Snorlax

Immunity
This Pokémon cannot be poisoned.
Thick Fat
Halves Ice- and Fire-type damage.
Type Tier
Normal OU
Level 100 Statistics (see level 5, 50, 100)
Min- Min Max Max+
HP
160
- 461 524 -
Atk
110
230 256 319 350
Def
65
149 166 229 251
SpA
65
149 166 229 251
SpD
110
230 256 319 350
Spe
30
86 96 159 174
  • Overused

Overview

Snorlax is one of the most dominant Pokemon in every single generation, if not the single most dominant Pokemon overall. It can be a major threat on any team regardless of the set it uses. Snorlax drastically changes metagames by itself and can be a pain to face, but if utilized correctly, it can be an amazing asset to your team. It is a monster through and through; be careful when facing it.

Name Item Ability Nature

Curselax

Leftovers Thick Fat Adamant
Moveset EVs
~ Curse
~ Body Slam
~ Earthquake / Shadow Ball / Fire Blast / Hidden Power Steel
~ Rest
144 HP / 68 Atk / 132 Def / 164 SpD

There aren't words that can explain how much Curselax affects the metagame. Snorlax in general is a huge force to be wary of, but with Curse, it is a monster. It has the perfect build for one too: high HP and Special Defense, fairly nice Attack, low Defense, and dreadful Speed. If Curselax is the last Pokemon on your team, there is a strong possibility that you can make a comeback, as Snorlax can boost up and beat down common counters such as Skarmory, which can no longer phaze it.

Curse, Body Slam, and Rest are all obligatory moves, but the attack in the third moveslot depends on your playstyle and team. Earthquake hurts Tyranitar, Jirachi, and Metagross, but leaves Snorlax powerless against Gengar. Shadow Ball solves the Gengar problem and hits other uncommon Ghost-types, such as Dusclops, a lot harder. However, it does only slightly more damage to Metagross than Snorlax's STAB moves already do, and Snorlax will thus lose in the long run. Shadow Ball also leaves Snorlax as setup bait for Tyranitar, which is never a good thing. Fire Blast's pros are fairly obvious: it 3HKOes Metagross and can break Gengar's Substitutes, which prevents it from using Focus Punch. As a further plus, it is also unaffected by Will-O-Wisp. However, Fire Blast's greatest use is to nab the OHKO on Forretress and the 2HKO on most Skarmory, which none of the other moves can. However, it too provides setup opportunities for Tyranitar. Hidden Power Steel also breaks Gengar's Substitutes while hitting Tyranitar super effectively. However, as with Shadow Ball variants, Hidden Power Steel Snorlax loses coverage on Metagross and Jirachi.

68 Attack EVs and 132 Defense EVs give Snorlax Attack and Defense stats of 300 and 200 respectively. The rest of the EVs are split between HP and Special Defense, and an Adamant nature boosts its Attack.

Name Item Ability Nature

RestTalk

Leftovers Thick Fat Adamant
Moveset EVs
~ Rest
~ Sleep Talk
~ Double-Edge / Body Slam
~ Earthquake / Shadow Ball
88 HP / 176 Atk / 132 Def / 112 SpD

This set can be a pain to take down overall, as it can sponge both direct attacks and status conditions with ease while dishing out heavy damage with STAB Double-Edge. It might not pack the same late-game punch as the Curselax variant, but it is nonetheless an amazing sponge and a valuable asset to most teams.

Name Item Nature

Choice Band

Choice Band Adamant / Careful
Moveset EVs
~ Body Slam / Return
~ Earthquake
~ Shadow Ball
~ Selfdestruct
52 HP / 252 Atk / 28 Def / 176 SpD

Snorlax can put a Choice Band to good use with its excellent bulk and good base 110 Attack; it fits in nicely on a Choice Band team as it is able to sponge special hits for the rest of your team. Return is the preferred STAB move for power and reliability, but Body Slam is always an option for its 30% paralysis rate. Selfdestruct OHKOes any opponents that don't resist it, and even some that do; for instance, even Skarmory needs maximum physical defense to survive.

Name Item Nature

SubPunch

Leftovers Adamant
Moveset EVs
~ Substitute
~ Focus Punch
~ Body Slam
~ Shadow Ball
116 HP / 120 Atk / 96 Def / 176 SpD

SubPunch Snorlax might not be as useful as the other sets, but the element of surprise can help it snag an extra KO or two. This Snorlax can't do much to either Metagross or Skarmory, however. Body Slam has the dual purpose of providing reliable STAB as well as paralysis support, which also helps Snorlax keep its Substitute intact. Shadow Ball dents Ghost-types such as Gengar and Dusclops, which is crucial as they are immune to Body Slam.

Name Item Nature

Mixed Attacker

Leftovers Brave
Moveset EVs
~ Body Slam
~ Earthquake
~ Rest / Selfdestruct
~ Fire Blast
124 HP / 68 Atk / 124 Def / 36 SpA / 156 SpD

This set requires some prediction, but if used correctly, Snorlax can badly hurt most of its switch-ins. It's really versatile and could definitely clean up the opponent's team if you save Snorlax for the late-game.

Name Item Nature

Boomlax (Counter + Selfdestruct)

Leftovers Adamant
Moveset EVs
~ Counter
~ Selfdestruct
~ Return / Body Slam
~ Focus Punch / Shadow Ball / Earthquake
144 HP / 68 Atk / 132 Def / 164 SpD

Due to Snorlax's immense special bulk, most opponents will aim to take it out with physical attacks. Counter takes advantage of this by putting Snorlax down to low health; it can then go out with a bang with Selfdestruct. Body Slam can paralyze opponents and hence enable Snorlax to outspeed them and use Explosion, but Return is stronger. The filler move depends on the team, but Shadow Ball is generally the most useful as it ensures that Ghost-types don't wall Snorlax cold.

Name Item Ability Nature

Mono-Attacker

Leftovers Thick Fat Adamant
Moveset EVs
~ Rest
~ Sleep Talk
~ Body Slam
~ Curse
116 HP / 120 Atk / 132 Def / 140 SpD

This is a very risky set; even though this Snorlax is extremely hard to take down, it is also easy to wall. However, with the support of a Pursuit user to trap Ghost-types and Dugtrio to take out Metagross and Tyranitar, Snorlax can pull off a late-game sweep.

Other Options

Double-Edge is an option over Return or Body Slam on any set for its greater power, but it gives Snorlax nasty recoil, which can hurt when coupled with Spikes and sandstorm. Therefore, it is recommended only on the RestTalk set. Similarly, Flamethrower is always an option over Fire Blast; as long as Snorlax doesn't use a Special Attack-lowering nature, it should 3HKO Skarmory and do enough damage to break Gengar's Substitutes. It also prevents Snorlax from being stalled out of Fire Blast PP. Thunderbolt and Thunder are two other decent special attacks Snorlax can hold off Skarmory with; Thunder can also paralyze opponents. Snorlax won't do much damage to Suicune with either, however.

Belly Drum can work; if it does, it's extremely dangerous. Yawn, Block, Charm, Psych Up, Protect, and Toxic are all novelty moves as Snorlax is better off just attacking. In general, with Snorlax's versatility, it can mix and match moves and end up with a good set most of the time.

Checks and Counters

Counters to Snorlax depend entirely on its set. Weezing gets the first mention because it's physically bulky enough to take most boosted hits and can use Pain Split to feed off of Snorlax's higher HP. Furthermore, Weezing has access to moves such as Haze, which will eliminate any boosts Snorlax can muster from Curse, as well as Will-O-Wisp, which will harshly reduce Snorlax's Attack stat while also negating Leftovers and causing a little extra damage. Weezing can hit relatively hard with Sludge Bomb, and if required, even turn to Explosion to finish off Snorlax.

Virtually any Snorlax set is walled early-game by Suicune, which can Roar away its Curse boosts. However, Suicune gets worn down by boosted hits pretty quickly and will be forced to Rest; there's always the possibility of Snorlax using Selfdestruct on Suicune as well. If Snorlax lacks a Fire- or Electric-type move, Skarmory can come in for free, set up Spikes, and phaze it away for Spikes damage. If Snorlax is the last Pokemon, however, these two counters have a harder time. Skarmory will only be able to beat Curse Snorlax if Skarmory carries Counter and the latter lacks a Fire- or Electric-type move. Suicune is faster and can set up Calm Mind, though it has little chance of coming out on top unless it has gained several boosts before Snorlax switches in.

Another pain for Snorlax is Celebi. Without a boost from Choice Band or Curse, Snorlax cannot easily 2HKO Celebi, which means it can stall out Snorlax with Leech Seed and Recover; it also shrugs off Body Slam paralysis thanks to Natural Cure and Heal Bell. To prevent losing to a Resting Snorlax, Celebi can set up Calm Mind and take down Snorlax with Psychic, as long as it plays it safe with Recover. Again, it needs to be wary of Selfdestruct. There's also the Metagross / Tyranitar / Gengar triangle addressed in the first set; if Snorlax doesn't have the right moves for them, they will beat it. However, note that it can stall out Gengar that lack Focus Punch more often than not, even if it doesn't have anything to hit Gengar with.

Fighting-types make for more offensive checks or counters to Snorlax. None can repeatedly come in on STAB Return, Body Slam, or Double-Edge and live to tell the tale, but they can switch into predicted Rests, Curses, and, to an extent, Snorlax's coverage attacks as well, and hit it on its relatively poor Defense; Focus Punch will hurt Snorlax even after multiple Curse boosts. Heracross puts a big dent in Snorlax with Brick Break or Megahorn, while Medicham can use Hi Jump Kick, but the best checks are Cross Chop users such as Machamp, Primeape, and Hariyama, as a critical hit will OHKO Snorlax no matter how many Curse boosts it has. Besides all this, Snorlax generally isn't good at taking physical hits from the likes of Aerodactyl and Salamence.