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Rhyperior (Update)

Discussion in 'Uploaded Analyses' started by capefeather, Feb 12, 2012.

  1. capefeather

    capefeather YOU CAN'T STOP THE FORDS
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    The original Rock Wrecker ;) I'm going change the outdated content and some of the writing (edit: actually it seems I'm just rewriting almost everything to add content and condense the existing content). Apparently, eldino did this last time, so I hope he/she doesn't mind!

    I'm going to have to ask about the EV spreads here. The main reason for 96 Speed EVs was for Donphan, but Azumarill and Registeel are in that Speed bracket as well. Registeel may not be worth investing the Speed EVs, but is Azumarill? It probably would help to force it to use Aqua Jet.

    I also think that it would be beneficial to take a better look at the HP EV allocation and maybe even the Attack EV allocation. Rhyperior's unbalanced stats make it rather silly to just throw EVs into HP and expect to achieve anything specific. I've tried specially defensive spreads as well (the tank set does talk about that but still) and they seem better in a few ways (43% damage reduction from special attacks is pretty big). I'm not really sure, though. Maybe it should just stick to its main job of forcing specific switch-ins.

    For what it's worth, absolute statements really aren't going to make sense here. Don't say Rhyperior should concentrate solely on physical Defense unless you actually want the EV spread to have 252 Def. I find this important enough to display 252 SpD spreads to drive in the point I'm making. If there's some attack that Rhyperior could be taking that makes it need more HP/Def (like Steelix in RU), then it should be mentioned because I'm not sure I can think of any offhand.

    [​IMG]

    [Overview]

    <p>Rhyperior is a rather bizarre Pokemon, having three awesome stats and three ... not-so-awesome stats. This often makes its EV spreads pretty complicated (this article might help). Its typing has a similar effect, giving it a very threatening STAB "QuakeEdge" combination in exchange for major defensive flaws. Solid Rock cushions the typing weaknesses, however, allowing Rhyperior to take weaker Grass- and Water-type attacks, such as Azumarill's Aqua Jet.</p>

    <p>Rhyperior's movepool is large enough for it to have several set possibilities, using such moves as Rock Polish and Rock Blast. Rhyperior's heavily unbalanced stats allow it to force specific opponents out very easily, which allows it to capitalize on its versatility. All in all, while it takes some knowledge of KOs to use Rhyperior effectively, it is a great Pokemon overall, and can find a place on nearly any team.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Tank
    move 1: Earthquake
    move 2: Rock Blast / Stone Edge
    move 3: Megahorn
    move 4: Stealth Rock / Substitute
    item: Leftovers
    ability: Solid Rock
    nature: Adamant
    evs: 208 HP / 252 Atk / 48 SpD

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>Rhyperior's stats and attacks make it a great choice for fighting "physical-with-physical". The perfect three-attack coverage makes it easy to force an opponent out and use that turn to set up Stealth Rock or a Substitute. Rhyperior can take most neutral physical attacks, as well as some super effective ones, and deliver a devastating blow off its massive base 140 Attack. Earthquake and Stone Edge take a good chunk out of Slowbro (32.2% - 38.3%), while Megahorn 2HKOes it (51.8% - 61.4%). Megahorn also deals over 89.1% to Shaymin, a guaranteed OHKO with Stealth Rock or a layer of Spikes. The Rock typing is a double-edged sword for Rhyperior as a Stealth Rock user, however, since it allows it to threaten Xatu but makes it vulnerable to Blastoise and Hitmontop, two very common users of Rapid Spin.</p>

    <p>Rock Blast allows Rhyperior to break Substitutes, and is a remarkably powerful move in its own right. On the other hand, Stone Edge deals damage more consistently and has an increased critical hit ratio, which is perfect for do-or-die moments.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>The EVs for this set can be tweaked in several different ways, and it pays to think about maximizing the benefit from the EV spread and making the most of the Special Defense boost from sand if it is being used. To give a taste of the complexity of making an EV spread for Rhyperior, the spread for the absolute optimum benefit from all of Attack, physical bulk, and special bulk would be 88 HP / 168 Atk / 252 SpD Adamant outside of sand, and 208 HP / 252 Atk / 48 SpD Adamant in sand. In practice, Attack is typically maximized to land as many KOs as possible, and some EVs are placed in HP to take physical attacks like Darmanitan's Superpower and Flygon's Earthquake without being 2HKOed. The latter spread mentioned is enough to take a Giga Drain from an unboosted 252 SpA Timid Mew, even without sand.</p>

    <p>On the other hand, the benefit from investing 252 EVs into Special Defense should not be ignored, providing a 43% boost to Rhyperior's ability to take special attacks. This allows Rhyperior to take attacks like mixed Houndoom's Fire Blast rather comfortably. Yet another possibility is 72 HP / 252 Atk / 184 SpD Adamant, so that Rhyperior takes neutral special attacks just as well as it takes super effective physical attacks; most notably, this spread prevents Hidden Power Grass from Zapdos and Raikou from assuredly OHKOing Rhyperior. Speed investment is less rewarding, but for what it's worth, 96 Speed outruns minimum Speed Azumarill, forcing it to use Aqua Jet to outrun Rhyperior, and 160 Speed outruns minimum Speed Empoleon and Porygon2.</p>

    <p>Special Grass- and Water-type attacks are Rhyperior's worst nightmares, hitting it for triple damage. Slowbro is nearly perfect for checking Rhyperior, as its huge physical bulk allows it to tank Rhyperior's STABs. Bulky Grass-types, such as Roserade and Shaymin, can also send Rhyperior running. Blastoise and Hitmontop both have super effective STABs and can capitalize on Rhyperior switching out by using Rapid Spin to clear out entry hazards. While Zapdos and Raikou cannot switch in freely on Rhyperior, they commonly carry a super effective Hidden Power, likely forcing Rhyperior out. Nidoking operates similarly, commonly having both Earth Power and Ice Beam to force Nidoking out. Porygon2 can actually take advantage of Rhyperior by Tracing Solid Rock or gaining an easy Special Attack boost with Download.</p>

    <p>As far as teammates go, special walls and Pokemon with key resistances are extremely helpful. Snorlax is one of the best options for tanking special attacks through its sheer special bulk, and is especially one of the best answers to Zapdos, Raikou, and Nidoking. Porygon2 and Rotom-H can also deal with Nidoking easily, though both share a weakness with Rhyperior. Grass-types are great teammates in general because they resist both Grass- and Water-type attacks. Roserade is a particularly good option, since it can use Giga Drain or Leaf Storm to make short work of the aforementioned threats to Rhyperior and set up Spikes or Toxic Spikes with ease. It also resists Hitmontop's Fighting-type attacks, and Sludge Bomb will deliver some serious pain to Shaymin. Zapdos is another good choice since it can switch into Ground-, Fighting-, and Grass-type moves and wreak havoc on all of the aforementioned enemies, aided by Rhyperior's Stealth Rock. Guts Heracross runs on a similar theme, and it also does not mind switching into Scald too terribly because of its good Special Defense and the chance of a burn, which activates Guts. Raikou lacks the aforementioned resistances, but its good Special Defense nonetheless make it more than viable, especially with its very threatening offensive prowess.</p>

    <p>Due to Rhyperior's vulnerability to common users of Rapid Spin, it may be worthwhile to look into Ghost-types to block it. Mismagius is among the best for this job, especially if it runs Thunderbolt to maim Blastoise. Dusclops is a more defensive possibility, having access to Will-O-Wisp to cripple Hitmontop. Keep in mind that both Blastoise and Hitmontop can use Foresight to force Rapid Spin to hit, making the effort rather useless. The offensive teammates mentioned earlier can be enough of a deterrent against both Blastoise and Hitmontop, though. Another alternative is to use Ferroseed to punish them with damage every time they use Rapid Spin.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Choice Band
    move 1: Stone Edge
    move 2: Earthquake
    move 3: Megahorn
    move 4: Ice Punch / Rock Blast
    item: Choice Band
    ability: Solid Rock
    nature: Adamant
    evs: 120 HP / 252 Atk / 12 Def / 124 Spe

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>While Rhyperior possesses neither the Speed nor the 120 Base Power STABs of fellow UU power-hitters Darmanitan, Heracross, and Arcanine, it continues to hold onto its niche as a Choice Band user by virtue of its enormous physical bulk and impeccable STAB coverage. Once Rhyperior has stood its ground, there are few switch-ins available to the opponent that do not face being massacred by one of Rhyperior's powerful moves. This is what makes Choice Band Rhyperior so effective: just switch in, take a pittance from a physical attack, smack the opponent's response hard, and repeat. Megahorn has a chance of OHKOing Slowbro (77.7% - 91.9%) and Flygon (90.7%+) with Stealth Rock damage, and may 2HKO Bronzong with Stealth Rock damage (43.2% - 51.5%).</p>

    <p>For the last slot, Ice Punch can OHKO Gligar with Stealth Rock damage (80.2% - 94.6%) and ensures a OHKO against Flygon and a 2HKO against Hippopotas. It is also a great accurate attack to fall back on in general against some of Stone Edge's usual targets if a hit is absolutely needed. Alternatively, Rock Blast can be used to get past Substitute users. Perhaps this set's greatest weakness is the imperfect accuracy of Stone Edge and Megahorn; a miss renders it extremely vulnerable to an opponent that suddenly has much more HP than it could have had.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>The only alternatives that really make sense are Aqua Tail and Avalanche. Aqua Tail is mainly for opposing Rhyperior, though Ice Punch already does a number to it and Aqua Tail misses the aforementioned KOs. Its imperfect accuracy also makes it rather risky. This set does not want to leave more up to chance than it has to. Avalanche is overkill for its unreliability; Ice Punch already hits most of its targets extremely hard.</p>

    <p>Maximum Attack is a given on this set to maximize the chances of KOing some of Rhyperior's bulkier checks with the right move. The other EVs have very specific purposes, enabling Rhyperior to take five Seismic Tosses or Night Shades and outrun minimum Speed Machamp, with the rest being put in Defense. Overall, this spread is great for switching into powerful physical attackers such as Darmanitan, Choice Band Stoutland, and various Dragon- and Flying-types carrying Outrage and Brave Bird. A bulkier spread like 208 HP / 252 Atk / 48 SpD is also good here, since it maximizes tanking ability in sand. Notably, spending EVs on Special Defense can also be beneficial, since this set can actually beat bulky Water-types, including Blastoise, Milotic, and Suicune, by surviving their Scalds and 2HKOing back. Another spread of 120 HP / 252 Atk / 136 SpD preserves Rhyperior's ability to take five Seismic Tosses or Night Shades, while sometimes preventing Zapdos and Raikou from OHKOing Rhyperior with Hidden Power Grass.</p>

    <p>Just about every check is wrecked by the correct move, and even sometimes by an incorrect move, so prepare for some prediction wars when using or facing Choice Band Rhyperior. Appropriate teammates should be on hand should Rhyperior make the wrong move. An offensive teammate is preferred here to maintain momentum. Shaymin and Heracross are among the best teammates, since both counter Slowbro and give Deoxys-D and Bronzong some problems. Shaymin also scares off Gligar. Flygon is trickier to deal with since it has U-turn, but it cannot take more than one Stone Edge and may become a liability if it uses U-turn and Rhyperior stays in. Taking into account that Rhyperior only really minds Earthquake and Choice Band Outrage from Flygon, teammates like Heracross, Zapdos, and Rotom-H can be used to force Flygon to think its move through carefully. Just be very wary of Choice Band Flygon, which plays a similar game to Choice Band Rhyperior and can turn that game in its favor.</p>

    <p>Rhyperior also needs free switch-ins. This can be achieved rather easily using teammates that attract physical attackers or walls. Roserade and Togekiss are nearly perfect for this thanks to their lower Defense and resistances to many of Rhyperior's weaknesses. Heracross works similarly as far as typing goes. U-turn users, such as Azelf and Flygon, are also good here.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Rock Polish
    move 1: Rock Polish
    move 2: Earthquake
    move 3: Stone Edge
    move 4: Megahorn
    item: Life Orb
    ability: Solid Rock
    nature: Jolly
    evs: 252 Atk / 20 SpD / 236 Spe

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>Rock Polish is an attempt to remedy Rhyperior's issues with Speed, allowing it to function as a late-game cleaner. With a Rock Polish boost, Rhyperior is potentially outrun only by Crobat and Choice Scarf users with 70 or higher base Speed. Suddenly, Shaymin cannot just sit by and use Seed Flare anymore, lest it eat a Megahorn and be OHKOed. Thanks to Rhyperior's power, most possible answers from the opponent need only be weakened to facilitate a sweep. Rhyperior's STAB moves alone have great coverage and can cause huge damage to many common Pokemon. Megahorn completes this coverage to score KOs on Shaymin and weakened Slowbro and Flygon.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>Since the fastest common UU Choice Scarf user under 70 base Speed is Machamp, the Speed EVs are tailored to outrun Weavile. Life Orb is crucial to land KOs and make up for the setup turn due to the focus on setting up a Rock Polish and sweeping. Rhyperior has a few other options that it can utilize on this set. First off, Aqua Tail allows Rhyperior to finish off weakened Ground-types, such as Hippopotas and opposing Rhyperior, without taking too much retaliation. Substitute can be used to ease prediction, and it may allow Rhyperior to gain an extra boost, meaning that it can outrun even the faster Choice Scarf users, such as Flygon. Swords Dance can be used for a "Double Dancer" set, but one may find that Rhyperior is simply not fast enough to sustain such a set. Ultimately, Megahorn is usually the best option for the fourth moveslot, as it enables Rhyperior to finish off weakened Slowbro while KOing most common Grass-types. Regarding items, Leftovers can be used over Life Orb to grant Rhyperior more longevity, but the power boost from Life Orb is needed to allow Rhyperior to gain crucial KOs on defensive Shaymin and weakened Slowbro, as well as to make up for the power loss from using a Jolly nature instead of an Adamant one.</p>

    <p>This set has trouble with many common Choice Scarf users, as they can revenge kill it when it is at low enough HP. Flygon, Krookodile, and Heracross can revenge kill a weakened Rhyperior with their STABs, while Choice Scarf Shaymin always KOes Rhyperior with Seed Flare. Physically bulky Pokemon, such as Slowbro (who must be on high health due to Megahorn's chance to OHKO), Milotic, Porygon2, Tangrowth, and Gligar, can survive an attack and dish out a knockout blow in return, cutting the sweep short. A team built around Rock Polish Rhyperior should thus be able to wear down and eliminate these threats; in Slowbro's case, this can prove exceedingly difficult due to Regenerator.</p>

    <p>For the bulky counters, special attackers with wide coverage are useful to put offensive pressure on the opponent. Grass- and Electric-types, such as Shaymin, Roserade, and Zapdos, are great teammates, since they can wreck the bulky Water-types and use Hidden Power Ice to deal with Gligar and Tangrowth. Roserade can also set up Spikes, which punishes switches, or Toxic Spikes, which will put a timer on bulky Water-, Grass-, and Ground-types as soon as they switch in, but its neutrality to Earthquake leaves it lacking against Flygon and Krookodile. Nidoking and Porygon2 run on a similar theme, though both will struggle against opposing Porygon2. Heracross is an interesting teammate because it can lure in Tangrowth and Slowbro under the right circumstances, only to nail them with Megahorn, but Gligar completely walls it.</p>

    <p>More "catch-all" strategies are available as well. Wynaut can trap these Pokemon (though it can still lose if the opponent has a Krookodile on the field, predicts the switch-in, and uses Crunch) and then proceed to KO them with either Counter or Mirror Coat. Wynaut can also use Tickle on Slowbro, so that it is KOed by a Pursuit from a strong physical attacker such as Spiritomb, Escavalier, or Houndoom. Another possibility is to use another physical sweeper, such as Weavile, to lure in the same checks and weaken the team in preparation for Rhyperior's sweep. Weavile also has a Dark-type STAB in Night Slash to hit Slowbro hard, as well as Ice Shard for the Choice Scarf users.</p>

    [Other Options]

    <p>Rhyperior does not have many other options. A Swords Dance set can be very threatening, but being slower than even some walls is a fatal flaw, as it means that Rhyperior is easily revenge killed by Water- and Grass-types. It can, however, work well under Trick Room or Tailwind support to fix Rhyperior's abysmal Speed stat, or in conjunction with Rock Polish. Then again, almost every set appreciates Trick Room or Tailwind support.</p>

    [Checks and Counters]

    <p>Grass-, Water-, and Ground-types are key to beating Rhyperior. Gligar is probably the most reliable counter, since it only really has to worry about Choice Band Ice Punch. Slowbro has been listed throughout, as all it really fears is a Megahorn, and even then, Slowbro can just switch out, regain its HP with Regenerator, and force Rhyperior to try Megahorn a second time, giving an easy opportunity for a Pokemon with a Bug-type resistance, such as Zapdos, to switch in. Electric-types in general are particularly threatening to Rhyperior if they manage to switch in, since they often carry Hidden Power Grass or Hidden Power Water, and even Hidden Power Ice will hit Rhyperior very hard. Shaymin is more or less in the same boat, although again, it is going to be taking a lot from Megahorn. Roserade, Nidoking, and Porygon2 are also very threatening if they manage to switch in. Porygon2 in particular has a fairly easy time with switching in, and it can either Trace Solid Rock or grab a Download boost. Opposing Rhyperior can also work well, but they must be wary of Aqua Tail. If Rock Polish Rhyperior is a cause of worry, most Choice Scarf users with a good super effective attack, such as Krookodile, Heracross, and Flygon, can deal with it, though in many cases, Rhyperior has to be weakened somewhat. Finally, as a user of Stealth Rock, Rhyperior is horribly vulnerable to common Rapid Spin users, such as Blastoise and Hitmontop.</p>
  2. SJCrew

    SJCrew Believer, going on a journey...
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    Stealth Rock should be first slash imo. Substitute isn't anywhere near near as good for an offensive team as Stealth Rock, and it stands to reason why most people end up using the latter anyway. Plus, Rhyperior's speed really gets in the way of breaking certain walls, such as most bulky Water-types and Hitmontop, so it wouldn't help much to Sub in the presence of these guys when they can just outpace you and KO or break the Sub 100% of the time.

    Also, second slash on the Choice Band set's 4th slot should be Ice Punch, not Avalanche, since Avalanche only allows you to hit your targets for 60 BP on the switch (which misses the KO on Gligar and offensive Shaymin after SR).
  3. PK Gaming

    PK Gaming Pursuing My True Self
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    Those 96 speed EVs are useless on the standard set. They were literally only for Donphan; its irrelevant against Registeel (who can't touch you) and Azumarill who you don't want to deal with most of the time. Though I can see the point of 96 speed evs on the choice band set if azumarill concerns you (though it isn't nearly as common as enough, so those 96 speed evs would be AC at best.)

    Rhyperior is just too damn slow. The one thing i'd like it to outspeed (Empoleon) requires to many speed EVs.

    EDIT: 160 speed evs let you outspeed Porygon2 and Empoleon, but its too easy for those other 2 Pokemon to start speed creeping.
  4. FlareBlitz

    FlareBlitz This was never a story that would have a happy end
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    I actually disagree with SpD EVs over HP / Def EVs on the Tank set - Rhyperior actually gains a lot from extra HP EVs when it comes to tanking SE physical hits and it really has no business tanking most special hits anyway, since it can't beat blastoise / milotic regardless and still dies to shit like Rosie's 0 SpA Giga Drain and (sometimes) LO Zapdos' HP Grass. The tank set is better off being brought in on physical hits, which is what Rhyperior should be used for anyway - running SpD means you take far too much from Darm Superpower and Flygon EQ (both of which 2hko 0 HP variants with one layer of spikes but not max HP variants). You mention in your post that you want "specific examples" of physical attacks and, while I gave you some in the previous sentence, that's not how tank sets works - Rhyperior should probably run something like 184 HP / 72 SpD so that it can take physical attacks better, its main purpose, while also not completely sucking at taking the occasional special attack (like NP Mew's unboosted Giga Drain).

    That said, I actually like SpD EVs on the CB set - Rhyperior is not fast enough to outrun most bulky waters, but it can actually take a Scald from all of them with max SpD and beat them. Unlike the tank set, which cannot 2hko any bulky water with Earthquake / Stone Edge (except milotic sometimes), CB gets flat kills on every bulky in the tier, including Suicune. In fact, it 2hkos Milotic through a scald burn, which is pretty sexy. This makes SpD EVs worthwhile on that.
  5. capefeather

    capefeather YOU CAN'T STOP THE FORDS
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    Well, what is a tank, then? The "take hits and dish them out" definition is among the best there is in Pokémon as far as optimizing such an ability precisely goes. At least, it's far more precise than "take physical hits better while not sucking at taking special attacks". Yet I find that people don't quite know how to quantify that. At least, they don't bother to quantify how well an EV spread is supposed to take a physical attack in comparison to a special attack, or how well a spread is supposed to attack in comparison to how well it can defend... except in the ability to land or avoid KOs. This is in spite of the availability of a defense EV calculator that people only seem to use on attackers and maybe "mixed walls". There are many answers to "good enough", and fewer answers to "best", which analyses should be striving for.

    People used to talk about precise defense biases all the time. What happened to that? My guess is that people found that the ability to land or avoid KOs is somewhat more important, which is true. Of course, to do this effectively, you need a good benchmark for landing or avoiding a KO. So ultimately, I don't see what's so wrong about my approach, other than that I haven't been as vigilant in finding KO benchmarks as I was with, say, OU Porygon2.
  6. FlareBlitz

    FlareBlitz This was never a story that would have a happy end
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    My point was that Rhyperior is considered a "physical tank" and it's not nearly as fat as Blissey, such that you can invest in the opposite stat while still being confident that it will perform its role. Without investment Rhyperior gets messed up by SE physical hits that it would otherwise be able to take, which is a problem given the weaknesses its atrocious typing lends it. And while there are probably specific benchmarks (such as the ones I mentioned), my overall point was that the purpose of a physical tank should to be take hits very well on the side it is meant to take hits from, while also not immediately dying to weaker SE hits from the other side. A high HP / low SpD spread accomplishes this better than a no HP / max SpD spread.
    The SpD spread is okay on the CB set because they have a purpose with respect to avoiding specific KOs and KOing back, whereas the tank set won't be getting those KOs.
  7. capefeather

    capefeather YOU CAN'T STOP THE FORDS
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    Does Aqua Tail actually hit anything on Choice Band other than Rhyperior?

    Also the funny thing about Blissey is that the standard 252 HP / 252 Def isn't "efficient" for general walling, anyway. The HP EVs are afaik for avoiding KOs. As far as I can tell, it's the same principle here: deviating from the "most efficient" spread(s) to land or avoid KOs. That or we quantify how well we should take special attacks as opposed to physical attacks.
  8. FPlease

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    Yeah I agree capefeather. I used rhyperior quite a bit a water tail are just for chumps. You might as well go for STAB EQ as it is a safer play. Also with ice punch I think avalanche is a viability that should be considered. Avalanche punishes u-turners who think they go to flygon to resist dual STAB which has happened more than once.
  9. capefeather

    capefeather YOU CAN'T STOP THE FORDS
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    Ice Punch already OHKOes Flygon if you're talking about the fourth slot. I also left Aqua Tail in as the first slash because, after all, Ice Punch is "only" for Gligar and maybe Flygon, who at minimum is damaged enough that it'll only get off maybe one attack.
  10. Oglemi

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    I've always used Ice Punch as a safety move myself, since it nails pokes such as Zapdos, Xatu, Shaymin, Nidos, Missy, Krook, Flygon, Gligar, etc. for really good damage, without having to rely on your Rock move's shoddy accuracy. IMO it's always had more utility over Aqua Tail, but this could just be me.

    If anything Ice Punch just offers a super effective/neutral hit and is guaranteed to hit, which can be crucial with a CB set.

    That's my 2 cents anyway, others can chime in here if they want.
  11. FlareBlitz

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    I've always used EQ / Megahorn / Stone Edge / Rock Blast on Rhyperior - Rock Blast helps destroy substitute users and you can still keep Stone Edge in case you need to nuke something. Aqua Tail doesn't have anywhere near that utility. The slashes should probably be Ice Punch / Rock Blast.
  12. Snunch

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    No need to mention Rock Blast on the RP set, you need the guaranteed power of Stone Edge to sweep.

    I really don't like that EV spread on CB because Rhyperior really shouldn't be trying to tank special attacks at all. Rhyperior should be played to its strengths, which include tanking CB Stoutland, various Outrages, and Brave Birds. 0/0 Rhyperior just cant do this reliably and shouldn't even be mentioned.

    I think the main EV spread on CB should be 120 HP / 252 Atk / 12 Def / 124 Spe. This allows Rhyperior to outspeed min Machamp, gives it 401 HP for night shade and hazard reasons and puts the rest into defense to better tank the physical attacks that you need it to. But really, aside from 252 atk, Rhyperior can run almost anything, so if any QC members have any EVs they really like please speak up.

    Sorry this is taking a while, Rhyperior is complex so I want to make sure we get everything right before this goes through QC.
  13. capefeather

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    I kind of figured someone else would comment on what Snunch suggested for Choice Band, which is part of why I delayed the edit a bit.
  14. Snunch

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  15. Chou Toshio

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  16. Moo

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    *stamp*
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    [Overview]

    <p>Rhyperior is a rather bizarre Pokemon, having three awesome stats and three (space after ''three'' and before the ellipse)... not-so-awesome stats. This makes it rather complicated to make EV spreads for it often makes its EV spreads pretty complicated. Its typing has a similar effect, giving it a very threatening STAB "QuakeEdge" combination in exchange for major defensive flaws. Solid Rock cushions the typing weaknesses, however, allowing Rhyperior to take weaker Grass- and Water-type attacks, such as Azumarill's Aqua Jet.</p>

    <p>Rhyperior's movepool is large enough that it has several set possibilities, using such moves as Rock Polish and Rock Blast. The heavily unbalanced stats allow Rhyperior to force specific opponents out very easily, which allows it to capitalize on its versatility. All in all, while it takes some knowledge of KOs to use Rhyperior effectively, it is a great Pokemon overall, and can find a place on nearly any team.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Tank
    move 1: Earthquake
    move 2: Rock Blast / Stone Edge
    move 3: Megahorn
    move 4: Stealth Rock / Substitute
    item: Leftovers
    ability: Solid Rock
    nature: Adamant
    evs: 208 HP / 252 Atk / 48 SpD

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>Rhyperior's stats and attacks make it a great choice for fighting ''physical-with-physical''. The perfect three-attack coverage makes it easy to force an opponent out and use that turn to use set up Stealth Rock or Substitute. It Rhyperior can take most neutral physical attacks, as well as some super effective ones, and deliver a devastating blow off of its massive 140 base 140 Attack. Earthquake and Stone Edge take a good chunk out of Slowbro (32.2% - 38.3%), while Megahorn 2HKOes it (51.8% - 61.4%). Megahorn also deals over 89.1% to Shaymin, a guaranteed OHKO with Stealth Rock or a layer of Spikes. The Rock typing is a double-edged sword for Rhyperior as a Stealth Rock user, however, since it allows it to threaten Xatu but makes it vulnerable to Blastoise and Hitmontop, two very common users of Rapid Spin.</p>

    <p>Rock Blast allows Rhyperior to break Substitutes, and is a remarkably powerful move in its own right. On the other hand, Stone Edge deals damage more consistently, and has an increased hit ratio, which is perfect for do-or-die moments.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>The EVs for this set can be tweaked in several different ways, and it pays to think about how to maximizing the benefit from the EV spread, and to consider the making the most of the Special Defense boost from sand if it is being used. To give a taste of the complexity of making an EV spread for Rhyperior, the spread for the absolute optimum benefit from all of Attack, physical bulk, and special bulk would be 88 HP / 168 Atk / 252 SpD Adamant outside the sand, and 208 HP / 252 Atk / 48 SpD Adamant in the sand. In practice, Attack is typically maximized to land as many KOs as possible, and some EVs are placed in HP to be able to take physical attacks like Darmanitan's Superpower and Flygon's Earthquake without being 2HKOed. The latter spread mentioned is enough to take a Giga Drain from an unboosted 252 SpA Timid Mew, even without sand.</p>

    <p>On the other hand, the benefit from investing 252 EVs into Special Defense should not be ignored, providing a 43% boost to Rhyperior's ability to take special attacks. This allows Rhyperior to take attacks like mixed Houndoom's Fire Blast rather comfortably. Yet another possibility is 72 HP / 252 Atk / 184 SpD Adamant so that Rhyperior takes neutral special attacks just as well as it takes super effective physical attacks. Speed investment is less rewarding, but for what it's worth, 96 Speed outruns minimum Speed Azumarill, forcing it to use Aqua Jet to outrun Rhyperior, and 160 Speed outruns minimum Speed Empoleon and Porygon2.</p>

    <p>Special Grass- and Water-type attacks are Rhyperior's worst nightmares, hitting it for triple damage. Slowbro is nearly perfect for checking Rhyperior, as its huge defensive physical bulk allows it to tank Rhyperior's STABs. Bulky Grass-types, such as Roserade and Shaymin, can also send Rhyperior running. Blastoise and Hitmontop both have super effective STABs and can capitalize on Rhyperior switching out by using Rapid Spin to clear out entry hazards. While Zapdos and Raikou cannot switch in freely on Rhyperior, they commonly carry a super effective Hidden Power, likely forcing Rhyperior out. Nidoking operates similarly, commonly having both Earth Power and Ice Beam to force Nidoking out. Porygon2 can actually take advantage of Rhyperior by Tracing Solid Rock or gaining an easy Special Attack boost with Download.</p>

    <p>As far as teammates go, special walls and Pokemon with key resistances are extremely helpful. Snorlax is one of the best options for tanking special attacks through its sheer special bulk, and is especially one of the best answers to Zapdos, Raikou, and Nidoking. Porygon2 and Rotom-H can also deal with Nidoking easily, though both share a weakness with one of Rhyperior's weaknesses each. Grass-types are great teammates in general because they resist both Grass- and Water-type attacks without difficulty, while walling opposing Grass-types. Roserade is a particularly good option, since Giga Drain or Leaf Storm will make short work of the aforementioned threats to Rhyperior, and it can also set up Spikes or Toxic Spikes with ease. It also resists Hitmontop's Fighting-type attacks, and Sludge Bomb will deliver some serious pain to Shaymin. Zapdos is another good choice since it can switch into Ground-, Fighting-, and Grass-type moves and wreak some havoc on all of the aforementioned enemies, aided by Rhyperior's Stealth Rock. Guts Heracross runs on a similar theme, and it also does not mind switching into Scald too terribly because of its good Special Defense and its potential burn the chance of a burn activating Guts. Raikou lacks the aforementioned resistances, but its good Special Defense nonetheless make it more than plausible viable, especially with its very threatening offensive prowess.</p>

    <p>Due to Rhyperior's vulnerability to common users of Rapid Spin, it may be worthwhile to look into Ghost-types to block it. Mismagius is among the best for this job, especially if it runs Thunderbolt to maim Blastoise. Dusclops is a more defensive possibility, having access to Will-O-Wisp to cripple Hitmontop. Keep in mind that both Blastoise and Hitmontop can use Foresight to force Rapid Spin to hit, making the effort rather useless. The offensive teammates mentioned earlier can be enough of a deterrent against both Blastoise and Hitmontop, though. Another alternative is to use Ferroseed to punish them with damage every time they use Rapid Spin.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Choice Band
    move 1: Stone Edge
    move 2: Earthquake
    move 3: Megahorn
    move 4: Ice Punch / Rock Blast
    item: Choice Band
    ability: Solid Rock
    nature: Adamant
    evs: 120 HP / 252 Atk / 12 Def / 124 Spe

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>While Rhyperior possesses neither the Speed nor the 120 Base Power STABs of fellow UU power-hitters Darmanitan, Heracross, and Arcanine, it continues to hold onto its niche as a Choice Band user by virtue of its enormous physical bulk and impeccable STAB coverage. Once Rhyperior has stood its ground, there are few switch-ins available to the opponent that do not face being massacred by one of Rhyperior's powerful moves. This is what makes Choice Band Rhyperior so effective: just switch in, take a pittance from a physical attack, smack the opponent's response hard, and repeat. Megahorn has a chance of OHKOing Slowbro (77.7% - 91.9%), Flygon (90.7%+), and bulky Deoxys-D (77% - 90.8%) with Stealth Rock damage, and may 2HKO Bronzong with Stealth Rock damage (43.2% - 51.5%).</p>

    <p>For the last slot, Ice Punch can OHKO Gligar with Stealth Rock damage (80.2% - 94.6%) and ensures a OHKO against Flygon and a 2HKO against Hippopotas. It is also a great accurate attack to fall back on in general against some of Stone Edge's usual targets if a hit is absolutely needed. Alternatively, Rock Blast can be used to get past Substitute users. Perhaps this set's greatest weakness is the imperfect accuracy of Stone Edge and Megahorn; a miss renders it extremely vulnerable to an opponent that suddenly has much more HP than it could have had.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>The only alternatives that really make sense are Aqua Tail and Avalanche. Aqua Tail is mainly for opposing Rhyperior, though Ice Punch already does a number to it and Aqua Tail misses the aforementioned KOs. Its imperfect accuracy also makes it rather risky. This set does not want to leave more up to chance than it has to. Avalanche is overkill for its unreliability; Ice Punch already hits most of its targets extremely hard.</p>

    <p>Maximum Attack is a given on this set to maximize the chances of KOing some of the bulkier checks with the right move. The rest of the given other EVs have very specific purposes, enabling Rhyperior reaching 401 HP to be able to take five Seismic Tosses and outrun minimum Speed Machamp, and putting the rest into Defense with the rest being put in Defense. Overall, this spread is great for switching into powerful physical attackers, such as Darmanitan, Choice Band Stoutland, and various Dragon- and Flying-types carrying Outrage and Brave Bird. A bulkier spread like 208 HP / 252 Atk / 48 SpD is also good here, since it maximizes tanking ability in the sand. Notably, spending EVs on Special Defense can also be beneficial, since this set can actually beat bulky Water-types, including Blastoise, Milotic, and Suicune, by surviving their Scalds and 2HKOing back.</p>

    <p>Just about every check is wrecked by the correct move, and even sometimes by an incorrect move, so prepare for some prediction wars when using or facing Choice Band Rhyperior. Appropriate teammates should be on hand should Rhyperior make the wrong move. An offensive teammate is preferred here to maintain momentum. Shaymin and Heracross are among the best teammates, since both counter Slowbro and give Deoxys-D and Bronzong some problems. Shaymin also scares off Gligar. Flygon is trickier to deal with since it has U-turn, but it takes over half 50%from Stone Edge and may become a liability if it uses U-turn and Rhyperior stays in. Remembering Taking into account that Rhyperior only really minds Earthquake and Choice Band boosted Outrage from Flygon, teammates like Heracross, Zapdos, and Rotom-H can be used to force Flygon to think its move through carefully. Just be very wary of Choice Band Flygon, which plays a similar game to Choice Band Rhyperior and can turn that game in its favor.</p>

    <p>Rhyperior also needs free switch-ins. This can be achieved rather easily using teammates that attract physical attackers or walls. Roserade and Togekiss are nearly perfect for this thanks to their lower Defense and resistances to many of Rhyperior's weaknesses. Heracross works similarly as far as typing goes. U-turn users, such as Azelf and Flygon, are also good here.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Rock Polish
    move 1: Rock Polish
    move 2: Earthquake
    move 3: Stone Edge
    move 4: Megahorn
    item: Life Orb
    ability: Solid Rock
    nature: Jolly
    evs: 252 Atk / 20 SpD / 236 Spe

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>Rock Polish is an attempt to remedy Rhyperior's issues with Speed, attempting allowing it to function as a late-game cleaner. With a Rock Polish boost, Rhyperior is potentially outrun only by Crobat and Choice Scarf users with 70 or higher base Speed. Suddenly, Shaymin cannot just sit by and use Seed Flare anymore, lest it eat a Megahorn and be OHKOed. Due to the focus on setting up a Rock Polish and sweeping, Life Orb is crucial to land KOs to make up for the setup turn. Thanks to Rhyperior's power, most possible answers from the opponent need only be weakened to facilitate a sweep.</p>

    <p>The moves and EVs are all fairly straightforward. The Rhyperior's STAB moves alone have great coverage and can cause huge damage to many common Pokemon. Megahorn completes this coverage to score KOs on Shaymin and weakened Slowbro and Flygon. Since the fastest common UU Choice Scarf user under 70 base Speed is Machamp, the Speed EVs are tailored to outrun Weavile.</p> (Fuse these two paragraphs. I moved two sentences to AC since they talked about Rhyperior's item and EVs, and these belong in AC, not Set Comments.)

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>Since the fastest common UU Choice Scarf user under base 70 Speed is Machamp, the Speed EVs are tailored to outrun Weavile. Life Orb is crucial to land KOs and make up for the setup turn due to the focus on setting up a Rock Polish and sweeping.Rhyperior has a few other options that it can utilize on this set. First off, Aqua Tail allows Rhyperior to finish off weakened Ground-types, such as Hippopotas and opposing Rhyperior, without taking too much retaliation. Substitute can be used to ease prediction, and it may allow Rhyperior to gain an extra boost, meaning that it can outrun even the faster Choice Scarf users, such as Flygon. Swords Dance can be used for a "Double Dancer" style set, but one may find that Rhyperior is simply not fast enough to sustain such a set. Ultimately, Megahorn is usually the best option for the fourth moveslot, as it enables Rhyperior to finish off weakened Slowbro, while KOing most common Grass-types. Regarding items, Leftovers can be used over Life Orb to grant Rhyperior some more survivability longevity, but the power boost from Life Orb is needed to allow Rhyperior to gain crucial KOs on defensive Shaymin and weakened Slowbro, as well as to make up for the power loss from using a Jolly nature instead of an Adamant one.</p>

    <p>This set has trouble with many common Choice Scarf users, as they can revenge kill it when it is at low enough HP. Flygon, Krookodile, and Heracross can revenge kill a weakened Rhyperior with their STABs, while Choice Scarf Shaymin always KOes Rhyperior with Seed Flare. Physically bulky Pokemon, such as Slowbro (who must be on high health due to Megahorn's chance to OHKO), Milotic, Porygon2, Tangrowth, and Gligar, can survive an attack and dish out a knockout blow in return, cutting the sweep short. The A team built around Rock Polish Rhyperior should thus be able to wear down and eliminate these threats; in Slowbro's case, this can prove exceedingly difficult due to Regenerator.</p>

    <p>For the bulky counters, special attackers with wide coverage are useful to put offensive pressure on the opponent. Grass- and Electric-types, such as Shaymin, Roserade, and Zapdos, are great teammates, since they can wreck the bulky Water-types and use Hidden Power Ice to deal with Gligar and Tangrowth. Roserade can also set up Spikes, which punishes switches, or Toxic Spikes, which will put a timer on bulky Water-, Grass-, and Ground-types as soon as they switch in, but its neutrality to Earthquake leaves it lacking against Flygon and Krookodile. Nidoking and Porygon2 run on a similar theme, though both will struggle against opposing Porygon2. Heracross is an interesting teammate because it can lure in Tangrowth and Slowbro under the right circumstances, only to nail them with Megahorn, but Gligar completely walls it.</p>

    <p>More "catch-all" strategies are available as well. Wynaut can trap these Pokemon (though the hope is that Krookodile doesn't it can still lose if the opponent has a Krookodile on the field, predicts the switch-in, and uses Crunch) and then proceed to KO them with either Counter or Mirror Coat. Wynaut can also use Tickle on Slowbro, so that it is KOed by a Pursuit from a strong physical attacker, such as Spiritomb, Escavalier, or Houndoom. Another possibility is to use another physical sweeper, such as Weavile, to lure in the same checks and weaken the team in preparation for Rhyperior's sweep. Weavile also has a Dark-type STAB in Night Slash to hit Slowbro hard, as well as Ice Shard for the Choice Scarf users.</p>

    [Other Options]

    <p>Rhyperior does not have many other options. A Swords Dance set can be very threatening, but being slower than even some walls is a fatal flaw, meaning making it is easily revenge killed by Water- and Grass-types. It can, however, work well under Trick Room or Tailwind support to fix Rhyperior's abysmal Speed stat, or in conjunction with Rock Polish. In fact, almost any set appreciates Trick Room support.</p>

    [Checks and Counters]

    <p>Grass-, Water-, and Ground-types are key to beating Rhyperior. Gligar is probably the most reliable counter, since it only really has to worry about Choice Band Ice Punch. Slowbro has been listed throughout, as all it really fears is a Megahorn, and even then, Slowbro can just switch out, regain its HP with Regenerator, and force Rhyperior to try Megahorn a second time, giving an easy opportunity for a Pokemon with a Bug-type resistance, such as Zapdos, to switch in. Electric-types in general are particularly threatening to Rhyperior if they manage to switch in, since they often carry Hidden Power Grass or Hidden Power Water, and even Hidden Power Ice will hit Rhyperior very hard. Shaymin is more or less in the same boat, although again, it is going to be taking a lot from Megahorn. Roserade, Nidoking, and Porygon2 are also very threatening if they manage to switch in. Porygon2 in particular has a fairly easy time with switching in, and it can either Trace Solid Rock or grab a Download boost. Opposing Rhyperior can also work well, but they must be wary of Aqua Tail. If Rock Polish Rhyperior is a cause of worry, most Choice Scarf users with a good super effective attack, such as Krookodile, Heracross, and Flygon, can deal with it, though in many cases, Rhyperior has to be weakened somewhat. Finally, as a user of Stealth Rock, Rhyperior is horribly vulnerable to common Rapid Spin users, such as Blastoise and Hitmontop.</p>


    [​IMG]

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  18. capefeather

    capefeather YOU CAN'T STOP THE FORDS
    is a Forum Moderatoris a CAP Contributoris a Battle Server Moderator Alumnus
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    Uh, yeah, sorry about the delay. Thanks, Calm Pokemaster! (Also, BBcode works on-site, right? I felt that the "Maximizing Your Defenses" article was relevant to Rhyperior's EVs.)
  19. Oglemi

    Oglemi MIEU
    is a Tournament Directoris a member of the Site Staffis a Community Contributoris a Pokemon Researcheris a Contributor to Smogonis a Smogon Media Contributoris an Administratoris a Tiering Contributor Alumnus
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    I'm actually not totally sure but in any case I or someone else will figure it out when it gets uploaded. :)
  20. uraga

    uraga Walking the streets with you in your worn-out jeans
    is a Contributor Alumnus

    Joined:
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    Show Hide
    [Overview]

    <p>Rhyperior is a rather bizarre Pokemon, having three awesome stats and three ... not-so-awesome stats. This often makes its EV spreads pretty complicated (this article might help). Its typing has a similar effect, giving it a very threatening STAB "QuakeEdge" combination in exchange for major defensive flaws. Solid Rock cushions the typing weaknesses, however, allowing Rhyperior to take weaker Grass- and Water-type attacks, such as Azumarill's Aqua Jet.</p>

    <p>Rhyperior's movepool is large enough for it to have that it has several set possibilities, using such moves as Rock Polish and Rock Blast. Rhyperior’s The heavily unbalanced stats allow it Rhyperior to force specific opponents out very easily, which allows it to capitalize on its versatility. All in all, while it takes some knowledge of KOs to use Rhyperior effectively, it is a great Pokemon overall, and can find a place on nearly any team.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Tank
    move 1: Earthquake
    move 2: Rock Blast / Stone Edge
    move 3: Megahorn
    move 4: Stealth Rock / Substitute
    item: Leftovers
    ability: Solid Rock
    nature: Adamant
    evs: 208 HP / 252 Atk / 48 SpD

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>Rhyperior's stats and attacks make it a great choice for fighting "physical-with-physical". The perfect three-attack coverage makes it easy to force an opponent out and use that turn to set up Stealth Rock or a Substitute. Rhyperior can take most neutral physical attacks, as well as some super effective ones, and deliver a devastating blow off its massive base 140 Attack. Earthquake and Stone Edge take a good chunk out of Slowbro (32.2% - 38.3%), while Megahorn 2HKOes it (51.8% - 61.4%). Megahorn also deals over 89.1% to Shaymin, a guaranteed OHKO with Stealth Rock or a layer of Spikes. The Rock typing is a double-edged sword for Rhyperior as a Stealth Rock user, however, since it allows it to threaten Xatu but makes it vulnerable to Blastoise and Hitmontop, two very common users of Rapid Spin.</p>

    <p>Rock Blast allows Rhyperior to break Substitutes, and is a remarkably powerful move in its own right. On the other hand, Stone Edge deals damage more consistently, and has an increased critical hit ratio, which is perfect for do-or-die moments.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>The EVs for this set can be tweaked in several different ways, and it pays to think about maximizing the benefit from the EV spread and making the most of the Special Defense boost from sand if it is being used. To give a taste of the complexity of making an EV spread for Rhyperior, the spread for the absolute optimum benefit from all of Attack, physical bulk, and special bulk would be 88 HP / 168 Atk / 252 SpD Adamant outside of the sand, and 208 HP / 252 Atk / 48 SpD Adamant in the sand. In practice, Attack is typically maximized to land as many KOs as possible, and some EVs are placed in HP to take physical attacks like Darmanitan's Superpower and Flygon's Earthquake without being 2HKOed. The latter spread mentioned is enough to take a Giga Drain from an unboosted 252 SpA Timid Mew, even without sand.</p>

    <p>On the other hand, the benefit from investing 252 EVs into Special Defense should not be ignored, providing a 43% boost to Rhyperior's ability to take special attacks. This allows Rhyperior to take attacks like mixed Houndoom's Fire Blast rather comfortably. Yet another possibility is 72 HP / 252 Atk / 184 SpD Adamant, so that Rhyperior takes neutral special attacks just as well as it takes super effective physical attacks;, and most notably, this spread prevents Hidden Power Grass from Zapdos and Raikou from assuredly OHKOing Rhyperior. Speed investment is less rewarding, but for what it's worth, 96 Speed outruns minimum Speed Azumarill, forcing it to use Aqua Jet to outrun Rhyperior, and 160 Speed outruns minimum Speed Empoleon and Porygon2.</p>

    <p>Special Grass- and Water-type attacks are Rhyperior's worst nightmares, hitting it for triple damage. Slowbro is nearly perfect for checking Rhyperior, as its huge physical bulk allows it to tank Rhyperior's STABs. Bulky Grass-types, such as Roserade and Shaymin, can also send Rhyperior running. Blastoise and Hitmontop both have super effective STABs and can capitalize on Rhyperior switching out by using Rapid Spin to clear out entry hazards. While Zapdos and Raikou cannot switch in freely on Rhyperior, they commonly carry a super effective Hidden Power, likely forcing Rhyperior out. Nidoking operates similarly, commonly having both Earth Power and Ice Beam to force Nidoking out. Porygon2 can actually take advantage of Rhyperior by Tracing Solid Rock or gaining an easy Special Attack boost with Download.</p>

    <p>As far as teammates go, special walls and Pokemon with key resistances are extremely helpful. Snorlax is one of the best options for tanking special attacks through its sheer special bulk, and is especially one of the best answers to Zapdos, Raikou, and Nidoking. Porygon2 and Rotom-H can also deal with Nidoking easily, though both share a weakness with Rhyperior. Grass-types are great teammates in general because they resist both Grass- and Water-type attacks. Roserade is a particularly good option, since it can use Giga Drain or Leaf Storm to will make short work of the aforementioned threats to Rhyperior, and it can also set up Spikes or Toxic Spikes with ease. It also resists Hitmontop's Fighting-type attacks, and Sludge Bomb will deliver some serious pain to Shaymin. Zapdos is another good choice since it can switch into Ground-, Fighting-, and Grass-type moves and wreak havoc on all of the aforementioned enemies, aided by Rhyperior's Stealth Rock. Guts Heracross runs on a similar theme, and it also does not mind switching into Scald too terribly because of its good Special Defense and the chance of a burn, which activates Guts. Raikou lacks the aforementioned resistances, but its good Special Defense nonetheless make it more than viable, especially with its very threatening offensive prowess.</p>

    <p>Due to Rhyperior's vulnerability to common users of Rapid Spin, it may be worthwhile to look into Ghost-types to block it. Mismagius is among the best for this job, especially if it runs Thunderbolt to maim Blastoise. Dusclops is a more defensive possibility, having access to Will-O-Wisp to cripple Hitmontop. Keep in mind that both Blastoise and Hitmontop can use Foresight to force Rapid Spin to hit, making the effort rather useless. The offensive teammates mentioned earlier can be enough of a deterrent against both Blastoise and Hitmontop, though. Another alternative is to use Ferroseed to punish them with damage every time they use Rapid Spin.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Choice Band
    move 1: Stone Edge
    move 2: Earthquake
    move 3: Megahorn
    move 4: Ice Punch / Rock Blast
    item: Choice Band
    ability: Solid Rock
    nature: Adamant
    evs: 120 HP / 252 Atk / 12 Def / 124 Spe

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>While Rhyperior possesses neither the Speed nor the 120 Base Power STABs of fellow UU power-hitters Darmanitan, Heracross, and Arcanine, it continues to hold onto its niche as a Choice Band user by virtue of its enormous physical bulk and impeccable STAB coverage. Once Rhyperior has stood its ground, there are few switch-ins available to the opponent that do not face being massacred by one of Rhyperior's powerful moves. This is what makes Choice Band Rhyperior so effective: just switch in, take a pittance from a physical attack, smack the opponent's response hard, and repeat. Megahorn has a chance of OHKOing Slowbro (77.7% - 91.9%) and Flygon (90.7%+) with Stealth Rock damage, and may 2HKO Bronzong with Stealth Rock damage (43.2% - 51.5%).</p>

    <p>For the last slot, Ice Punch can OHKO Gligar with Stealth Rock damage (80.2% - 94.6%) and ensures a OHKO against Flygon and a 2HKO against Hippopotas. It is also a great accurate attack to fall back on in general against some of Stone Edge's usual targets if a hit is absolutely needed. Alternatively, Rock Blast can be used to get past Substitute users. Perhaps this set's greatest weakness is the imperfect accuracy of Stone Edge and Megahorn; a miss renders it extremely vulnerable to an opponent that suddenly has much more HP than it could have had.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>The only alternatives that really make sense are Aqua Tail and Avalanche. Aqua Tail is mainly for opposing Rhyperior, though Ice Punch already does a number to it and Aqua Tail misses the aforementioned KOs. Its imperfect accuracy also makes it rather risky. This set does not want to leave more up to chance than it has to. Avalanche is overkill for its unreliability; Ice Punch already hits most of its targets extremely hard.</p>

    <p>Maximum Attack is a given on this set to maximize the chances of KOing some of its the bulkier checks with the right move. The other EVs have very specific purposes, enabling Rhyperior to take five Seismic Tosses or Night Shades, and outrun minimum Speed Machamp, with the rest being put in Defense. Overall, this spread is great for switching into powerful physical attackers such as Darmanitan, Choice Band Stoutland, and various Dragon- and Flying-types carrying Outrage and Brave Bird. A bulkier spread like 208 HP / 252 Atk / 48 SpD is also good here, since it maximizes tanking ability in the sand. Notably, spending EVs on Special Defense can also be beneficial, since this set can actually beat bulky Water-types, including Blastoise, Milotic, and Suicune, by surviving their Scalds and 2HKOing back. Another spread of 120 HP / 252 Atk / 136 SpD preserves Rhyperior's ability to take five Seismic Tosses or Night Shades, while sometimes preventing Zapdos and Raikou from OHKOing Rhyperior with Hidden Power Grass.</p>

    <p>Just about every check is wrecked by the correct move, and even sometimes by an incorrect move, so prepare for some prediction wars when using or facing Choice Band Rhyperior. Appropriate teammates should be on hand should Rhyperior make the wrong move. An offensive teammate is preferred here to maintain momentum. Shaymin and Heracross are among the best teammates, since both counter Slowbro and give Deoxys-D and Bronzong some problems. Shaymin also scares off Gligar. Flygon is trickier to deal with since it has U-turn, but it cannot take more than one Stone Edge and may become a liability if it uses U-turn and Rhyperior stays in. Taking into account that Rhyperior only really minds Earthquake and Choice Band Outrage from Flygon, teammates like Heracross, Zapdos, and Rotom-H can be used to force Flygon to think its move through carefully. Just be very wary of Choice Band Flygon, which plays a similar game to Choice Band Rhyperior and can turn that game in its favor.</p>

    <p>Rhyperior also needs free switch-ins. This can be achieved rather easily using teammates that attract physical attackers or walls. Roserade and Togekiss are nearly perfect for this thanks to their lower Defense and resistances to many of Rhyperior's weaknesses. Heracross works similarly as far as typing goes. U-turn users, such as Azelf and Flygon, are also good here.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Rock Polish
    move 1: Rock Polish
    move 2: Earthquake
    move 3: Stone Edge
    move 4: Megahorn
    item: Life Orb
    ability: Solid Rock
    nature: Jolly
    evs: 252 Atk / 20 SpD / 236 Spe

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>Rock Polish is an attempt to remedy Rhyperior's issues with Speed, allowing it to function as a late-game cleaner. With a Rock Polish boost, Rhyperior is potentially outrun only by Crobat and Choice Scarf users with 70 or higher base Speed. Suddenly, Shaymin cannot just sit by and use Seed Flare anymore, lest it eat a Megahorn and be OHKOed. Thanks to Rhyperior's power, most possible answers from the opponent need only be weakened to facilitate a sweep. Rhyperior's STAB moves alone have great coverage and can cause huge damage to many common Pokemon. Megahorn completes this coverage to score KOs on Shaymin and weakened Slowbro and Flygon.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>Since the fastest common UU Choice Scarf user under 70 base Speed is Machamp, the Speed EVs are tailored to outrun Weavile. Life Orb is crucial to land KOs and make up for the setup turn due to the focus on setting up a Rock Polish and sweeping. Rhyperior has a few other options that it can utilize on this set. First off, Aqua Tail allows Rhyperior to finish off weakened Ground-types, such as Hippopotas and opposing Rhyperior, without taking too much retaliation. Substitute can be used to ease prediction, and it may allow Rhyperior to gain an extra boost, meaning that it can outrun even the faster Choice Scarf users, such as Flygon. Swords Dance can be used for a "Double Dancer" set, but one may find that Rhyperior is simply not fast enough to sustain such a set. Ultimately, Megahorn is usually the best option for the fourth moveslot, as it enables Rhyperior to finish off weakened Slowbro while KOing most common Grass-types. Regarding items, Leftovers can be used over Life Orb to grant Rhyperior more longevity, but the power boost from Life Orb is needed to allow Rhyperior to gain crucial KOs on defensive Shaymin and weakened Slowbro, as well as to make up for the power loss from using a Jolly nature instead of an Adamant one.</p>

    <p>This set has trouble with many common Choice Scarf users, as they can revenge kill it when it is at low enough HP. Flygon, Krookodile, and Heracross can revenge kill a weakened Rhyperior with their STABs, while Choice Scarf Shaymin always KOes Rhyperior with Seed Flare. Physically bulky Pokemon, such as Slowbro (who must be on high health due to Megahorn's chance to OHKO), Milotic, Porygon2, Tangrowth, and Gligar, can survive an attack and dish out a knockout blow in return, cutting the sweep short. A team built around Rock Polish Rhyperior should thus be able to wear down and eliminate these threats; in Slowbro's case, this can prove exceedingly difficult due to Regenerator.</p>

    <p>For the bulky counters, special attackers with wide coverage are useful to put offensive pressure on the opponent. Grass- and Electric-types, such as Shaymin, Roserade, and Zapdos, are great teammates, since they can wreck the bulky Water-types and use Hidden Power Ice to deal with Gligar and Tangrowth. Roserade can also set up Spikes, which punishes switches, or Toxic Spikes, which will put a timer on bulky Water-, Grass-, and Ground-types as soon as they switch in, but its neutrality to Earthquake leaves it lacking against Flygon and Krookodile. Nidoking and Porygon2 run on a similar theme, though both will struggle against opposing Porygon2. Heracross is an interesting teammate because it can lure in Tangrowth and Slowbro under the right circumstances, only to nail them with Megahorn, but Gligar completely walls it.</p>

    <p>More "catch-all" strategies are available as well. Wynaut can trap these Pokemon (though it can still lose if the opponent has a Krookodile on the field, predicts the switch-in, and uses Crunch) and then proceed to KO them with either Counter or Mirror Coat. Wynaut can also use Tickle on Slowbro, so that it is KOed by a Pursuit from a strong physical attacker such as Spiritomb, Escavalier, or Houndoom. Another possibility is to use another physical sweeper, such as Weavile, to lure in the same checks and weaken the team in preparation for Rhyperior's sweep. Weavile also has a Dark-type STAB in Night Slash to hit Slowbro hard, as well as Ice Shard for the Choice Scarf users.</p>

    [Other Options]

    <p>Rhyperior does not have many other options. A Swords Dance set can be very threatening, but being slower than even some walls is a fatal flaw, as it which means Rhyperior it is easily revenge killed by Water- and Grass-types. It can, however, work well under Trick Room or Tailwind support to fix Rhyperior's abysmal Speed stat, or in conjunction with Rock Polish. In fact, almost every any set appreciates Trick Room support.</p>

    [Checks and Counters]

    <p>Grass-, Water-, and Ground-types are key to beating Rhyperior. Gligar is probably the most reliable counter, since it only really has to worry about Choice Band Ice Punch. Slowbro has been listed throughout, as all it really fears is a Megahorn, and even then, Slowbro can just switch out, regain its HP with Regenerator, and force Rhyperior to try Megahorn a second time, giving an easy opportunity for a Pokemon with a Bug-type resistance, such as Zapdos, to switch in. Electric-types in general are particularly threatening to Rhyperior if they manage to switch in, since they often carry Hidden Power Grass or Hidden Power Water, and even Hidden Power Ice will hit Rhyperior very hard. Shaymin is more or less in the same boat, although again, it is going to be taking a lot from Megahorn. Roserade, Nidoking, and Porygon2 are also very threatening if they manage to switch in. Porygon2 in particular has a fairly easy time with switching in, and it can either Trace Solid Rock or grab a Download boost. Opposing Rhyperior can also work well, but they must be wary of Aqua Tail. If Rock Polish Rhyperior is a cause of worry, most Choice Scarf users with a good super effective attack, such as Krookodile, Heracross, and Flygon, can deal with it, though in many cases, Rhyperior has to be weakened somewhat. Finally, as a user of Stealth Rock, Rhyperior is horribly vulnerable to common Rapid Spin users, such as Blastoise and Hitmontop.</p>


    GP CHECK 2/2
  21. capefeather

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