Smeargle's Studio General Thread: Spriting and Banners go here!

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Can someone make me a Header for my forum?

- 733px x 192px
- Renders: Artworks of Azelf, Arcanine, Salamence, Alakazam, Shaymin-L, Gengar, Gyarados, all with effect like in my avatar (that glow around the Render)
- Font: Pokemon Competitive-Battling Federation
- Background: Some black-colors, mixed with dark blue-colors

I only can offer Pokésav'd Pokémon as price. I hope, someone make this. Thanks forwards!
Bleh I'm no good but I wanted to do it for fun/practice. If you want to wait on something more professional feel free. I won't feel offended at all. :P

http://i118.photobucket.com/albums/o95/sceptical1216/Terra.png

 
Can someone make me a Togekiss Avatar? Just make the Backround Red and Blue, everything else on it is fine just make it look nice XD. Thanks!
 
Prepare yourselves for my Scratching Guide!

X’s Scratch Spriting Guide​



So, due to request, I have created my first spriting guide detailing my personal method of Scratching. My method is completely different from TCoD’s, so don’t pretend that this is going to look anything similar. This guide uses my Bronze Koffing trophy as an example. This guide also assumes you know how to sprite already, and are just getting around to scratching, and that you are using the standard Paint program. So, without further ado, let’s start Scratching!​



~~~~~~~~~~~~~​



Step 1


Draw it out.​



So I’m guessing you probably weren’t expecting this to be in here. But yes, It is my honest belief that every good scratch begins with a hard copy of the pose and whatnot. Try to start your sketch with a good idea of what you’re looking to draw. If it’s a fakemon you’re trying to sprite, do a few concept sketches first, and get the idea firmly in your mind. Remember, the most important part of drawing is to be patient and to keep a light, steady hand. Only darken your outline when you’re done with the rough sketch. I also recommend, for straighter lines, that you should draw with many back-and-forth strokes, that way you can slowly curve the line, and if you make a mistake, you can correct it in the backstroke.​



Step 2


Scan and Resize​



Now that your masterpiece is finished, you can scan it. After you’ve scanned it, make sure it’s got reasonable proportions. A variety of sites (even PhotoDraw, if you have the program) can resize pictures, so go out and find one. If you don’t know one, most image hosting sites carry an image editor that can do this task.​



Step 3


SAVE AS PNG​



Trust me, even though this is the simplest step, it’s probably the most important. If you don’t save sprites as PNG, they’ll lose quality, so even if your sprite is a masterpiece, the compression from saving it as JPG, BMP, or anything else, it will look bad.​



Step 4


Clean up the Scan


Whoo! Now we get to the fun part, aka, Spriting!





Looks pretty grimy right now, huh? Yeah, that’s because the paper has imperfections in it which shows in the scan. And because scanners auto-save images as JPG. Now do you see what I meant when I said save as a PNG? Thought so. But anyway, before we fix that, we need to draw the lineart. So, now we will fix up the outline using the scan as a base. If you had a little too much detail in your original art, and the compression makes it utterly incomprehensible, use the hard copy and figure out what the heck that smudge on the screen is, and adjust the outline accordingly.​



Now that the lineart is there, you’re going to want to erase that filigree. Just select the base Paint White color and fill in with the pencil. If you want to make absolutely sure you erase all of it, color it instead with an easily visible color (green/pink) and then use the Paint bucket tool to fill in the green/pink background with White.​



Remember also that this is your last chance to resize fairly easily. If it looks too big, don’t be afraid to fix it.





Now, doesn’t that look a lot better?​



Step 5


Basecoat


Now, from what I’ve seen, most people like to use colors that they created by hand. This is not the way to go. Only create custom colors if absolutely necessary. Otherwise, steal them from an official sprite. Once you’ve selected you’re base colors, you’ll want to fill in your sprite with the base color, or the color in the middle of your palette (to the brighter side, if it has an even number of colors). Simple, right?​



Now, I will demonstrate using Lopunny’s, Shiny Staraptor’s, Glalie’s, and Shiny Advance Pidgeot’s colors.





Yeah, simple indeed.​



Step 6


Finish the job.​



Now you’ll finish the job by shading in the entire thing. Another part which requires patience, Shading can take up the better part of an hour. Just remember to make sure it looks natural. Remember that in Pokemon, the light source is always from the upper left, towards the way the Pokemon is facing. Also, make sure the outline isn’t all black. Where the black is directed at the Sun, use the darkest shade of (adjacent color) that you have. Otherwise, it will look less official, and lack a quality that official sprites have.​



Here is the finished product:





Now, it is time for the most important step: Step 7!​



Step 7


BRAG!​



You may now show off your work with pride. I actually wasn’t joking about this being important, though. If you show off your sprite around an experienced community, they WILL give criticisms, which WILL make you better; if you listen and try to fix what you did wrong/ could do better, you will get better. Heck, I evolved from criticisms, and developed my own method of Scratching from them. Honest. So remember, learn from your mistakes, everyone!​



~~~~~~~~~~~~~​



So, I hope you guys liked my first guide and found it useful. If you have any criticisms, tell me, and I will fix my guide, and hopefully make it better.​



So, as mentioned in there, C+C please. Also, does anyone know if I can just make a thread for this and future tutorials? And yes, that is my submission for the Bronze Koffing featured in there.​
 
XandZero2, most of your suggestions are decent except, in my opinion, your advice to refrain from creating one's own palettes. Obviously, you realize that a bad palette can "ruin" a sprite, but a palette that is both unique and well-crafted can make a scratch that much more interesting. I usually attribute a ripped palette to the artist's lack of creativity or proficiency in color theory.

In addition, I believe that this thread would be an appropriate place to post your tutorial.
 
Oh boy, my lineart for my Ludicolo Pixel Over is up:



I realize that the blotches on the hands and feet aren't technically lineart, but I included them so that when I color I know where they are.

C+C appreciated.

EDIT: X&Z- how did you get a thing with a show/hide thing for your guide (bad wording, I know)
 
XandZero2, most of your suggestions are decent except, in my opinion, your advice to refrain from creating one's own palettes. Obviously, you realize that a bad palette can "ruin" a sprite, but a palette that is both unique and well-crafted can make a scratch that much more interesting. I usually attribute a ripped palette to the artist's lack of creativity or proficiency in color theory.

In addition, I believe that this thread would be an appropriate place to post your tutorial.
Thanks for the link. Also, I believe the same thing for the most part, actually, but since this is a beginner walkthrough, I thought it would be better to reccomend a ripped palette, since I have seen numerous beginners (myself included) create a palette that has too much or not enough contrast. I'll fix that, though, so that I don't give people a morbid outlook on a custom palette before they get good at scratching. Thanks for the comment.
 
All of this work is great guys.

X&Z: Listen to Headpunch.

WSF: The lineart looks great, although you may want to make the stripes on his fur have spikier edges. His right eye (from his point of view) also looks a bit weird. Other than that, color and shade it right and you'll have an amazing pixel over.

It looks like it's
[noparse][/noparse]



Also, I have been around, I've just been much to lazy too log on. I'm getting new carpet in a few weeks and I'm planning a trip to Albequerque. Between those two things and my music related stuff I've been quite tired, not to mention very busy.

Soon enough I'm going to have to find the time to figure out how to work with layers......Paint.NET is pretty awesome.
 
Also, I have been around, I've just been much to lazy too log on. I'm getting new carpet in a few weeks and I'm planning a trip to Albequerque. Between those two things and my music related stuff I've been quite tired, not to mention very busy.

Soon enough I'm going to have to find the time to figure out how to work with layers......Paint.NET is pretty awesome.
Yep, as soon as you figure out layers and the selection tool, you'll never want to use mspaint ever again.
 
Yeah, the selction tool's the only bad thing - it's a bit of a pain to select a large area of white so that the pointer will work. Unless there's an easier way...?
 
Large wall of text explaining Paint.net's select tools:

Tools:
Square: Selects an area of the picture in a draggable square shape. Mostly useful if the picture your selecting has a transparent background and your pasting it into a new layer

Free Select: Scratch out your selection free hand. Not very useful after you learn how to use layers and transparency, then the square select and the eraser tool are better than this.

Magic Wand Select: This is my favorite. This basically selects pixels in a paint bucket type fashion. If their is a lightning bolt icon at the top of the screen, then this tool will select the pixel you click on and every adjacent pixel of the same color. If you click the lighting bolt icon and change it to the globe icon, the Magic Wand will select every pixel of that color in the entire image. Sweet right? You can also adjust the how sensitive the selection is to color hue by adjusting the %bar next to the Lightning/Globe icon, but you'll have to play with that on your own.

Selection Modes: This is the blue square in the menu bar.

Replace: Standard Selection mode. Anytime you make a new selection, the old selection goes away.

Addition: Very useful. Anytime you make a new selection, it is made in addition to the old one. This is where the free form selection tool can be useful.

Subtraction: Instead of making a new selection, this mode substracts from whatever you current selection is.


And new animation. What do you guys think?
 
thats a better animation but i preffered the bigger one but anyway it looks really good
(i know you said you are not sure if you're going to mugen but i see your sprites becoming my favourite characters already. ) keep up the good work :)
 
Yep, as soon as you figure out layers and the selection tool, you'll never want to use mspaint ever again.
After 10 minutes on Paint.NET I never wanted to use paint again :D

Even without layers it's cool.

Large wall of text explaining Paint.net's select tools:

Tools:
Square: Selects an area of the picture in a draggable square shape. Mostly useful if the picture your selecting has a transparent background and your pasting it into a new layer

Free Select: Scratch out your selection free hand. Not very useful after you learn how to use layers and transparency, then the square select and the eraser tool are better than this.

Magic Wand Select: This is my favorite. This basically selects pixels in a paint bucket type fashion. If their is a lightning bolt icon at the top of the screen, then this tool will select the pixel you click on and every adjacent pixel of the same color. If you click the lighting bolt icon and change it to the globe icon, the Magic Wand will select every pixel of that color in the entire image. Sweet right? You can also adjust the how sensitive the selection is to color hue by adjusting the %bar next to the Lightning/Globe icon, but you'll have to play with that on your own.

Selection Modes: This is the blue square in the menu bar.

Replace: Standard Selection mode. Anytime you make a new selection, the old selection goes away.

Addition: Very useful. Anytime you make a new selection, it is made in addition to the old one. This is where the free form selection tool can be useful.

Subtraction: Instead of making a new selection, this mode substracts from whatever you current selection is.


And new animation. What do you guys think?
Thanks.

Magic wand looks cool, but I haven't done anything sprite related yet so I don't know how awesome it is. But most of the tools are awesome. I'm especially likin' the gradient tool.

I've made a couple things so far, and they look great considering my measly experience. I'll show you the best two.



This is one of the first things I made using two tutorials I found online.



This was easy to make and took me like a minute.

The end result isn't too shabby, and I can change the color of the lightning with a slider
 
I don't know, as you really would have to have photoshop and paint.NET to know. I can say that Paint.NET isn't nearly as good as photoshop (there are multiple tutorials showing you how to mimic photoshop tools and effects), but it's waaaaaaaaaaaay better than paint.

Canti can probably answer that better than me though.

As far as free things go, Paint.NET is one of the best around.
 
How does Paint.net compare to Photoshop?
Honestly, I have both, and for spriting I find paint.NET to be marginally better than Photoshop in that category. Photoshop is excellent for seriously in-depth fixes on pictures, and massive alteration. Pixeling in photoshop is rather hard compared to paint.NET though.
 

Alchemator

my god if you don't have an iced tea for me when i
is a Forum Moderator Alumnusis a Top Smogon Media Contributor Alumnus

A revamped Venasaur, using my own colours.

Why'd you make the plasma around it's arms white, Alchemator?
Cool Venusaur! Not entirely sure what you mean by the question but here goes:

1. That's the colour of the inner plasma
2. That coloured plasma is around what you might consider its 'arms'
 


Well, there's my roster. Not much, but enough to start off with, and enough that I can finish this on my own if nobody can help me. Machamps not done yet, still gotta add the details.

Anybody wanna try coloring/shading the Hitmonlee or the Blaziken? It would save me a lot of time so that I can just focus on the animations, and of course I would give credit in the final production.
 

Alchemator

my god if you don't have an iced tea for me when i
is a Forum Moderator Alumnusis a Top Smogon Media Contributor Alumnus
Some colour flips I've been doing:
[Colour flips]
How do they look?
They look fine :D

[Animations]
Well, there's my roster. Not much, but enough to start off with, and enough that I can finish this on my own if nobody can help me. Machamps not done yet, still gotta add the details.

Anybody wanna try coloring/shading the Hitmonlee or the Blaziken? It would save me a lot of time so that I can just focus on the animations, and of course I would give credit in the final production.
Those are looking brilliant Canti, I would help but I don't think I'd be much use :(

EDIT:
8D
 
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