8%</li>
    <li>Dark Pulse vs 248/8 Jellicent 89.57 - 105.7%</li>
    <li>Fire Blast vs 244/0 Landorus-T 92.41 - 108.94%</li>
    <li>Fire Blast vs 252/0 Hippowdon 88.1% - 103.8%</li>
    <li>Fire Blast vs 252/252+ Jirachi 103% - 121.3%</li>
    <li>Fire Blast vs 252/252+ Celebi 100.99 - 119.05%</li>
    <li>+0 Fire Blast vs 252/216+ Ferrothorn 109.1% - 128.4%</li>
    </ul>

    <p>Leftovers is a good alternative to Life Orb as it increases Mew's overall survivability, but it comes at the cost of some firepower. A Lum Berry is useful as it allows Mew to avoid status once, which helps in taking out Pokemon that rely on status to beat Mew. A Modest nature and a spread of 220 HP / 252 SpA / 36 Spe can be used to increase Mew's bulk and further boost its damage potential, securing a few more OHKOs at +2 (such as Garchomp and Gastrodon), but this reduces Mew's Speed and its ability to outspeed certain threats. Specifically, Mew now fails to outrun max Speed Haxorus and Hydreigon, and it also misses out on the Speed tie with opposing base 100 Speed Pokemon such as Salamence, Volcarona, Celebi, and Jirachi.</p>

    <p>Mew has a couple of extra moves at its disposal. Giga Drain can be used over a coverage move to OHKO the likes of Politoed, Rotom-W, Jellicent, and Gastrodon after a Nasty Plot boost, which is significant as each of these Pokemon can potentially avoid the OHKO from +2 Psyshock. Calm Mind bolsters Mew's defense and prevents it from being checked as easily by special attackers. It's difficult to take the offensive with Calm Mind as Mew's boosting move due to its comparatively lower power boost, however. Baton Pass is an interesting move to use on Nasty Plot Mew. It weakens Mew's ability to sweep by replacing a coverage move, but it allows Mew to make a hasty retreat should a counter switch into it. Mew can simply pass along those Nasty Plot boosts, making it a hybrid sweeper and team player. Baton Pass also helps Mew differentiate itself from other powerful Nasty Plot users such as Thundurus-T. Softboiled gives Mew reliable recovery and is effective against stall teams that rely on wearing down opposing sweepers. Softboiled works particularly well with Life Orb because it allows Mew to keep its power without compromising its bulk. Unfortunately, as with Baton Pass, it cuts down on Mew's sweeping ability by eating up a moveslot.</p>

    <p>Similarly to any other sweeper, Mew appreciates the presence of entry hazards to achieve several OHKOs. Blissey is typically OHKOed by a boosted Psyshock if Stealth Rock and a layer of Spikes are on the field. Reliable entry hazard users, such as Skarmory and Ferrothorn, are good partners to Mew for this very reason. While Nasty Plot Mew is incredibly difficult to outright counter, it has several checks that keep it from being a top threat. The Pokemon that can check Mew are completely dependent on Mew's coverage moves. Specially defensive Jirachi is a strong counter if Mew isn't carrying Fire Blast, while Latias and Latios are very reliable counters if Mew lacks Dark Pulse. Faster Pokemon, such as Latias, Latios, Starmie, and Gengar, can switch into a resisted attack or Nasty Plot and force Mew out with their powerful STAB attacks. Choice Scarf Tyranitar is a solid partner for Mew because it can counter Latias and Latios and check Starmie and Gengar. Bulky Scizor is also capable of checking Latias, Latios, and Gengar. Additionally, unlike Tyranitar, it doesn't summon sandstorm, keeping Mew from taking extra residual damage.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Baton Pass
    move 1: Baton Pass
    move 2: Rock Polish
    move 3: Swords Dance / Nasty Plot
    move 4: Taunt / Substitute
    item: Mental Herb / Lum Berry
    nature: Timid
    evs: 252 HP / 240 Def / 16 Spe

    <p>Mew is a Baton Pass user that uses its durability, Speed, and access to Taunt to gain tremendous momentum with its boosting moves while simultaneously keeping potential enemies at bay with Taunt. If you can manage to get the ball rolling with Mew's boosts, you can possibly decide the match in an instant, as a fully powered-up Baton Pass recipient is nearly unstoppable. While Mew faces some competition as a Baton Passer from other standalone Baton Pass users such as Gorebyss and Smeargle, it still has a few perks over them, specifically its access to Taunt over the former and significantly more bulk over the latter. Rock Polish is mandatory as it lets Mew outspeed most of the metagame, giving Mew the ability to Baton Pass in the face of Pokemon who are normally faster. The choice between Swords Dance and Nasty Plot is naturally team-dependent. Strong physical attackers, particularly Garchomp, Landorus-T, and Terrakion, will appreciate Swords Dance, while special attackers such as Latios and Hydreigon are bolstered by Nasty Plot. Finally, Taunt allows Mew to shut down Pokemon who might attempt to hit it or its Baton Pass recipients with status or phaze them out with Whirlwind or Roar.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>There aren't any alternative item choices. Mental Herb can protect Mew from being Taunted and is invaluable against Prankster users. Lum Berry grants Mew the ability to dodge harmful status such as paralysis and sleep, and is very useful in conjunction with Synchronize and Taunt. The EVs on this set give Mew the maximum amount of bulk while still giving it enough Speed to outspeed most of the metagame after a Rock Polish. HP is maxed out, and the leftover EVs are placed in Defense, providing Mew with extra insurance against the likes of Tyranitar and Scizor if screens are up. A specially defensive spread can be used should you want Mew to wall powerful special threats such as Choice Specs Latios without Light Screen support. Mew has a ton of other move options for the third slot, including but not limited to Bulk Up, Amnesia, Iron Defense, and Calm Mind. The defensive boosting moves are better suited for defensive teams, however.</p>

    <p>This set absolutely requires dual screen support in order to succeed. With dual screens in play, Mew is nearly impossible to OHKO, giving it plenty of room to set up. You should bring Mew in after one of your Pokemon has been KOed, preferably your dual screen user. Directly switching into an opposing Pokemon is unwise because Mew should remain in tip-top condition to maximize its chances of successfully pulling off a Baton Pass. Uxie and Latios deserve a mention because they can set up dual screens and are capable of using Memento, which lets Mew safely switch into the battlefield, and makes Mew nearly indestructible. Bronzong is also a decent dual screen supporter, as its excellent typing and bulk gives it excellent longevity, allowing it to repeatedly set up dual screens. It can also use Explosion to safely bring Mew onto the field.</p>

    <p>There are a variety of Baton Pass recipients to choose from, but the right recipient is required to win matches. It should have excellent natural bulk, decent coverage, the ability to OHKO most of the metagame, and resistances to common priority moves. Garchomp fits the bill for most of these categories; at +2/+2, it can easily OHKO or 2HKO the entire metagame and is extremely difficult to counter. Garchomp's typing makes it resistant to Stealth Rock, making it hard for defensive teams to wear down. Lucario also an excellent recipient as it's also quite difficult to counter, and it even has its own priority move. Keldeo is the perfect recipient on the special side as it's almost impossible to counter at +2/+2, resists common forms of priority, and also resists Stealth Rock.</p>

    <p>While this variant of Mew is almost impossible to counter due to the nature of Baton Pass, there are a few Pokemon who give it trouble. Priority Taunt users such as Tornadus and Sableye can put a complete stop to Mew's Baton Passing attempts. Trick users, such as Choice Latios and Rotom-W, can cripple Mew or its Baton Pass recipients. Because this Mew lacks any offensive moves, it is a sitting duck against faster Pokemon, so powerful sweepers such as Terrakion can set up on Mew if it hasn't used Rock Polish. Dragon Tail users are a pain because the move itself is unaffected by Taunt, completely ruining all Baton Pass attempts. Substitute can bypass Dragon Tail, but it comes at the cost of a boosting move or Taunt. There are some attacks that are simply too strong for Mew to handle, even with dual screens. Choice Band Tyranitar, for example, can still 2HKO Mew even with Reflect up. Mew isn't limited to passing offensive boosts; it can also pass a variety of defensive boosts as well, namely Iron Defense and Amnesia. Finally, it's important to keep in mind that Mew is completely dependent on dual screens for success. While losing them doesn't leave Mew completely helpless, it is unable to stand up against any sort of offense without them.</p>

    [Other Options]

    <p>Mew is the king of other options. Seriously, it's not an exaggeration to suggest that Mew can pull off just about any moveset. It has one of the largest movepools in the entire game, second only to Smeargle; however, unlike Smeargle, it has the stats to back them up. Even so, it can be difficult to find sets outside of the ones that are listed that Mew can run without being outclassed or just flat-out mediocre at. A stand-alone Swords Dance set is possible with a moveset consisting of Flame Charge, Drain Punch, and Baton Pass. This unconventional moveset gives Mew the ability to set up Swords Dances and bypass Tyranitar, Scizor, Heatran, and other Steel-types, as well as pass along the boosts to another physical attacker. The support set can utilize either Roar or Dragon Tail for phazing or Hypnosis to temporarily incapacitate a foe. Mew can also use a Transform set, which can be handy when dealing with an opposing boosting sweeper. To sum it up, Mew gets nearly everything, so go nuts, pick four moves, and see what works for you. If you can imagine it, Mew can probably make it happen.</p>

    [Checks and Counters]

    <p>Countering Mew can be a difficult task due to its staggering versatility. Scouting out its moveset instead of blindly switching in is recommended. Heatran hard-counters support sets, as it resists Psychic-type attacks and is immune to Will-O-Wisp. In fact, if Heatran switches into a Will-O-Wisp, it can retaliate against Mew and its teammates with its boosted Fire-type moves. Strong special attackers are generally suited to taking on Mew. Both Latias and Latios can switch in with little to no trouble and fire off their powerful STAB attacks; however, Mew can actually stall out Choice variants with Softboiled and Special Defense investment. Calm Mind Latios and Latias, on the other hand, can use Mew as setup fodder. Thundurus-T is capable of overpowering Mew with its powerful Electric-type moves or even potentially set up with Nasty Plot or Agility, as Mew cannot OHKO it with Ice Beam. Hydreigon can switch into Mew without worry and fire off its powerful Dark- or Dragon-type STAB moves. Rain sweepers such as Keldeo and Tornadus can similarly overwhelm Mew with their rain-boosted attacks.</p>

    <p>Lead sets can be dealt with by Tyranitar, who can switch into Mew and OHKO it through its Focus Sash because of Sand Stream. Scizor, Heatran, and assorted Steel-types can also switch in and handle it. That said, knocking Mew out and preventing Mew from setting up Stealth Rock are two very different things. Because of Mew's access to Magic Coat and Focus Sash, it is pretty much guaranteed to set up Stealth Rock. Magic Bounce users, such as Espeon and Xatu, are the best stops to Mew, but both of them need to carry a strong attack to actually damage it. Otherwise, Magic Bounce users can be used to break Mew's Focus Sash and switch into a Pokemon that can OHKO it afterwards. The opponent can always predict this, however.</p>

    <p>Nasty Plot Mew's counters are separated into two groups: those who can counter it if it lacks Fire Blast, and those who can counter it if it lacks Dark Pulse. Specially defensive Jirachi, for example, is a hard counter to the former Mew, as it can switch in, cripple Mew with Body Slam, and stall out Mew with a combination of Iron Head and Wish. Bulky Swords Dance Scizor can switch into Mew and hit it with a STAB Bug Bite, which easily brings Mew into Bullet Punch's KO range. On the other hand, Mew that lack Dark Pulse can be beaten by Latias, Latios, and Starmie.</p>

    <p>For the Baton Pass set, there are several precautions you can take to guarantee that Mew doesn't pull off a Baton Pass. Team Preview allows you to scan your opponent's team, determine who Mew's dual screens user is, and devise a way to stop it. A fast Taunt user, such as Azelf or Sableye, can put a stop to most dual screens users. Unfortunately, Azelf itself is a common dual screens user, and relying on a Speed tie to stop it isn't exactly recommended. It's also possible to directly Taunt Mew, but Mew that carry Mental Herb can bypass this. Strong Choice Scarf users will only allow Azelf to set up one screen, giving you an easier time when dealing with Mew. Powerful Fire-types can similarly prevent Metagross from setting up more than one screen. Keep in mind that if you fail to stop screens, it's almost impossible to stop Mew from Baton Passing due to its incredible bulk. Fortunately, unlike Gorebyss and Smeargle, Mew typically takes three turns to set up its Baton Pass recipient, so keep that in mind and find a way to stop it before it Baton Passes.</p>

    Support Skeleton (open)

    name: Support
    move 1: Taunt
    move 2: Will-O-Wisp
    move 3: Softboiled
    move 4: Ice Beam / Psychic
    item: Leftovers
    nature: Bold
    evs: 252 HP / 148 Def / 108 Spe

    [SET COMMENTS]
    • Update the Pokemon mentioned in the analysis to reflect the current metagame (out with the old, in with the new)
    • Change a bunch of things and fix up a few inaccuracies, like the opening sentence (Do people even switch Tyranitar and Scizor into Mew anymore?!?)
    • I need a definitive EV spread. There seems to be a split on specially defensive spreads and physically defensive spreads
    • Ice Beam needs to be slashed in the 4th slot (and maybe move Seismic Toss to AC?)
    • Can't check certain physical attackers on switch in (Strong dragons like CB Chomp / Lum nite are problematic)
    • More emphasis on S-S-S-TALL BREAKING!
    • Destroys Sand Stall w/ Heatran out of the way, but struggles vs Rain stall because Scald ruins everyone's day
    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]
    • A Specially Defensive spread is completely viable
    • Mention how Mew is somewhat vulnerable to super strong special attackers (Thundurus-T, Keldeo, etc)
    • Seismic Toss & Light Screen in AC


    Lead Skeleton (open)

    name: Lead
    move 1: Stealth Rock
    move 2: Magic Coat / Taunt
    move 3: Explosion
    move 4: Tailwind
    item: Normal Gem
    nature: Jolly
    evs: 108 HP / 252 Atk / 148 Spe

    [SET COMMENTS]
    • Updated the moveset. Magic Coat and Tailwind are now a staples.
    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]
    • Zen Headbutt moved to AC


    Nasty Plot Skeleton (open)

    name: Nasty Plot
    move 1: Nasty Plot
    move 2: Psyshock / Psychic
    move 3: Aura Sphere
    move 4: Fire Blast / Dark Pulse
    item: Leftovers / Lum Berry
    nature: Timid
    evs: 4 HP / 252 SpA / 252 Spe

    [SET COMMENTS]
    • General fixes here and there
    • Dark Pulse > Shadow Ball (lol)
    • Leftovers > Life Orb maybe?
    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]
    • Modest with 40 hp / 252 spa / 216 spe evs is an option (specifically outspeeds kyurem-b and below)
    • Giga Drain smashes Rotom-W, Gastrodon, bulky Politoed and Jellicent (should you not use Dark Pulse) and the recovery is pretty sweet.
    • Calm Mind over Nasty Plot is you want a weaker but more durable sweeper.


    Baton Pass Skeleton (open)

    name: Baton Pass
    move 1: Baton Pass
    move 2: Rock Polish
    move 3: Swords Dance / Nasty Plot
    move 4: Taunt / Substitute
    item: Lum Berry
    nature: Timid
    evs: 252 HP / 240 Def / 16 Spe

    [SET COMMENTS]
    • Metagame update (Baton Pass is harder now, imo)
    • New spread lets Mew outspeed Scarf Lati@s at +2
    • More emphasis about using Mew on conventional Baton Pass teams
    • Espeon
    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]
    • Defensive Baton Pass set (Barrier / Amnesia)
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2013
  2. Pocket

    Pocket Apo, the astronaut's best friend >:3
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    Is the stallbreaker set still the top Mew set? I feel like it can be dropped down a notch; I've seen a couple of NP sets taking names in WCOP.

    The SR Lead set is good - it frees up your Terrakion / Landorus-T to use something else over the SR slot. Xatu, Espeon, Sableye, and Starmie are bitches though, so suggestion of teammates that can handle these threats would be gravy
  3. tehy

    tehy

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    For a set like the first set, I think a SpD spread makes more sense. Honestly, what it reminds me a lot of is Sableye, and in most situations, threats will be switching into YOU, and you want to stay in for as long as you can. Therefore, most physical threats will be getting burned, except maybe Lumnite (And since i often see Ice Beam, that's a crap switch-in anyhow). While you don't outspeed all physical threats, you outspeed most that hit you SE, and you should have enough bulk to take one, burn, and Softboiled.

    I suppose a good thing to do would be to mention in AC that a physically defensive thread is better for support (Unless it isn't?), to check physical sweepers, while the specially defensive thread is more for stallbreaking/ 'sweeping' (which can happen if you remove anything able to break you.)
  4. shrang

    shrang Defend the Headquarters of Revolution
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    A couple of things:
    - Mention Light Screen in the support set. It's a pity that Mew doesn't get Pressure, otherwise it could be a pretty cool quick staller like Mewtwo, but still, Light Screen does let you minimise damage from both sides, making Mew very hard to crack.
    - Since you have a strong mention of Espeon in the Baton Pass set, Substitute might be a better move over Taunt to prevent phazing, since Espeon can't block Dragon Tail while Substitute can. Mew's Sub is generally strong enough to survive most Dragon Tails anyway.
  5. Jukain

    Jukain fuck macle
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    Why is the Stealth Rock set last? It's honestly one of the best sets in my experience. It's a stellar lead with lots of little uses, faring well against almost every lead in the metagame. I'd put the set order Support -> Stealth Rock -> NP -> BP. The slashes should also look like this, imo:

    move 1: Stealth Rock
    move 2: Explosion
    move 3: Zen Headbutt
    move 4: Taunt / Tailwind / Magic Coat

    Stealth Rock and Explosion are pretty obviously non-negotiable. Zen Headbutt is also compulsory, being key for hitting Pokemon like Terrakion, Tentacruel, and Keldeo, as well as a lot of things neutrally. Not having an attack sucks a ton every time I've done it. I'd say Taunt is the only negotiable move on the set, simply because there are other great moves fighting for the slot. No other move does exactly the same job, but others have their niches and I don't think Zen Headbutt is the one to replace. Tailwind is extremely good for its temporary Speed boost. Magic Coat does a similar job to Taunt except requires better reading of the opponent etc. on the user's side.
  6. PK Gaming

    PK Gaming Pursuing My True Self
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    @Jukain: I've moved the SR set (now called Lead) to #2. It's good at setting the pace of the match in your favor from the get go, and it's generally more consistent than the Nasty Plot set (on top of being more common). The choice of making Magic Coat a primary move choice might seem weird, but there's a very good reason for that. With Magic Coat, you can prevent faster Pokemon (Terrakion, Azelf, Mew, etc) from setting up hazards and freely set up a Tailwind in the process. You lose some utility against slower Pokemon, but lead Mew should be mainly concerned with setting up hazards, Tailwind, and Exploding as quickly as possible (and you can still block slower Pokemon from setting up hazards).

    @tehy: I've decided to stick with the Physically Defensive spread on the support set. While a Specially Defensive spread gives you a leg up on special attackers, the physical defense is invaluable for letting you tank things like U-turns, Pursuit, boosted Outrages from the physical Dragons and boosted Stone Edge's and Bullet Seed from Terrakion and Breloom respectively. I feel like those attributes, along with the added synergy from Special walls makes Phys. Def Mew a bit better overall. That said, I intend on giving the SpD spread a greater emphasis AC than before.

    @shrang: I slashed Substitute after Taunt on the BP set, because the set is primarily focused on "quick pass" Mew and because even Espeon BP teams will appreciate Taunt, as it allows Mew to stay in against Whirlwind / Roar users. Substitute's ability to block Dragon Tail isn't really impressive since Dragon Tail users are extremely rare.
  7. Jukain

    Jukain fuck macle
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    that's one of my favorite versions -- it looks great!

    definitely ac flamethrower just to roast those stupid scizors that'll u-turn and thus prevent you from getting up tailwind
  8. BKC

    BKC
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    talked with pk about what to do with this analysis and it looks fine.

    qc approved 1/3
  9. Trinitrotoluene

    Trinitrotoluene ♪~ forced amnesia, an epiphany won’t see ya ~♪
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    Hey, the Lead Mew set is missing 2 HP EVs. The actual EV spread should be 108 HP / 252 Atk / 148 Spe. Just a heads up.
  10. dice

    dice RAP GAME GiTTARACKUR
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    252 hp / 240 def / 16 spe timid for main spread
    same for baton pass

    mention running 36 hp / 252 spa / 220 spe modest for NP; outspeeds kyurem-b and below

    qc approved 2/2
  11. PK Gaming

    PK Gaming Pursuing My True Self
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    Ready for the 3rd QC check.
  12. ginganinja

    ginganinja Dating Haunter
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    could we get an AC mention of NightShade on the stallbreaker set?

    Its not the most amazing move, but it was a source of immense frustration for me whenever I tried to beat Mew with a Sub CM Latias, or other such Substitute mon.

    Everything else looks really solid.

    Before I approve tho, I just wanted to get QCs opinion on something, Would have discussed it earlier, but it honestly slipped my mind. Basically what is everyones thoughts on SD? I tended to be disparaging of it, but its destroyed me on a few occasions, and been average on some other occasions. I am not heavily endorsing it (since its been really awesome, and sometimes really average when I tested it), just wanting to get QCs opinion on it before I approve the entire analysis and we close off on this thing.
  13. AccidentalGreed

    AccidentalGreed HOMERUN, CABRONES
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    Ehhhh I think Swords Dance is in the gray area between "okay" and "gimmicky", but I don't think we have to be in such a big hurry to get it up at this time. I haven't even personally tested it out myself, so it's foggy as of now. We can approve the analysis now, then somebody else can make a separate thread for Swords Dance Mew if they want, and show us it isn't as average as we think it is. That cool?

    @ginganinja
    Pocket likes this.
  14. alexwolf

    alexwolf King of Conquerors
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    Yeah agreeing with AG, let's finish with this for now and we will see what we will do with SD Mew. I don't have a lot of experience with or against it, so i couldn't give an educated opinion about it anyway.
  15. AccidentalGreed

    AccidentalGreed HOMERUN, CABRONES
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    Because everybody asked very very nicely

    QC APPROVED 3/3

    Let's get to GP'ing, clickies.
  16. tehy

    tehy

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    amcheck

    needs moar sableye mentions

    amcheck (open)

    [Overview]

    <p>With its balanced stats, solid level-up movepool, and access to literally every tutor and TM in the game, it's no surprise that Mew is an easy contender for the title of "most versatile Pokemon." Access to some of the most sought -after support moves in the game, including Will-O-Wisp and Taunt, makes Mew one of the most impressive supportive Pokemon in the game. However, it's not just the threat of top-notch support that makes Mew so difficult to deal with. Mew's versatility gives it so many different optionsets, from support, to Baton Pass user, to sweeper, to even lead, that Mew has plenty of viable sets, each of which requires the correct answer to prevent it from just taking over the game. Mew is a Pokemon that tests your opponent's reactions first and foremost, and if they react poorly, there will be hell to pay.</p>

    <p>However, where it shines in versatility it lacks in focus. Its mediocre Speed stat puts it at the mercy of several notable Pokemon, including Keldeo and Latias, and its rather average offensive stats make it difficult to sweep. Still, the threat of these options means that even just seeing Mew puts the opponent on the back foot, and with the right followup, it's easy to ride that advantage to victory.</p>


    [SET]
    name: Support
    move 1: Taunt
    move 2: Will-O-Wisp
    move 3: Softboiled
    move 4: Ice Beam / Psychic
    item: Leftovers
    nature: Timid
    evs: 252 HP / 240 Def / 16 Spe

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>Support Mew functions as a top notch supporting Pokemon, with access to effective tools to help it in almost any given scenario. Taunt puts slower defensive Pokemon in an unfavorable position by forcing them to attack, and can occasionally prevent faster Pokemomn from setting up. Will-oO-Wisp can burn foes, which constantly saps them of their health and utterly cripples physical attackers. Both moves have wonderful synergy with each other, as the combination of being tTaunted and afflicted with a Burn status can typically renders a slower Pokemon completely useless. Ice Beam works as a coverage attack that targets a large volume of OU for super effective damage. It's particularly effective against the likes of Garchomp, Dragonite, Landorus-T and Thundurus-T, each of whom are among the best set up sweepers in the tier. On the other hand, Psychic is more effective against Substitute users and is stronger against the likes of Terrakion, Toxicroak and Conkeldurr. That said, Ice Beam is usually the better choice, since it's useful for dealing with a wider range of threats.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>A specially defensive spread may be used to improve Mew's effectiveness against special attackers. This in turn makes it more useful against a wider variety of Pokemon, as Mew can already somewhat deal with incoming physical attackers with Will-oO-Wisp, and can now keep up with certain Special Attackers. Keep in mind that Will-oO-Wisp is not a substitute for being physical defensive, and thus this is spread ineffective against fastpowerful, fand stronger physical attacking Pokemon who have a way of 2HKOing/OHKOing it. A Bold nature can noticeably increase Mew's physical defense, but you're better off sticking with Timid, as it ensures that Mew is capable of outrunning Jolly Breloom, Adamant Dragonite, and Adamant Gyarados. Night Shade grants Mew the ability to deal consistent damage, and is very useful against Substitute users, such as Latias, who would ordinarily that set up on Mew. (such as Latias for example)</p>

    <p>Despite having terrific defensive prowess on the physical spectrum, Mew is somewhat vulnerable on the special side; special attackers (especially ones that are boosted by rain) are by far the biggest threats to Mew. Pokemon that can deal with Heatran are almost mandatory teammates, as Heatran can effortlessly switch into Mew and turn into a liability for as long as it is active. Tyranitar makes for a good partner, as it can usually take on most special attackers, as well as Heatran, and comes with the added bonus of being able to defeat Latios and Latias (both of whom are strong checks to Mew in their own right.) Starmie is a decent partner, as it can also check Heatran, and also has utility against the likes of Keldeo, who can decimate Mew with Hydro Pump.</p>

    <p>Mew stands tall as one of the best stallbreakers in the tier, as it is capable of dismantling the most common stall cores on it's own. It struggles mightily against rain stall, as the prevalence of Scald makes it difficult to stay on the field. As such, you strongly consider carrying anti-rain stall technologymeasures. (Specially Defensive Hippowdon, Celebi, and Starmie, for example). You'll want to maximize Mew's effectiveness by bringing it on the field as quickly and efficiently as possible. Keeping it near max HP at all times is imperative to succeeding with Mew, as it is usually only capable of checking powerful threats when it's healthy</p>


    [SET]
    name: Lead
    move 1: Stealth Rock
    move 2: Taunt / Magic Coat
    move 3: Explosion
    move 4: Tailwind
    item: Normal Gem
    nature: Jolly
    evs: 108 HP / 252 Atk / 148 Spe

    <p>Mew's near -limitless movepool and balanced stats make it an effective lead, especially on hyper offensive teams that cannot afford to make room for a Ghost-type Pokemon. With access to Taunt and Magic Coat, Mew beats nearly every other lead in the game. It even possesses an, and has the advantage of bulk over lead Azelf, whose frailty mandates a Focus Sash in order to set Stealth Re of a Fock and use Explosion Sash. Mew's solid bulk allows it to carry a Normal Gem, giving a muwhich stronger Explosion and ensuring momentum. A Normal Gem-boosted Explosion secures more significant KOs, such as nearly guaranteeing an OHKO on defensive Xatu.</p>

    <p> Taunt shuts down slower opponents, preventing them from setting up their own entry hazards or boosting stats. Magic Coat, on the other hand bounces back Stealth Rock and Taunt from faster leads such as Terrakion, Aerodactyl, Azelf, Infernape and opposing Mew. Taunt gets priority over Magic Coat because it doesn't necessarily stop hazards from being set up, it merely blocks them for a turn. This means that an opponent can spam Stealth Rock until you run out of PP for Magic Coat. In addition, Taunt is invaluable for completely shutting down opposing Suicide Leads, such as Forretress and Skarmory. Tailwind is handy for building momentum, particularly if Mew is used as a suicide lead. It can set up Stealth Rock quickly, use Tailwind to increase its speed, and follow up with an Explosion to clear the way for your next switch-in to use the remaining two -turn Speed boost.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>The EVs are standard fare, allowing maximum power for Explosion. Zen Headbutt is a decent alternative to Tailwind; It's the strongest physical STAB move in Mew's repertoire and serves as a deterrent to Gengar or Terrakion attempting to switch in and absorb an Explosion.</p>

    <p>Care must be taken with this particular set. If your opponent has Espeon, Xatu, or a probable lead Starmie, it is best to save Mew and lead with something else. Explosion is a high risk/high reward move, especially if your opponent has a Ghost-type on their team. Though momentum might be retained through a free switch-in, Explosion's huge base power should not be forgotten. Checks to this set include Life Orb Gengar, Choice Specs Latios, Choice Band Garchomp and Terrakion, all of which outspeed Mew, and can threaten it with high-powered STAB attacks. Therefore, support of your own is necessary. Scizor makes quick work of opposing Gengar, and it can also check Starmie, which is notoriously hard to deal with, handily. Though it shares a Bug-type weakness, Tyranitar can be a handy partner for Mew and the rest of the team. In addition to setting up permanent sand with its ability, Tyranitar is a good counter to Espeon and Xatu, while being a reasonable check to Starmie and Latios so long as it avoids a Water-type move. All four can be trapped thanks to Pursuit or outright KOed via Crunch. Gengar also falls prey to Tyranitar, but Tyranitar must be wary of Focus Blast. Dragonite and just about any other sweeper appreciate Mew's ability to set up Stealth Rock; additionally, Dragonite can switch into opposing Landorus-T's Ground-type attacks should you wish to save Mew's Explosion. Rotom-W is another Pokemon who appreciates a free switch-in on Earthquake and makes quick work of Landorus-T with STAB Hydro Pump.</p>


    [SET]
    name: Nasty Plot
    move 1: Nasty Plot
    move 2: Psyshock / Psychic
    move 3: Aura Sphere
    move 4: Fire Blast / Dark Pulse
    item: Leftovers / Lum Berry
    nature: Timid
    evs: 4 HP / 252 SpA / 252 Spe

    <p>Mew is capable of taking the offensive with Nasty Plot, making it difficult for opponents to outright counter due to its excellent coverage and high power. Nasty Plot boosts Mew's Special Attack to 598 which gives Mew enough power to OHKO and 2HKO most of the metagame. Psyshock also allows Mew to take out special walls such as Chansey, Blissey and other Pokemon that invest in special defense. Keep in mind, however, that because it targets Defense, physically defensive Pokemon such as Landorus-T and physically defensive Hippowdon are capable of surviving a boosted Psyshock. Psychic, on the other hand, OHKOes both the aforementioned Pokemon and its higher Base Power allows it to score more OHKOs in general. Aura Sphere provides Mew with good coverage, as very few Pokemon resist bothe Psychic &and Fighting combination. In particular, Aura Sphere allows Mew to beat Tyranitar, one of the most common and prominent special tanks in the metagame.</p>

    <p>The final slot is up to you and mainly dependent on what your team can handle. Dark Pulse lets Mew take down opposing Psychic-types, such as Latias, Latios, Starmie, and Reuniclus, while Fire Blast lets Mew KO Steel-types neutral to Fighting-type moves. Jirachi, Forretresss, Scizor and Skarmory are all OHKOed by Fire Blast at +2. Fire Blast also lets you OHKO standard Landorus-T after Stealth Rock and deal heavy damage to physically defensive Hippowdon after a boost, which effectively eliminates Psyshock's weakness. The biggest advantage to using Nasty Plot Mew over any other special sweeper is its unpredictability. Its counters are mainly based on the final coverage move. For example, Latias and Starmie can check Mew if it's using Fire Blast, while bulky Steel-types, particularly Scizor and Jirachi, can just as easily counter Mew if it's using Dark Pulse. That detail is Mew's biggest trump card, so keep your opponent's awareness in mind when you're attempting to sweep with Mew.</p>

    <p>To show the power that Mew can bring to the table, here are some calculations, assuming Mew has one Nasty Plot boost:</p>

    <ul class="damage_calculation">
    <li>+2 LO Psyshock vs 252 HP / 252 Def Bold Blissey: 72% - 84.9%</li>
    <li>+2 LO Psyshock vs 252 HP / 252 Def Bold Chansey: 53.3% - 62.8%</li>
    <li>+2 LO Aura Sphere vs 252 HP / 252 SpD Sassy Tyranitar: 101% - 118.8%</li>
    <li>+0 LO Fire Blast vs 252 HP / 216 SpD Sassy Ferrothorn: 109.1% - 128.4%</li>
    <li>+2 LO Dark Pulse vs 248 HP / 216 Def Bold Jellicent: 89.8% - 106.2%</li>
    <li>+2 LO Fire Blast vs 244 HP / 0 SpD Landorus-T: 92.41 - 108.94%</li>
    <li>+2 LO Fire Blast vs 252 HP / 0 Impish Hippowdon: 88.1% - 103.8%</li>
    <li>+2 LO Fire Blast vs 252 HP / 252 SpD Careful Jirachi: 103% - 121.3%</li>
    <li>+2 LO Fire Blast vs 252 HP / 252 SpD Calm Celebi: 100.99 - 119.05%</li>
    </ul>

    <p>Leftovers is a good alternative to Life Orb, increasing Mew's overall survivability, but at the cost of some firepower. A Lum Berry is useful as it allows you to avoid status once, which helps in taking out Pokemon that rely on status to beat Mew. The EVs are pretty standard fare, max Speed EVs are used to outrun most of the Pokemon in the tier that lie just outside of the 101+ Speed tier and Speed tie against opposing 100 base Speed Pokemon. A Modest nature with 220 HP / 252 SpA / 36 Spe may be used to increase Mew's bulk and further boost its damage potential, securing a few more OHKOs at +2, however, this noticeably reduces Mew's Speed and its ability to outspeed certain threats. Specifically, Mew loses the ability to outspeed Haxorus and Hydreigon, and Speed tie with opposing base 100 Speed Pokemon such as Salamence, Volcarona, Celebi, and Jirachi.</p>

    <p>Mew has a couple of extra moves at its disposal; Giga Drain can be used over a coverage move to OHKO to the likes of Politoed, Rotom-W, Jellicent and Gastrodon after a Nasty Plot boost (It's important to note that each of these Pokemon can potentially avoid the OHKO from +2 Psyshock). Calm Mind bolsters Mew's defensive options, and prevent it from being as checked as easily from special attackers. It's difficult to take the offensive with Calm Mind as Mew's boosting move due to it's comparatively lower power boost, however. Baton Pass is an interesting move to use on Nasty Plot Mew. It weakens Mew's ability to sweep by replacing a coverage move, but it allows Mew to make a hasty retreat should a counter switch into it. Mew can simply pass along those Nasty Plot boosts, making it a hybrid sweeper and team player. Baton Pass also helps Mew differentiate itself from other powerful Nasty Plot users such as Thundurus-T. Softboiled gives Mew reliable recovery and is effective against Stall teams that rely on wearing down opposing sweepers. Softboiled works particularly well with Life Orb, because it allows Mew to keep its power without compromising its bulk. Unfortunately, as with Baton Pass, it cuts down on Mew's sweeping ability by eating up a coverage move.</p>

    <p>Similarly to any other sweeper, Mew appreciates the presence of entry hazards to achieve several OHKOs. Blissey is typically OHKOed by a boosted Psyshock if Stealth Rock and a layer of Spikes are on the field. Reliable entry hazard users, such as Skarmory and Ferrothorn, are good partners to Mew for this very reason. While Nasty Plot Mew is incredibly difficult to outright counter, it has several checks that keep it from being a top threat. The Pokemon that can check Mew are completely dependent on Mew's coverage moves. Specially defensive Jirachi is a strong counter if Mew isn't carrying Fire Blast, while Latias and Latios are very reliable counters if Mew isn't carrying Dark Pulse. Faster Pokemon, such as Latias(again), Starmie, Latios and Gengar, can switch into a resisted attack or Nasty Plot and force Mew out with their powerful STAB attacks. Scarf Tyranitar is a solid partner for Mew because it can counter Latias and Latios and check Starmie and Gengar. Bulky Scizor is also capable of checking Latias, Latios and Gengar. Unlike Tyranitar, it doesn't summon sandstorm, keeping Mew from incurrtaking sandstorm damage.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Baton Pass
    move 1: Baton Pass
    move 2: Rock Polish
    move 3: Swords Dance / Nasty Plot
    move 4: Taunt / Substitute
    item: Lum Berry
    nature: Timid
    evs: 252 HP / 240 Def / 16 Spe

    <p>Mew is a Baton Pass users that uses it's durability, Speed and it's abilityccess to use Taunt to gain tremendous momentum with it's boosting moves while simultaneously keeping potential enemies at bay with Taunt. If you can manage to get the ball rolling with Mew's boosts, you can possibly decide the match in an instant, because a fully powered-up Baton Pass recipient is nearly unstoppable. While Mew faces some competition as a Baton Passer from other standalone Baton Pass users such as Gorebyss, and Smeargle, it still has a few perks over them, namely access to Taunt over the former two and significantly more bulk over the latter. Rock Polish is mandatory, as it lets Mew outspeed most of the metagame, giving Mew the ability to Baton Pass in the face of Pokemon who are normally faster. The choice between Swords Dance and Nasty Plot is naturally team-dependent. Strong physical attackers, particularly Garchomp, Landorus-T and Terrakion, will naturally appreciate Swords Dance, while special attackers such as Latios and Hydreigon are bolstered by Nasty Plot. Finally, Taunt allows Mew to shut down Pokemon who may attempt to plague it or its Baton Pass recipients with status or phase them out with Whirlwind/Roar.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>There aren't any alternative item choices, as Lum Berry grants Mew the ability to dodge harmful status such as paralysis and sleep, and is very useful in conjunction with Synchronize and Taunt. The EVs on this set attempt to give Mew the maximum amount of bulk, while still giving it enough Speed to outspeed most of the metagame after a Rock Polish. HP EVs areis maxed out, while the leftover EVs are placed in Defense, providing Mew with extra insurance against the likes of Tyranitar and Scizor if screens are up. A Special Defense oriented spread may be used should you want Mew to survive powerful special threats such as Choice Specs Latios without Light Screen support. Mew has a ton of other move options for the 3rd slot, including but not limited to Bulk Up, Amnesia, Iron Defense, and Calm Mind. The defensive boosting moves are better suited to being used on defensive teams, however.</p>

    <p>This set absolutely requires dual screen support in order to succeed. With dual screens in play, Mew is nearly impossible to OHKO, giving it plenty of room to set up. You should bring Mew in after one of your Pokemon haves been KOed, preferably your dual screen user. Directly switching into an opposing Pokemon is unwise because Mew should remain in tip-top condition to maximize its chances of successfully pulling off a Baton Pass. Uxie and Latios deserve a mention because they can set up dual screens and are capable of using Memento, which lets Mew safely switch into the battlefield and it makes Mew nearly indestructible. Bronzong is also a decent dual screen supporter, as its excellent typing and bulk gives it excellent staying power, allowing it to repeatedly set up dual screens. It can also use Explosion to safely bring Mew into the fray.</p>

    <p>Mew has a variety of Baton Pass recipients to choose from, however, the right recipient is required to win matches. It should have excellent natural bulk, decent coverage, the ability to OHKO most of the metagame, and resistances to common priority moves. Garchomp fits the bill for most of these categories; At +2/+2, it can easily OHKO or 2HKO the entire metagame, and is extremely difficult to counter. Garchomp's typing makes it resistant to Stealth Rock, making hard for defensive teams to wear it down. Lucario's also an excellent recipient, since it's also quite difficult to counter and it even has its own priority move. Keldeo is the perfect recipient on the special side, as it's almost impossible to counter at +2/+2, resists common forms of priority, and is resistant to Stealth Rock.</p>

    <p>While this variant of Mew is almost impossible to counter due to the nature of Baton Pass, there are a few Pokemon who give it trouble. Priority Taunt users such as Tornadus and Sableye can put a complete stop to Mew's Baton Passing attempts. Trick users, such as Choice Latios and Rotom-W, can cripple Mew or its Baton Pass recipients. Because this Mew lacks any offensive moves, it is a sitting duck against faster Pokemon, so powerful sweepers such as Terrakion can set up on Mew if it hasn't used Rock Polish. Dragon Tail users are a pain, because the move itself is unaffected by Taunt, completely ruining all Baton Pass attempts. Substitute can bypass Dragon Tail, howeverbut it comes at the cost of a boosting move or Taunt. There are some attacks that are simply too strong for Mew to handle, even with dual screens. Choice Band Tyranitar for example, can still 2HKO Mew even with Reflect up. Mew isn't limited to passing offensive boosts; it can also pass a variety of defensive boosts as well, namely Iron Defense and Amnesia. Finally, it's important to keep in mind that Mew is completely dependent on Dual Screens for success. While losing them doesn't leave Mew completely helpless, it is unable to stand up against any sort of offense without them.</p>

    [Other Options]

    Mew is the king of other options. Seriously, it's not an exaggeration to suggest that Mew can pull off just about any moveset. It has one of the largest movepools in the entire game, second only to Smeargle; however, unlike Smeargle, it has the stats to back them up. Even so, it can be difficult to find sets outside of the ones that are listed that Mew can run without being outclassed or just flat out mediocre. A stand-alone Swords Dance set is possible, with a moveset consisting of Flame Charge, Drain Punch and Baton Pass. This unconventional moveset gives Mew the ability to set up Swords Dances and bypass Tyranitar, Scizor, Heatran and other Steel-types, as well as pass along the boosts to another physical attacker. The support set can utilize either Roar or Dragon Tail for phazing or Hypnosis to temporarily incapacitate a foe. Mew can also use a Transform set, which can be handy when dealing with an opposing boosting sweeper. To sum it up, Mew gets nearly everything, so go nuts, pick four moves, and see what works for you. If you can imagine it, Mew can probably make it happen.

    [Checks and Counters]

    <p>Countering Mew can be a difficult task due to its staggering versatility. Scouting out its moveset instead of blindly switching in is recommended. Support sets are hard countered by Heatran, who resists Psychic and is immune to Will-O-Wisp. In fact, if Heatran switches into a Will-O-Wisp ,it can easily retaliate against Mew and its teammates with its boosted Fire-type moves. Strong special attackers are generally suited to taking on Mew; Both Latias and Latios can switch in with little to no trouble and fire off their powerful STAB attacks, however, Mew can actually stall out Choice variants with Softboiled and Special Defense investment. Calm Mind Latios and Latias, on the other hand, can use Mew as setup fodder. Thundurus-T is capable of overpowering Mew with it's powerful Electric-type moves, or even potentially set up with Nasty Plot or Agility, as Mew cannot OHKO it with Ice Beam. Hydreigon can switch into Mew without worry and fire off its powerful Dark or Dragon STAB moves. Rain abusers such as Keldeo and Tornadus can similarly overwhelm Mew with their rain boosted attacks.</p>

    <p>Lead sets can be dealt with Tyranitar, who can switch into Mew and OHKO it through it's Focus Sash because of Sands Stream. Scizor, Heatran and assorted Steel-types can also switch in and handle it. That said, knocking Mew out and preventing Mew from setting up Stealth Rock are two very different things. Because of Mew's access to Magic Coat and Focus Sash, Mew is pretty much guaranteed. Magic Bounce users, such as Espeon and Xatu are the ultimate stops to Mew, though both of them need to carry a strong attack to actually damage it. Otherwise, Magic Bounce users can be used to break Mew's Focus Sash, and switch into a Pokemon that can OHKO it afterwards. The Mew user can always predict this, however.</p>

    <p>Nasty Plot Mew's counters are separated into two groups: those who can counter Mew if it lacks Fire Blast, and those who can counter Mew if it lacks Dark Pulse. Specially defensive Jirachi for example, is a hard counter to Mew if it doesn’t have Fire Blast. It can switch in and cripple Mew with Body Slam, and stall out Mew with a combination of Iron Head and Wish. Bulky Swords Dance Scizor can switch into Mew and hit it with a strong Bug Bite, which easily brings Mew into Bullet Punch's KO range. On the other hand, Mew that lack Dark Pulse Ball can be beaten by Latias, Latios and Starmie.</p>

    <p>For the Baton Pass set, there are several precautions you can take to guarantee that Mew doesn't pull off a Baton Pass. Team Preview allows you to scan your opponent's team, determine who Mew's dual screen user is, and devise a way to stop it. A fast Taunt user, such as Azelf or Sableye, can put a stop to most dual screen users. Unfortunately, Azelf itself is a common dual screens user, and relying on a Speed tie to stop it isn't exactly recommended. Strong Choice Scarf users, will only allow Azelf to set up one screen, giving you an easier time when dealing with Mew. Keep in mind that if you fail to stop screens, it's almost impossible to stop Mew from Baton Passing due to its incredible bulk. Fortunately, unlike Gorebyss and Smeargle, Mew typically takes three turns to set up its Baton Pass recipient, so keep that in mind and find a way to stop it before it Baton Passes.</p>
  17. AccidentalGreed

    AccidentalGreed HOMERUN, CABRONES
    is a Forum Moderatoris a Contributor to Smogon
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    Oh and @PK Gaming while you're doing that check, can you just give a quick mention of Mental Herb on the Baton Pass set, maybe just perhaps in the AC? IMO if you're not against a Jirachi dedicated to paraflinching, the Lum Berry isn't exactly the best item there, since Mew doesn't really care about status and can just pass (meanwhile, it can also Taunt sleep users), and the recipient wins games assuming you play the cards correctly.

    Mental Herb in my experience has REALLY been a lifesaver against Prankster Taunt (or just plain Taunt users in general) ; Sableye and the rare Whimsicott just a plain headache against Mew and its attacking teammates, while Tornadus just blasts things after doing its job. Basically being immune to Taunt for one turn ensures Mew isn't useless most of the time, especially considering Sableye and other fast Taunt users (Terrakion etc) been rising up. Basically, you trade the ability to set up on Venusaur and Jirachi, in exchange for screwing up the occasional but fatally dangerous Prankster user. Up to you.
  18. PK Gaming

    PK Gaming Pursuing My True Self
    is a Site Staff Alumnusis a Forum Moderator Alumnusis a Community Contributor Alumnusis a Tiering Contributor Alumnusis a Contributor Alumnusis a Past SPL Winner

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    Good point. I'll rewrite the analysis to accommodate Mental Herb. (not in AC, but as a main option over Lum Berry)
    AccidentalGreed likes this.
  19. Governess

    Governess A Beautiful Blossom Waiting to Bloom
    is a Researcher Alumnusis a Smogon Media Contributor Alumnusis a Contributor Alumnus

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    Hihi, GP Check! Sorry that this took longer than expected.
    Whoever decides to do the second GP check: there are a few things I wasn't sure about so I didn't touch it, so hopefully you can figure it out yourself, as I cannot fix nearly everything from an analysis of this length ^^;

    The writing / prose itself is fine, but I focused on the technical stuff (commas, grammar, etc).

    Additions / Changes (Comments)
    Removes

    GP Check (open)
    [Overview]

    <p>With its balanced stats, solid level-up movepool, and access to literally every tutor move and TM in the game, it's no surprise that Mew is an easy contender for the title of the "most versatile Pokemon." Access to some of the most sought after support moves in the game, including Will-O-Wisp and Taunt, makes Mew one of the most impressive support Pokemon in the game. However, it's not just the threat of top-notch support that makes Mew so difficult to deal with. Mew's versatility gives it so many different and viable sets to choose from, ranging from support, to Baton Pass user, to sweeper, toand even lead, that Mew has plenty of viable sets, each of which requires the correct answer to prevent it from just taking over the game. Mew is a Pokemon that tests your opponent's reactions first and foremost, and if they react poorly, there will be hell to pay.</p>

    <p>However, where it shines in versatility it lacks in focus. Its mediocre Speed stat puts it at the mercy of several notable Pokemon, including Keldeo and Latias, and its rather average offensive stats make it difficult to sweep. Still, the threat of these options means that even just seeing Mew puts the opponent on the back foot, and with the right followup, it's easy to ride that advantage to victory.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Support
    move 1: Taunt
    move 2: Will-O-Wisp
    move 3: Softboiled
    move 4: Ice Beam / Psychic
    item: Leftovers
    nature: Timid
    evs: 252 HP / 240 Def / 16 Spe

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>Support Mew functions as a top -notch supporting Pokemon, (RC) with access to effective tools to help it in almost any given scenario. Taunt puts slower defensive Pokemon in an unfavorable position by forcing them to attack, and it can occasionally prevent faster Pokemon from setting up. Will-O-Wisp can burn foes, which constantly saps them of their health and utterly cripples physical attackers. Both moves have wonderful synergy with each other, as the combination of Taunt and Bburn typically renders a slower Pokemon completely useless. Ice Beam works targets a large volume of OU for super effective damage. It's particularly effective against the likes of Garchomp, Dragonite, Landorus-T and Thundurus-T, each of whom are among the best set up sweepers in the tier. On the other hand, Psychic is more effective against Substitute users and is stronger against the likes of Terrakion, Toxicroak and Conkeldurr. That said, Ice Beam is usually the better choice, asince it's useful for dealing with a wider range of threats.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>A specially defensive spread maycan be used to improve Mew's effectiveness against special attackers. This in turn makes it more useful against a wider variety of Pokemon, as Mew can already somewhat deal with incoming physical attackers with Will-O-Wisp, and it can now keep up with certain Sspecial Aattackers. Keep in mind that Will-O-Wisp is not a substitute for being physical defensive, and thus this spread is ineffective against powerful, fast physical attacking Pokemon. A Bold nature can noticeably increase Mew's physical dDefense, but you're better off sticking with Timid as it ensures that Mew is capable of outrunning Jolly Breloom, Adamant Dragonite, and Adamant Gyarados. Night Shade grants Mew the ability to deal consistent damage, (RC) and is very useful against Substitute users, such as Latias, who would ordinarily that setup on Mew.</p>

    <p>Despite having terrific defensive prowess on the physical spectrumly defensive side, Mew is somewhat vulnerable on the special side; special attackers (especially ones thwhose attacks are boosted byin the rain) are by far the biggest threats to Mew. Pokemon that can deal with Heatran are almost mandatory teammates, as Heatran can effortlessly switch into Mew and turn into a liability for as long as it is active. Tyranitar makes for a good partner, as it can usually take on most special attackers, as well as Heatran, and it comes with the added bonus of being able to defeat Latios and Latias (both of whom are strong checks to Mew in their own right). Starmie is a decent partner, as it can also check Heatran, and it has utility against the likes of Keldeo, who can decimate Mew with Hydro Pump.</p>

    <p>Mew stands tall as one of the best stallbreakers in the tier, as it is capable of dismantling the most common stall cores on it's own. It struggles mightily against rain stall, as the prevalence of Scald makes it difficult to stay on the field. As such, you should strongly consider carrying anti-rain stall measures. (Sspecially Ddefensive Hippowdon, Celebi, and Starmie for example). You'll want to maximize Mew's effectiveness by bringing it on the field as quickly and efficiently as possible. Keeping it near max HP at all times is imperative to succeeding with Mew, as it is usually only capable of checking powerful threats when it's healthy.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Lead
    move 1: Stealth Rock
    move 2: Taunt / Magic Coat
    move 3: Explosion
    move 4: Tailwind
    item: Normal Gem
    nature: Jolly
    evs: 108 HP / 252 Atk / 148 Spe

    <p>Mew's near -limitless movepool and balanced stats make it an effective lead, especially on hyper offensive teams that cannot afford to make room for a Ghost-type Pokemon. With access to Taunt and Magic Coat, Mew beats nearly every other lead in the game, (RC) and has the advantage of bulk over lead Azelf, whose frailty mandates use of a Focus Sash. Mew's solid bulk allows it to carry a Normal Gem, which secures more significant KOs, such as nearly guaranteeing an OHKO on defensive Xatu.</p>

    <p>Taunt shuts down slower opponents, preventing them from setting up their own entry hazards or boosting stats. Magic Coat, on the other hand, (AC) bounces back Stealth Rock and Taunt from faster leads such as Terrakion, Aerodactyl, Azelf, Infernape, (AC) and opposing Mew. Taunt gets priority over Magic Coat because it doesn't necessarily stop hazards from being set up,; it merely blocks them for a turn. This means that an opponent can spamcontinuously use Stealth Rock until you (are you referring to Mew running out of PP? If so, change 'you' to 'Mew') run out of PP for Magic Coat. In addition, Taunt is invaluable for completely shutting down opposing Ssuicide Lleads, such as Forretress and Skarmory. Tailwind is handy for building momentum, particularly if Mew is used as a suicide lead. It can set up Stealth Rock quickly, use Tailwind to increase its sSpeed, and follow up with an Explosion to clear the way for your next switch- in to use the remaining two turn Speed boost.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>The EVs are standard fare, allowing maximum power for Explosion. Zen Headbutt is a decent alternative to Tailwind; It's the strongest physical STAB move in Mew's repertoire and serves as a deterrent to Gengar or Terrakion attempting to switch in and absorb an Explosion.</p>

    <p>Care must be taken with this particular set. If your opponent has Espeon, Xatu, or a Starmie, it is best to save Mew and lead with something else. Explosion is a high -risk/ high -reward move, especially if your opponent has a Ghost-type on their team. Though momentum might be retained through a free switch- in, Explosion's huge bBase pPower should not be forgotten. Checks to this set include Life Orb Gengar, Choice Specs Latios, Choice Band Garchomp and Terrakion, all of whichom outspeed Mew, (RC) and can threaten it with high-powered STAB attacks. Therefore, support of your own is necessary. Scizor makes quick work of opposing Gengar, and it can also check Starmie, whicho is notoriously hard to deal with, handily. Though it shares a Bug-type weakness, Tyranitar can be a handy partner for Mew and the rest of the team. In addition to setting up permanent sand with its ability, Tyranitar is a good counter to Espeon and Xatu, (RC)while being a reasonable check to Starmie and Latios so long as it avoids a Water-type move. All four can be trapped thanks to Pursuit or outright KOed via Crunch. Gengar also falls prey to Tyranitar, but Tyranitar must be wary of Focus Blast. Dragonite and just about any other sweeper appreciate Mew's ability to set up Stealth Rock; additionally, Dragonite can switch into opposing Landorus-T's Ground-type attacks should you wish to save Mew's Explosion. Rotom-W is another Pokemon who appreciates a free switch-in on Earthquake and makes quick work of Landorus-T with its STAB Hydro Pump.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Nasty Plot
    move 1: Nasty Plot
    move 2: Psyshock / Psychic
    move 3: Aura Sphere
    move 4: Fire Blast / Dark Pulse
    item: Leftovers / Lum Berry
    nature: Timid
    evs: 4 HP / 252 SpA / 252 Spe

    <p>Mew is capable of taking the offensive with Nasty Plot, making it difficult for opponents to outright counter due to its excellent coverage and high power. Nasty Plot boosts Mew's Special Attack to 598, (AC) which gives Mew enough power to OHKO and 2HKO most of the metagame. Psyshock also allows Mew to take out special walls, (AC) such as Chansey, (RC) and Blissey, (AC) and other Pokemon that invest in sSpecial dDefense. Keep in mind, however, that because it targets Defense, physically defensive Pokemon such as Landorus-T and physically defensive Hippowdon are capable of surviving a boosted Psyshock. Psychic, on the other hand, OHKOes both the aforementioned Pokemon, (AC) and its higher Base Power allows it to score more OHKOs in general. Aura Sphere provides Mew with good coverage, as very few Pokemon resist both Psychic and Fighting. In particular, Aura Sphere allows Mew to beat Tyranitar, one of the most common and prominent special tanks in the metagame.</p>

    <p>The final slot is up to you and mainly dependent on what your team can handle. Dark Pulse lets Mew take down opposing Psychic-types, such as Latias, Latios, Starmie, and Reuniclus, while Fire Blast lets Mew KO Steel-types neutral to Fighting-type moves. Jirachi, Forretress, Scizor and Skarmory are all OHKOed by Fire Blast at +2. Fire Blast also lets you OHKO standard Landorus-T after Stealth Rock and deal heavy damage to physically defensive Hippowdon after a boost, which effectively eliminates Psyshock's weakness. The biggest advantage to using Nasty Plot Mew over any other special sweeper is its unpredictability. Its counters are mainly based on the final coverage move. For example, Latias and Starmie can check Mew if it's using Fire Blast, while bulky Steel-types, particularly Scizor and Jirachi, can just as easily counter Mew if it's using Dark Pulse. That detail is Mew's biggest trump card, so keep your opponents awareness in mind when you're attempting to sweep with Mew.</p>

    <p>To show the power that Mew can bring to the table, here are some calculations, assuming Mew has one Nasty Plot boost:</p>

    <ul class="damage_calculation">
    <li>+2 LO Psyshock vs 252 HP / 252 Def Bold Blissey: 72% - 84.9%</li>
    <li>+2 LO Psyshock vs 252 HP / 252 Def Bold Chansey: 53.3% - 62.8%</li>
    <li>+2 LO Aura Sphere vs 252 HP / 252 SpD Sassy Tyranitar: 101% - 118.8%</li>
    <li>+0 LO Fire Blast vs 252 HP / 216 SpD Sassy Ferrothorn: 109.1% - 128.4%</li>
    <li>+2 LO Dark Pulse vs 248 HP / 216 Def Bold Jellicent: 89.8% - 106.2%</li>
    <li>+2 LO Fire Blast vs 244 HP / 0 SpD Landorus-T: 92.41 - 108.94%</li>
    <li>+2 LO Fire Blast vs 252 HP / 0 Impish Hippowdon: 88.1% - 103.8%</li>
    <li>+2 LO Fire Blast vs 252 HP / 252 SpD Careful Jirachi: 103% - 121.3%</li>
    <li>+2 LO Fire Blast vs 252 HP / 252 SpD Calm Celebi: 100.99 - 119.05%</li>
    </ul>

    <p>Leftovers is a good alternative to Life Orb, increasing Mew's overall survivability, but ait comes with the cost of some firepower. A Lum Berry is useful as it allows you to avoid status once, which helps in taking out Pokemon that rely on status to beat Mew. The EVs are pretty standard fare,; max Speed EVs are used to outrun most of the Pokemon in the tier that lie just outside of the 101+ Speed tier (something about the 101+ doesn't seem right to me, but idk how to go about it. Another GP can take a look at it) and Speed tie against opposing 100 base 100 Speed Pokemon. A Modest nature with 220 HP / 252 SpA / 36 Spe maycan be used to increase Mew's bulk and further boost its damage potential, securing a few more OHKOs at +2, howeverbut this noticeably reduces Mew's Speed and its ability to outspeed certain threats. Specifically, Mew loses the ability to outspeed Haxorus and Hydreigon, and it also misses out on the Speed tie with opposing base 100 Speed Pokemon such as Salamence, Volcarona, Celebi, and Jirachi.</p>

    <p>Mew has a couple of extra moves at its disposal; Giga Drain can be used over a coverage move to OHKO to the likes of Politoed, Rotom-W, Jellicent and Gastrodon after a Nasty Plot boost (It's important to note that each of these Pokemon can potentially avoid the OHKO from +2 Psyshock). Calm Mind bolsters Mew's defensive options, (RC) and prevent it from being as checked as easily from special attackers. It's difficult to take the offensive with Calm Mind as Mew's boosting move due to it's comparatively lower power boost, however. Baton Pass is an interesting move to use on Nasty Plot Mew. It weakens Mew's ability to sweep by replacing a coverage move, but it allows Mew to make a hasty retreat should a counter switch into it. Mew can simply pass along those Nasty Plot boosts, making it a hybrid sweeper and team player. Baton Pass also helps Mew differentiate itself from other powerful Nasty Plot users such as Thundurus-T. Softboiled gives Mew reliable recovery and is effective against Sstall teams that rely on wearing down opposing sweepers. Softboiled works particularly well with Life Orb, (RC) because it allows Mew to keep its power without compromising its bulk. Unfortunately, as with Baton Pass, it cuts down on Mew's sweeping ability by eating up a coverage move.</p>

    <p>Similarly to any other sweeper, Mew appreciates the presence of entry hazards to achieve several OHKOs. Blissey is typically OHKOed by a boosted Psyshock if Stealth Rock and a layer of Spikes are on the field. Reliable entry hazard users, such as Skarmory and Ferrothorn, are good partners to Mew for this very reason. While Nasty Plot Mew is incredibly difficult to outright counter, it has several checks that keep it from being a top threat. The Pokemon that can check Mew are completely dependent on Mew's coverage moves. Specially defensive Jirachi is a strong counter if Mew isn't carrying Fire Blast while Latias and Latios are very reliable counters if Mew isn't carrying Dark Pulse. Faster Pokemon, such as Latias(again), Starmie, Latios, (AC) and Gengar, can switch into a resisted attack or Nasty Plot and force Mew out with their powerful STAB attacks. Scarf Tyranitar is a solid partner for Mew because it can counter Latias and Latios and check Starmie and Gengar. Bulky Scizor is also capable of checking Latias, Latios and Gengar. Unlike Tyranitar, it doesn't summon sandstorm, keeping Mew from taking sandstorm damage.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Baton Pass
    move 1: Baton Pass
    move 2: Rock Polish
    move 3: Swords Dance / Nasty Plot
    move 4: Taunt / Substitute
    item: Mental Herb / Lum Berry
    nature: Timid
    evs: 252 HP / 240 Def / 16 Spe

    <p>Mew is a Baton Pass user that uses its durability, Speed, (AC) and access to Taunt to gain tremendous momentum with it's boosting moves while simultaneously keeping potential enemies at bay with Taunt. If you can manage to get the ball rolling with Mew's boosts, you can possibly decide the match in an instant, because a fully powered-up Baton Pass recipient is nearly unstoppable. While Mew faces some competition as a Baton Passer from other standalone Baton Pass users such as Gorebyss and Smeargle, it still has a few perks over them, namespecifically its access to Taunt over the former and significantly more bulk over the latter. Rock Polish is mandatory, as it lets Mew outspeed most of the metagame, giving Mew the ability to Baton Pass in the face of Pokemon who are normally faster. The choice between Swords Dance and Nasty Plot is naturally team-dependent. Strong physical attackers, particularly Garchomp, Landorus-T and Terrakion, will naturally appreciate Swords Dance, while special attackers such as Latios and Hydreigon are bolstered by Nasty Plot. Finally, Taunt allows Mew to shut down Pokemon who may attempt to plague it or its Baton Pass recipients with status or phase them out with Whirlwind/ or Roar.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>There aren't any alternative item choices; Mental Herb can protect Mew from being taunted, and it's invaluable against Prankster users. Lum Berry grants Mew the ability to dodge harmful status such as paralysis and sleep, (RC) and is very useful in conjunction with Synchronize and Taunt. The EVs on this set attempt to give Mew the maximum amount of bulk, (RC) while still giving it enough Speed to outspeed most of the metagame after a Rock Polish. HP is maxed out, while(AC) and the leftover EVs are placed in Defense, providing Mew with extra insurance against the likes of Tyranitar and Scizor if screens are up. A Sspecial Dly defense ive-oriented spread maycan be used should you want Mew to survive powerful special threats such as Choice Specs Latios without Light Screen support. Mew has a ton of other move options for the 3third slot, including, (AC) but not limited to, (AC) Bulk Up, Amnesia, Iron Defense, and Calm Mind. The defensive boosting moves are better suited to being used on defensive teams, however.</p>

    <p>This set absolutely requires dual screen support in order to succeed. With dual screens in play, Mew is nearly impossible to OHKO, giving it plenty of room to set up. You should bring Mew in after one of your Pokemon has been KOed, preferably your dual screen user. Directly switching into an opposing Pokemon is unwise because Mew should remain in tip-top condition to maximize its chances of successfully pulling off a Baton Pass. Uxie and Latios deserve a mention because they can set up dual screens and are capable of using Memento, which lets Mew safely switch into the battlefield, (AC) and it makes Mew nearly indestructible. Bronzong is also a decent dual screen supporter, as its excellent typing and bulk gives it excellent staying powerlongevity, allowing it to repeatedly set up dual screens. It can also use Explosion to safely bring Mew ionto the frayield.</p>

    <p>Mew has a variety of Baton Pass recipients to choose from, howeverbut the right recipient is required to win matches. It should have excellent natural bulk, decent coverage, the ability to OHKO most of the metagame, and resistances to common priority moves. Garchomp fits the bill for most of these categories; Aat +2/+2, (also not sure how to go about this as well, I'll leave it for the next GP) it can easily OHKO or 2HKO the entire metagame, (RC) and is extremely difficult to counter. Garchomp's typing makes it resistant to Stealth Rock, making it hard for defensive teams to wear it down. Lucario also an excellent recipient, since (RC) as it's also quite difficult to counter, (AC) and it even has its own priority move. Keldeo is the perfect recipient on the special side as it's almost impossible to counter at +2/+2, resists common forms of priority, and is resistant to Stealth Rock.</p>

    <p>While this variant of Mew is almost impossible to counter due to the nature of Baton Pass, there are a few Pokemon who give it trouble. Priority Taunt users such as Tornadus and Sableye can put a complete stop to Mew's Baton Passing attempts. Trick users, such as Choice Latios and Rotom-W, can cripple Mew or its Baton Pass recipients. Because this Mew lacks any offensive moves, it is a sitting duck against faster Pokemon, so powerful sweepers such as Terrakion can set up on Mew if it hasn't used Rock Polish. Dragon Tail users are a pain, (RC) because the move itself is unaffected by Taunt, completely ruining all Baton Pass attempts. Substitute can bypass Dragon Tail, but it comes at the cost of a boosting move or Taunt. There are some attacks that are simply too strong for Mew to handle, even with dual screens. Choice Band Tyranitar, (AC) for example, can still 2HKO Mew even with Reflect up. Mew isn't limited to passing offensive boosts; it can also pass a variety of defensive boosts as well, namely Iron Defense and Amnesia. Finally, it's important to keep in mind that Mew is completely dependent on Ddual Sscreens for success. While losing them doesn't leave Mew completely helpless, it is unable to stand up against any sort of offense without them.</p>

    [Other Options]

    <p>Mew is the king of other options. Seriously, it's not an exaggeration to suggest that Mew can pull off just about any moveset. It has one of the largest movepools in the entire game, second only to Smeargle; however, unlike Smeargle, it has the stats to back them up. Even so, it can be difficult to find sets outside of the ones that are listed that Mew can run without being outclassed or just flat out mediocre. A stand-alone Swords Dance set is possible, (RC) with a moveset consisting of Flame Charge, Drain Punch, (AC) Baton Pass, (AC) and Baton Pass(When you say 'consisting of, that means that the set only contains the moves that you listed above, and I doubt that it has 3 moves x3 Maybe it's just a filler move?). This unconventional moveset gives Mew the ability to set up Swords Dances and bypass Tyranitar, Scizor, Heatran, (AC) and other Steel-types, as well as pass along the boosts to another physical attacker. The support set can utilize either Roar or Dragon Tail for phazing or Hypnosis to temporarily incapacitate a foe. Mew can also use a Transform set, which can be handy when dealing with an opposing boosting sweeper. To sum it up, Mew gets nearly everything, so go nuts, pick four moves, and see what works for you. If you can imagine it, Mew can probably make it happen.</p>

    [Checks and Counters]

    <p>Countering Mew can be a difficult task due to its staggering versatility. Scouting out its moveset instead of blindly switching in is recommended. Support sets are hard countered by Heatran, who resists Psychic-type attacks and is immune to Will-O-Wisp. In fact, if Heatran switches into a Will-O-Wisp, it can retaliate against Mew and its teammates with its boosted Fire-type moves. Strong special attackers are generally suited to taking on Mew; Bboth Latias and Latios can switch in with little to no trouble and fire off their powerful STAB attacks, (RC); however, Mew can actually stall out Choiced variants with Softboiled and Special Defense investment. Calm Mind Latios and Latias, on the other hand, can use Mew as setup fodder. Thundurus-T is capable of overpowering Mew with its powerful Electric-type moves, (RC) or even potentially set up with Nasty Plot or Agility, as Mew cannot OHKO it with Ice Beam. Hydreigon can switch into Mew without worry and fire off its powerful Dark- or Dragon-type STAB moves. Rain abusweepers such as Keldeo and Tornadus can similarly overwhelm Mew with their rain -boosted attacks.</p>

    <p>Lead sets can be dealt with by Tyranitar, who can switch into Mew and OHKO it through its Focus Sash because of Sand Stream. Scizor, Heatran, (AC) and assorted Steel-types can also switch in and handle it. That said, knocking Mew out and preventing Mew from setting up Stealth Rock are two very different things. Because of Mew's access to Magic Coat and Focus Sash, Mew is pretty much guaranteed to set up Stealth Rock. Magic Bounce users, such as Espeon and Xatu, (AC) are the ultimate stops to Mew, thoughbut both of them need to carry a strong attack to actually damage it. Otherwise, Magic Bounce users can be used to break Mew's Focus Sash, (RC) and switch into a Pokemon that can OHKO it afterwards. The Mew useropponent can always predict this, however.</p>

    <p>Nasty Plot Mew's counters are separated into two groups: those who can counter Mew if it lacks Fire Blast, and those who can counter Mew if it lacks Dark Pulse. Specially defensive Jirachi, (AC) for example, is a hard counter to Mew if it doesn’t have Fire Blast. It can switch in and cripple Mew with Body Slam, (RC) and stall out Mew with a combination of Iron Head and Wish. Bulky Swords Dance Scizor can switch into Mew and hit it with a strongSTAB Bug Bite, (AC) which easily brings Mew into Bullet Punch's KO range. On the other hand, Mew that lack Dark Pulse can be beaten by Latias, Latios and Starmie.</p>

    <p>For the Baton Pass set, there are several precautions you can take to guarantee that Mew doesn't pull off a Baton Pass. Team Preview allows you to scan your opponent's team, determine who Mew's dual screen user is, and devise a way to stop it. A fast Taunt user, such as Azelf or Sableye, can put a stop to most dual screen users. Unfortunately, Azelf itself is a common dual screens user, and relying on a Speed tie to stop it isn't exactly recommended. It's also possible to directly Taunt Mew, thoughbut Mew that carry Mental hHerb can bypass this. Strong Choice Scarf users, (RC) will only allow Azelf to set up one screen, giving you an easier time when dealing with Mew. Powerful Fire-types can similarly prevent Metagross from setting up more than one screen. Keep in mind that if you fail to stop screens, it's almost impossible to stop Mew from Baton Passing due to its incredible bulk. Fortunately, unlike Gorebyss and Smeargle, Mew typically takes three turns to set up its Baton Pass recipient, so keep that in mind and find a way to stop it before it Baton Passes.</p>

    [​IMG] 1/2
  20. PK Gaming

    PK Gaming Pursuing My True Self
    is a Site Staff Alumnusis a Forum Moderator Alumnusis a Community Contributor Alumnusis a Tiering Contributor Alumnusis a Contributor Alumnusis a Past SPL Winner

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    Messages:
    5,153
    Thanks

    Implemented Governess's GP check + added a mention of Light Screen in the AC of the support set.
  21. sirndpt

    sirndpt
    is an Artist Alumnusis a Contributor Alumnus

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    gp 2/2

    did a copypastable in case it's more convenient, because this is such a long analysis and because there were several silly hyphen/spacing issues the first time around i'd like to be sure don't happen again!

    here you go (open)
    [Overview]

    <p>With its balanced stats, solid level-up movepool, and access to literally every tutor move and TM in the game, it's no surprise that Mew is an easy contender for the title of "most versatile Pokemon." Access to some of the most sought-after support moves, including Will-O-Wisp and Taunt, makes Mew one of the most impressive support Pokemon. However, it's not just the threat of top-notch support that makes Mew so difficult to deal with. Mew's versatility gives it so many different and viable sets to choose from—ranging from support to Baton Pass user, sweeper, and even lead—that Mew has plenty of viable sets, each of which requires the correct answer to prevent it from just taking over the game. Mew is a Pokemon that tests your opponent's reactions first and foremost, and if they react poorly, there will be hell to pay.</p>

    <p>However, where it shines in versatility it lacks in focus. Its mediocre Speed stat puts it at the mercy of several notable Pokemon, including Keldeo and Latias, and its rather average offensive stats make it difficult to sweep. Still, the threat of these options means that even just seeing Mew puts the opponent on the back foot, and with the right followup, it's easy to ride that advantage to victory.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Support
    move 1: Taunt
    move 2: Will-O-Wisp
    move 3: Softboiled
    move 4: Ice Beam / Psychic
    item: Leftovers
    nature: Timid
    evs: 252 HP / 240 Def / 16 Spe

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>Support Mew functions as a top-notch supporting Pokemon with access to effective tools to help it in almost any given scenario. Taunt puts slower defensive Pokemon in an unfavorable position by forcing them to attack, and it can occasionally prevent faster Pokemon from setting up. Will-O-Wisp can burn foes, which constantly saps them of their health and utterly cripples physical attackers. Both moves have wonderful synergy with each other, as the combination of Taunt and burn typically renders a slower Pokemon completely useless. Ice Beam targets a large proportion of OU Pokemon for super effective damage. It's particularly effective against the likes of Garchomp, Dragonite, Landorus-T, and Thundurus-T, who number among the best setup sweepers in the tier. On the other hand, Psychic is more effective against Substitute users and is stronger against the likes of Terrakion, Toxicroak, and Conkeldurr. That said, Ice Beam is usually the better choice, as it's useful for dealing with a wider range of threats.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>A specially defensive spread can be used to improve Mew's effectiveness against special attackers. This in turn makes it more useful against a wider variety of Pokemon, as Mew can already somewhat deal with incoming physical attackers with Will-O-Wisp, and it can now keep up with certain special attackers (name some of these special attackers imo?). Keep in mind that Will-O-Wisp is not a substitute for physical defense, however, and thus this spread is ineffective against powerful, fast physical attacking Pokemon. A Bold nature can noticeably increase Mew's physical defense, but you're better off sticking with Timid as it ensures that Mew is capable of outrunning Jolly Breloom, Adamant Dragonite, and Adamant Gyarados. Night Shade grants Mew the ability to deal consistent damage and is very useful against Substitute users, such as Latias, who would ordinarily set up on Mew. Light Screen strengthens Mew's Special Defense, making it all the more difficult for your opponent to break through Mew, but it comes at the cost of a precious moveslot.</p>

    <p>Despite having terrific prowess on the physically defensive side, Mew is somewhat vulnerable on the special side; special attackers (especially ones whose attacks are boosted in the rain) are by far the biggest threats to Mew. Pokemon that can deal with Heatran are almost mandatory teammates, as Heatran can effortlessly switch into Mew and turn into a liability for as long as it is active. Tyranitar makes for a good partner as it can usually take on most special attackers, as well as Heatran, and it comes with the added bonus of being able to defeat Latios and Latias, both of whom are strong checks to Mew in their own right. Starmie is a decent partner, as it can also check Heatran and has utility against the likes of Keldeo, who can decimate Mew with Hydro Pump.</p>

    <p>Mew stands tall as one of the best stallbreakers in the tier, as it is capable of dismantling the most common stall cores on its own. It struggles mightily against rain stall, however, as the prevalence of Scald makes it difficult for Mew to stay on the field. As such, you should strongly consider carrying anti-rain stall measures, such as specially defensive Hippowdon, Celebi, and Starmie. (should the following part go in set comments instead? it seems too important a piece of info to be tucked away at the end of AC) You'll want to maximize Mew's effectiveness by bringing it on the field as quickly and efficiently as possible. Keeping it near max HP at all times is imperative to succeeding with Mew, as it is usually only capable of checking powerful threats when it's healthy.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Lead
    move 1: Stealth Rock
    move 2: Taunt / Magic Coat
    move 3: Explosion
    move 4: Tailwind
    item: Normal Gem
    nature: Jolly
    evs: 108 HP / 252 Atk / 148 Spe

    <p>Mew's near-limitless movepool and balanced stats make it an effective lead, especially on hyper offensive teams that cannot afford to make room for a Ghost-type Pokemon. With access to Taunt and Magic Coat, Mew beats nearly every other lead in the game and has the advantage of bulk over lead Azelf, whose frailty mandates use of a Focus Sash. Mew's solid bulk allows it to carry a Normal Gem, which secures more significant KOs, such as the near-guaranteed OHKO on defensive Xatu.</p>

    <p>Taunt shuts down slower opponents, preventing them from setting up their own entry hazards or boosting their stats. Magic Coat, on the other hand, bounces back Stealth Rock and Taunt from faster leads such as Terrakion, Aerodactyl, Azelf, Infernape, and opposing Mew. Taunt gets priority over Magic Coat because it doesn't necessarily stop hazards from being set up; it merely blocks them for a turn. This means that an opponent can continuously use Stealth Rock until Mew runs out of Magic Coat PP. In addition, Taunt is invaluable for completely shutting down opposing suicide leads, such as Forretress and Skarmory. Tailwind is handy for momentum, particularly if Mew is used as a suicide lead. It can set up Stealth Rock quickly, use Tailwind to increase its Speed, and follow up with an Explosion to clear the way for your next switch-in to use the remaining two-turn Speed boost.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>Zen Headbutt is a decent alternative to Tailwind; it's the strongest physical STAB move in Mew's repertoire and serves as a deterrent to Gengar or Terrakion attempting to switch in and absorb an Explosion.</p>

    <p>Care must be taken with this particular set. If your opponent has Espeon, Xatu, or Starmie, it is best to save Mew and lead with something else. Explosion is a high-risk high-reward move, especially if your opponent has a Ghost-type on their team. Though a free switch-in might retain you momentum, do not forget Explosion's huge Base Power.</p>

    <p>Checks to this set include Life Orb Gengar, Choice Specs Latios, and Choice Band Garchomp and Terrakion, all of whom outspeed Mew and threaten it with high-powered STAB attacks. Scizor makes quick work of opposing Gengar and can also handily check Starmie, who is notoriously hard to deal with. Though it shares a Bug-type weakness with Mew, Tyranitar can be a handy partner. In addition to setting up permanent sand, Tyranitar is a good counter to Espeon and Xatu while being a reasonable check to Starmie and Latios so long as it avoids a Water-type move, trapping all four with Pursuit or outright KOing them with Crunch. Gengar also falls prey to Tyranitar, but Tyranitar must be wary of Focus Blast. Dragonite—and just about any other sweeper—appreciates Mew's ability to set up Stealth Rock; additionally, Dragonite can switch into opposing Landorus-T's Ground-type attacks should you wish to save Mew's Explosion. Rotom-W is another Pokemon who appreciates a free switch-in on Earthquake and makes quick work of Landorus-T with its STAB Hydro Pump.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Nasty Plot
    move 1: Nasty Plot
    move 2: Psyshock / Psychic
    move 3: Aura Sphere
    move 4: Fire Blast / Dark Pulse
    item: Leftovers / Lum Berry
    nature: Timid
    evs: 4 HP / 252 SpA / 252 Spe

    <p>Mew is capable of taking the offensive with Nasty Plot, and it is difficult for opponents to outright counter due to its excellent coverage and high power. Nasty Plot boosts Mew's Special Attack to 598, which gives Mew enough power to OHKO or 2HKO most of the metagame. Psyshock allows Mew to take out special walls such as Chansey and Blissey, as well as other Pokemon that invest in Special Defense. Keep in mind, however, that because it targets Defense, physically defensive Pokemon such as Landorus-T and physically defensive Hippowdon are capable of surviving a boosted Psyshock. Psychic, on the other hand, OHKOes both the aforementioned defensive Grounds, and its higher Base Power allows it to score more OHKOs in general. Aura Sphere provides Mew with good coverage, as very few Pokemon resist both Psychic and Fighting. In particular, Aura Sphere allows Mew to beat Tyranitar, one of the most common and prominent special tanks in the metagame.</p>

    <p>The final slot is up to you and mainly dependent on what your team can handle. Dark Pulse lets Mew take down opposing Psychic-types, such as Latias, Latios, Starmie, and Reuniclus, while Fire Blast lets Mew KO Steel-types neutral to Fighting-type moves. Jirachi, Forretress, Scizor, and Skarmory are all OHKOed by +2 Fire Blast. Fire Blast also lets Mew OHKO standard Landorus-T after Stealth Rock and deal heavy damage to physically defensive Hippowdon after a boost, which effectively eliminates Psyshock's weakness. The biggest advantage to using Nasty Plot Mew over any other special sweeper is its unpredictability. Its counters are mainly based on its final coverage move. For example, Latias and Starmie can check Mew if it's using Fire Blast, while bulky Steel-types, particularly Scizor and Jirachi, can just as easily counter Mew if it's using Dark Pulse. That detail is Mew's biggest trump card, so keep your opponent's awareness (not sure what this means) in mind when you're attempting to sweep with Mew.</p>

    <p>To show the power that Mew can bring to the table, here are some calculations. Unless stated otherwise, assume Mew has a Life Orb and one Nasty Plot boost:</p>

    <ul class="damage_calculation">
    <li>Psyshock vs 252/252+ Blissey 72% - 84.9%</li>
    <li>Psyshock vs 252/252+ Chansey 53.3% - 62.8%</li>
    <li>Aura Sphere vs 252/252+ Tyranitar 101% - 118.8%</li>
    <li>Dark Pulse vs 248/ (what are its spdef evs?) Jellicent 89.8% - 106.2%</li>
    <li>Fire Blast vs 244/0 Landorus-T 92.41 - 108.94%</li>
    <li>Fire Blast vs 252/0 Hippowdon 88.1% - 103.8%</li>
    <li>Fire Blast vs 252/252+ Jirachi 103% - 121.3%</li>
    <li>Fire Blast vs 252/252+ Celebi 100.99 - 119.05%</li>
    <li>+0 Fire Blast vs 252/216+ Ferrothorn 109.1% - 128.4%</li>
    </ul>

    <p>Leftovers is a good alternative to Life Orb as it increases Mew's overall survivability, but it comes at the cost of some firepower. A Lum Berry is useful as it allows Mew to avoid status once, which helps in taking out Pokemon that rely on status to beat Mew (such as?). A Modest nature and a spread of 220 HP / 252 SpA / 36 Spe can be used to increase Mew's bulk and further boost its damage potential, securing a few more OHKOs at +2 (such as?), but this noticeably reduces Mew's Speed and its ability to outspeed certain threats. Specifically, Mew now fails to outrun Haxorus and Hydreigon, and it also misses out on the Speed tie with opposing base 100 Speed Pokemon such as Salamence, Volcarona, Celebi, and Jirachi.</p>

    <p>Mew has a couple of extra moves at its disposal. Giga Drain can be used over a coverage move to OHKO the likes of Politoed, Rotom-W, Jellicent, and Gastrodon after a Nasty Plot boost, which is significant as each of these Pokemon can potentially avoid the OHKO from +2 Psyshock. Calm Mind bolsters Mew's defense and prevents it from being checked as easily by special attackers. It's difficult to take the offensive with Calm Mind as Mew's boosting move due to its comparatively lower power boost, however. Baton Pass is an interesting move to use on Nasty Plot Mew. It weakens Mew's ability to sweep by replacing a coverage move, but it allows Mew to make a hasty retreat should a counter switch into it. Mew can simply pass along those Nasty Plot boosts, making it a hybrid sweeper and team player. Baton Pass also helps Mew differentiate itself from other powerful Nasty Plot users such as Thundurus-T. Softboiled gives Mew reliable recovery and is effective against stall teams that rely on wearing down opposing sweepers. Softboiled works particularly well with Life Orb because it allows Mew to keep its power without compromising its bulk. Unfortunately, as with Baton Pass, it cuts down on Mew's sweeping ability by eating up a moveslot.</p>

    <p>Similarly to any other sweeper, Mew appreciates the presence of entry hazards to achieve several OHKOs. Blissey is typically OHKOed by a boosted Psyshock if Stealth Rock and a layer of Spikes are on the field. Reliable entry hazard users, such as Skarmory and Ferrothorn, are good partners to Mew for this very reason. While Nasty Plot Mew is incredibly difficult to outright counter, it has several checks that keep it from being a top threat. The Pokemon that can check Mew are completely dependent on Mew's coverage moves. Specially defensive Jirachi is a strong counter if Mew isn't carrying Fire Blast, while Latias and Latios are very reliable counters if Mew lacks Dark Pulse. Faster Pokemon, such as Latias, Latios, Starmie, and Gengar, can switch into a resisted attack or Nasty Plot and force Mew out with their powerful STAB attacks. Choice Scarf Tyranitar is a solid partner for Mew because it can counter Latias and Latios and check Starmie and Gengar. Bulky Scizor is also capable of checking Latias, Latios, and Gengar. Additionally, unlike Tyranitar, it doesn't summon sandstorm, keeping Mew from taking extra residual damage.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Baton Pass
    move 1: Baton Pass
    move 2: Rock Polish
    move 3: Swords Dance / Nasty Plot
    move 4: Taunt / Substitute
    item: Mental Herb / Lum Berry
    nature: Timid
    evs: 252 HP / 240 Def / 16 Spe

    <p>Mew is a Baton Pass user that uses its durability, Speed, and access to Taunt to gain tremendous momentum with its boosting moves while simultaneously keeping potential enemies at bay with Taunt. If you can manage to get the ball rolling with Mew's boosts, you can possibly decide the match in an instant, as a fully powered-up Baton Pass recipient (such as?) is nearly unstoppable. While Mew faces some competition as a Baton Passer from other standalone Baton Pass users such as Gorebyss and Smeargle, it still has a few perks over them, specifically its access to Taunt over the former and significantly more bulk over the latter. Rock Polish is mandatory as it lets Mew outspeed most of the metagame, giving Mew the ability to Baton Pass in the face of Pokemon who are normally faster. The choice between Swords Dance and Nasty Plot is naturally team-dependent. Strong physical attackers, particularly Garchomp, Landorus-T, and Terrakion, will appreciate Swords Dance, while special attackers such as Latios and Hydreigon are bolstered by Nasty Plot. Finally, Taunt allows Mew to shut down Pokemon who might attempt to hit it or its Baton Pass recipients with status or phaze them out with Whirlwind or Roar.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>There aren't any alternative item choices. Mental Herb can protect Mew from being Taunted and is invaluable against Prankster users. Lum Berry grants Mew the ability to dodge harmful status such as paralysis and sleep, and is very useful in conjunction with Synchronize and Taunt. The EVs on this set give Mew the maximum amount of bulk while still giving it enough Speed to outspeed most of the metagame after a Rock Polish. HP is maxed out, and the leftover EVs are placed in Defense, providing Mew with extra insurance against the likes of Tyranitar and Scizor if screens are up. A specially defensive spread can be used should you want Mew to wall powerful special threats such as Choice Specs Latios without Light Screen support. Mew has a ton of other move options for the third slot, including but not limited to Bulk Up, Amnesia, Iron Defense, and Calm Mind. The defensive boosting moves are better suited for defensive teams, however.</p>

    <p>This set absolutely requires dual screen support in order to succeed. With dual screens in play, Mew is nearly impossible to OHKO, giving it plenty of room to set up. You should bring Mew in after one of your Pokemon has been KOed, preferably your dual screen user. Directly switching into an opposing Pokemon is unwise because Mew should remain in tip-top condition to maximize its chances of successfully pulling off a Baton Pass. Uxie and Latios deserve a mention because they can set up dual screens and are capable of using Memento, which lets Mew safely switch into the battlefield, and makes Mew nearly indestructible. Bronzong is also a decent dual screen supporter, as its excellent typing and bulk gives it excellent longevity, allowing it to repeatedly set up dual screens. It can also use Explosion to safely bring Mew onto the field.</p>

    <p>There are a variety of Baton Pass recipients to choose from, but the right recipient is required to win matches. It should have excellent natural bulk, decent coverage, the ability to OHKO most of the metagame, and resistances to common priority moves. Garchomp fits the bill for most of these categories; at +2/+2, it can easily OHKO or 2HKO the entire metagame and is extremely difficult to counter. Garchomp's typing makes it resistant to Stealth Rock, making it hard for defensive teams to wear down. Lucario also an excellent recipient as it's also quite difficult to counter, and it even has its own priority move. Keldeo is the perfect recipient on the special side as it's almost impossible to counter at +2/+2, resists common forms of priority, and also resists Stealth Rock.</p>

    <p>While this variant of Mew is almost impossible to counter due to the nature of Baton Pass, there are a few Pokemon who give it trouble. Priority Taunt users such as Tornadus and Sableye can put a complete stop to Mew's Baton Passing attempts. Trick users, such as Choice Latios and Rotom-W, can cripple Mew or its Baton Pass recipients. Because this Mew lacks any offensive moves, it is a sitting duck against faster Pokemon, so powerful sweepers such as Terrakion can set up on Mew if it hasn't used Rock Polish. Dragon Tail users are a pain because the move itself is unaffected by Taunt, completely ruining all Baton Pass attempts. Substitute can bypass Dragon Tail, but it comes at the cost of a boosting move or Taunt. There are some attacks that are simply too strong for Mew to handle, even with dual screens. Choice Band Tyranitar, for example, can still 2HKO Mew even with Reflect up. Mew isn't limited to passing offensive boosts; it can also pass a variety of defensive boosts as well, namely Iron Defense and Amnesia. Finally, it's important to keep in mind that Mew is completely dependent on dual screens for success. While losing them doesn't leave Mew completely helpless, it is unable to stand up against any sort of offense without them.</p>

    [Other Options]

    <p>Mew is the king of other options. Seriously, it's not an exaggeration to suggest that Mew can pull off just about any moveset. It has one of the largest movepools in the entire game, second only to Smeargle; however, unlike Smeargle, it has the stats to back them up. Even so, it can be difficult to find sets outside of the ones that are listed that Mew can run without being outclassed or just flat-out mediocre at. A stand-alone Swords Dance set is possible with a moveset consisting of Flame Charge, Drain Punch, and Baton Pass. This unconventional moveset gives Mew the ability to set up Swords Dances and bypass Tyranitar, Scizor, Heatran, and other Steel-types, as well as pass along the boosts to another physical attacker. The support set can utilize either Roar or Dragon Tail for phazing or Hypnosis to temporarily incapacitate a foe. Mew can also use a Transform set, which can be handy when dealing with an opposing boosting sweeper. To sum it up, Mew gets nearly everything, so go nuts, pick four moves, and see what works for you. If you can imagine it, Mew can probably make it happen.</p>

    [Checks and Counters]

    <p>Countering Mew can be a difficult task due to its staggering versatility. Scouting out its moveset instead of blindly switching in is recommended. Heatran hard-counters support sets, as it resists Psychic-type attacks and is immune to Will-O-Wisp. In fact, if Heatran switches into a Will-O-Wisp, it can retaliate against Mew and its teammates with its boosted Fire-type moves. Strong special attackers are generally suited to taking on Mew. Both Latias and Latios can switch in with little to no trouble and fire off their powerful STAB attacks; however, Mew can actually stall out Choice variants with Softboiled and Special Defense investment. Calm Mind Latios and Latias, on the other hand, can use Mew as setup fodder. Thundurus-T is capable of overpowering Mew with its powerful Electric-type moves or even potentially set up with Nasty Plot or Agility, as Mew cannot OHKO it with Ice Beam. Hydreigon can switch into Mew without worry and fire off its powerful Dark- or Dragon-type STAB moves. Rain sweepers such as Keldeo and Tornadus can similarly overwhelm Mew with their rain-boosted attacks.</p>

    <p>Lead sets can be dealt with by Tyranitar, who can switch into Mew and OHKO it through its Focus Sash because of Sand Stream. Scizor, Heatran, and assorted Steel-types can also switch in and handle it. That said, knocking Mew out and preventing Mew from setting up Stealth Rock are two very different things. Because of Mew's access to Magic Coat and Focus Sash, it is pretty much guaranteed to set up Stealth Rock. Magic Bounce users, such as Espeon and Xatu, are the best stops to Mew, but both of them need to carry a strong attack to actually damage it. Otherwise, Magic Bounce users can be used to break Mew's Focus Sash and switch into a Pokemon that can OHKO it afterwards. The opponent can always predict this, however.</p>

    <p>Nasty Plot Mew's counters are separated into two groups: those who can counter it if it lacks Fire Blast, and those who can counter it if it lacks Dark Pulse. Specially defensive Jirachi, for example, is a hard counter to the former Mew, as it can switch in, cripple Mew with Body Slam, and stall out Mew with a combination of Iron Head and Wish. Bulky Swords Dance Scizor can switch into Mew and hit it with a STAB Bug Bite, which easily brings Mew into Bullet Punch's KO range. On the other hand, Mew that lack Dark Pulse can be beaten by Latias, Latios, and Starmie.</p>

    <p>For the Baton Pass set, there are several precautions you can take to guarantee that Mew doesn't pull off a Baton Pass. Team Preview allows you to scan your opponent's team, determine who Mew's dual screens user is, and devise a way to stop it. A fast Taunt user, such as Azelf or Sableye, can put a stop to most dual screens users. Unfortunately, Azelf itself is a common dual screens user, and relying on a Speed tie to stop it isn't exactly recommended. It's also possible to directly Taunt Mew, but Mew that carry Mental Herb can bypass this. Strong Choice Scarf users will only allow Azelf to set up one screen, giving you an easier time when dealing with Mew. Powerful Fire-types can similarly prevent Metagross from setting up more than one screen. Keep in mind that if you fail to stop screens, it's almost impossible to stop Mew from Baton Passing due to its incredible bulk. Fortunately, unlike Gorebyss and Smeargle, Mew typically takes three turns to set up its Baton Pass recipient, so keep that in mind and find a way to stop it before it Baton Passes.</p>
  22. PK Gaming

    PK Gaming Pursuing My True Self
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    Thank you @sirndpt, I appreciate the thorough GP check.

    I think I addressed most of your concerns, with the exception of adding Baton Pass recipients (it feels redundant because they're already mentioned in the same paragraph) and elaborating on status users (that sentence was referring to virtually every status user in the tier, ie: Thunder Wave users, WoW users, Toxic, etc)

    In the Nasty Plot set I changed awareness to perception, does that sound any better?
    Kingler12345 likes this.
  23. Kingler12345

    Kingler12345 COOKIE COOKIE COOKIE STARTS WITH C
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    Why bolded part only for ferro??
  24. Namso

    Namso
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    Because he said this above the calculations:

    Meaning he's pointing out that Mew OHKOes Ferrothorn with no Nasty Plot boost.
  25. Kingler12345

    Kingler12345 COOKIE COOKIE COOKIE STARTS WITH C
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    Ok then.
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