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Swampert (GP 2/2)

Discussion in 'Uploaded Analyses' started by dragonboy52, Jul 18, 2012.

  1. dragonboy52

    dragonboy52
    is a Contributor Alumnus

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    [Overview]

    <p>For the past two generations, Swampert had been an OU staple. However, this generation, the power creep of OU was just too much for Swampert to handle and Swampert now finds itself in UU for the first time. The environment of last generation's OU is much like that of this generation's UU, meaning Swampert feels right at home in this tier. Swampert makes for a fantastic choice in UU because he combines great bulk, a wonderful defensive typing, a solid movepool, and an often overlooked base 110 Attack stat, serving as one of the best defensive pivots in the UU tier.</p>

    <p>Even with that in mind, Swampert has its limitations. First of all, it lacks reliable recovery, which means it cannot stand up to many hits. It also has a terrible quadruple weakness to Grass, so Shaymin and Tangrowth can switch in with impunity. The real problem with using Swampert is knowing how to use him correctly. Swampert is not a wall, but rather a tank; if you try to sponge neutral attacks with the mud fish, then you'll find Swampert's HP dropping to zero far too quickly. However, if you're aware of its typing and take Swampert's limitations into account, then Swampert will be a great asset to your team.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Defensive Tank
    move 1: Stealth Rock
    move 2: Scald / Waterfall
    move 3: Earthquake
    move 4: Toxic / Roar
    item: Leftovers
    nature: Relaxed / Impish
    ability: Torrent
    evs: 240 HP / 16 Atk / 252 Def

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>Swampert's claim to fame in previous generations was its great physical bulk, and that hasn't changed this generation. Swampert needs all the physical defense he can get in order to stop some of UU's strongest attackers such as Life Orb Darmanitan and Choice Scarf Flygon. With the nature and EVs listed, Choice Scarf Flygon fails to 2HKO Swampert and Darmanitan can barely 3HKO Swampert after Leftovers recovery. Although there are few dedicated leads in BW2, Swampert works well in the lead position because he can set up Stealth Rock against most Pokemon in UU and will rarely be taken down in one hit. Swampert should use a secondary STAB in the second slot, and Scald and Waterfall are the best choices. Scald has the ability to spread burns, which is devastating for most physical attackers. Waterfall, on the other hand, comes off of Swampert's mighty base 110 Attack. However, Scald's burn can be detrimental for teams that rely heavily on inflicting other status problems. If spreading burn is what your team needs, choose Scald. Otherwise, Waterfall will deal a good amount of damage. Earthquake is Swampert's best attacking move, hitting Fire- and Steel-types such as Darmanitan, Cobalion, and Victini super effectively. In the final spot, Swampert has an array of useful support moves, but the choice usually boils down to Toxic versus Roar. If Scald is your Water-type move, then it's best to go with Roar, as Swampert already spreads status with Scald. Toxic is generally a better choice if Waterfall is your secondary STAB, but it's really a decision based on team preference.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>The purpose of the EVs is to reach a Leftovers number to recover more HP and maximize physical bulk. The remainder of the EVs are put into Attack so Earthquake can hit slightly harder. Swampert's main fault is its lack of recovery, and there are ways to remedy that weakness that can be used in the fourth slot. The first option is Protect, which gives Swampert additional Leftovers recovery, scouts for any unexpected Grass-type moves, and messes with Hi Jump Kick users such as Mienshao and Scrafty. Rest is the other solution, but it costs a moveslot (potentially two if Swampert uses Sleep Talk) and incapacitates Swampert for two turns. If Swampert uses Rest, it's important to have Aromatherapy or Heal Bell support from Roserade or Togekiss. Both of those Pokemon make good partners for Swampert regardless of Heal Bell or Aromatherapy. Togekiss resists Swampert's lone weakness, and Swampert resists two of Togekiss's three weaknesses. Roserade also resists Grass-type attacks and provides Spikes support, forming a formidable defensive core with Swampert. Offensively, Crobat absorbs any Grass-type attack and can help rack up entry hazard damage through U-turn or blast the opponent with a powerful Brave Bird.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Choice Band
    move 1: Earthquake
    move 2: Waterfall
    move 3: Ice Punch
    move 4: Superpower / Stone Edge
    item: Choice Band
    nature: Adamant
    evs: 208 HP / 252 Atk / 4 SpD / 44 Spe

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>Choice Band Swampert epitomizes the idea of bulky offense, retaining the offensive set's bulk while cranking the Attack power up to eleven. Earthquake is the main attacking option on Swampert; able to attain an OHKO on Spikes Roserade and . For Flying- and Grass-type Pokemon, Swampert can use the consistently powerful Waterfall and Ice Punch, the latter of which is a great coverage move that hits Pokemon weak to Ice just as hard as a neutral Earthquake. Ice Punch will always OHKO Zapdos with Stealth Rock down and has a slight chance to knock it out even without Stealth Rock damage. Superpower rounds out this set by giving Swampert a way to defeat Scrafty, regardless of the set. Stone Edge also works in the fourth slot, but Ice Punch gains equal coverage and the power boost is not worth the lower accuracy. The EVs are straightforward: the Speed EVs let Swampert outspeed Umbreon and base 60 Speed Pokemon that only invest a little in Speed so that none can switch in and stall Swampert. Attack is obviously maximized in order to pack a punch. The remainder of the EVs significantly boost Swampert's bulk, but not enough for Swampert to take powerful STAB attacks repeatedly. Furthermore, there is no Leftovers to boost Swampert's durability, so try to keep Swampert out of the line of fire.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>There isn't much to change on Choice Band Swampert. You can adjust the EVs to find a more preferable balance between bulk and Speed, but keep in mind that this set is designed to be slow and bulky. Raising Swampert's Speed much is not recommended. Wish and Stealth Rock support, especially the latter, are appreciated, as Swampert needs the extra damage to obtain key 2HKOs, such as against 252/252+ Suicune and 248/252+ Slowbro. Prediction is key, especially on the defensive side, as Swampert does have trouble switching into strong attacks. Swampert can still shrug off resisted and neutral non-STAB attacks from most Pokemon, but can't reliably take many other attacks and expect to last long. Likewise, most Pokemon have extreme difficulty taking hits from Choice Band Swampert, so if Swampert switches in safely it can shift the game's momentum in its user's favor. Choice Band Swampert has an extreme element of surprise as the most common set is the defensive Stealth Rock setter, so the opponent will be shocked when their Roserade is defeated in one hit or Zapdos can't take an Ice Punch. Swampert's favorite teammates include defensive Roserade, as it 4x resists Grass-type attacks and can set up Spikes that make Swampert a pain to switch into; Rhyperior, for setting up Stealth Rock and defeating Flying-type Pokemon reliably; and Flying-type Pokemon, such as Togekiss and Zapdos, to take Grass-type hits and build momentum for Swampert's team. Furthermore, Swampert can safely take the Electric-type moves that give Togekiss and Zapdos headaches.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Offensive Tank
    move 1: Earthquake
    move 2: Waterfall
    move 3: Ice Punch
    move 4: Stealth Rock / Roar / Toxic
    item: Leftovers
    nature: Adamant
    evs: 240 HP / 252 Atk / 16 Def

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>Is Swampert not hitting hard enough? Well, this set is the answer. Offensive Swampert combines Swampert's awesome base 110 Attack and great three-move coverage to hit opposing Pokemon much harder than the defensive set does. However, this additional power comes at the expense of Swampert's bulk. The first three attacks of this set are very straightforward; STAB Earthquake is fantastic coming off of Swampert's 350 Attack, able to fell offensive Roserade in one hit and cause severe damage to defensive Roserade sets. Waterfall is an obvious choice for a second move, as it provides decent power with STAB, and great coverage alongside Earthquake. Ice Punch is a great coverage move, smacking Flygon, Gligar, Zapdos, and Grass-types decently hard. However, note that the only Grass-type that's usually beaten in one hit is Roserade, so the other Grass-types can still switch into Swampert without fearing an OHKO. Unlike the defensive set's Ice Punch, this variant can terrorize Togekiss, scoring a 2HKO. The final moveslot should be dedicated to a support move such as Stealth Rock, Roar, or Toxic. Stealth Rock is great if your team otherwise lacks Stealth Rock support, turning many of your team's 2HKOs into OHKOs. However, a move such as Roar or Toxic can discourage opponents from setting up on Swampert.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>The most important distinction between this Swampert and the defensive variant is that offensive Swampert is considerably less bulky than the defensive one. Fortunately, even with that loss of bulk still allows it this set is still able to deal with Raikou just as well as the defensive variant does. Other Pokemon, such as Choice Scarf Flygon and Choice Scarf Darmanitan, however, have a much easier time dealing with this set than the defensive one, as their STAB attacks do much more damage. On the other hand, other Pokemon have a much more difficult time switching into this Pokemon as it's hitting with so much more force than the typical defensive Swampert. For example, offensive Roserade cannot switch into Earthquake or Ice Punch as it is OHKOed 91% of the time, even without Stealth Rock. Defensive Roserade takes upwards of 65% from an Earthquake, which can be enough to pick off a weakened one hoping to use Swampert as setup fodder. Unlike the defensive set, offensive Swampert is able to 2HKO most Pokemon with two neutral hits with the exception of extremely bulky Pokemon such as Umbreon or Tangrowth. Substitute is a great move to use on this set as Swampert forces switches easily, especially on common Pokemon such as Raikou, Xatu, and Choice-locked Pokemon that cannot harm the defensive set. If Swampert decides to use Substitute, it's worth bumping the HP EVs to 252 in order to have 101 HP Substitutes that cannot be broken by Night Shade or Seismic Toss. Roserade is a perfect partner, especially the defensive Spiker set, as it can absorb attacks from Pokemon such as Zapdos. The Spikes that Roserade sets make it tough to switch into a powerhouse like Swampert. Bouffalant gets a special mention here for straight-up absorbing Grass-type attacks and using them as fuel for ridiculously powerful Head Charges. When using this variant of Swampert, it's important to predict well because this Swampert does not have the bulk to take many neutral STAB attacks.</p>

    [Other Options]

    <p>Curse Swampert has been a standard set for what seems like an eternity, but that set has fallen out of favor as Swampert's bulk just doesn't carry it as far as it used to. Swampert gets Counter and Mirror Coat, which can catch an opponent off guard. Rest and Sleep Talk are Swampert's only form of recovery, but they leave Swampert a sitting duck for three straight turns unless Swampert comes with Heal Bell or Aromatherapy support. Swampert has a decent special movepool, so a Choice Specs set is viable, but there's little point in using moves such as Hydro Pump, Ice Beam, Sludge Wave, and Hidden Power when its fearsome base 110 Attack and awesome physical coverage goes farther. Yawn is worth a mention for forcing switches, but Swampert can force switches well enough with its wonderful typing, great movepool, and Roar.</p>

    [Checks and Counters]

    <p>Bulky Grass-types are Swampert's nemeses. Roserade, Shaymin, and Tangrowth can switch into Swampert rather easily and either destroy Swampert in one hit or force it to switch. However, weakened Shaymin and Roserade have to watch out for offensive and Choice Band Ice Punches. Grass-type attacks in general scare Swampert as the mud fish takes quadruple damage from any Grass-type move. Pokemon that commonly run Giga Drain or Hidden Power Grass, such as Yanmega, Zapdos, and Rotom-H, can all come in on an Earthquake or on the revenge kill and beat Swampert with either move. Burns, especially from the omnipresent Scald or from Prankster Sableye, absolutely ruin Swampert because they destroy Swampert's bulk and slash its Attack. Though Swampert has the bulk to take unboosted Scalds all day, it cannot risk a burn. Spikes also wear Swampert down and allow Pokemon such as Sharpedo or Kingdra to break through its defenses. The best way to defeat Swampert is to repeatedly pummel it with strong attacks; it loses most wars of attrition because of its lack of recovery.</p>
  2. PK Gaming

    PK Gaming Pursuing My True Self
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    QC APPROVED (1/3)
  3. kokoloko

    kokoloko from Mexico
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    You should probably leave the on-site Tank set as the primary option, tbh. Defensive Swampert has always been mediocre imo.

    Then again, I'm probably not one to talk since I never use it. You should definitely try to get some input from FlareBlitz--he's the one who uses it the most afaik.
  4. FlareBlitz

    FlareBlitz This was never a story that would have a happy end
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    Yeah I've been using defensive pert a lot because the max HP / max attack spread folds too easily to all these common Fighting-types. It's KO'd at by CB HJK from Mienshao, 2hko'd by close combat from moxie scarfcross, ohko'd +1 LO HJK from Scrafty, etc. I imagine that both offensive and defensive utility pert are viable in this metagame, but I would say both deserve an analysis (they tend to have different moves and fit on different teams, after all).

    This is the set I use:

    Swampie
    Leftovers
    240 HP / 52 Atk / 216 Def
    Relaxed

    -Scald
    -Earthquake
    -Toxic
    -Stealth Rock

    Toxic is great on pert because it messes with Blastoise, Milotic, P2, and other bulky things that might try and take you on 1v1. Scald bullshit is Scald bullshit, and Earthquake is your "don't fuck with me" button for opposing set-up sweepers. 52 Atk does a few nice things for you, including guaranteeing that offensive Roserade can't switch in without taking at least enough damage to die to Life Orb / next SR switch-in, guaranteeing a 2hko on 4/0 Kingdra (you are guaranteed to survive a rain-boosted LO surf, a specs draco meteor, and have a 60% chance of surviving a rain-boosted LO Hydro Pump), guaranteeing the ohko on 4/0 cobalion at -1, etc.
  5. Chou Toshio

    Chou Toshio @Fighting Necktie
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    I'm going to agree with Flareblitz's assessment of offensive Swampert-- it does get killed too easily, considering the roles you will usually use Swampert for. The high power of full attack investment is nice and useful, but the current meta has a lot more use for a more defensive set than at the time we initially made the analysis (a lot more hard hitting fighting types, and Mew and Deo-D leaving means you'll often be struggling harder to check them).
  6. FlareBlitz

    FlareBlitz This was never a story that would have a happy end
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    I thought I already approved this, sorry about that.

    Approved 2/3
  7. Red3mpti0n

    Red3mpti0n

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    Calling it plain Offensive just makes it sound like it could be merged or slashed with CB, when that's simply not the case. The Offensive set has some of the utility the Tank set has and the some of the power the Offensive set has. I think it'd be best to clearly distinguish the two sets. Could we rename the first two sets Defensive Tank and Offensive Tank, respectively?
  8. kokoloko

    kokoloko from Mexico
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    ^ Yeah, I agree.

    I would also consider listing CB before Offensive Tank, it seems better, but maybe that's just me.

    Anyway,

    QC Approved 3/3
  9. MysticNova

    MysticNova

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    [Overview]

    <p>For the past two generations, Swampert was an OU staple. However, this generation, the power creep of OU was just too much for Swampert to handle and Swampert now finds itself in UU for the first time. The environment of last generation's OU is much like that of this generation's UU, meaning Swampert feels right at home in this tier. Swampert's a fantastic choice for a teammate in UU because he combines great bulk, a wonderful defensive typing, a solid movepool and an often overlooked Base 110 Attack stat to be one of the best defensive pivots in the UU tier.</p>

    <p> Still, Swampert has its limitations. First of all, it lacks reliable recovery, which means it cannot repeatedly take hits. It also has a terrible quadruple weakness to Grass, so Shaymin and Tangrowth can switch in with impunity. The real problem with using Swampert is knowing how to use him correctly. Swampert is not a wall, but rather a tank. If you try to sponge neutral attacks with the mud fish, then you'll find Swampert's HP dropping to zero far too often. However, if you're aware of Swampert's typing and take Swampert's limitations into account, then Swampert will be a great asset to your team. </p>


    [SET]
    name: Defensive Tank
    move 1: Stealth Rock
    move 2: Scald / Waterfall
    move 3: Earthquake
    move 4: Toxic / Roar
    item: Leftovers
    nature: Relaxed / Impish
    ability: Torrent
    evs: 240 HP / 16 Atk / 252 Def

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p> Swampert's claim to fame in previous generations was its great Pphysical bulk, and that doesn't change this generation either. Swampert needs all the Pphysical dDefense he can get in order to stop some of UU's strongest attackers such as Life Orb Darmanitan and Choice Scarf Flygon. With the nature and EVs listed, Scarf Flygon fails to 2HKO Swampert and Darmanitan can barely 3HKO Swampert with Leftovers factored in. Though there are few dedicated leads in BW anymore, Swampert works well in the lead position because he can set up Stealth Rock against most Pokemon in UU and will rarely be taken down in one hit. Swampert should use a secondary STAB in the second slot, and Scald and Waterfall are the best choices. Scald has the ability to spread burn, which is devastating for most Physical attackers. Waterfall, on the other hand, comes off of Swampert's superior Base 110 Attack and Scald's burn can be detrimental for teams that rely heavily on other status problems. If the burn chance is appealing, go with Scald. Otherwise, Waterfall's your move. Earthquake is Swampert's best attacking move, hitting Fire- and Steel-types such as Darmanitan, Cobalion, and Victini super-effectively. In the final spot, Swampert has an array of useful support moves, but the choice usually boils down to Toxic versus Roar. If Scald is your Water move, then it's best to go with Roar since Swampert already spreads burn with Scald. Toxic is generally a better choice if Waterfall is your secondary STAB, but it's really a decision based on team preference. </p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>Swampert's main fault is its lack of recovery, and there are ways to remedy that weakness that can be used in the fourth slot. The first option is Protect, which gives Swampert additional Leftovers recovery, scouts for any unexpected Grass moves, and messes with Hi Jump Kick users such as Mienshao and Scrafty. Rest is the other obvious solution, but it costs a moveslot (potentially two if Swampert uses Sleep Talk) and incapacitates Swampert for two turns. If Swampert uses rRest, it's important to have Aromatherapy or Heal Bell support from Roserade or Togekiss. In fact, both of those Pokemon make good partners for Swampert regardless of Heal Bell or Aromatherapy. Togekiss resists Swampert's lone weakness, and Swampert resists two of Togekiss' three weaknesses. Roserade also resists Grass and provides Spikes support, forming a formidable defensive core with Swampert. Offensively, Bouffalant deserves a mention since it has Sap Sipper, which absorbs Grass attacks and turns them into Attack boosts. The purpose of the(a bit unnecessary, consider just going with "The Evs reach...") EVs are to reach a Leftovers number and maximize Physical bulk. The balance of theremaining EVs are thrown into Attack so Earthquake can hit ever so slightly harder. </p>




    [SET]
    name: Choice Band
    move 1: Earthquake
    move 2: Waterfall
    move 3: Ice Punch
    move 4: Superpower / Stone Edge
    item: Choice Band
    nature: Adamant
    evs: 208 HP / 252 Atk / 48 Spe

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>Choice Band Swampert epitomizes the idea of bulky offense. Swampert retains the Offensive set's bulk but cranks the Attack power up to eleven with the item Choice Band. Earthquake is the main attacking option on Swampert, able to OHKO Defensive Roserade and even 2HKO max Defense Suicune with Stealth Rock support. For Flying- and Grass-type Pokemon, Swampert can use both the consistently powerful Waterfall or Ice Punch, a great coverage move that hits Pokemon weak to Ice just as hard as a neutral Earthquake. Ice Punch will always OHKO Zapdos with Stealth Rock down and has a slight chance to do the job even without the Rocks helping it. Superpower rounds out this set by giving Swampert a way to defeat Scrafty regardless of the set. Stone Edge also works in the fourth slot, but Ice Punch has just as good coverage and the power boost is not worth the 80% accuracy. The EVs are straightforward: the Speed is to outspeed Umbreon (and consequently Porygon2 as well) so it can't switch in and Wish stall Swampert and, while Attack is obviously maximized in order to hit extremely hard. The remainder of the EVs significantly boost Swampert's bulk, but remember that this set is not meant to take hits. Swampert will survive just about any strong, neutral STAB hit but has trouble taking much more than that. Furthermore, Choice Band means that there's are no Leftovers to boost Swampert's durability, so try to keep Swampert out of the line of fire.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>There isn't much to change on Choice Band Swampert. You can adjust the EVs to find a more preferable balance between bulk and Speed but keep in mind that this set is designed to be slow and bulky. Raising Swampert's Speed much is not recommended. Wish and Stealth Rock support, especially the latter, are nice since Swampert needs the extra damage to reach target OHKOs and appreciates any health boost it can get. Prediction is key, especially on the defensive side since Swampert does have trouble switching into strong attacks. Swampert can still shrug off resisted and neutral non-STAB attacks from most Pokemon, but can't reliably take many other attacks and expect to last long. Likewise, most Pokemon have extreme difficulty taking hits from Choice Band Swampert, so if Swampert switches in safely it can shift the game's momentum in its user's favor. Choice Band Swampert has an extremegreat element of surprise,(comma) since the most common set is the defensive Stealth Rock setter, so the opponent will be shocked when their Roserade is defeated in one hit or their Zapdos can't take an Ice Punch. Swampert's favorite teammates are the following: defensive Roserade for obvious reasons: it 4x resists Grass and canits 4x Grass resist and ability to set up the Spikes that make Swampert a pain to switch into, Rhyperior for setting up Stealth Rock and defeating Flying-type Pokemon reliably, ands well as Flying-type Pokemon likesuch as Togekiss and Zapdos to, who can take Grass-type hits and building momentum for itsthe team. Furthermore, Swampert can take the Electric- and Rock-type moves that give Togekiss and Zapdos headaches.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Offensive Tank
    move 1: Earthquake
    move 2: Waterfall
    move 3: Ice Punch
    move 4: Stealth Rock / Roar / Toxic
    item: Leftovers
    nature: Adamant
    EVs: 240 HP / 252 Atk / 16 Def

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>Swampert's not hitting hard enough? Well, then this set is the answer. Offensive Swampert combines Swampert's wonderful base 110 Attack and great three-move coverage to hit opposing Pokemon much harder than the defensive set does. However, this additional power comes at the cost of Swampert's bulk. The first three attacks of this set are very straightforward: Earthquake is fantastic coming off of Swampert's 350 Attack, able to fell offensive Roserade in one hit and cause severe damage to defensive Roserade sets. Waterfall is an obvious choice for a second move, since it provides decent power and great coverage. Ice Punch is a great coverage move, smacking Flygon, Gligar, Zapdos, and the Grass -types decently hard. However, note that the only Grass type that's usually beaten in one hit is Roserade, so the other Grass types can still switch into Swampert without fearing an OHKO. Unlike the Defensive set's Ice Punch, this set's Ice Punch can terrorize Togekiss, scoring a two-hit knockout on the bird. However, in order to actually beat Togekiss,(comma) it takes some prediction with Roost and some luck. The final moveslot should be dedicated to a support move such as Stealth Rock, Roar, or Toxic. Stealth Rock is great if there' is not an other Pokemon using it on your team, and if there is, then awhile moves like Roar or Toxic can discourage opponents from setting up on Swampert.</p>


    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>The most important distinction between this Swampert and the defensive variant is that offensive Swampert is considerably less bulky than the defensive one. Fortunately, that loss of bulk still allows it to deal with Raikou just as well as the defensive version does. Other Pokemon, such as Scarf Flygon and Scarf Darmanitan, however, have a much easier time dealing with this set than the defensive one. On the other hand, other Pokemon have a much more difficult time switching into this Pokemon since it's hitting with so much more force than the typical defensive Swampert. For example, Offensive Roserade cannot switch into Earthquake or Ice Punch unless it wants to be OHKO'd 91% of the time even without Stealth Rock. Defensive Roserade takes upwards of 65% from an Earthquake, which can be enough to pick off a weakened one hoping to use Swampert as an opportunity to Rest, use Synthesis, or knock Swampert out with a Giga Drain. Unlike with the Defensive set, Offensive Swampert is able to 2HKO most Pokemon with two neutral hits with the exception of extremely bulky Pokemon like Umbreon or Tangrowth. Substitute is a great move to use on this set since Swampert forces switches easily, especially on common Pokemon such as Raikou, Xatu, or Choice-locked Pokemon that cannot harm the defensive set. If Swampert decides to use Substitute, it's worth bumping the HP EVs to 252 in order to have 101 HP Substitutes that can't be broken by Night Shade or Seismic Toss. Those moves are rare in UU, but it's such a small EV change that it's worth making. Roserade is a perfect partner, especially the defensive Spiker Roserade,(comma) because Roserade can absorb attacks forrom Pokemon like Zapdos and(you should probably use a different example, since Heat Wave hits too hard), while the Spikes that Roserade produces make it tough to switch into a powerhouse like Swampert. Bouffalant gets a special mention here for straight-up absorbing Grass-type attacks and using them as fuel for ridiculously powered Head Charges. When using a Swampert set like this one, it's important to predict well because this Swampert does not have the bulk to take many neutral STAB attacks.</p>

    [Other Options]

    <p>Cursepert has been a standard set for what seems like an eternity, but that set has fallen out of favor as Swampert's bulk just doesn't carry it as far as it used to. It's still a viable option, but Curse just isn't the move it used to be. Swampert gets Counter and Mirror Coat, which can catch an opponent off guard. Rest and Sleep Talk are Swampert's only form of recovery, but they leave Swampert a sitting duck for three straight turns unless Swampert comes with Heal Bell support. Swampert has a decent Special movepool, so a Choice Specs set is doable, but there's little point in using moves like Hydro Pump, Ice Beam, Sludge Wave, and...Hidden Power when it has a fearsome Base 110 Attack and all the Physical moves it needs to run a Choice Band set. Yawn is worth a mention for forcing switches, but Swampert can force switches finewell enough with its wonderful typing and sweet movepool</p>

    [Checks and Counters]

    <p>Bulky Grass-types are Swampert's nemeses. Roserade, Shaymin, and Tangrowth can switch into Swampert rather easily (weakened Pokemon and Roserade have to watch out for Offensive and Choice Band Ice Punches) (make some mention of Roserade being destroyed by Earthquake on the more offensive sets) and either destroy Swampert in one hit or force a switch. Grass-type attacks in general, whether or not they come from Grass-type Pokemon, give Swampert a scare since the mud fish takes quadruple damage from any Grass move. Pokemon that commonly run Giga Drainrass Knot or Hidden Power Grass, two common Grass-type coverage moves, include Azelf, Yanmega, Zapdos, and Rotom-H. Fortunately, none of them (Most Checks and Counters sections are written in the point of the non-user, so it is kind of inconsistent here, especially with the last part...) none of these Pokemon can reliably switch into Swampert, so those Pokemon willey usually stick to revenge killing. Burns, especially those from the omnipresent Scald, absolutely ruin Swampert because Burn destroys Swampert's bulk and slashes its Attack power. Though Swampert has the bulk to take Scalds all day, it cannot risk a burn. Note that if Swampert takes two Scalds, its more likely to get burned than stay status-free. Spikes also wear Swampert down and allow Pokemon to break its defenses. The best way to defeat Swampert(right here) is to just pummel it with strong attacks, even if they're not 2KOs. Though Swampert can hit back pretty hard, it loses most wars of attrition because of its lack of recovery.</p>




    Hopefully this will bump this a bit. Anyway, I'm just doing Swampert since it's one of my favorites as well.
  10. Mazz

    Mazz UU's Workhorse
    is a Forum Moderatoris a Community Contributoris a Contributor Alumnus
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    Amateur Check (open)
  11. kokoloko

    kokoloko from Mexico
    is a member of the Site Staffis a Super Moderatoris a Community Contributoris a Tiering Contributoris a Contributor to Smogonis a Smogon Media Contributoris a Past SPL Winner
    UU Leader

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    Lolcat's been inactive for five days and we're backed up enough as it is; does someone want to take over this and push it through GP?

    Okay, dragonboy52 is doing it.
  12. dragonboy52

    dragonboy52
    is a Contributor Alumnus

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    implemented am.check
  13. Aurora

    Aurora If the spelling was P-E-T-E-R...
    is a Battle Server Moderator Alumnus

    Joined:
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    [Overview]

    <p>For the past two generations, Swampert had been an OU staple. However, this generation, the power creep of OU was just too much for Swampert to handle and Swampert now finds itself in UU for the first time. The environment of last generation's OU is much like that of this generation's UU, meaning Swampert feels right at home in this tier. Swampert makes for a fantastic choice in UU because he combines great bulk, a wonderful defensive typing, a solid movepool and an often overlooked Bbase 110 Attack stat, serving as one of the best defensive pivots in the UU tier.</p>

    <p>Still, Swampert has its limitations. First of all, it lacks reliable recovery, which means it cannot repeatedly take hits. It also has a terrible quadruple weakness to Grass, so Shaymin and Tangrowth can switch in with impunity. The real problem with using Swampert is knowing how to use him correctly. Swampert is not a wall, but rather a tank. If you try to sponge neutral attacks with the mud fish, then you'll find Swampert's HP dropping to zero far too quickly. However, if you're aware of Swampert's typing and take Swampert's limitations into account, then Swampert will be a great asset to your team.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Defensive Tank
    move 1: Stealth Rock
    move 2: Scald / Waterfall
    move 3: Earthquake
    move 4: Toxic / Roar
    item: Leftovers
    nature: Relaxed / Impish
    ability: Torrent
    evs: 240 HP / 16 Atk / 252 Def

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>Swampert's claim to fame in previous generations was its great Pphysical bulk, and that doesn't hasn't changed this generation either. Swampert needs all the physical defense he can get in order to stop some of UU's strongest attackers, such as Life Orb Darmanitan and Choice Scarf Flygon. With the nature and EVs listed, Scarf Flygon fails to 2HKO Swampert and Darmanitan can barely 3HKO Swampert with Leftovers factored in after Leftovers recovery. Though there are few dedicated leads in BW anymore, Swampert works well in the lead position because he can set up Stealth Rock against most Pokemon in UU and will rarely be taken down in one hit. Swampert should use a secondary STAB in the second slot, and Scald and Waterfall are the best choices. Scald has the ability to spread burns, which is devastating for most physical attackers. Waterfall, on the other hand, comes off of Swampert's (space) mighty Bbase 110 Attack. (space) However, Scald's burn can be detrimental for teams that rely heavily on inflicting other status problems. If the burn chance is appealing, go with Scald. Otherwise, Waterfall's your move. Earthquake is Swampert's best attacking move, hitting Fire- and Steel-types such as Darmanitan, Cobalion, and Victini super effectively. In the final spot, Swampert has an array of useful support moves, but the choice usually boils down to Toxic versus Roar. If Scald is your Water-type move, then it's best to go with Roar since as Swampert already spreads burn status with Scald. Toxic is generally a better choice if Waterfall is your secondary STAB, but it's really a decision based on team preference. </p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>Swampert's main fault is its lack of recovery, and there are ways to remedy that weakness that can be used in the fourth slot. The first option is Protect, which gives Swampert additional Leftovers recovery, scouts for any unexpected Grass moves, and messes with Hi Jump Kick users such as Mienshao and Scrafty. Rest is the other obvious solution, but it costs a moveslot (potentially two if Swampert uses Sleep Talk) and incapacitates Swampert for two turns. If Swampert uses rRest, it's important to have Aromatherapy or Heal Bell support from Roserade or Togekiss. Both of those Pokemon make good partners for Swampert regardless of Heal Bell or Aromatherapy. Togekiss resists Swampert's lone weakness, and Swampert resists two of Togekiss' three weaknesses. Roserade also resists Grass-type attacks and provides Spikes support, forming a formidable defensive core with Swampert. Offensively, Bouffalant deserves a mention since as it has Sap Sipper, which absorbs Grass-type attacks and turns them into Attack boosts. The purpose of the EVs are to reach a Leftovers number and maximize Physical bulk. The remainder of the EVs are thrown into Attack so Earthquake can hit slightly harder.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Choice Band
    move 1: Earthquake
    move 2: Waterfall
    move 3: Ice Punch
    move 4: Superpower / Stone Edge
    item: Choice Band
    nature: Adamant
    evs: 208 HP / 252 Atk / 48 Spe

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>Choice Band Swampert epitomizes the idea of bulky offense,. Swampert retainsing the Ooffensive set's bulk but cranksing the Attack power up to eleven when holding a Choice Band. Earthquake is the main attacking option on Swampert, able to OHKO Ddefensive Roserade and even 2HKO max Defense Suicune with Stealth Rock support. For Flying- and Grass-type Pokemon, Swampert can use both the consistently powerful Waterfall or and Ice Punch, a great coverage move that hits Pokemon weak to Ice just as hard as a neutral Earthquake. Ice Punch will always OHKO Zapdos with Stealth Rock down and has a slight chance to do the job even without the Rrocks helping it. Superpower rounds out this set by giving Swampert a way to defeat Scrafty regardless of the set. Stone Edge also works in the fourth slot, but Ice Punch gains equal coverage and the power boost is not worth the 80% accuracy. The EVs are straightforward: the Speed is to outspeed Umbreon and Porygon2 so that neither can switch in and stall Swampert. Attack is obviously maximized in order to hit extremely hard. The remainder of the EVs significantly boost Swampert's bulk, but not enough for Swampert to take powerful STAB attacks repeatedly. Furthermore, Choice Band means that there's no Leftovers to boost Swampert's durability, so try to keep Swampert out of the line of fire.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>There isn't much to change on Choice Band Swampert. You can adjust the EVs to find a more preferable balance between bulk and Speed, but keep in mind that this set is designed to be slow and bulky. Raising Swampert's Speed much is not recommended. Wish and Stealth Rock support, especially the latter, are appreciated since as Swampert needs the extra damage to reach target obtain key OHKOs and appreciates any health boost it can get. Prediction is key, especially on the defensive side since as Swampert does have trouble switching into strong attacks. Swampert can still shrug off resisted and neutral non-STAB attacks from most Pokemon, but can't reliably take many other attacks and expect to last long. Likewise, most Pokemon have extreme difficulty taking hits from Choice Band Swampert, so if Swampert switches in safely it can shift the game's momentum in its user's favor. Choice Band Swampert has an extreme element of surprise since as the most common set is the defensive Stealth Rock setter, so the opponent will be shocked when their Roserade is defeated in one hit or their Zapdos can't take an Ice Punch. Swampert's favorite teammates include defensive Roserade as it 4x resists Grass-type attacks and can set up Spikes that make Swampert a pain to switch into, Rhyperior for setting up Stealth Rock and defeating Flying-type Pokemon reliably, and Flying-type Pokemon like Togekiss (space) or Zapdos to take Grass-type hits and build momentum for (space) Swampert's team. Furthermore, Swampert can take the Electric-type moves that give Togekiss and Zapdos headaches.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Offensive Tank
    move 1: Earthquake
    move 2: Waterfall
    move 3: Ice Punch
    move 4: Stealth Rock / Roar / Toxic
    item: Leftovers
    nature: Adamant
    EVs: 240 HP / 252 Atk / 16 Def

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>Swampert's not hitting hard enough? Well, then this set is the answer. Offensive Swampert combines Swampert's wonderful base 110 Attack and great three-move coverage to hit opposing Pokemon much harder than the defensive set does. However, this additional power comes at the cost of Swampert's bulk. The first three attacks of this set are very straightforward; Earthquake is fantastic coming off of Swampert's 350 Attack, able to fell offensive Roserade in one hit and cause severe damage to defensive Roserade sets. Waterfall is an obvious choice for a second move, (space) as it provides decent power, STAB, and great coverage alongside Earthquake. Ice Punch is a great coverage move, smacking Flygon, Gligar, Zapdos, and Grass-types decently hard. However, note that the only Grass-type that's usually beaten in one hit is Roserade, so the other Grass-types can still switch into Swampert without fearing an OHKO. Unlike the Ddefensive set's Ice Punch, this variant can terrorize Togekiss, scoring a 2HKO on the bird. The final moveslot should be dedicated to a support move such as Stealth Rock, Roar, or Toxic. Stealth Rock is great if your team currently otherwise lacks Stealth Rock support, turning many of your team's 2HKOs into OHKOs. However, a move like Roar or Toxic can discourage opponents from setting up on Swampert.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>The most important distinction between this Swampert and the defensive variant is that offensive Swampert is considerably less bulky than the defensive one. Fortunately, that loss of bulk still allows it to deal with Raikou just as well as the defensive variant does. Other Pokemon, such as Scarf Flygon and Scarf Darmanitan, however, have a much easier time dealing with this set than the defensive one, as their STAB attacks do much more damage. On the other hand, other Pokemon have a much more difficult time switching into this Pokemon since as it's hitting with so much more force than the typical defensive Swampert. For example, Ooffensive Roserade cannot switch into Earthquake or Ice Punch as it is OHKO'ed 91% of the time, even without Stealth Rock. Defensive Roserade takes upwards of 65% from an Earthquake, which can be enough to pick off a weakened one hoping to use Swampert as an opportunity to (space) use Rest, Synthesis, or knock Swampert out with Giga Drain. Unlike with the Dd[/color][/b]efensive set, Offensive Swampert is able to 2HKO most Pokemon with two neutral hits with the exception of extremely bulky Pokemon like Umbreon or Tangrowth. Substitute is a great move to use on this set since as Swampert forces switches easily, especially on common Pokemon such as Raikou, Xatu, or Choice-locked Pokemon that cannot harm the defensive set. If Swampert decides to use Substitute, it's worth bumping the HP EVs to 252 in order to have 101 HP Substitutes that cannot be broken by Night Shade or Seismic Toss. Roserade is a perfect partner, especially the defensive Spikers[/b] Roserade because it can absorb attacks from Pokemon like Zapdos. (space) The Spikes that Roserade sets make it tough to switch into a powerhouse like Swampert. Bouffalant gets a special mention here for straight-up absorbing Grass-type attacks and using them as fuel for ridiculously powerful Head Charges. When using this variant of Swampert, it's important to predict well because this Swampert does not have the bulk to take many neutral STAB attacks.</p>

    [Other Options]

    <p>Cursepert has been a standard set for what seems like an eternity, but that set has fallen out of favor as Swampert's bulk just doesn't carry it as far as it used to. Swampert gets Counter and Mirror Coat, which can catch an opponent off guard. Rest and Sleep Talk are Swampert's only form of recovery, but they leave Swampert a sitting duck for three straight turns unless Swampert comes with Heal Bell support. Swampert has a decent Sspecial movepool, so a Choice Specs set is doable, but there's little point in using moves like Hydro Pump, Ice Beam, Sludge Wave, and Hidden Power when it has a fearsome Bbase 110 Attack and all the Pphysical moves it needs to run a Choice Band set. Yawn is worth a mention for forcing switches, but Swampert can force switches fine enough with its wonderful typing, sweet movepool, and Roar.</p>

    [Checks and Counters]

    <p>Bulky Grass-types are Swampert's nemeses. Roserade, Shaymin, and Tangrowth can switch into Swampert rather easily and either destroy Swampert in one hit or force it to switch. (space) However, weakened (space) Shaymin (space) and Roserade have to watch out for Ooffensive and Choice Band Ice Punches. Grass-type attacks in general, whether or not they come from Grass-type Pokemon, give Swampert a scare since as the mud fish takes quadruple damage from any Grass-type move. Pokemon that commonly run Giga Drain or Hidden Power Grass, such as Azelf, Yanmega, Zapdos, and Rotom-H, can all come in on an Earthquake or on the revenge kill and beat Swampert with either move. Burns, especially from the omnipresent Scald or from Prankster Sableye, absolutely ruin Swampert because they destroy Swampert's bulk and slash its Attack. Though Swampert has the bulk to take unboosted Scalds all day, it cannot risk a burn. Spikes also wear Swampert down and allow Pokemon such as Sharpedo or Kingdra to break through its defenses. The best way to defeat Swampert is to repeatedly pummel it with strong attacks, (space) as it loses most wars of attrition because of its lack of recovery.</p>
  14. RitterCat

    RitterCat
    is an Artistis a Forum Moderatoris a Contributor Alumnus
    Moderator

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    stompity stomp
    [gp]1/2[/gp]
  15. dragonboy52

    dragonboy52
    is a Contributor Alumnus

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    implemented, thanks!
  16. Lesser Smaug

    Lesser Smaug

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2011
    Messages:
    145
    More amateur GP checks

    I was working on a GP check for the UU Empoleon analysis...I had to nix it because NixHex ninja'd me :(

    Anyways!

    Comments in (bold brackets) (be careful not to confuse these for additions)
    Additions in Bold
    Removals in Red

    Amateur GP check (open)

    [Overview]

    <p>For the past two generations, Swampert had been an OU staple. However, this generation, the power creep of OU was just too much for Swampert to handle and Swampert now finds itself in UU for the first time. The environment of last generation's OU is much like that of this generation's UU, meaning Swampert feels right at home in this tier. Swampert makes for a fantastic choice in UU because he combines great bulk, a wonderful defensive typing, a solid movepool and an often overlooked base 110 Attack stat, serving as one of the best defensive pivots in the UU tier.</p>

    <p>Still Even with that in mind, Swampert has its limitations. First of all, it lacks reliable recovery, which means it cannot repeatedly take stand up to many hits. It also has a terrible quadruple weakness to Grass, so Shaymin and Tangrowth can switch in with impunity. The real problem with using Swampert is knowing how to use him correctly. Swampert is not a wall, but rather a tank. If you try to sponge neutral attacks with the mud fish, then you'll find Swampert's HP dropping to zero far too quickly often. However, if you're aware of Swampert's typing and take Swampert's limitations into account, then Swampert will be a great asset to your team.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Defensive Tank
    move 1: Stealth Rock
    move 2: Scald / Waterfall
    move 3: Earthquake
    move 4: Toxic / Roar
    item: Leftovers
    nature: Relaxed / Impish
    ability: Torrent
    evs: 240 HP / 16 Atk / 252 Def

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>Swampert's claim to fame in previous generations was its great physical bulk, and that hasn't changed this generation. Swampert needs all the physical defense he can get in order to stop some of UU's strongest attackers, such as Life Orb Darmanitan and Choice Scarf Flygon. With the nature and EVs listed, Scarf Flygon fails to 2HKO Swampert and Darmanitan can barely 3HKO Swampert after Leftovers recovery. AltThough there are few dedicated leads in BW (isn't it the BW2 metagame?), Swampert works well in the lead position because he can set up Stealth Rock against most Pokemon in UU and will rarely be taken down in one hit. Swampert should use a secondary STAB in the second slot, and Scald and Waterfall are the best choices. Scald has the ability to spread burns, which is devastating for most physical attackers. Waterfall, on the other hand, comes off of Swampert's mighty base 110 Attack. However, Scald's burn can be detrimental for teams that rely heavily on inflicting other status problems. If the burn chance is appealing spreading burn is what your team needs, go with choose Scald. Otherwise, Waterfall's your move will deal great damage. Earthquake is Swampert's best attacking move, hitting Fire- and Steel-types such as Darmanitan, Cobalion, and Victini super effectively. In the final spot, Swampert has an array of useful support moves, but the choice usually boils down to Toxic versus Roar. If Scald is your Water-type move, then it's best to go with Roar, as Swampert already spreads status with Scald. Toxic is generally a better choice if Waterfall is your secondary STAB, but it's really a decision based on team preference.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>Swampert's main fault is its lack of recovery, and there are ways to remedy that weakness that can be used in the fourth slot. The first option is Protect, which gives Swampert additional Leftovers recovery, scouts for any unexpected Grass moves, and messes with Hi Jump Kick users such as Mienshao and Scrafty. Rest is the other obvious solution, but it costs a moveslot (potentially two if Swampert uses Sleep Talk) and incapacitates Swampert for two turns. If Swampert uses Rest, it's important to have Aromatherapy or Heal Bell support from Roserade or Togekiss. Both of those Pokemon make good partners for Swampert regardless of Heal Bell or Aromatherapy. Togekiss resists Swampert's lone weakness, and Swampert resists two of Togekiss' three weaknesses. Roserade also resists Grass-type attacks and provides Spikes support, forming a formidable defensive core with Swampert. Offensively, Bouffalant deserves a mention as it has Sap Sipper, which absorbs Grass-type attacks and turns them into Attack boosts. The purpose of the EVs are to reach a Leftovers number to recover more HP and maximize Pphysical bulk. The remainder of the EVs are thrown tossed into Attack so Earthquake can hit slightly harder.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Choice Band
    move 1: Earthquake
    move 2: Waterfall
    move 3: Ice Punch
    move 4: Superpower / Stone Edge
    item: Choice Band
    nature: Adamant
    evs: 208 HP / 252 Atk / 48 Spe

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>Choice Band Swampert epitomizes the idea of bulky offense, retaining the offensive set's bulk but while cranking the Attack power up to eleven. Earthquake is the main attacking option on Swampert;, it is able to OHKO defensive Roserade and even 2HKO max Defense Suicune with Stealth Rock support. For Flying- and Grass-type Pokemon, Swampert can use both the consistently powerful Waterfall, and Ice Punch, a great coverage move that hits Pokemon weak to Ice just as hard as a neutral Earthquake. Ice Punch will always OHKO Zapdos with Stealth Rock down and has a slight chance to do the job knock the bird out even without rocks helping it Stealth Rock damage. Superpower rounds out this set by giving Swampert a way to defeat Scrafty, regardless of the set. Stone Edge also works in the fourth slot, but Ice Punch gains equal coverage and the power boost is not worth the 80% lower accuracy. The EVs are straightforward: the Speed EVs let Swampert is to outspeed Umbreon and Porygon2 so that neither can switch in and stall Swampert. Attack is obviously maximized in order to hit extremely hard pack a punch. The remainder of the EVs significantly boost Swampert's bulk, but not enough for Swampert to take powerful STAB attacks repeatedly. Furthermore, Choice Band means that there's no there are no Leftovers to boost Swampert's durability, so try to keep Swampert out of the line of fire.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>There isn't much to change on Choice Band Swampert. You can adjust the EVs to find a more preferable balance between bulk and Speed, but keep in mind that this set is designed to be slow and bulky. Raising Swampert's Speed much is not recommended. Wish and Stealth Rock support, especially the latter, are appreciated, as Swampert needs the extra damage to obtain key OHKOes, and appreciates any health boost it can get. Prediction is key, especially on the defensive side, as Swampert does have trouble switching into strong attacks. Swampert can still shrug off resisted and neutral non-STAB attacks from most Pokemon, but can't reliably take many other attacks and expect to last long. Likewise, most Pokemon have extreme difficulty taking hits from Choice Band Swampert, so if Swampert switches in safely it can shift the game's momentum in its user's favor. Choice Band Swampert has an extreme element of surprise as the most common set is the defensive Stealth Rock setter, so the opponent will be shocked when their Roserade is defeated in one hit or their Zapdos can't take an Ice Punch. Swampert's favorite teammates include defensive Roserade, as it 4x doubly resists Grass-type attacks and can set up Spikes that make Swampert a pain to switch into;, Rhyperior, for setting up Stealth Rock and defeating Flying-type Pokemon reliably;, and Flying-type Pokemon, such as like (You never use the word "like" to list examples. You use it to compare things.) Togekiss or Zapdos to take Grass-type hits, and build momentum for Swampert's team. (When you have a list with commas, use semicolons to separate each example.) Furthermore, Swampert can safely take the Electric-type moves that give Togekiss and Zapdos headaches.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Offensive Tank
    move 1: Earthquake
    move 2: Waterfall
    move 3: Ice Punch
    move 4: Stealth Rock / Roar / Toxic
    item: Leftovers
    nature: Adamant
    EVs: 240 HP / 252 Atk / 16 Def

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>Is Swampert not hitting hard enough? Well, this set is the answer. Offensive Swampert combines Swampert's wonderful awesome base 110 Attack and great three-move coverage to hit opposing Pokemon much harder than the defensive set does. However, this additional power comes at the cost expense of Swampert's bulk. The first three attacks of this set are very straightforward; STAB Earthquake is fantastic coming off of Swampert's 350 Attack, able to fell offensive Roserade in one hit and cause severe damage to defensive Roserade sets. Waterfall is an obvious choice for a second move, as it provides decent power, STAB, and great coverage alongside Earthquake. Ice Punch is a great coverage move, smacking Flygon, Gligar, Zapdos, and Grass-types decently hard. However, note that the only Grass-type that's usually beaten in one hit is Roserade, so the other Grass-types can still switch into Swampert without fearing an OHKO. Unlike the defensive set's Ice Punch, this variant can terrorize Togekiss, scoring a 2HKO on the bird. The final moveslot should be dedicated to a support move such as Stealth Rock, Roar, or Toxic. Stealth Rock is great if your team otherwise lacks Stealth Rock support, turning many of your team's 2HKOs into OHKOs. However, a move like Roar or Toxic can discourage opponents from setting up on Swampert.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>The most important distinction between this Swampert and the defensive variant is that offensive Swampert is considerably less bulky than the defensive one. Fortunately, that loss of bulk still allows it to deal with Raikou just as well as the defensive variant does. Other Pokemon, such as Scarf Flygon and Scarf Darmanitan, however, have a much easier time dealing with this set than the defensive one, as their STAB attacks do much more damage. On the other hand, other Pokemon have a much more difficult time switching into this Pokemon as it's hitting with so much more force than the typical defensive Swampert. For example, offensive Roserade cannot switch into Earthquake or Ice Punch as it is OHKOed 91% of the time, even without Stealth Rock. Defensive Roserade takes upwards of 65% from an Earthquake, which can be enough to pick off a weakened one hoping to use Swampert as an opportunity to use Rest, Synthesis, or knock Swampert out with Giga Drain set-up fodder. Unlike the defensive set, offensive Swampert is able to 2HKO most Pokemon with two neutral hits with the exception of extremely bulky Pokemon like Umbreon or Tangrowth. Substitute is a great move to use on this set as Swampert forces switches easily, especially on common Pokemon such as Raikou, Xatu, or Choice-locked Pokemon that cannot harm the defensive set. If Swampert decides to use Substitute, it's worth bumping the HP EVs to 252 in order to have 101 HP Substitutes that cannot be broken by Night Shade or Seismic Toss. Roserade is a perfect partner, especially the dDefensive sSpiker set, as it can absorb attacks from Pokemon like such as Zapdos. The Spikes that Roserade sets make it tough to switch into a powerhouse like Swampert. Bouffalant gets a special mention here for straight-up absorbing Grass-type attacks and using them as fuel for ridiculously powerful Head Charges. When using this variant of Swampert, it's important to predict well because this Swampert does not have the bulk to take many neutral STAB attacks.</p>

    [Other Options]

    <p>Curse Swampert has been a standard set for what seems like an eternity, but that set has fallen out of favor as Swampert's bulk just doesn't carry it as far as it used to. Swampert gets Counter and Mirror Coat, which can catch an opponent off guard. Rest and Sleep Talk are Swampert's only form of recovery, but they leave Swampert a sitting duck for three straight turns unless Swampert comes with Heal Bell or Aromatherapy support. Swampert has a decent special movepool, so a Choice Specs set is doable, but there's little point in using moves like Hydro Pump, Ice Beam, Sludge Wave, and Hidden Power when its has a fearsome base 110 Attack and all the awesome physical coverage moves it needs to run a Choice Band set goes farther. Yawn is worth a mention for forcing switches, but Swampert can force switches fine enough with its wonderful typing, sweet great movepool, and Roar.</p>

    [Checks and Counters]

    <p>Bulky Grass-types are Swampert's nemeses. Roserade, Shaymin, and Tangrowth can switch into Swampert rather easily and either destroy Swampert in one hit or force it to switch. However, weakened Shaymin and Roserade have to watch out for offensive and Choice Band Ice Punches. Grass-type attacks in general, whether or not they come from Grass-type Pokemon, give scare Swampert a scare as the mud fish takes quadruple damage from any Grass-type move. Pokemon that commonly run Giga Drain or Hidden Power Grass, such as Azelf, Yanmega, Zapdos, and Rotom-H, can all come in on an Earthquake or on the revenge kill and beat Swampert with either move. Burns, especially from the omnipresent Scald or from Prankster Sableye, absolutely ruin Swampert because they destroy Swampert's bulk and slash its Attack. Though Swampert has the bulk to take unboosted Scalds all day, it cannot risk a burn. Spikes also wear Swampert down and allow Pokemon such as Sharpedo or Kingdra to break through its defenses. The best way to defeat Swampert is to repeatedly pummel it with strong attacks;, as it loses most wars of attrition because of its lack of recovery.</p>


    Whoa. This didn't need a lot of editing. One problem I feel is there is that some of the prose is either written "informally", so to speak, (i.e. "has a slight chance to do the job even without rocks helping it"), or some prose could be made more concise and to the point. However, this is a good job. I applaud you!
  17. dragonboy52

    dragonboy52
    is a Contributor Alumnus

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2009
    Messages:
    1,986
    implemented
  18. mikel

    mikel @ air baloon
    is a Contributor to Smogonis a Battle Server Admin Alumnusis a Forum Moderator Alumnus

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2011
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    Amateur check~

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  19. dragonboy52

    dragonboy52
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    implemented most of those changes.
  20. FlareBlitz

    FlareBlitz This was never a story that would have a happy end
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    Do we really want this write-up to emphasize things like Boufflant? A better partner to mention would be Crobat.

    Also, roserade and swampert are great partners, but not because roserade can take hits from Zapdos...that's supposed to be swampert's job. Roserade is cleanly 2hko'd by Heat Wave.
  21. Oglemi

    Oglemi THE DREAM IS REAL
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    [Overview]

    <p>For the past two generations, Swampert had been an OU staple. However, this generation, the power creep of OU was just too much for Swampert to handle and Swampert now finds itself in UU for the first time. The environment of last generation's OU is much like that of this generation's UU, meaning Swampert feels right at home in this tier. Swampert makes for a fantastic choice in UU because he combines great bulk, a wonderful defensive typing, a solid movepool, and an often overlooked base 110 Attack stat, serving as one of the best defensive pivots in the UU tier.</p>

    <p>Even with that in mind, Swampert has its limitations. First of all, it lacks reliable recovery, which means it cannot stand up to many hits. It also has a terrible quadruple weakness to Grass, so Shaymin and Tangrowth can switch in with impunity. The real problem with using Swampert is knowing how to use him correctly. Swampert is not a wall, but rather a tank; if you try to sponge neutral attacks with the mud fish, then you'll find Swampert's HP dropping to zero far too quickly. However, if you're aware of its typing and take Swampert's limitations into account, then Swampert will be a great asset to your team.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Defensive Tank
    move 1: Stealth Rock
    move 2: Scald / Waterfall
    move 3: Earthquake
    move 4: Toxic / Roar
    item: Leftovers
    nature: Relaxed / Impish
    ability: Torrent
    evs: 240 HP / 16 Atk / 252 Def

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>Swampert's claim to fame in previous generations was its great physical bulk, and that hasn't changed this generation. Swampert needs all the physical defense he can get in order to stop some of UU's strongest attackers such as Life Orb Darmanitan and Choice Scarf Flygon. With the nature and EVs listed, Choice Scarf Flygon fails to 2HKO Swampert and Darmanitan can barely 3HKO Swampert after Leftovers recovery. Although there are few dedicated leads in BW2, Swampert works well in the lead position because he can set up Stealth Rock against most Pokemon in UU and will rarely be taken down in one hit. Swampert should use a secondary STAB in the second slot, and Scald and Waterfall are the best choices. Scald has the ability to spread burns, which is devastating for most physical attackers. Waterfall, on the other hand, comes off of Swampert's mighty base 110 Attack. However, Scald's burn can be detrimental for teams that rely heavily on inflicting other status problems. If spreading burn is what your team needs, choose Scald. Otherwise, Waterfall will deal a good amount of damage. Earthquake is Swampert's best attacking move, hitting Fire- and Steel-types such as Darmanitan, Cobalion, and Victini super effectively. In the final spot, Swampert has an array of useful support moves, but the choice usually boils down to Toxic versus Roar. If Scald is your Water-type move, then it's best to go with Roar, as Swampert already spreads status with Scald. Toxic is generally a better choice if Waterfall is your secondary STAB, but it's really a decision based on team preference.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>The purpose of the EVs is to reach a Leftovers number to recover more HP and maximize physical bulk. The remainder of the EVs are put into Attack so Earthquake can hit slightly harder. Swampert's main fault is its lack of recovery, and there are ways to remedy that weakness that can be used in the fourth slot. The first option is Protect, which gives Swampert additional Leftovers recovery, scouts for any unexpected Grass-type moves, and messes with Hi Jump Kick users such as Mienshao and Scrafty. Rest is the other obvious solution, but it costs a moveslot (potentially two if Swampert uses Sleep Talk) and incapacitates Swampert for two turns. If Swampert uses Rest, it's important to have Aromatherapy or Heal Bell support from Roserade or Togekiss. Both of those Pokemon make good partners for Swampert regardless of Heal Bell or Aromatherapy. Togekiss resists Swampert's lone weakness, and Swampert resists two of Togekiss's three weaknesses. Roserade also resists Grass-type attacks and provides Spikes support, forming a formidable defensive core with Swampert. Offensively, Bouffalant deserves a mention as it has Sap Sipper, which absorbs Grass-type attacks and turns them into Attack boosts Crobat absorbs any Grass-type attack and can help rack up entry hazard damage through U-turn or blast the opponent with a powerful Brave Bird. The purpose of the EVs is to reach a Leftovers number to recover more HP and maximize physical bulk. The remainder of the EVs are put into Attack so Earthquake can hit slightly harder.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Choice Band
    move 1: Earthquake
    move 2: Waterfall
    move 3: Ice Punch
    move 4: Superpower / Stone Edge
    item: Choice Band
    nature: Adamant
    evs: 208 HP / 252 Atk / 48 Spe

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>Choice Band Swampert epitomizes the idea of bulky offense, retaining the offensive set's bulk while cranking the Attack power up to eleven. Earthquake is the main attacking option on Swampert; it is able to OHKO defensive Roserade and even 2HKO max Defense Suicune with Stealth Rock support. For Flying- and Grass-type Pokemon, Swampert can use the consistently powerful Waterfall and Ice Punch, the latter of which is a great coverage move that hits Pokemon weak to Ice just as hard as a neutral Earthquake. Ice Punch will always OHKO Zapdos with Stealth Rock down and has a slight chance to knock the bird it out even without Stealth Rock damage. Superpower rounds out this set by giving Swampert a way to defeat Scrafty, regardless of the set. Stone Edge also works in the fourth slot, but Ice Punch gains equal coverage and the power boost is not worth the lower accuracy. The EVs are straightforward: the Speed EVs let Swampert outspeed Umbreon and Porygon2 so that neither can switch in and stall Swampert. Attack is obviously maximized in order to pack a punch. The remainder of the EVs significantly boost Swampert's bulk, but not enough for Swampert to take powerful STAB attacks repeatedly. Furthermore, there is no Leftovers to boost Swampert's durability, so try to keep Swampert out of the line of fire.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>There isn't much to change on Choice Band Swampert. You can adjust the EVs to find a more preferable balance between bulk and Speed, but keep in mind that this set is designed to be slow and bulky. Raising Swampert's Speed much is not recommended. Wish and Stealth Rock support, especially the latter, are appreciated, as Swampert needs the extra damage to obtain key OHKOs (you need to explain which specific OHKOes lol), and appreciates any health boost it can get. Prediction is key, especially on the defensive side, as Swampert does have trouble switching into strong attacks. Swampert can still shrug off resisted and neutral non-STAB attacks from most Pokemon, but can't reliably take many other attacks and expect to last long. Likewise, most Pokemon have extreme difficulty taking hits from Choice Band Swampert, so if Swampert switches in safely it can shift the game's momentum in its user's favor. Choice Band Swampert has an extreme element of surprise as the most common set is the defensive Stealth Rock setter, so the opponent will be shocked when their Roserade is defeated in one hit or Zapdos can't take an Ice Punch. Swampert's favorite teammates include defensive Roserade, as it 4x resists Grass-type attacks and can set up Spikes that make Swampert a pain to switch into; Rhyperior, for setting up Stealth Rock and defeating Flying-type Pokemon reliably; and Flying-type Pokemon, such as Togekiss and Zapdos, to take Grass-type hits and build momentum for Swampert's team. Furthermore, Swampert can safely take the Electric-type moves that give Togekiss and Zapdos headaches.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Offensive Tank
    move 1: Earthquake
    move 2: Waterfall
    move 3: Ice Punch
    move 4: Stealth Rock / Roar / Toxic
    item: Leftovers
    nature: Adamant
    evs: 240 HP / 252 Atk / 16 Def

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>Is Swampert not hitting hard enough? Well, this set is the answer. Offensive Swampert combines Swampert's awesome base 110 Attack and great three-move coverage to hit opposing Pokemon much harder than the defensive set does. However, this additional power comes at the expense of Swampert's bulk. The first three attacks of this set are very straightforward; STAB Earthquake is fantastic coming off of Swampert's 350 Attack, able to fell offensive Roserade in one hit and cause severe damage to defensive Roserade sets. Waterfall is an obvious choice for a second move, as it provides decent power with STAB, and great coverage alongside Earthquake. Ice Punch is a great coverage move, smacking Flygon, Gligar, Zapdos, and Grass-types decently hard. However, note that the only Grass-type that's usually beaten in one hit is Roserade, so the other Grass-types can still switch into Swampert without fearing an OHKO. Unlike the defensive set's Ice Punch, this variant can terrorize Togekiss, scoring a 2HKO on the bird. The final moveslot should be dedicated to a support move such as Stealth Rock, Roar, or Toxic. Stealth Rock is great if your team otherwise lacks Stealth Rock support, turning many of your team's 2HKOs into OHKOs. However, a move such as Roar or Toxic can discourage opponents from setting up on Swampert.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>The most important distinction between this Swampert and the defensive variant is that offensive Swampert is considerably less bulky than the defensive one. Fortunately, even with that loss of bulk still allows it this set is still able to deal with Raikou just as well as the defensive variant does. Other Pokemon, such as Choice Scarf Flygon and Choice Scarf Darmanitan, however, have a much easier time dealing with this set than the defensive one, as their STAB attacks do much more damage. On the other hand, other Pokemon have a much more difficult time switching into this Pokemon as it's hitting with so much more force than the typical defensive Swampert. For example, offensive Roserade cannot switch into Earthquake or Ice Punch as it is OHKOed 91% of the time, even without Stealth Rock. Defensive Roserade takes upwards of 65% from an Earthquake, which can be enough to pick off a weakened one hoping to use Swampert as setup fodder. Unlike the defensive set, offensive Swampert is able to 2HKO most Pokemon with two neutral hits with the exception of extremely bulky Pokemon such as Umbreon or Tangrowth. Substitute is a great move to use on this set as Swampert forces switches easily, especially on common Pokemon such as Raikou, Xatu, and Choice-locked Pokemon that cannot harm the defensive set. If Swampert decides to use Substitute, it's worth bumping the HP EVs to 252 in order to have 101 HP Substitutes that cannot be broken by Night Shade or Seismic Toss. Roserade is a perfect partner, especially the defensive Spiker set, as it can absorb attacks from Pokemon such as Zapdos. The Spikes that Roserade sets make it tough to switch into a powerhouse like Swampert. Bouffalant gets a special mention here for straight-up absorbing Grass-type attacks and using them as fuel for ridiculously powerful Head Charges. When using this variant of Swampert, it's important to predict well because this Swampert does not have the bulk to take many neutral STAB attacks.</p>

    [Other Options]

    <p>Curse Swampert has been a standard set for what seems like an eternity, but that set has fallen out of favor as Swampert's bulk just doesn't carry it as far as it used to. Swampert gets Counter and Mirror Coat, which can catch an opponent off guard. Rest and Sleep Talk are Swampert's only form of recovery, but they leave Swampert a sitting duck for three straight turns unless Swampert comes with Heal Bell or Aromatherapy support. Swampert has a decent special movepool, so a Choice Specs set is viable, but there's little point in using moves such as Hydro Pump, Ice Beam, Sludge Wave, and Hidden Power when its fearsome base 110 Attack and awesome physical coverage goes farther. Yawn is worth a mention for forcing switches, but Swampert can force switches well enough with its wonderful typing, great movepool, and Roar.</p>

    [Checks and Counters]

    <p>Bulky Grass-types are Swampert's nemeses. Roserade, Shaymin, and Tangrowth can switch into Swampert rather easily and either destroy Swampert in one hit or force it to switch. However, weakened Shaymin and Roserade have to watch out for offensive and Choice Band Ice Punches. Grass-type attacks in general scare Swampert as the mud fish takes quadruple damage from any Grass-type move. Pokemon that commonly run Giga Drain or Hidden Power Grass, such as Yanmega, Zapdos, and Rotom-H, can all come in on an Earthquake or on the revenge kill and beat Swampert with either move. Burns, especially from the omnipresent Scald or from Prankster Sableye, absolutely ruin Swampert because they destroy Swampert's bulk and slash its Attack. Though Swampert has the bulk to take unboosted Scalds all day, it cannot risk a burn. Spikes also wear Swampert down and allow Pokemon such as Sharpedo or Kingdra to break through its defenses. The best way to defeat Swampert is to repeatedly pummel it with strong attacks; it loses most wars of attrition because of its lack of recovery.</p>


    [gp]2/2[/gp]
  22. kokoloko

    kokoloko from Mexico
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    i finished up oglemi's GP check

    gr8 job every1

    uploaded

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