Resource SS OU Viability Ranking Thread [See post #321]

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:Clefable: A+ ---> S

Clef is an incredibly good right now, it can deal with most defensive or balanced cores due to it's access to flamethrower/fire blast, thunderbolt and moonblas. It hits incredibly hard with LO, only bulky fire types like Flareon, Rotom-H, Centiskorch or Arcanine want to switch in on the LO variant. Other bulky sets also have access to great support moves such as Wish, aromatherapy, and T-wave, this thing also has access to stealth rocks, and an amazing ability (magic guard).

Clefable can beat/threaten some noticeable Hazard setters such as:
Toxipex
252+ SpA Life Orb Clefable Thunderbolt vs. 252 HP / 4 SpD Toxapex: 166-198 (54.6 - 65.1%) -- guaranteed 2HKO after Stealth Rock and Black Sludge recovery
Ferrothorn
252+ SpA Life Orb Clefable Fire Blast vs. 252 HP / 252+ SpD Ferrothorn: 359-426 (101.9 - 121%) -- guaranteed OHKO
Seismitoad
252+ SpA Life Orb Clefable Moonblast vs. 252 HP / 4 SpD Seismitoad: 226-266 (54.5 - 64.2%) -- guaranteed 2HKO after Leftovers recovery
Tyranitar
252+ SpA Life Orb Clefable Moonblast vs. 252 HP / 252 SpD Tyranitar in Sand: 190-226 (47 - 55.9%) -- 69.9% chance to 2HKO
Clef also beats/threatens 2 of OU's best hazard control mons:
Corviknight
252+ SpA Life Orb Clefable Fire Blast vs. 252 HP / 252+ SpD Corviknight: 221-263 (55.2 - 65.7%) -- guaranteed 2HKO after Leftovers recovery
Mandibuzz
252+ SpA Life Orb Clefable Moonblast vs. 252 HP / 252+ SpD Mandibuzz: 265-315 (62.5 - 74.2%) -- guaranteed 2HKO
I think Clefable overall has a good match up against balance, offense, and bulkier teams.




Expect a post about Runiclus & Bisharp moving up to B+ soon.
 
252 SpA Choice Specs Dragapult Fire Blast vs. 252 HP / 252+ SpD Corviknight: 240-284 (60 - 71%) -- guaranteed 2HKO
252 SpA Choice Specs Dragapult Thunderbolt vs. 252 HP / 252+ SpD Corviknight: 196-232 (49 - 58%) -- guaranteed 2HKO after Stealth Rock
252 SpA Rotom-Heat/Wash/Mow Thunderbolt vs. 252 HP / 252+ SpD Corviknight: 204-242 (51 - 60.5%) -- guaranteed 2HKO
252 SpA Rotom-Heat Overheat vs. 252 HP / 252+ SpD Corviknight: 294-348 (73.5 - 87%) -- guaranteed 2HKO
252 Atk Hustle Dracozolt Bolt Beak (170 BP) vs. +1 248 HP / 8 Def Corviknight: 440-518 (110.2 - 129.8%) -- guaranteed OHKO
252 Atk Hustle Dracozolt Bolt Beak (170 BP) vs. +2 248 HP / 8 Def Corviknight: 330-390 (82.7 - 97.7%) -- 68.8% chance to OHKO after Stealth Rock and Leftovers recovery
252 Atk Dracozolt Bolt Beak (170 BP) vs. +1 248 HP / 8 Def Corviknight: 294-348 (73.6 - 87.2%) -- guaranteed 2HKO after Stealth Rock
252 Atk Cinderace Pyro Ball vs. +1 248 HP / 8 Def Corviknight: 230-272 (57.6 - 68.1%) -- guaranteed 2HKO after Stealth Rock and Leftovers recovery
252+ Atk Choice Band Dracovish Fishious Rend (170 BP) vs. +1 248 HP / 8 Def Corviknight: 226-267 (56.6 - 66.9%) -- guaranteed 2HKO after Stealth Rock and Leftovers recovery
These calcs are misleading and you'll see why I say this if you apply it in practice.
Dragapult's Fire Blast has low PP and Leftovers + Roost allows Corvi to tank 4 hits unless you get 3 High Rolls in a row. Corviknight BU is not switching into Dragapult, so the SR part is unnecessary. Meaning, Thunderbolt will have a 55.5% chance to 2HKO and still gets PP stalled.
Same thing with the Rotoms's Thunderbolts.
Rotom-Heat's Overheat looks impressive until you take into consideration that the next Overheat is only doing 37.5-44% and losing half the PP already.
Dracozolt barely missed the cut-off and is losing more usage due to the popularity of electric resists & ground types like Seismitoad. It's actually not that common anymore.
Cinderace is a 50/50, it needs all High Rolls to beat a +1 Corviknight.
Yeah, Dracovish is an obvious 2HKO on Corvi. Dracovish is an ugly monster, this is true.
The whole point of pressure and the immense bulk in Special Defense is to wear down special attackers's PP. You also don't want to switch into attacks haphazardly, that defeats the purpose of going for a sweep.
The biggest weakness for the Bulk Up set is that it doesn't fit on a lot of teams.
Corviknight is definitely S rank worthy but, it's easy to see that Corviknight has 4MSS with any set it runs. U-Turn is always a good move to run on defog sets and helps alleviate the 4MSS issue somewhat.
It's just a great blanket pivot to many mons in the tier while still being incredibly flexible.
 

TPP

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In case you missed the first part, the explanations for the S and A ranking mons can be found in this post. Here are the explanations for the mons in the B ranks:

B+ Rank

Cinderace is an interesting pivot thanks to Court Change, which allows it to swap hazards on the field. Due to its high speed, and decent power, it can force out Steel-types and Fairy-types, as well as specially defensive pokemon like Mandibuzz and Snorlax. While doing this, it can apply a bit of pressure with Pyro Ball, High Jump Kick and Super Fang in order to weaken switch ins like Seismitoad. Additionally, it can always U-turn out to grab momentum in order to let in a teammate to capitalize on the bulky water/ground that was sent in to check Cinderace. Unfortunately, it can be trapped by Dugtrio and offensively it may struggle due to bulky Water-types being extremely common.


Dracozolt is similar to Dracovish in that it can deal ridiculous damage with a single attack while naturally outspeeding every utility mon. It can be very difficult to switch into unless one has a sturdy Ground-type, as Ground-types are immune to Bolt Beak. This means that Seismitoad, Hippowdon and Excadrill can potentially switch in and force Dracozolt out. However, with the exception of Hippowdon, Dracozolt can still deal solid damage to other switch ins thanks to Dragon Claw, Low Kick, and Fire Fang. Dugtrio can also trap Dracozolt, whereas Dracovish can survive an Earthquake from Dugtrio and not get trapped as easily. Finally, Dracozolt has to deal with Hustle's negative effect of lowering its accuracy, which can result in some frustrating turns. Dracozolt is able to come in on Corviknight and force out nearly everything slower than it, including Clefable, Aegislash, Mandibuzz, Hatterene, Ferrothorn, and bulky waters outside of Seismitoad and Gastrodon. It's a solid wallbreaker, but it does have a bit more counterplay than the mons ranked above it.


Gengar typically runs Choice Specs with Trick, and can be a huge threat to teams thanks to its power, coverage, and phenomenal speed Tier. Gengar is able to outspeed everything except for Cinderace, Hawlucha, Dugtrio, Dragapult and Choice Scarf mons. Gengar can potentially break through its most common switch in, Mandibuzz, by utilizing Sludge Bomb's poison chance in order to leave Mandibuzz in range to be 2HKO'd by Sludge Bomb the next time it switches in. Aside from Mandibuzz, Gengar can threaten most specially defensive mons, which are usually Clefable and Sylveon. However, Corviknight is one mon specially defensive mon that can somewhat safely switch into Gengar, as Shadow Ball only has a 2% chance to 2HKO with Stealth Rock. On the other hand, Gengar can punish Corviknight with Thunderbolt, or cripple it with Trick in order to allow Gengar's teammates that are normally checked by Corviknight to break through the opposing team. Like Aegislash, Gengar is great at 2HKO'ing many defensive threats, but it can struggle to flat out 1HKO some threats and thus get forced out when it wants to attack. Gengar also loses a bit of power if it Tricks away its Choice Specs, causing it to feel somewhat weak and remain walled by Mandibuzz and Corviknight.


Kommo-o can be run on hyper offense teams for its Clangorous Soul set, and it can be run on bulky offense and balance teams for its Stealth Rock set. The Clangorous Soul set turns Kommo-o into a sweeper that outspeeds the entire tier and enables it to 2HKO common specially defensives mons such as Mandibuzz and Clefable. While behind screens, Kommo-o can avoid the 2HKO from Fairy-types and proceed to 2HKO back with Flash Cannon. Kommo-o can 2HKO Corviknight with Flamethrower and 2HKO Mandibuzz with Clanging Scales. While Kommo-o may not be able to 1HKO these mons, it can avoid being 1HKO'd in return and may also have the opportunity to set up a 2nd Clangorous Soul against something like Mandibuzz, who is unable to pressure Kommo-o. Corviknight has to rely on Iron Head or Brave Bird, neither of which can KO Kommo-o even if Reflect is not up. Kommo-o's natural bulk and typing allow it to set up against common mons like Rotom-Heat and Tyranitar. Its abilities, Bulletproof and Soundproof can be very helpful at times, with Bulletproof granting immunity to Shadow Ball, and Soundproof granting immunity to sound attacks. Common Shadow Ball users include Aegislash, Dragapult and Gengar. Sound move users include Sylveon and Toxicity, both of which are unable to touch Kommo-o and are forced to switch out. However, this set does share its fair number of flats, with one of them being that Kommo-o will only be able to set up one time as Throat Spray will be used up the first time Clangorous Soul is used. While it might not sound bad, it can restrict Kommo-o a little on when it should set up. Having one set up opportunity ties into its other notable flaws, one of which includes Clear Smog from Gastrodon and Haze from Milotic or Toxapex being capable of immediately shut down Kommo-o's sweep. The last flaw is that Clanging Scales can use up Throat Spray as well, meaning that Kommo-o will not be able to set up properly in a single turn to 2HKO the aforementioned threats earlier in this paragraph. The other set Kommo-o can run involves being physically defensive while providing Stealth Rock. This set can switch into Excadrill, Sub + Nasty Plot Hydreigon, and Dracovish. The main drawback to the defensive set is that it can be rather passive, as Kommo-o fails to threaten much with only Body Press and an additional coverage move.


Rotom-Mow, unlike both Rotom-Heat and Rotom-Wash, is able to get through Seismitoad thanks to Leaf Storm and generally does well against the common core of Seismitoad + Clefable + Corviknight. It can also punish switch ins with status (Thunder Wave or Will-O-Wisp), and it may also cripple switch ins with Trick should Rotom-Mow be running a Choice Scarf set. While it has great potential offensively, defensively it leaves much to be desired as it does not resist Flying, it is weak to U-turn, and it does not resist much, which all mean that it doesn't have the greatest set up opportunities unless it is forcing out a threat like Seismitoad. The other big flaw with Rotom-Mow is that it has competition from Rotom-Heat and Rotom-Wash, the former of which can 1v1 Rotom-Mow.


Togekiss can be a frightening set up sweeper thanks to Air Slash + Flamethrower hitting nearly everything except for Rotom-Heat and Tyranitar. Togekiss can put in massive work against balance and stall teams, in part to Air Slash + Serene Grace preventing slower mons from being able to threaten it as often as they would like to. Substitute prevents it from being statused by mons like Toxapex and Seismitoad, and it also has a generally good matchup against both Seismitoad + Clefable + Corviknight, and Ferrothorn + Toxapex cores. Togekiss's main flaws are its Stealth Rock weakness and general difficulty with setting up both a Nasty Plot and a Substitute. It also hates Rotom-Heat, which can resist Air Slash and Flamethrower and outspeed Togekiss to force it out. Against balance and stall teams it might not be so hard, but against offensive teams, it'll have a hard time.

B Rank

Bisharp is one of the few wallbreakers that has access to both Swords Dance and priority. Sucker Punch allows it to threaten faster offensive mons like Dragapult and Scarf Dracovish, while Swords Dance with Throat Chop and Iron Head can put pressure on slower defensive targets. Bisharp can abuse Defog from Mandibuzz and Corviknight, but it does have to be careful as Mandibuzz may carry Foul Play, and Corviknight may 1HKO it with Body Press. Bisharp sits at a decent speed tier of 70, which enables it to outspeed every defensive utility mon. However, Bisharp struggles a little in that some faster targets like Dragapult and Rotom-Heat can avoid Sucker Punch and status back with Will-O-Wisp, and then despite having Swords Dance, Bisharp can fail to 1HKO a majority of defensive threats, some of which can punish Bisharp back and cripple it or KO it. Seismitoad would be an example of one of those defensive threats, as Bisharp cannot 1HKO it even with +2 Adamant Life Orb Throat Chop.


Gastrodon is similar to Seismitoad except that it can run a more specially defensive set in order to try and handle threats like Clefable, Hatterene, and Dragapult. Gastrodon is a better answer to Rotom-Heat as well due to more special defense and access to Recover. Gastrodon can handle Hatterene and lower set up sweepers thanks to Clear Smog, and it can avoid being set up fodder against Hydreigon with Ice Beam. It can also handle Scarf Dracovish and Dracozolt, but can be prone to either one should they be running a Choice Band set. The biggest advantage Seismitoad has over Gastrodon is access to Stealth Rock, which allows Seismitoad to capitalize on the turns it switches in. Seismitoad also has access to Toxic, which can directly cripple threats like Dracovish. The other notable problem for Gastrodon is that Seismitoad can be paired with Wish Clefable/Sylveon in order to keep itself healthy to continue checking Rotom-Heat while providing Stealth Rock. Despite that, Gastrodon is pretty reliable and as long as Rotom-Heat and Dragapult are common in the tier, then Gastrodon should provide some good value.


Grimmsnarl is the best screen setter in the tier and is a staple on hyper offense teams that rely on screens. It also has other sets that focus on setting up with Bulk Up that are decent but are not too consistent as Grimmsnarl has to choose between running Darkest Lariat or Spirit Break. Darkest Lariat allows you to get past Steel-types and not Fairy-types, while Spirit Break lets you get past Fairy-types and not Steel-types. Corviknight and Clefable being among the most common mons in the tier along with Toxapex, who can Haze away boosts, cause Bulk Up sets to struggle. Defensively, Grimmsnarl has a nice typing that allows it to switch into Dragapult, who happens to be the most used mon in the tier. While it may struggle offensively, Grimmsnarl providing unmatched utility to hyper offense teams is enough to keep it in the B rank.


Hawlucha is still fairly viable in OU and can turn into a decent sweeper on hyper offense teams. Fairy-types like Clefable being specially defensive instead of physically defensive can allow Hawlucha to be a fairly big threat to bulky offense teams. However, Hawlucha's success at sweeping may depend on the bulky Water-type the team has, and if that team has Aegislash or not. Seismitoad for example can be set up against if Hawlucha has a sub up while behind screens and then lose to Hawlucha. Toxapex on the other hand, which runs a physically defensive set this generation can tank +2 Brave Bird easily and Haze away Hawlucha's boosts and stop the sweep. Overall, Hawlucha can sometimes be a decent sweeper, and then at other times it may struggle more than it would like to.


Jellicent is a physically defensive Water-type that can check physical attackers such as Dracovish and Excadrill. It is also able to apply pressure to slower balance teams thanks to Night Shade + Taunt. Strength Sap causes physical attackers to have a harder time KO'ing it and it simultaneously provides Jellicent recovery. The main downsides to Jellicent include Strength Sap not being reliable recovery when a special attacker like Clefable switches in, and then the fact that Dracovish may break through Jellicent with Crunch.


Obstagoon is a decent wallbreaker thanks to its solid damage output that comes from the combination of Guts, Facade, and Knock Off. Obstagoon having base 95 speed is nice as it allows it to outspeed some other offensive mons, such as Rotom-Heat, Excadrill and Choice Band Dracovish. Knock Off is a great move this generation due to nothing being immune to it, and aside from Tyranitar and Bisharp, nothing resists Facade + Knock Off. However, Obstagoon has some freedom with its other 2 slots, which could include any of the following: Obstruct, Bulk Up, Close Combat, and Switcheroo. Obstruct can be nice to force out targets or help put them in KO range as well as provide a safe turn to activate Flame Orb. Bulk Up can boost Obstagoon's power to help achieve KO's, and Close Combat can be nice at KO'ing Dark types like Tyranitar. Switcheroo is an interesting choice as it can allow Obstagoon to steal an item from the opponent and hand over its Flame Orb to burn them. The biggest flaw with Obstagoon would probably be how it can struggle to flat out 1HKO several defensive threats, and even struggle to 2HKO some threats such as specially defensive Corviknight.


Reuniclus is a decent set up sweeper that has a generally good matchup against bulkier teams. Calm Mind + Psychic/Stored Power + Thunder/Focus Blast + Recover can put in solid work against common defensive backbones while being difficult to KO. It can set up against passive mons like Seismitoad and Toxapex, and it can provide some defensive utility against physical threats like Conkeldurr. However, Reuniclus can still be threatend out by common Ghost and Dark-types, including Dragapult, Tyranitar, Hydreigon, Mandibuzz and Aegislash. Additionally, Reuniclus can be prone to Taunt from Corviknight if it is not running Thunder. This also means that Reuniclus can be forced to rely on Focus Blast to KO Corviknight, which can be difficult due to Pressure and Focus Blasts's poor accuracy.


Sylveon is similar to specially defensive Clefable except for Hyper Voice bypassing Substitute to hit threats like Hydreigon, and Mystical Fire or Calm Mind being run in the last slot instead of Stealth Rock. Clefable having Stealth Rock and Magic Guard gives it a big edge over Sylveon, especially with Magic Guard because Sylveon is prone to status and hazards. However, Sylveon does provide better special bulk, which can make it better at handling Hydreigon and Dragapult.


Toxtricity is a powerful breaker that can get past Ground-types thanks to Boomburst. It can be extremely difficult to switch into, which makes the matchup against balance and stall teams rather good. It can also switch into non Life Orb Clefable, Toxapex, and Corviknight, all of which are common. On the other hand, Toxtricity has some very notable flaws. While base 75 speed can be nice and allows it to speed tie with Dracovish and Dracozolt, it is outsped by other common offensive mons such as Rotom-Heat and Hydreigon. Toxtricity is also very prone to Dugtrio, who can remove Toxtricity in a single shot. Toxitricity also has to deal with Soundproof Kommo-o, and then finally, while Boomburst is an excellent move, Ghost-types are very common, with Dragapult being the most used mon in OU. One of those Ghost-types alongside a Ground-type can cause the player with Toxtricity to have a harder than desired time when attacking.

B- Rank

Gyarados is one of the biggest losers following the dynamax ban, and is no longer the top level threat it used to be. Gyarados currently struggles with choosing which defensive answers it wants to beat and which ones it wants to get stopped by, which for a sweeper can be very frustrating. Sub + Bounce can help it set up against passive mons, but then you have to remember that switch ins like Seismitoad and Ferrothorn run Protect regularly, while Toxapex commonly uses Baneful Bunker. Those moves prevent them from getting hit by Bounce and result in Gyarados getting walled. With Power Whip instead of Substitute, Gyarados struggles a bit more with setting up at the cost of being able to bypass some Water-types, most notably Seismitoad and Gastrodon. Earthquake can be run alongside Power Whip to provide extra coverage and a way to handle Toxapex, but Gyarados will still be unable to defeat Ferrothorn and also has to rely on Waterfall to get past Hydreigon. Even after 1 Dragon Dance, Gyarados may not be able to 1HKO offensive threats. For example, Bounce can deal 95% max to Dragapult and 75% max with Earthquake. Depending on the matchup, Gyarados may be able to put in some work, but it is far less consistent than it used to be.


Mamoswine with Choice Band is a strong wallbreaker that boasts great coverage between Icicle Crash, Earthquake and Stone Edge/Superpower, and it has priority in Ice Shard on top of that. Stone Edge can be used to hit Flying-types or Levitate mons that resist Icicle Crash, such as Rotom-Heat and Rotom-Wash. Mamoswine hits hard enough to nearly 2HKO most of the tier, with common pivots such as Seismitoad taking 50% - 60% from EQ, Ferrothorn taking 41% - 48% from EQ, and specially defensive Corviknight (who may try to be used as an emergency check or switch into an expected EQ) taking 50% - 59% from Icicle Crash. Mamoswine also sits at a decent speed tier, enabling it to outspeed Choice Band Dracovish and Dracozolt. However, it does not provide much defensively and it can sometimes struggle to switch in directly to an attack due to not resisting too much. While base 80 speed is decent, it can be outsped by faster mons like Rotom-Heat, Hydreigon and Dragapult, while also being prone to Conkeldurr's Mach Punch. Finally, while it can 2HKO a lot of things, it may struggle to 1HKO some physically defensive walls like bulky Water-types. This means that in a 1v1 situation, a healthy bulky water like Seismitoad can force Mamoswine out.


Milotic is a nice mixed wall that can handle physical threats like Excadrill and Dracovish, and then special threats like Aegislash. It has reliable recovery with Recover, and it has Haze to prevent set up sweepers like Reuniclus from sweeping. Milotic is also one of the few bulky Water-types that isn't set up fodder for Hydreigon, as Dragonbreath or Ice Beam can be used to prevent it and Dragapult from setting up a substitute in front of Milotic. While it did help with Darmanitan, who is no longer in the tier, Milotic can help teams with big threats like Choice Specs Aegislash and Hydreigon and continues to remain fairly viable.


Pelipper is a bit low due to Rain not being too consistent in the metagame right now. Aside from Dracovish, Rain's limited list of abusers, including Seismitoad, Barraskewda and Mantine are not terribly threatening and generally lack breaking power to help break down the opposing team together. Cores like Seismitoad + specially defensive Clefable, or Ferrothorn + Toxapex have a pretty easy time dealing with Rain and those cores are fairly common at the moment. While Dracovish can help break for its teammates, being choice locked without swift swim can make it vulnerable and fairly easy to punish back with something like Dragapult. Rain has seen better days and may need some time to develop.


As I mentioned in my post here, Sigilyph runs a similar set to Life Orb Clefable, with the key differences being better recovery in Roost, and the ability to set up with Calm Mind. Sigilyph also shares the benefit of having Magic Guard as an ability, which can grant it opportunities to switch directly into weaker mons like Seismitoad and Toxapex. Sigilyph can turn into a dangerous sweeper due to Psychic + Heat Wave having solid coverage, and has a generally good matchup against cores such as Seismitoad + Clefable + Corviknight, and Ferrothorn + Toxapex. This results in Sigilyph having a slightly different group of checks than Clefable. While Sigilyph can get past specially defensive Clefable, Sylveon and Rotom-Heat, it struggles with Mandibuzz, Tyranitar, and Hydreigon. It's one of the more recent additions to the tier, so it's a bit low in that it hasn't fully established its potential in the eyes of everyone.

Sorry if I sounded repetitive while writing this, but many of the offensive mons share the same flaws and are overall less consistent than the mons in the A and S ranks.

Explanations for the C ranking mons can be found here!
 
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Gengar typically runs Choice Specs with Trick, and can be a huge threat to teams thanks to its power, coverage, and phenomenal speed Tier. Gengar is able to outspeed everything except for Cinderace, Hawlucha, Dugtrio, Dragapult and Choice Scarf mons. Gengar can potentially break through its most common switch in, Mandibuzz, by utilizing Sludge Bomb's poison chance in order to leave Mandibuzz in range to be 2HKO'd by Sludge Bomb the next time it switches in. Aside from Mandibuzz, Gengar can threaten most specially defensive mons, which are usually Clefable and Sylveon. However, Corviknight is one mon specially defensive mon that can somewhat safely switch into Gengar, as Shadow Ball only has a 2% chance to 2HKO with Stealth Rock. On the other hand, Gengar can punish Corviknight with Thunderbolt, or cripple it with Trick in order to allow Gengar's teammates that are normally checked by Corviknight to break through the opposing team. Like Aegislash, Gengar is great at 2HKO'ing many defensive threats, but it can struggle to flat out 1HKO some threats and thus get forced out when it wants to attack. Gengar also loses a bit of power if it Tricks away its Choice Specs, causing it to feel somewhat weak and remain walled by Mandibuzz and Corviknight.
Gengar -> A-
Nastyplot lo gengar is one of the few stall breaker not prone being trapped by duggy , Tbolt Sludge Wave Eball/Focus miss is a pain to deal for stall , eball is usually better , missing shadow ball only hurts against shadow sneak less aegi ,corsola, and ferro/spedef exca if not running focus miss, depending on which coverage you run as last slot, some stall team loses at team preview ; mandi , corv , clef , pex , all eveeolution , all rotom-form , seismi , gastro , snorlax , ferro , hat , hippo , ttar, exca ,all of them drop like a fly .
 
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alright I’m gonna do something unprecedented here, but since it's one of my favorite mons I just gotta speak on it.


Mandibuzz

I think mandibuzz is ranked far too high, A+ is just outrageous for it.


There are so many things that can take it out this generation and a lot of mons that straight shut it down or set up on it. It seemed like it was good but like a lot of mons have shit that just take care of it. Aegislash can steel beam it or head smash it, or even +2 close combat it bc it gets that for some reason. hydriegon shits on it pretty heavily and dragupult does a shit ton if u predict physical and it's specs or if u predict specs and it's physical. not to mention the shit ton of fairies running around just eh. like I wish it was really good this gen, I really do. I love thats it's getting attention but like It's really just overhype and by extension just stop. Id argue for now it's B-.
I know people love to say that it's much better this gen but truth be told, as the mandibuzz god himself( I’m Omari P if that wasn't clear), it a'int, quit your lying, and stop the circle jerk. I’m actually thinking about trying a semi offensive set to try and see if any other sets can work but the standard taunt set (bc toxic is useless on it this gen) is highkey mid and there aren't that many physical attackers that it can stop In its tracks right now. just wild how this kids game has changed.

Gastrodon being b rank is also outrageous as well but I really don't give a fuck about that mon so someone else can take it.
 

TPP

Blue Bird
is a Top Tutoris a Top Team Rateris a Community Leaderis a Community Contributoris a Tiering Contributor
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Last but not least, here are the C rank explanations. If you missed the first two posts, here are the links for the S+A Rank explanations, and the B Rank explanations. Keep in mind that while these mons can play a single role well enough to be considered viable, those roles on a bigger scale are typically played by mons in the S, A and B rankings. The mons in the C ranks may have something that makes them unique and for that reason, they are considered viable in OU.

C+ Rank

Avalugg is a physically defensive wall that also provides hazard removal via Rapid Spin. It can sponge hits from some physical wallbreakers like Dracozolt, Mamoswine, and Obstagoon, and then it can also avoid the 1HKO from set up sweepers including Swords Dance Excadrill, Aegislash, and Hawlucha. It can then proceed to KO them back with Avalanche or Earthquake. It also has reliable recovery in Recovery and can be immune to hazards thanks to Heavy-Duty Boots. However, despite being a physically defensive wall, it can get 2HKO'd by common Choice Band users, including Aegislash, Dracovish, and Tyranitar.


Barraskewda is only found on rain teams and is the fastest mon in the tier when Rain is active. It has decent coverage options in Liquidation + Close Combat + Psychic Fangs, but it is not terribly strong and is usually reserved as a cleaner rather than a wallbreaker. It is unable to boost its attack power, which can prevent it from being a bigger threat to bulkier teams. Rain not being in the best spot does have a negative effect on its viability.


Centiskorch runs a specially defensive set that enables it to switch into Fairy-types like Life Orb Clefable. Flash Fire grants it immunity to Fire-type attacks, and it relies on Rest + Sleep Talk to heal itself. Centiskorch can avoid being passive by utilizing Knock Off and Fire Lash, the latter of which has a 100% Defense drop rate, enabling it to deal more damage over time to an opponent who continues to stay in. Fire Lash allows Centiskorch to slowly, but surely pressure Calm Mind users like Hatterene.


Corsala-Galar is a surprisingly bulky mon that may be run on balance, semi-stall or stall teams. It runs a physically defensive set that is capable of walling common physical threats, such as Conkeldurr, Excadrill, and Hawlucha. While its bulk already allows it to handle those threats, Corsala-Galar has access to Strength Sap and Will-O-Wisp in order to lower the opponent's attack stat while healing up, and burn opponents respectively. It also provides Stealth Rock and can prevent Rapid Spin users from removing hazards thanks to its Ghost typing. It relies on Night Shade to attack, and while it is difficult to take down, it can be rather passive against most special attackers and can be taken advantage of by them fairly easily.


Flareon, like Centiskorch, runs a specially defensive set that is used to check Fairy-types. Flareon also relies on Flash Fire, and unlike Centiskorch, it can heal up teammates through Wish. Flareon can threaten special attackers with Flare Blitz, and it can use Yawn or Will-O-Wisp to status switch-ins like Seismitoad and Rotom-Heat. Yawn in particular can be nice as Flareon runs Protect, which can allow it to safely put the opponent to sleep.


Mew is typically used as a dual hazard setter on hyper offense teams. It gained Spikes this generation and can set up both Stealth Rock and Spikes while preventing the opponent from using Defog thanks to Taunt. Mew can also use Self-destruct to prevent the opponent from removing hazards, and it may also run Flare Blitz with Red Card to deal significant damage to Excadrill before phasing it out with Red Card, which also blocks the effect of Excadrill's Rapid Spin.


Mimikyu is back and runs the same set as it did last generation. Swords Dance with Shadow Claw and Play Rough alongside a Life Orb can grant Mimikyu respectable attacking power, while Shadow Sneak allows it to threaten faster targets, most notably Dragapult as it is the most used mon in OU. Disguise allows Mimikyu to absorb a hit at the cost of 12.5% of its health, and this can be very helpful for offensive teams that desire an emergency threat to fast sweepers like Hawlucha. That being said, Mimikyu does struggle with breaking past common physically defensive walls, such as Ferrothorn and Toxapex, the latter of which can also Haze away Mimikyu's boosts and threaten it with a Scald burn.


Snorlax is a Curse sweeper that is able to rely on its ability, Thick Fat, to help it set up against Fire and Ice-types in addition to special attackers in general. Body Slam + Darkest Lariat has near perfect coverage, with the former being capable of paralyzing opponents and the latter providing Snorlax the ability to defeat opposing Bulk Up and Curse users. Rest keeps Snorlax healthy and it can typically catch bulky offense teams by surprise. Snorlax will however, struggle against balance teams due to Toxapex having Haze, Hippowdon having Whirlwind, as well as balance having other ways to abuse Snorlax as it sleeps. This can also include Ferrothorn using Knock Off, Leech Seed, and Spikes.


Vaporeon is another bulky Water-type that can check Dracovish thanks to its ability, Water Absorb. Unlike the other bulky Water-types, it can provide Wish to heal up teammates while also providing Haze to prevent set up sweepers, such as Hatterene, from sweeping. Vaporeon may be found on stall teams for the aforementioned purposes it plays, and it faces competition from Seismitoad, Toxapex, Jellicent, Milotic, Pyukumuku and Quagsire as a bulky Water-type.


Xatu is an interesting pivot that is able to safely bring in teammates thanks to Teleport having negative priority. Magic Bounce prevents it from being directly statused by threats like Seismitoad, whom Xatu is also able to prevent from setting up Stealth Rock. Xatu did retain Roost, which allows it to stay healthy, and has some freedom with the last two slots. It may run Night Shade, Heat Wave, Air Slash, Thunder Wave, or Grass Knot in those last two slots. Heat Wave hits Steel-types, Air Slash is a generally good STAB move, Grass Knot to deal damage back to Seismitoad, and Thunder Wave to paralyze threats like Hydreigon and Tyranitar.

C Rank

Crawdaunt is a powerful wallbreaker that can wreak havoc against balance and stall teams. Adaptability alongside Knock Off and Liquidation severely limits defensive switch ins, especially when you consider how everything in this generation is prone to Knock Off. Crawdaunt runs a Choice Band set that also uses Close Combat to immediately KO Ferrothorn, and Aqua Jet to allow it to threaten faster threats like Dugtrio. While Crawdaunt is a fantastic breaker, it does suffer from having a low base speed stat of 55, which causes it to get outsped by Aegislash and most offensive mons in the tier.


Drednaw is a unique Swift Swim user that has access to Swords Dance, which can allow it to weaken or KO common water resists like Seismitoad, Toxapex and Ferrothorn. Drednaw also has the option to provide Stealth Rock at the cost of giving up Swords Dance. It has decent coverage with Stone Edge + Liquidation + Superpower, the latter of which can be used to 1HKO Ferrothorn after a Swords Dance. It can act as a wallbreaker on Rain, but it will typically fail to 1HKO most defensive threats after a Swords Dance. Despite that, significantly weakening water resists for teammates is valuable for Rain and it is something Drednaw can do decently well.


Pyukumuku can be used as a physically defensive wall on stall teams. It relies on Unaware to prevent set up sweepers from bypassing it, and It can use Soak + Toxic to status targets back. It did however, lose Block, which previously enabled it to trap threats. As a physically defensive Water-type, it faces competition from Seismitoad, Toxapex, Jellicent, Milotic, Vaporeon and Quagsire, the last of which is also an Unaware well.


Ribombee is a fast mon that can set up Sticky Web for hyper offense teams that utilize Sticky Web. Sticky Web teams are not as consistent as hyper offense teams that rely on dual screens, and for that reason, Ribombee is placed in C rank to establish that Sticky Web teams are viable, but not too consistent.


Umbreon, much like Sylveon and Flareon, runs a specially defensive set that not only provides defensive utility, but can also heal up teammates with Wish. Umbreon is a very sturdy Ghost resist that can switch into Dragapult, Specs Aegislash, and Gengar pretty comfortably. It is worth noting that physical Aegislash sets carrying Close Combat can threaten and KO Umbreon, which prevents it from fully handling Aegislash. Umbreon is a little limited in its final two slots, which could include Snarl, Foul Play, Yawn, or Screech. Snarl bypasses Substitute to deal damage and lower Hydreigon's special attack, Foul Play is a decent measure against physical attacker, Screech can lower defenses through Substitute in order for Foul Play to deal more damage, and Yawn can put the opposing mon to sleep. It faces competition from Mandibuzz, who can also provide Defog and is immune to hazards thanks to Heavy-Duty Boots.

C- Rank

Copperajah is an absolute monster under Trick Room, as it has incredible attacking power and coverage. Copperajah's ability, Heavy Metal, boosts the base power of Heavy Slam and Heat Crash and can help achieve notable KO's, such as Heat Crash 1HKO'ing specially defensive Corviknight with Stealth Rock. Power Whip provides Copperajah the ability to break through bulky waters, such as Seismitoad, while Earthquake can be used to help break through Toxapex. Copperajah can also be used as a Stealth Rock user, in part to it having good matchups against the common hazard removers in the tier. However, it is very slow and will typically have to give up a coverage move to run Stealth Rock.


Durant is on ok wallbreaker that uses a Choice Band set, as it no longer gets Hone Claws. Durant's base speed of 109 is excellent, allowing it to outspeed common offensive mons such as Hydreigon, Rotom-Heat, and Excadrill. Hustle alongside a Choice Band grants Durant solid raw power at the cost of lower accuracy. Durant can run First Impression, Iron Head, Superpower, Stone Edge, and it has additional coverage options in Thunder Fang and Stomping Tantrum. First Impression allows Durant to fire off a very powerful attack with priority that can hit any target regardless of their speed stat. Iron Head allows Durant to KO Fairy-types like Clefable, and will also be Durant's most reliable STAB move as First Impression only works on the first turn Durant is in. Superpower and Stomping Tantrum can hit Steel-types like Ferrothorn and Aegislash, while Stone Edge can hit Fire and Flying-types like Rotom-Heat and Gyarados. Thunder Fang can deal additional damage to Corviknight while also hitting Gyarados. While it can be a big threat, it does struggle with the negative effect of Hustle, as well as being a bit more prediction reliant than other choice item users. For example, when facing either Seismitoad + Clefable + Corviknight, Seismitoad can switch into Stone Edge, Iron head, and Thunder Fang, Clefable can switch into Superpower and First Impression, and Corviknight can switch into everything except Thunder Fang.


Flygon has a small niche as a Choice Scarf user who is immune to Spikes and resists Stealth Rock. It outspeeds every mon outside of weather mons and Hawlucha with Unburden activated. Flygon can act as a fast pivot and bring in teammates with U-turn, and it also has some decent coverage options to force out common offensive mons. Dragon Claw can force out Dragon-types like Dragapult, Hydreigon, Dracovish and Dracozolt. Rock Slide can force out Rotom-Heat, and Earthquake can hit Excadrill, Aegislash and Electric-types like Toxtricity. However, it is not fairly strong and as a Choice Scarf user, it faces competition from Rotom-Heat, Rotom-Wash, Rotom-Mow, Hydreigon and Ditto.


Haxorus can be an alright wallbreaker or sweeper thanks to Dragon Dance and Swords Dance. In addition to Outrage, it can run Earthquake and Iron Tail in order to hit Steel-types and Fairy-types respectively, and then it may also run Close Combat in order to get past Corviknight and immediately KO Ferrothorn. Base 97 speed is fairly nice, allowing it to outspeed other offensive mons such as Rotom-Heat, Excadrill and Obstagoon. Unfortunately, it does get outsped by Hydreigon, and Outrage sets struggle to get past Corviknight. Iron Tail, while powerful, does have accuracy issues and may cause Haxorus's sweep to come up short.


Polteageist is a decent Shell Smash user that can be found on hyper offense teams. In addition to Shell Smash, it runs Shadow Ball + Giga Drain + Stored Power. Shadow Ball is the STAB of choice and Giga Drain can be useful to keep Polteageist healthy while hitting some Dark-types, most notably Tyranitar. Stored Power can become very powerful thanks to Shell Smash along with Polteageist's ability, Weak Armor, which also boosts Polteageist's speed in order to allow it to outspeed the entire tier. While it is a dangerous special attacker, Polteageist generally struggles against Dark-types that aren't weak to Giga Drain, with Mandibuzz and Hydreigon being the most common threats to it. While Tyranitar is weak to Giga Drain, it can avoid the 1HKO and must be weakened a bit before hand.


Quagsire is a physically defensive wall that uses its ability, Unaware, to handle physical set up sweepers like Hawlucha and Bisharp. It can use Haze to prevent Mold Breaker Excadrill from breaking it, and it can status back with Scald or Toxic. Thanks to its typing and ability, it can shut down Rotom-Heat and manage against Dracozolt. As a physically defensive Water-type, it faces competition from Seismitoad, Toxapex, Jellicent, Milotic, Vaporeon and Pyukumuku.

Now that my trilogy of long posts is over, I hope you guys find this helpful or learn something from it. As always, anyone is free to ask questions or correct me if I incorrectly stated something above. Have a nice day, and I hope you all enjoy the first weekend of the new year.
 

Mogrem

Banned deucer.
I would like to discuss Bewear.
bewear.png
It is an excelent wallbreaker with its tremendous raw power, being able to break through common balance cores with the likes of Toxapex, Mandibuzz and Corviknight.
I've mostly been using Choice Band Bewear, which has proven to be a force to be recognized, but Swords Dance sets are also ridiculously good. Thanks to Fluffy, Bewear can even survive a few hits from the likes of Excadrill and Kommo-o and OHKO them back with STAB Close Combat. Here are a few replays in matches Bewear had great utility.
With all that, I would like to nominate Bewear from UR to C-.

Also, I believe Dragapult should move up to S. It simply provides too much utility and versatility with choiced sets, while SubDisable is just really obnoxious for a lot of its common checks to deal with.
 

Srn

5/6 Doctors agree Russian Roulette is totally safe
is a Pre-Contributor

Durant is on ok wallbreaker that uses a Choice Band set, as it no longer gets Hone Claws. Durant's base speed of 109 is excellent, allowing it to outspeed common offensive mons such as Hydreigon, Rotom-Heat, and Excadrill. Hustle alongside a Choice Band grants Durant solid raw power at the cost of lower accuracy. Durant can run First Impression, Iron Head, Superpower, Stone Edge, and it has additional coverage options in Thunder Fang and Stomping Tantrum. First Impression allows Durant to fire off a very powerful attack with priority that can hit any target regardless of their speed stat. Iron Head allows Durant to KO Fairy-types like Clefable, and will also be Durant's most reliable STAB move as First Impression only works on the first turn Durant is in. Superpower and Stomping Tantrum can hit Steel-types like Ferrothorn and Aegislash, while Stone Edge can hit Fire and Flying-types like Rotom-Heat and Gyarados. Thunder Fang can deal additional damage to Corviknight while also hitting Gyarados. While it can be a big threat, it does struggle with the negative effect of Hustle, as well as being a bit more prediction reliant than other choice item users. For example, when facing either Seismitoad + Clefable + Corviknight, Seismitoad can switch into Stone Edge, Iron head, and Thunder Fang, Clefable can switch into Superpower and First Impression, and Corviknight can switch into everything except Thunder Fang.
TPP baby why u do this

I think slapping choice band on a pokemon like durant is a terrible waste of its first impression when durant has such decent speed and is rather frail, it would much rather click a coverage move to pressure a defensive check that just switched into its first impression instead of being forced out immediately. U rly need to be nailing different shit as they come in and realize they don't tank at all. In the example you mentioned (clefable+corviknight+seismitoad), adamant LO is gonna have a much better time than choice band.

Outspeeding hydreigon is pretty unimportant bc ur always gonna click first impression vs it, this is true of many pokemon between 348 and 303, hence why I advocated for adamant nature in my post, along with LO you reach important benchmarks like 2hko'ing pex and corviknight with thunder fang.

And that brings me to my next complaint: why are you mentioning stone edge first, and then thunder fang as additional coverage? Thunder fang is crucial, I honestly think I should've slashed Iron head with Crunch because hitting corviknight and toxapex is way too important to give up (along with other shit like jellicent). Stone edge also has 64% accuracy with hustle, and I certainly did say "Stunt or Die" but the two examples you mention are not good enough to justify stone edge on durant. Gyarados dies to thunder fang of course, but Durant is again being underestimated when it comes to rotom-heat.

252+ Atk Life Orb Hustle Durant First Impression vs. 248 HP / 0 Def Rotom-Heat: 131-155 (43.2 - 51.1%) -- guaranteed 2HKO after Stealth Rock
252+ Atk Life Orb Hustle Durant Superpower vs. 248 HP / 0 Def Rotom-Heat: 234-276 (77.2 - 91%) -- guaranteed OHKO after Stealth Rock

Scarf variants get ohko'd by superpower and cannot switch-in, while non-scarf variants die to first impression+superpower, and rotom-heat attempting to switch in as weakened mon is forced out by threat of first impression revenge kill is a common enough scenario. Stone Edge is simply not worth it, even if you do ohko, bc 64% is rly shaky and u probably dont wanna lose any of the coverage you'd otherwise have. You will ohko some other fire types like centiskorch and flareon, but you ohko flareon with superpower anyway and who cares about fukin centipede.

Stomping Tantrum also seems like a weird option to me. It's not really hitting any ground types that switch into thunder fang with tantrum that it couldn't otherwise hurt, and I can barely see myself letting go of thunder fang+superpower so idk where tantrum would fit. Stomping Tantrum is also a contact move, so its not like it avoids activating king shield, making crunch a slightly better choice to hit aegislash while also hitting corsola-g.

I loved the summaries you've given but I felt that durant wasn't being represented as the threat it is, I hope mans see the light and bump it up.
 
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TPP baby why u do this

I think slapping choice band on a pokemon like durant is a terrible waste of its first impression when durant has such decent speed and is rather frail, it would much rather click a coverage move to pressure a defensive check that just switched into its first impression instead of being forced out immediately. U rly need to be nailing different shit as they come in and realize they don't tank at all. In the example you mentioned (clefable+corviknight+seismitoad), adamant LO is gonna have a much better time than choice band.

Outspeeding hydreigon is pretty unimportant bc ur always gonna click first impression vs it, this is true of many pokemon between 348 and 303, hence why I advocated for adamant nature in my post, along with LO you reach important benchmarks like 2hko'ing pex and corviknight with thunder fang.

And that brings me to my next complaint: why are you mentioning stone edge first, and then thunder fang as additional coverage? Thunder fang is crucial, I honestly think I should've slashed Iron head with Crunch because hitting corviknight and toxapex is way too important to give up (along with other shit like jellicent). Stone edge also has 64% accuracy with hustle, and I certainly did say "Stunt or Die" but the two examples you mention are not good enough to justify stone edge on durant. Gyarados dies to thunder fang of course, but Durant is again being underestimated when it comes to rotom-heat.

252+ Atk Life Orb Hustle Durant First Impression vs. 248 HP / 0 Def Rotom-Heat: 131-155 (43.2 - 51.1%) -- guaranteed 2HKO after Stealth Rock
252+ Atk Life Orb Hustle Durant Superpower vs. 248 HP / 0 Def Rotom-Heat: 234-276 (77.2 - 91%) -- guaranteed OHKO after Stealth Rock

Scarf variants get ohko'd by superpower and cannot switch-in, while non-scarf variants die to first impression+superpower, and rotom-heat attempting to switch in as weakened mon is forced out by threat of first impression revenge kill is a common enough scenario. Stone Edge is simply not worth it, even if you do ohko, bc 64% is rly shaky and u probably dont wanna lose any of the coverage you'd otherwise have. You will ohko some other fire types like centiskorch and flareon, but you ohko flareon with superpower anyway and who cares about fukin centipede.

Stomping Tantrum also seems like a weird option to me. It's not really hitting any ground types that switch into thunder fang with tantrum that it couldn't otherwise hurt, and I can barely see myself letting go of thunder fang+superpower so idk where tantrum would fit. Stomping Tantrum is also a contact move, so its not like it avoids activating king shield, making crunch a slightly better choice to hit aegislash while also hitting corsola-g.

I loved the summaries you've given but I felt that durant wasn't being represented as the threat it is, I hope mans see the light and bump it up.
While I haven't been the biggest fan of Durant after Dynamax ban (even considered it to be complete shit), I do think the set you mentioned sounds like it works on paper and that TPP may have dropped the ball on a description for Durant, but nomming it all the way up to B is ludicrous in my opinion. Looking at the rest of the Pokemon in B, Durant doesn't have the same level of reliability to do its job as a wallbreaker such as Obstagoon or Toxtricity (which are pretty high even considering they both get trapped by Dugtrio). Also putting it in B means ranking it higher than Pokemon such as Mamoswine and Snorlax (both which needs to be higher than they are) who I believe are such great Pokemon in this meta and are criminally underrated.

I do admit that what you describe seems higher than a garbage C- Pokemon, but you're way too positive and optimistic on Durant.
 

Ausma

Formerly mangarrow
TPP baby why u do this

I think slapping choice band on a pokemon like durant is a terrible waste of its first impression when durant has such decent speed and is rather frail, it would much rather click a coverage move to pressure a defensive check that just switched into its first impression instead of being forced out immediately. U rly need to be nailing different shit as they come in and realize they don't tank at all. In the example you mentioned (clefable+corviknight+seismitoad), adamant LO is gonna have a much better time than choice band.

Outspeeding hydreigon is pretty unimportant bc ur always gonna click first impression vs it, this is true of many pokemon between 348 and 303, hence why I advocated for adamant nature in my post, along with LO you reach important benchmarks like 2hko'ing pex and corviknight with thunder fang.

And that brings me to my next complaint: why are you mentioning stone edge first, and then thunder fang as additional coverage? Thunder fang is crucial, I honestly think I should've slashed Iron head with Crunch because hitting corviknight and toxapex is way too important to give up (along with other shit like jellicent). Stone edge also has 64% accuracy with hustle, and I certainly did say "Stunt or Die" but the two examples you mention are not good enough to justify stone edge on durant. Gyarados dies to thunder fang of course, but Durant is again being underestimated when it comes to rotom-heat.

252+ Atk Life Orb Hustle Durant First Impression vs. 248 HP / 0 Def Rotom-Heat: 131-155 (43.2 - 51.1%) -- guaranteed 2HKO after Stealth Rock
252+ Atk Life Orb Hustle Durant Superpower vs. 248 HP / 0 Def Rotom-Heat: 234-276 (77.2 - 91%) -- guaranteed OHKO after Stealth Rock

Scarf variants get ohko'd by superpower and cannot switch-in, while non-scarf variants die to first impression+superpower, and rotom-heat attempting to switch in as weakened mon is forced out by threat of first impression revenge kill is a common enough scenario. Stone Edge is simply not worth it, even if you do ohko, bc 64% is rly shaky and u probably dont wanna lose any of the coverage you'd otherwise have. You will ohko some other fire types like centiskorch and flareon, but you ohko flareon with superpower anyway and who cares about fukin centipede.

Stomping Tantrum also seems like a weird option to me. It's not really hitting any ground types that switch into thunder fang with tantrum that it couldn't otherwise hurt, and I can barely see myself letting go of thunder fang+superpower so idk where tantrum would fit. Stomping Tantrum is also a contact move, so its not like it avoids activating king shield, making crunch a slightly better choice to hit aegislash while also hitting corsola-g.

I loved the summaries you've given but I felt that durant wasn't being represented as the threat it is, I hope mans see the light and bump it up.
I can attest a rise of some sort with Durant. Maybe not to B, but C- is far too much of an understatement for the sheer power this thing brings to the table, especially with extremely powerful priority STAB. In fact, I have a good nom for it:

C- --> C+ or B-

https://replay.pokemonshowdown.com/gen8ou-1040115130 (the knockout on mandi)
https://replay.pokemonshowdown.com/gen8ou-1040118783-bpv8y4y12jpitdkli4n7fl2ittlu3kqpw (even though my opponent forfeit, the damage Durant dealt to Seismitoad and Rotom Heat was more than enough to allow my +2 Jolly Exca to clean up)
https://replay.pokemonshowdown.com/gen8ou-1040130430 (Despite the fact I lost the game, Durant was a vital tool to apply pressure to the opponent with thanks to its terrorizing priority)
https://replay.pokemonshowdown.com/gen8ou-1040133790 (weakened seismitoad and applied heavy pressure to hydreigon/corviknight

These games were outright won because of 1: Durant considerably weakening walls or 2: outright knocking out walls. On top of that, its great defensive typing makes it a relatively easy switch-in in most circumstances, especially if you swap in on an otherwise passive mon like Ferrothorn, Defog Corvi, or Mandibuzz. Whether it's outclassed or unreliable as merit of Hustle, I can't deny that this thing is a menace as thanks to its surprisingly solid offensive stats (especially in this metagame), STAB First Impression, STAB Iron Head, and great coverage in Stone Edge, Thunder Fang, and Superpower (probably wouldn't recommend the former though).

Other noms brought up:

Hatterene drop
:

I disagree. Hatterene's merit is its sheer offensive potential, strong dual STAB, solid coverage in Mystical Fire, and Magic Bounce. The latter is probably the biggest reason I'd endorse it staying in A-; the fact it can so easily switch into passive Pokemon (even Ferro thanks to its low speed) and set up a Trick Room is startlingly powerful, especially given how balance and semi-stall are starting to take the forefront bit by bit. Underestimating this Pokemon would be an absolute mistake.

Mandibuzz drop:


I disagree here too. Mandi's greatest merits are not only in its unique, effective defensive typing but the fact it can run things like STAB Knock Off, Foul Play, and Toxic--something Corviknight, a mon with a similar role, doesn't have at its disposal. Not only that, but the fact it acts as a strong blanket check against Specs Pult and Nasty Plot sweepers outside of the Rotoms gives it a flexibility I can't see in anything lower than A tier. Even then, that's a tight argument to make. Whether Sylveon does better in one area or not ultimately doesn't matter when you have valuable moves and utilities that yield more overall flexibility and utility than Wish passing.

More noms I agree with that have already been explained:

Gengar: B+ --> A-
Aegislash: A --> A+
 
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Last but not least, here are the C rank explanations. If you missed the first two posts, here are the links for the S+A Rank explanations, and the B Rank explanations. Keep in mind that while these mons can play a single role well enough to be considered viable, those roles on a bigger scale are typically played by mons in the S, A and B rankings. The mons in the C ranks may have something that makes them unique and for that reason, they are considered viable in OU.

C+ Rank

Avalugg is a physically defensive wall that also provides hazard removal via Rapid Spin. It can sponge hits from some physical wallbreakers like Dracozolt, Mamoswine, and Obstagoon, and then it can also avoid the 1HKO from set up sweepers including Swords Dance Excadrill, Aegislash, and Hawlucha. It can then proceed to KO them back with Avalanche or Earthquake. It also has reliable recovery in Recovery and can be immune to hazards thanks to Heavy-Duty Boots. However, despite being a physically defensive wall, it can get 2HKO'd by common Choice Band users, including Aegislash, Dracovish, and Tyranitar.


Barraskewda is only found on rain teams and is the fastest mon in the tier when Rain is active. It has decent coverage options in Liquidation + Close Combat + Psychic Fangs, but it is not terribly strong and is usually reserved as a cleaner rather than a wallbreaker. It is unable to boost its attack power, which can prevent it from being a bigger threat to bulkier teams. Rain not being in the best spot does have a negative effect on its viability.


Centiskorch runs a specially defensive set that enables it to switch into Fairy-types like Life Orb Clefable. Flash Fire grants it immunity to Fire-type attacks, and it relies on Rest + Sleep Talk to heal itself. Centiskorch can avoid being passive by utilizing Knock Off and Fire Lash, the latter of which has a 100% Defense drop rate, enabling it to deal more damage over time to an opponent who continues to stay in. Fire Lash allows Centiskorch to slowly, but surely pressure Calm Mind users like Hatterene.


Corsala-Galar is a surprisingly bulky mon that may be run on balance, semi-stall or stall teams. It runs a physically defensive set that is capable of walling common physical threats, such as Conkeldurr, Excadrill, and Hawlucha. While its bulk already allows it to handle those threats, Corsala-Galar has access to Strength Sap and Will-O-Wisp in order to lower the opponent's attack stat while healing up, and burn opponents respectively. It also provides Stealth Rock and can prevent Rapid Spin users from removing hazards thanks to its Ghost typing. It relies on Night Shade to attack, and while it is difficult to take down, it can be rather passive against most special attackers and can be taken advantage of by them fairly easily.


Flareon, like Centiskorch, runs a specially defensive set that is used to check Fairy-types. Flareon also relies on Flash Fire, and unlike Centiskorch, it can heal up teammates through Wish. Flareon can threaten special attackers with Flare Blitz, and it can use Yawn or Will-O-Wisp to status switch-ins like Seismitoad and Rotom-Heat. Yawn in particular can be nice as Flareon runs Protect, which can allow it to safely put the opponent to sleep.


Mew is typically used as a dual hazard setter on hyper offense teams. It gained Spikes this generation and can set up both Stealth Rock and Spikes while preventing the opponent from using Defog thanks to Taunt. Mew can also use Self-destruct to prevent the opponent from removing hazards, and it may also run Flare Blitz with Red Card to deal significant damage to Excadrill before phasing it out with Red Card, which also blocks the effect of Excadrill's Rapid Spin.


Mimikyu is back and runs the same set as it did last generation. Swords Dance with Shadow Claw and Play Rough alongside a Life Orb can grant Mimikyu respectable attacking power, while Shadow Sneak allows it to threaten faster targets, most notably Dragapult as it is the most used mon in OU. Disguise allows Mimikyu to absorb a hit at the cost of 12.5% of its health, and this can be very helpful for offensive teams that desire an emergency threat to fast sweepers like Hawlucha. That being said, Mimikyu does struggle with breaking past common physically defensive walls, such as Ferrothorn and Toxapex, the latter of which can also Haze away Mimikyu's boosts and threaten it with a Scald burn.


Snorlax is a Curse sweeper that is able to rely on its ability, Thick Fat, to help it set up against Fire and Ice-types in addition to special attackers in general. Body Slam + Darkest Lariat has near perfect coverage, with the former being capable of paralyzing opponents and the latter providing Snorlax the ability to defeat opposing Bulk Up and Curse users. Rest keeps Snorlax healthy and it can typically catch bulky offense teams by surprise. Snorlax will however, struggle against balance teams due to Toxapex having Haze, Hippowdon having Whirlwind, as well as balance having other ways to abuse Snorlax as it sleeps. This can also include Ferrothorn using Knock Off, Leech Seed, and Spikes.


Vaporeon is another bulky Water-type that can check Dracovish thanks to its ability, Water Absorb. Unlike the other bulky Water-types, it can provide Wish to heal up teammates while also providing Haze to prevent set up sweepers, such as Hatterene, from sweeping. Vaporeon may be found on stall teams for the aforementioned purposes it plays, and it faces competition from Seismitoad, Toxapex, Jellicent, Milotic, Pyukumuku and Quagsire as a bulky Water-type.


Xatu is an interesting pivot that is able to safely bring in teammates thanks to Teleport having negative priority. Magic Bounce prevents it from being directly statused by threats like Seismitoad, whom Xatu is also able to prevent from setting up Stealth Rock. Xatu did retain Roost, which allows it to stay healthy, and has some freedom with the last two slots. It may run Night Shade, Heat Wave, Air Slash, Thunder Wave, or Grass Knot in those last two slots. Heat Wave hits Steel-types, Air Slash is a generally good STAB move, Grass Knot to deal damage back to Seismitoad, and Thunder Wave to paralyze threats like Hydreigon and Tyranitar.

C Rank

Crawdaunt is a powerful wallbreaker that can wreak havoc against balance and stall teams. Adaptability alongside Knock Off and Liquidation severely limits defensive switch ins, especially when you consider how everything in this generation is prone to Knock Off. Crawdaunt runs a Choice Band set that also uses Close Combat to immediately KO Ferrothorn, and Aqua Jet to allow it to threaten faster threats like Dugtrio. While Crawdaunt is a fantastic breaker, it does suffer from having a low base speed stat of 55, which causes it to get outsped by Aegislash and most offensive mons in the tier.


Drednaw is a unique Swift Swim user that has access to Swords Dance, which can allow it to weaken or KO common water resists like Seismitoad, Toxapex and Ferrothorn. Drednaw also has the option to provide Stealth Rock at the cost of giving up Swords Dance. It has decent coverage with Stone Edge + Liquidation + Superpower, the latter of which can be used to 1HKO Ferrothorn after a Swords Dance. It can act as a wallbreaker on Rain, but it will typically fail to 1HKO most defensive threats after a Swords Dance. Despite that, significantly weakening water resists for teammates is valuable for Rain and it is something Drednaw can do decently well.


Pyukumuku can be used as a physically defensive wall on stall teams. It relies on Unaware to prevent set up sweepers from bypassing it, and It can use Soak + Toxic to status targets back. It did however, lose Block, which previously enabled it to trap threats. As a physically defensive Water-type, it faces competition from Seismitoad, Toxapex, Jellicent, Milotic, Vaporeon and Quagsire, the last of which is also an Unaware well.


Ribombee is a fast mon that can set up Sticky Web for hyper offense teams that utilize Sticky Web. Sticky Web teams are not as consistent as hyper offense teams that rely on dual screens, and for that reason, Ribombee is placed in C rank to establish that Sticky Web teams are viable, but not too consistent.


Umbreon, much like Sylveon and Flareon, runs a specially defensive set that not only provides defensive utility, but can also heal up teammates with Wish. Umbreon is a very sturdy Ghost resist that can switch into Dragapult, Specs Aegislash, and Gengar pretty comfortably. It is worth noting that physical Aegislash sets carrying Close Combat can threaten and KO Umbreon, which prevents it from fully handling Aegislash. Umbreon is a little limited in its final two slots, which could include Snarl, Foul Play, Yawn, or Screech. Snarl bypasses Substitute to deal damage and lower Hydreigon's special attack, Foul Play is a decent measure against physical attacker, Screech can lower defenses through Substitute in order for Foul Play to deal more damage, and Yawn can put the opposing mon to sleep. It faces competition from Mandibuzz, who can also provide Defog and is immune to hazards thanks to Heavy-Duty Boots.

C- Rank

Copperajah is an absolute monster under Trick Room, as it has incredible attacking power and coverage. Copperajah's ability, Heavy Metal, boosts the base power of Heavy Slam and Heat Crash and can help achieve notable KO's, such as Heat Crash 1HKO'ing specially defensive Corviknight with Stealth Rock. Power Whip provides Copperajah the ability to break through bulky waters, such as Seismitoad, while Earthquake can be used to help break through Toxapex. Copperajah can also be used as a Stealth Rock user, in part to it having good matchups against the common hazard removers in the tier. However, it is very slow and will typically have to give up a coverage move to run Stealth Rock.


Durant is on ok wallbreaker that uses a Choice Band set, as it no longer gets Hone Claws. Durant's base speed of 109 is excellent, allowing it to outspeed common offensive mons such as Hydreigon, Rotom-Heat, and Excadrill. Hustle alongside a Choice Band grants Durant solid raw power at the cost of lower accuracy. Durant can run First Impression, Iron Head, Superpower, Stone Edge, and it has additional coverage options in Thunder Fang and Stomping Tantrum. First Impression allows Durant to fire off a very powerful attack with priority that can hit any target regardless of their speed stat. Iron Head allows Durant to KO Fairy-types like Clefable, and will also be Durant's most reliable STAB move as First Impression only works on the first turn Durant is in. Superpower and Stomping Tantrum can hit Steel-types like Ferrothorn and Aegislash, while Stone Edge can hit Fire and Flying-types like Rotom-Heat and Gyarados. Thunder Fang can deal additional damage to Corviknight while also hitting Gyarados. While it can be a big threat, it does struggle with the negative effect of Hustle, as well as being a bit more prediction reliant than other choice item users. For example, when facing either Seismitoad + Clefable + Corviknight, Seismitoad can switch into Stone Edge, Iron head, and Thunder Fang, Clefable can switch into Superpower and First Impression, and Corviknight can switch into everything except Thunder Fang.


Flygon has a small niche as a Choice Scarf user who is immune to Spikes and resists Stealth Rock. It outspeeds every mon outside of weather mons and Hawlucha with Unburden activated. Flygon can act as a fast pivot and bring in teammates with U-turn, and it also has some decent coverage options to force out common offensive mons. Dragon Claw can force out Dragon-types like Dragapult, Hydreigon, Dracovish and Dracozolt. Rock Slide can force out Rotom-Heat, and Earthquake can hit Excadrill, Aegislash and Electric-types like Toxtricity. However, it is not fairly strong and as a Choice Scarf user, it faces competition from Rotom-Heat, Rotom-Wash, Rotom-Mow, Hydreigon and Ditto.


Haxorus can be an alright wallbreaker or sweeper thanks to Dragon Dance and Swords Dance. In addition to Outrage, it can run Earthquake and Iron Tail in order to hit Steel-types and Fairy-types respectively, and then it may also run Close Combat in order to get past Corviknight and immediately KO Ferrothorn. Base 97 speed is fairly nice, allowing it to outspeed other offensive mons such as Rotom-Heat, Excadrill and Obstagoon. Unfortunately, it does get outsped by Hydreigon, and Outrage sets struggle to get past Corviknight. Iron Tail, while powerful, does have accuracy issues and may cause Haxorus's sweep to come up short.


Polteageist is a decent Shell Smash user that can be found on hyper offense teams. In addition to Shell Smash, it runs Shadow Ball + Giga Drain + Stored Power. Shadow Ball is the STAB of choice and Giga Drain can be useful to keep Polteageist healthy while hitting some Dark-types, most notably Tyranitar. Stored Power can become very powerful thanks to Shell Smash along with Polteageist's ability, Weak Armor, which also boosts Polteageist's speed in order to allow it to outspeed the entire tier. While it is a dangerous special attacker, Polteageist generally struggles against Dark-types that aren't weak to Giga Drain, with Mandibuzz and Hydreigon being the most common threats to it. While Tyranitar is weak to Giga Drain, it can avoid the 1HKO and must be weakened a bit before hand.


Quagsire is a physically defensive wall that uses its ability, Unaware, to handle physical set up sweepers like Hawlucha and Bisharp. It can use Haze to prevent Mold Breaker Excadrill from breaking it, and it can status back with Scald or Toxic. Thanks to its typing and ability, it can shut down Rotom-Heat and manage against Dracozolt. As a physically defensive Water-type, it faces competition from Seismitoad, Toxapex, Jellicent, Milotic, Vaporeon and Pyukumuku.

Now that my trilogy of long posts is over, I hope you guys find this helpful or learn something from it. As always, anyone is free to ask questions or correct me if I incorrectly stated something above. Have a nice day, and I hope you all enjoy the first weekend of the new year.
I genuinely do not understand what niche Pyukumuku has, since it lost block. It feels like it’s completely and utterly useless and outclassed in every way by quagsire. I don’t think it should even be ranked.
 
Last but not least, here are the C rank explanations. If you missed the first two posts, here are the links for the S+A Rank explanations, and the B Rank explanations. Keep in mind that while these mons can play a single role well enough to be considered viable, those roles on a bigger scale are typically played by mons in the S, A and B rankings. The mons in the C ranks may have something that makes them unique and for that reason, they are considered viable in OU.

C+ Rank


Mew is typically used as a dual hazard setter on hyper offense teams. It gained Spikes this generation and can set up both Stealth Rock and Spikes while preventing the opponent from using Defog thanks to Taunt. Mew can also use Self-destruct to prevent the opponent from removing hazards, and it may also run Flare Blitz with Red Card to deal significant damage to Excadrill before phasing it out with Red Card, which also blocks the effect of Excadrill's Rapid Spin.
Speaking on one of my other favorite mons here.


Mew

Ok, since Ive been here long enough I've seen a trend with versatile and open ended mons; yall really choose some of the most basic ass low tier 0 thought about sets for it and throw it on the VR or just choose to not rank it. Whichever one of the goons of the oligarchy made this set I don't care if you think it's good, it's not. This is one of the worst mew sets I've ever seen actually. If that's the set youre going off of I'd argue D rank; shit's terrible. I've been seeing them on the ladder and it's just like such a goddamn waste of slot and time, I feel bad that these people followed your example.
The mews that I use, and the ones that actually are good on the ladder from what ive seen, take advantage of the it's set up moves and moves to pretty much take care of anything you want in here; especially with many 4x effective most running around. You can run special shit like ice beam, fire blast, energy ball, earth power, sphere/ blast, etc, but you also can run dragon dance shit and have shit like fangs, close combat, flare blitze, gunk shot, whatever you really need for your team.

Ive actually swept with mew plenty of times, and it's amazing. Dittos aren't a threat to you as their hp is low, and youre full of tech. Fun fact, if you run psychic plate, +1 Psychic fangs kills dragupult from full.
Anyway, this is an argument for boosting mew's ranking to B+, but not bc of the bullshit sets yall posted and have been talking about. the actual good ones.

If you need replays, I definitely got you.
 
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Speaking on one of my other favorite mons here.


Mew

Ok, since Ive been here long enough I've seen a trend with versatile and open ended mons; yall really choose some of the most basic ass low tier 0 thought about sets for it and throw it on the VR or not rank it. Whichever one of the goons of the oligarchy made this set I don't care if you think it's good, it's not. This is one of the worst mew sets I've ever seen actually. If that's the set youre going off of I'd argue D rank; shit's terrible. I've been seeing them on the ladder and it's just like such a goddamn waste of slot and time, I feel bad that these people followed your example.
The mews that I use, and the ones that actually are good on the ladder from what ive seen, take advantage of the it's set up moves and moves to pretty much take care of anything you want in here; especially with many 4x effective most running around. You can run special shit like ice beam, fire blast, energy ball, earth power, sphere/ blast, etc, but you also can run dragon dance shit and have shit like fangs, close combat, flare blitze, gunk shot, whatever you really need for your team.

Ive actually swept with mew plenty of times, and it's amazing. Dittos aren't a threat to you as their hp is low, and youre full of tech. Fun fact, if you run psychic plate, +1 Psychic fangs kills dragupult from full.
Anyway, this is an argument for boosting mew's ranking to B+, but not bc of the bullshit sets yall posted and have been talking about. the actual good ones.

If you need replays, I definitely got you.
You have not given a good set but thrown a bunch of random moves. Copypaste a good one (or more) from the builder if yours is/are better.
 
You have not given a good set but thrown a bunch of random moves. Copypaste a good one (or more) from the builder if yours is/are better.

The mews that I use, and the ones that actually are good on the ladder from what ive seen, take advantage of the it's set up moves and moves to pretty much take care of anything you want in here; especially with many 4x effective most running around. You can run special shit like ice beam, fire blast, energy ball, earth power, sphere/ blast, etc, but you also can run dragon dance shit and have shit like fangs, close combat, flare blitze, gunk shot, whatever you really need for your team.

Ive actually swept with mew plenty of times, and it's amazing. Dittos aren't a threat to you as their hp is low, and youre full of tech. Fun fact, if you run psychic plate, +1 Psychic fangs kills dragupult from full.
You are not a child, and if you are I apologize just dm me and I got you. But assuming that you are not, you can type, you can access replays, you can think on your own. I gave 1 specific situation here that obviously gave you 2 moves, and the held item from my own team. you can fill in the rest depending on your team.

Screen Shot 2020-01-03 at 6.49.23 PM.png
 
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I’m incredibly surprised that at this point, after all these years, people still don’t know that’s how Thunder Pwoell is in these threads; sure he’s a brash little bastard, but he almost always has relevant and interesting information relating to current topics at hand, even at the cost of giving the human race too much credit from time to time.

Anyways, to prevent this from being single sentence post unrelated to Pokémon, I’m gonna echo Durant being moved up a sub rank, even though I think Choice Band might limit the options and make it much more prediction reliant and Hustle makes it sometimes inaccurate. The power it has, capable of weakening walls for other sweepers, is valuable to some teams, and works well as either an early-mid game breaker or a late game cleaner, pending how the plays line up (though the latter is much less likely to happen). It clearly has issues in comparison to other physical attackers, but that’s why the nomination is only to C, anyways.
 
Shadowmariogalaxy64 as a omari p alt? jk

Wanted to get in on the rise/drops for dragapult,Mandibuzz and hatterene



Mandibuzz: A+ to A

Mandibuzz is fine but i think its better off in A rank. Mandibuzz certainly catches a ton of things but i dont think its as good as it was a while back. The metas mostly adapted to it so it no longer checks aegislash/hydra as well as it once did. Aegislash can run specs which absolutely demolishes or smash mandi with banded headsmash (which ohkos specially defensive mandi). Hydra is starting to run lorb nasty plot with draco meteor which absolutely shreds past mandi's bulk. Mandibuzz has some good merits like being able to check bisharp which i dont doubt and it brings tons of utility to the table with taunt/toxic/slow u turn/knock. Though if i'm being completely honest i feel like mandi does suffer 4mss in that regard since it wants to fit everything but cant. But thats besides the point. I agree with a drop simply because i feel like the metas adapting to it but in many cases its still the second best defoger in the tier i just think its much easier to deal with then it once was.

Hatterene:

Don't really know why this thing deserves a drop. It has fantastic bulk combined with a absolutely annoying and potent Calm mind set which has a pretty good matchup against fat teams thanks to being immune to toxic and capable of reflecting back hazards. This things hard to switch in and in many cases is a better reuniclus. Its trick room set while not as strong is really hard for more offensive teams to deal with simply because of how strong it is. A- rank is perfectly fine because it struggles vs more faster/offensive teams, if it runs calm mind and is worn down fast by volt turn which is fairly common currently but does very well against slower more passive teams and takes advantage of that with CM+draining kiss.

Dragapult: A+ to S

Just going to disagree with this right away. Pult is absolutely one of the best mons in the current tier since it serves as a means of speed control while being capable of forcing out a large majority of mons because of its speed tier. However I dont agree with the basis of noming it simply because its versatile. Yes, its versitile however pult switch-ins for the most part are the same regardless of set. A good example of this is sylveon which while it probably wont appreciate a DD phantom force, chances are its living if its healthy and returning the favor with hyper voice. Mandibuzz (in certain situations) and corviknight are also very safe pult switch ins in many cases too with the latter being obscenely good right now. Pult is a fantastic mon but its not S rank worthy in the slightest right now. Good mon but i feel like in many cases most of its offensive pressure comes from its speed and not its versatility which mostly has overlapping checks.
 
Hydregion A -> S

The meta's already evolved quite a bit since the G-Darm ban and Hydregion has come out to be a big winner, and imo a centralizing force in the metagame. With a great speed tier, amazing defensive typing, and a movepool that gives it terrifying flexibility, there's almost no reason not to run this thing. Defensively, it's amazing as an offensive check to nearly all of the bulky water types, who never run (or can't run) Ice Beam, as well as checking a host of anti-meta mons that otherwise can break the game. Bisharp, Grimmsnarl, and other setup Sucker Punch users are too slow to hit it with anything else, so if they get chipped down, Hydre can usually finish them off (although Max Spdef BU Grimm will still win). Its one of the few great checks to Reuniclus, whose reliance on Focus Miss can be exploited by Sub+NP or Sub+Roost sets. Hydre is also a complete monster to LO Clefable, Aegislash, Dracovish, Excadrill, Mew, and non-Darts Dragapult - being able to revenge or even set up on these mons is huge because of their propensity to get kills and put you in an awkward position. Hydre is in no way broken, but it is centralizing - it takes all of the loose threads in the meta and forces them back into their corner, with out a doubt one of the best mons available.

Mimikyu C+ -> B-

Meme-kyu is actually way less bad this gen, for a few reasons. It's still not great, but it has enjoyed some boosts. The first is that Ghosts like Dragapult, Gengar and Aegislash are now real threats, whereas in Gen 7, Shadow Sneak itself was a questionable move choice due to the omnipotence/omnipresence of Gren and Lele, not to mention the overall power creep that put Mimi so far down the list in terms of speed and power that it was pretty much always a bad pick outside of meme teams. Fairy+Ghost is solid offensive coverage, and with a built-in Focus Sash and random moves like Destiny Bond, Taunt, and Will-o-Wisp at its disposal in case you want to switch things up, Mimikyu has what it needs to break common physical walls while outspeeding the base 95 speed tier. I know it's dumb, but with Shadow Claw's elevated crit chance, Mimi does have a chance of breaking Ferro or Pex, though it needs hazards to do so. Mimikyu is far better at cleaning up defensive cores than it is at checking them, and with the ability to spinblock, it can effectively function on hazards offense.

Webs has also seen a boost from the viability of Ghosts as spinblockers and sweepers, as it has from the likes of Bisharp, who can effectively counter Corviknight's or Mandi's Defog. Mimikyu is a great answer to Dark types like Grimmsnarl or Mandibuzz that hope to check Hydregion and Dragapult, and I personally think its ability is undersold in light of how valuable the Focus Sash mechanic is on offensive teams, and how hard it has become to clear hazards.

Ditto - A- -> C+

Imo Ditto has completely lost its will to live, with the main reasons for its rank getting the axe recently. It performs a very very very limited role of revenge-checking things like DD Draga or Gyarados - and with Setup sweeping being somewhat uncommon and easy to wall, it's hard to justify why I would pick Ditto instead of something that checks DD mons and can still provide other utility, like Rotom-W or Mandibuzz, for instance. I think Ditto's stall niche will always be there, but, like I said, this thing currently just lacks a reason to live and is in no way as viable as the other mons in the ranks immediately below it. While multi-tier jumps in ranking are not "supposed" to happen, this case is justified given how much of Ditto's usage was contingent on checking Dynamax and G-Darm.
 
You are not a child, and if you are I apologize just dm me and I got you. But assuming that you are not, you can type, you can access replays, you can think on your own. I gave 1 specific situation here that obviously gave you 2 moves, and the held item from my own team. you can fill in the rest depending on your team.
I am sorry, I was way too good-mannered in my first message. Your sets (or whatever you call that attempt of criticizing others without any valuable critique or concrete alternatives) are bad, your modes are rude and you should feel ashamed of tainting this topic, please bow and repent.

To not make this a one-liner dealing with a real grown up kid, ditto should not be dropped to C+ lol. It’s worse than before dynamax ban that’s for sure, but it’s still really useful vs statuppers and a really good revengekiller. It’s also really good in a stall vs stall matchup, effectively getting infinite PPs, albeit those matchups are pretty rare right now.
 
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To A+
How you put aegis below the mon that is used mostly to counter it (and pult but that's way easier to counter) is absurd. People talk about dragapults variety of sets, but honestly the only ones that are consistent are specs and sub wisp, with dd basically being useless until you kill the fairy/bulky steel.
Aegis has way more variety into his game: specs, band, sd are just surface level sets. You also can use stuff like sub with metal sound or king shield or even some crazy mixed LO sets.
Because of this, the amount of pressure aegis puts on you just on team prewiew is astounding. Aegislash benefits heavily from the slow down of the metagame, with it's 60 speed making work of crawdaunt, clefable, conkeldurr and the like. And even some threats who are faster like dragapult and Gengar can't check it at all due to being prone to Shadow sneak, and hydreigon/rotom heat can't hit it behind an sub.
Not only that but unlike other breakers like crawdaunt (conk to some extent too) aegis has a multitude of switch in opportunities.When paired with dragapult for example, it can easily take advantage of it's most common counters like spdef fairy types (https://replay.pokemonshowdown.com/gen8ou-1038871341) Or heavily pressure if they happen to share the same check (mandi). It's sd set doesn't care one bit about corvinight, even using it as setup fodder if it lacks bulk up, and special sets completely destroy it, making it so that if you don't have a mandi on your team, it's almost certain you will lose atleast 1 Mon to this monster. Honestly, for it's versatility and overall utility it provides aegis is a probable candidate for one of the best mons on the tier rn, but an S rank would prob be a stretch, and I already asked for crawdaunt to jump like 4 tiers soooo
TLDR: Aegislash is amazingly versatile and can basically beat any of it's checks, has an amazing typing that helps it offensively and defensively, granting it lots of switch in opportunities,And frees up a lot of holes on the enemy team so something like dragapult can come in and finish the job, if not beat the opponent by itself.
 
Been a Lurker for a while, but I want to propose Conk up to A rank. This thing is absolutely insane in damage output and can either ohko offense threats or 2kho defensive threats that with speed investment it outspeeds. I've been running a more offensive set with Close Combat, Mach Punch, Earthquake, and Facade and the calcs are just insane, so far the only safe switch in I've found is Corsola Galar, whose passive as hell. Just showing calcs for everyone in the S/A rankings of the viability tier list

252+ Atk Guts Conkeldurr Close Combat vs. 252 HP / 252+ Def Corviknight: 237-280 (59.2 - 70%) -- guaranteed 2HKO after Stealth Rock
252+ Atk Guts Conkeldurr Facade (140 BP) vs. 252 HP / 252+ Def Clefable: 232-274 (58.8 - 69.5%) -- guaranteed 2HKO after Leftovers recovery(If a more offense spread w/o defense investment then Facade has a chance to ohko)
252+ Atk Guts Conkeldurr Earthquake vs. 0 HP / 0 Def Dragapult: 240-283 (75.7 - 89.2%) -- 12.5% chance to OHKO after Stealth Rock(People love to switch this in predicting a fighting type move)
252+ Atk Guts Conkeldurr Close Combat vs. 252 HP / 4 Def Mandibuzz: 325-384 (76.6 - 90.5%) -- guaranteed 2HKO(Mandibuzz Does outspeed even max speed investment, but there's really nothing it can do to Conk)
252+ Atk Guts Conkeldurr Close Combat vs. 252 HP / 0 Def Rotom-Heat: 322-379 (105.9 - 124.6%) -- guaranteed OHKO
252+ Atk Guts Conkeldurr Facade (140 BP) vs. 252 HP / 252+ Def Seismitoad: 229-270 (55.3 - 65.2%) -- guaranteed 2HKO after Stealth Rock and Leftovers recovery
252+ Atk Guts Conkeldurr Facade (140 BP) vs. 252 HP / 252+ Def Toxapex: 141-167 (46.3 - 54.9%) -- 98.8% chance to 2HKO after Stealth Rock and Black Sludge recovery
252+ Atk Guts Conkeldurr Earthquake vs. 252 HP / 0 Def Aegislash-Blade: 282-334 (87 - 103%) -- 56.3% chance to OHKO after Stealth Rock
252+ Atk Guts Conkeldurr Close Combat vs. 0 HP / 0 Def Dracovish: 340-402 (105.9 - 125.2%) -- guaranteed OHKO
252+ Atk Guts Conkeldurr Mach Punch vs. 0 HP / 0 Def Dugtrio: 198-234 (93.8 - 110.9%) -- guaranteed OHKO after Stealth Rock
252+ Atk Guts Conkeldurr Mach Punch vs. 4 HP / 0 Def Excadrill: 344-408 (95 - 112.7%) -- 87.5% chance to OHKO after Stealth Rock
252+ Atk Guts Conkeldurr Close Combat vs. 252 HP / 252+ Def Ferrothorn: 408-480 (115.9 - 136.3%) -- guaranteed OHKO
252+ Atk Guts Conkeldurr Mach Punch vs. 4 HP / 0 Def Hydreigon: 252-296 (77.3 - 90.7%) -- 25% chance to OHKO after Stealth Rock
252+ Atk Guts Conkeldurr Facade (140 BP) vs. 252 HP / 0 Def Hatterene: 277-326 (87.1 - 102.5%) -- 93.8% chance to OHKO after Stealth Rock
252+ Atk Guts Conkeldurr Close Combat vs. 252 HP / 112+ Def Hippowdon: 244-288 (58 - 68.5%) -- guaranteed 2HKO after Stealth Rock and Leftovers recovery
252+ Atk Guts Conkeldurr Close Combat vs. 252 HP / 252+ Def Rotom-Wash: 234-276 (76.9 - 90.7%) -- 25% chance to OHKO after Stealth Rock and Leftovers recovery
252+ Atk Guts Conkeldurr Mach Punch vs. 252 HP / 0 Def Tyranitar: 420-496 (103.9 - 122.7%) -- guaranteed OHKO

Conk absolutely tears through the tier and even better it can't be trapped by duggy as Mach Punch kills after rocks and it's not very useful for Ditto to copy as Ditto does not gain the guts boost and a lot of Conk's power comes from being able to switch moves to make predictions. Facade is usually the move to go for as basically the only safe switch ins are incredibly bulky mons(Which he can then beat with Close Combat) or Ghost Types, which all get annihilated by Earthquake. Conk has lured in an aegislash and Ohkoed with Earthquake several times, which really benefits my team(Granted I'm not exactly high ladder, but still). Conk's also a good revenge killer taking out huge threats for teams like Hydreigon and Excadrill with just a little chip with Mach Punch.
Finally Conk has surprisingly decent bulk, which while it can't switch in on offense threats allows it to consistently switch in on the many more passive mons in the tier as it doesn't care about soaking status. Seismatoad in particular is just fodder for conk to come in on as both scald and EQ do around 30 without investment and then something on the opposing team dies. Same goes for Mandibuzz/Ferrothorn/Toxapex, which are all pretty common.
 
Been a Lurker for a while, but I want to propose Conk up to A rank. This thing is absolutely insane in damage output and can either ohko offense threats or 2kho defensive threats that with speed investment it outspeeds. I've been running a more offensive set with Close Combat, Mach Punch, Earthquake, and Facade and the calcs are just insane, so far the only safe switch in I've found is Corsola Galar, whose passive as hell. Just showing calcs for everyone in the S/A rankings of the viability tier list

252+ Atk Guts Conkeldurr Close Combat vs. 252 HP / 252+ Def Corviknight: 237-280 (59.2 - 70%) -- guaranteed 2HKO after Stealth Rock
252+ Atk Guts Conkeldurr Facade (140 BP) vs. 252 HP / 252+ Def Clefable: 232-274 (58.8 - 69.5%) -- guaranteed 2HKO after Leftovers recovery(If a more offense spread w/o defense investment then Facade has a chance to ohko)
252+ Atk Guts Conkeldurr Earthquake vs. 0 HP / 0 Def Dragapult: 240-283 (75.7 - 89.2%) -- 12.5% chance to OHKO after Stealth Rock(People love to switch this in predicting a fighting type move)
252+ Atk Guts Conkeldurr Close Combat vs. 252 HP / 4 Def Mandibuzz: 325-384 (76.6 - 90.5%) -- guaranteed 2HKO(Mandibuzz Does outspeed even max speed investment, but there's really nothing it can do to Conk)
252+ Atk Guts Conkeldurr Close Combat vs. 252 HP / 0 Def Rotom-Heat: 322-379 (105.9 - 124.6%) -- guaranteed OHKO
252+ Atk Guts Conkeldurr Facade (140 BP) vs. 252 HP / 252+ Def Seismitoad: 229-270 (55.3 - 65.2%) -- guaranteed 2HKO after Stealth Rock and Leftovers recovery
252+ Atk Guts Conkeldurr Facade (140 BP) vs. 252 HP / 252+ Def Toxapex: 141-167 (46.3 - 54.9%) -- 98.8% chance to 2HKO after Stealth Rock and Black Sludge recovery
252+ Atk Guts Conkeldurr Earthquake vs. 252 HP / 0 Def Aegislash-Blade: 282-334 (87 - 103%) -- 56.3% chance to OHKO after Stealth Rock
252+ Atk Guts Conkeldurr Close Combat vs. 0 HP / 0 Def Dracovish: 340-402 (105.9 - 125.2%) -- guaranteed OHKO
252+ Atk Guts Conkeldurr Mach Punch vs. 0 HP / 0 Def Dugtrio: 198-234 (93.8 - 110.9%) -- guaranteed OHKO after Stealth Rock
252+ Atk Guts Conkeldurr Mach Punch vs. 4 HP / 0 Def Excadrill: 344-408 (95 - 112.7%) -- 87.5% chance to OHKO after Stealth Rock
252+ Atk Guts Conkeldurr Close Combat vs. 252 HP / 252+ Def Ferrothorn: 408-480 (115.9 - 136.3%) -- guaranteed OHKO
252+ Atk Guts Conkeldurr Mach Punch vs. 4 HP / 0 Def Hydreigon: 252-296 (77.3 - 90.7%) -- 25% chance to OHKO after Stealth Rock
252+ Atk Guts Conkeldurr Facade (140 BP) vs. 252 HP / 0 Def Hatterene: 277-326 (87.1 - 102.5%) -- 93.8% chance to OHKO after Stealth Rock
252+ Atk Guts Conkeldurr Close Combat vs. 252 HP / 112+ Def Hippowdon: 244-288 (58 - 68.5%) -- guaranteed 2HKO after Stealth Rock and Leftovers recovery
252+ Atk Guts Conkeldurr Close Combat vs. 252 HP / 252+ Def Rotom-Wash: 234-276 (76.9 - 90.7%) -- 25% chance to OHKO after Stealth Rock and Leftovers recovery
252+ Atk Guts Conkeldurr Mach Punch vs. 252 HP / 0 Def Tyranitar: 420-496 (103.9 - 122.7%) -- guaranteed OHKO

Conk absolutely tears through the tier and even better it can't be trapped by duggy as Mach Punch kills after rocks and it's not very useful for Ditto to copy as Ditto does not gain the guts boost and a lot of Conk's power comes from being able to switch moves to make predictions. Facade is usually the move to go for as basically the only safe switch ins are incredibly bulky mons(Which he can then beat with Close Combat) or Ghost Types, which all get annihilated by Earthquake. Conk has lured in an aegislash and Ohkoed with Earthquake several times, which really benefits my team(Granted I'm not exactly high ladder, but still). Conk's also a good revenge killer taking out huge threats for teams like Hydreigon and Excadrill with just a little chip with Mach Punch.
Finally Conk has surprisingly decent bulk, which while it can't switch in on offense threats allows it to consistently switch in on the many more passive mons in the tier as it doesn't care about soaking status. Seismatoad in particular is just fodder for conk to come in on as both scald and EQ do around 30 without investment and then something on the opposing team dies. Same goes for Mandibuzz/Ferrothorn/Toxapex, which are all pretty common.
I agree conk is great but in practice clefable can definitely switch in, it can tank anything conk throws at it rather well even if its meant as your special wall. Circumstantially aegislash, pex, and corviknight can switch in with a degree of safely, as you'd have to predict them with earthquake (or in the latter's case thunder punch). When conk lurs aegislash and oneshots it with earthquake its usually either ur opponent running out of options and crossing his fingers ur not running quake or him just being braindead.

I'm also not sure what I think about a guts set without drain punch. If I was gonna skip drain punch I'd roll with AV instead of flame orb+guts. The damage from statuses and even minor hits adds up tbh

Edit: last paragraph is just in theory, i always just use drain punch
 
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I agree conk is great but in practice clefable can definitely switch in, it can tank anything conk throws at it rather well even if its meant as your special wall. Circumstantially aegislash, pex, and corviknight can switch in with a degree of safely, as you'd have to predict them with earthquake (or in the latter's case thunder punch). When conk lurs aegislash and oneshots it with earthquake its usually either ur opponent running out of options and crossing his fingers ur not running quake or him just being braindead.

I'm also not sure what I think about a guts set without drain punch. If I was gonna skip drain punch I'd roll with AV instead of flame orb+guts. The damage from statuses and even minor hits adds up tbh

Edit: last paragraph is just in theory, i always just use drain punch
Clefable definitely cannot tank anything Conk throws at it. Facade OHKOs offensive LO Clefable and does 58.8 - 69.5% to max defense Clefable, who is then outsped and KOed next turn by offensive Conkeldurr. Close Combat is a viable option since the power increase is pretty noticeable.

I think Conk's biggest weakness is that he can be prediction reliant and too many wrong guesses can leave him susceptible to being worn down. His coverage attacks all have common immunities and every turn he gets wrong is another turn of burn damage (as opposed to being able to spam strong neutral coverage attacks like Shadow Ball). Wish support definitely helps him a lot here, but once he gets whittled down to 50% or so it's a lot easier for faster attackers who don't fear Mach Punch to take him out. That said he's definitely a huge threat to both defensive and offensive teams and I could see him moving up for sure.
 
I agree conk is great but in practice clefable can definitely switch in, it can tank anything conk throws at it rather well even if its meant as your special wall. Circumstantially aegislash, pex, and corviknight can switch in with a degree of safely, as you'd have to predict them with earthquake (or in the latter's case thunder punch). When conk lurs aegislash and oneshots it with earthquake its usually either ur opponent running out of options and crossing his fingers ur not running quake or him just being braindead.

I'm also not sure what I think about a guts set without drain punch. If I was gonna skip drain punch I'd roll with AV instead of flame orb+guts. The damage from statuses and even minor hits adds up tbh

Edit: last paragraph is just in theory, i always just use drain punch
Clefable is not at all a Conk switch in if running Facade. With my set, Max def gets outside and Koed and if Clefable is LO with enough speed to outrun max speed Conk(which for an offensive team is the way to go imo, bulkier teams can appreciate the drain punch wallbreaker), it has a good chance to Ohko
252+ Atk Guts Conkeldurr Facade (140 BP) vs. 116 HP / 0 Def Clefable: 344-405 (95.5 - 112.5%) -- 75% chance to OHKO
If anything, fast Conk is a pretty good lure to Clefable. And speedy conk also doesn't need Thunderpunch for Corv, Close Combat 2hkos and Conk outspends Corv as well. You say that Aegislash won't switch in unless your team is running out of options, but well, when Conk comes it, unless you have Corsola Galar or Max Def Jellicent(Still beaten if Thunder Punch Conk), your team is basically always out of options. Conk can also tailor his set to your team. Need to slap fairy/psychic types, run Facade. Need to slap Jellicent and Corv? Run Thunder Punch. It can even defog for some other utility. I just think a mon with the ability to oho or 2kho every relevant mon in the tier deserves at least A rank, especially since it isn't as fragile as say Crawdaunt(Or as predictable) and can offer some utility with defog.
 
C+ Rank
Haxorus can be an alright wallbreaker or sweeper thanks to Dragon Dance and Swords Dance. In addition to Outrage, it can run Earthquake and Iron Tail in order to hit Steel-types and Fairy-types respectively, and then it may also run Close Combat in order to get past Corviknight and immediately KO Ferrothorn. Base 97 speed is fairly nice, allowing it to outspeed other offensive mons such as Rotom-Heat, Excadrill and Obstagoon. Unfortunately, it does get outsped by Hydreigon, and Outrage sets struggle to get past Corviknight. Iron Tail, while powerful, does have accuracy issues and may cause Haxorus's sweep to come up short.
Haxorus should be B+ rank
If anyone here is in middle or high ladder you've seen my squad so you know I run haxorus. Again, this is an example of someone thinking of a set and just rolling with it without actually testing it out; but luckily you have me. It's pretty versatile especially given its new tools this generation and what sets people are running.

"In addition to Outrage, it can run Earthquake and Iron Tail in order to hit Steel-types and Fairy-types respectively, and then it may also run Close Combat in order to get past Corviknight and immediately KO Ferrothorn."
this is a pretty weird and one dimensional statement. CC is an amazing move that this more than ferrothron and depending on ur set can get some good non locked damage. You also failed to mention poison jab, which is super useful for gaining traction on the fairies. I run adamant and it does like 75% to Clefable and 90% to Sylveon which is far more than enough. It has one of the highest attack stats in the game, saying it's an ok wallbreaker doesnt really do it justice.
But anyway, I actually run mold breaker adamant scarf haxorus, and it's a really REALLY good cleaner has outrage neutrality Kos a bunch of shit and poison jab nabs Kos on the fairies when chipped down. CC and EQ are for SE Kos (especially on the rotoms) or if you wanna catch a hydreigon slacking. iron tail only Kos Sylveon (without life orb) and thats not really a big enough threat to warrant it bc It misses. a lot. Idk why ppl are sleeping on this mon, once the fairies are gone it just shits on teams pretty easily. outrage doing like 80% to seimitoad and 90% to Conkeldurr, and ofc its 2hko the ghost dragon. Youre not gonna really get past hippo with this set but like ... you have 5 other teammates. Move this to B+
 
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