Unpopular opinions

Celestial Automaton

Banned deucer.
Is it an unpopular opinion to hate Looker with a fiery passion? Idk I just can’t stand the guy! He just waffles on in some strange way and I just find it really annoying. Bloody hell if he’s considered to be handsome in the Pokémon world I’d hate to see what’s considered ugly. At least D/P and their heartless glitch-fest remakes don’t have this imbecile in them (they still suck though!)
 
The more and more I hear about this game, the more tempted I am to buy it, and the more optimistic I am for Gen 9.
The simple fact you get told within the first 15 minutes that
- You will die
- You're 15 so "old enough to work"
- Also everyone hates you and you will die

should sell you on buying it :psysly:


(I meme a lot about it, but honestly the more mature tone of the game is really a nice change of pace from "don't worry the power of friendship and love saves us all :) " of other games)
 
Consider the following half unpopular-opinion, half chiming in on PLA.

I frequently find the Pokemon main games to be incredibly boring because it's almost entirely Single-Battle OHKO focused, which is something that affects the entries I like as much as the ones I don't. I get being able to clear out Wild Encounters or obvious Fodder trainers in very short order, but even a lot of the bosses tend to play out as "one-shot their Pokemon and move along". A lot of RPGs I play can have this issue in places, but Pokemon is where I notice it most frequently and, in my opinion, to its detriment. It leads to Pokemon without stand out offenses being a borderline impossible sell for the in-game runs, and also means most of the battles are lopsided difficulty wise if you understand the most basic game mechanics of type match ups and aren't specifically handicapped (like using all Special moves on a Phys-only Pokemon like Ursaring).

The thing that has me most interested in PLA so far is the talk about how building teams with a balance of offensive and defensive backbone seems to be very important to handling a lot of the harder battles. I also very much enjoyed the Orre games because there was more cause to consider Pokemon with supportive effects or defensive utility (be it natural or Shadow vs. Shadow in XD's case) to not only deal with Pokemon who were often stronger than your team, but employed legitimately disruptive strategies like Miror B's bulky Rain Dance/Dish Ludicolos, or Ein's Rain and Water/Thunder spam team. Given the number of trainers was a bit sparser relative to the number of bosses, considering who to level and how your team worked together was a lot more important since there were more Participants per battle to manage and you wouldn't (easily) outlevel and simply overpower opponents the same way.

I notice that the way most other RPG's go, they either incentivize learning a bit more about the Battle System (if only on the level of balancing offense and support/defense to a party for the long haul) or compensate the simplistic battle experience with other elements such as variety of content, story, etc. Pokemon sometimes dealt in the latter with extras such as Gen 4's Underground or Pokeathlon, Gen 5's PWT and greater investment in the story elements, Gen 7's Mantine Surf, but it's not necessarily consistent enough that it manages to compensate on a level that lets me gloss over it like in Final Fantasy for example.

tl;dr I'd like Pokemon to step outside the Single-Battle One-shot fest, whether with existing systems like Orre's Double Battles or innovating on it like PLA did with the Style System/Encounters/Move Overhauls
 
Consider the following half unpopular-opinion, half chiming in on PLA.

I frequently find the Pokemon main games to be incredibly boring because it's almost entirely Single-Battle OHKO focused, which is something that affects the entries I like as much as the ones I don't. I get being able to clear out Wild Encounters or obvious Fodder trainers in very short order, but even a lot of the bosses tend to play out as "one-shot their Pokemon and move along". A lot of RPGs I play can have this issue in places, but Pokemon is where I notice it most frequently and, in my opinion, to its detriment. It leads to Pokemon without stand out offenses being a borderline impossible sell for the in-game runs, and also means most of the battles are lopsided difficulty wise if you understand the most basic game mechanics of type match ups and aren't specifically handicapped (like using all Special moves on a Phys-only Pokemon like Ursaring).

The thing that has me most interested in PLA so far is the talk about how building teams with a balance of offensive and defensive backbone seems to be very important to handling a lot of the harder battles. I also very much enjoyed the Orre games because there was more cause to consider Pokemon with supportive effects or defensive utility (be it natural or Shadow vs. Shadow in XD's case) to not only deal with Pokemon who were often stronger than your team, but employed legitimately disruptive strategies like Miror B's bulky Rain Dance/Dish Ludicolos, or Ein's Rain and Water/Thunder spam team. Given the number of trainers was a bit sparser relative to the number of bosses, considering who to level and how your team worked together was a lot more important since there were more Participants per battle to manage and you wouldn't (easily) outlevel and simply overpower opponents the same way.

I notice that the way most other RPG's go, they either incentivize learning a bit more about the Battle System (if only on the level of balancing offense and support/defense to a party for the long haul) or compensate the simplistic battle experience with other elements such as variety of content, story, etc. Pokemon sometimes dealt in the latter with extras such as Gen 4's Underground or Pokeathlon, Gen 5's PWT and greater investment in the story elements, Gen 7's Mantine Surf, but it's not necessarily consistent enough that it manages to compensate on a level that lets me gloss over it like in Final Fantasy for example.

tl;dr I'd like Pokemon to step outside the Single-Battle One-shot fest, whether with existing systems like Orre's Double Battles or innovating on it like PLA did with the Style System/Encounters/Move Overhauls
That's not what I've been hearing about the Legends battle system. I've heard lots about how priority/agile spam can make slower mons unable to do anything and how the damage is so high you need to trade KOs and revenge kill everything you don't already have a speed advantage on, but I haven't heard anything about defensive play actually being useful (besides that you might as well take higher defensive stats because the calculation basically doesn't care about the attack stats)
 
That's not what I've been hearing about the Legends battle system. I've heard lots about how priority/agile spam can make slower mons unable to do anything and how the damage is so high you need to trade KOs and revenge kill everything you don't already have a speed advantage on, but I haven't heard anything about defensive play actually being useful (besides that you might as well take higher defensive stats because the calculation basically doesn't care about the attack stats)
TLDR defensive play becomes relevant if you're trying to catch Alphas and do the postgame X vs 1 battles, because due to the way damage is calculated, a Weedle has same damage potential of an Alakazam at high enough level, meanwhile bulk reduces the damage a ton more than it would normally, and with AI actually not being dumb in this game, you want your pokemon to actually be able to not die in 1 hit.
 
meanwhile bulk reduces the damage a ton more than it would normally, and with AI actually not being dumb in this game, you want your pokemon to actually be able to not die in 1 hit.
This is why the Ingo fight with Alphas is hell, his Pokemon are both stupid bulky and stupid fast. I had to be around 8 levels higher, drowzy his Basculegion and use a Strong Style Bitter Malice (basically better Hex) to barely one shot it.

Also, since now we are talking about Legends Arceus, I wanna talk about how important that it was a main entry sold as one single game, and not two or three separate versions. I've been thinking about it since I completed L:A by myself and when I rewatched the Victini movie, which bafflingly was released in 2 versions like the main games...

As a single version, the Pokemon experience hasn't changed so much, and that selling separate versions is an outdated practice that just serves as a monetary hassle. It was cool when it incentivized socializing to catch them all, but in this more technological/digital era which keeping in touch is easier than ever, it's really not that relevant anymore and it should have stopped a long time ago. So you can imagine my disappointment when Gen 9 was announced with 2 separate versions...
 
Consider the following half unpopular-opinion, half chiming in on PLA.

I frequently find the Pokemon main games to be incredibly boring because it's almost entirely Single-Battle OHKO focused, which is something that affects the entries I like as much as the ones I don't. I get being able to clear out Wild Encounters or obvious Fodder trainers in very short order, but even a lot of the bosses tend to play out as "one-shot their Pokemon and move along". A lot of RPGs I play can have this issue in places, but Pokemon is where I notice it most frequently and, in my opinion, to its detriment. It leads to Pokemon without stand out offenses being a borderline impossible sell for the in-game runs, and also means most of the battles are lopsided difficulty wise if you understand the most basic game mechanics of type match ups and aren't specifically handicapped (like using all Special moves on a Phys-only Pokemon like Ursaring).

The thing that has me most interested in PLA so far is the talk about how building teams with a balance of offensive and defensive backbone seems to be very important to handling a lot of the harder battles. I also very much enjoyed the Orre games because there was more cause to consider Pokemon with supportive effects or defensive utility (be it natural or Shadow vs. Shadow in XD's case) to not only deal with Pokemon who were often stronger than your team, but employed legitimately disruptive strategies like Miror B's bulky Rain Dance/Dish Ludicolos, or Ein's Rain and Water/Thunder spam team. Given the number of trainers was a bit sparser relative to the number of bosses, considering who to level and how your team worked together was a lot more important since there were more Participants per battle to manage and you wouldn't (easily) outlevel and simply overpower opponents the same way.

I notice that the way most other RPG's go, they either incentivize learning a bit more about the Battle System (if only on the level of balancing offense and support/defense to a party for the long haul) or compensate the simplistic battle experience with other elements such as variety of content, story, etc. Pokemon sometimes dealt in the latter with extras such as Gen 4's Underground or Pokeathlon, Gen 5's PWT and greater investment in the story elements, Gen 7's Mantine Surf, but it's not necessarily consistent enough that it manages to compensate on a level that lets me gloss over it like in Final Fantasy for example.

tl;dr I'd like Pokemon to step outside the Single-Battle One-shot fest, whether with existing systems like Orre's Double Battles or innovating on it like PLA did with the Style System/Encounters/Move Overhauls
This trend towards one-shotting might have something to do with how slow battles in Pokemon are in general. Every single little effect happens back to back, even though a lot of it could happen simultaneously, or not at all. Do you really need to see a textbox saying your attack was super effective with every single super effective move you ever do, even though it tells you that it will be super effective when selecting the move? Do you really need to see a textbox saying that your Pokemon got buffeted by hail every turn? Even the newer games use this archaic programming, and because every gen introduces new moves and abilities, this problem gets worse with every gen. The generational gimmicks really don't help either. I try to avoid z-moves as much as possible, for example, just because I don't want to watch that long-ass animation every single time. By encouraging this one-shot fest, GF can make sure that battles don't take forever, so they can mask their badly programmed battle system.
 
Monster Sanctuary has exclusively 3v3 battles, but they go much faster because things like damage multipliers and any statuses inflicted are conveyed through icons instead of text. Or for a game more similar to Pokémon, Temtem also conveys damage multipliers using icons that appear when the target is hit.
 

fx

moon tourism
is an Artist Alumnusis a Forum Moderator Alumnus
This trend towards one-shotting might have something to do with how slow battles in Pokemon are in general. Every single little effect happens back to back, even though a lot of it could happen simultaneously, or not at all. Do you really need to see a textbox saying your attack was super effective with every single super effective move you ever do, even though it tells you that it will be super effective when selecting the move? Do you really need to see a textbox saying that your Pokemon got buffeted by hail every turn? Even the newer games use this archaic programming, and because every gen introduces new moves and abilities, this problem gets worse with every gen. The generational gimmicks really don't help either. I try to avoid z-moves as much as possible, for example, just because I don't want to watch that long-ass animation every single time. By encouraging this one-shot fest, GF can make sure that battles don't take forever, so they can mask their badly programmed battle system.
it also doesn’t help that the newer games like SwSh and BDSP are so unbalanced due to the nature of the mandatory EXP share and EXP gain in general, creating for a very one-sided and frankly boring battling experience. i actually enjoyed BDSP but my god getting through the game was so boring and i essentially button-mashed the whole main plot because there was no real challenge to it other than MAYBE the champion battle. the framework for battling is so notable for pokemon but jesus christ they need to do some serious overhauling of some of the qualities you were referring to plus a serious re-evaluation of the entire battling engine
 
I hereby disown this. Something major has recently happened: I actually played the fucking game. I got it for Christmas and have been going through it and my god what the hell was I thinking??? This game is actually so cool and fun and filled with extra goodies and cool new Pokemon and sidequests and just a lot of great changes to make a grand old experience on the whole. Alola Photo Club is the goat. Ultra Recon Squad good. Totem Togedemaru and its trial is the goat, literally my only defense for Totem Vikavolt in this was "it looks cooler" what the fuck was wrong with slightly younger me.

Life lesson for everyone here: Don't hate on games you haven't played for arbitrary garbage that doesn't matter. I'm not deleting this because I put a lot of effort into it and in spite of everything I think the fact this game once made me feel this way is worth something still I think. Just know it no longer represents my feelings, like, at all.
Very late reply, but I saw this and I wanted to say a few things here.

First of all, I am happy to hear that you have played US/UM, and that you like them! However, I am very disappointed by the way you were always talking about about these games in the past. Whenever you ranted about US/UM, I always assumed you were basing it on your own experiences after having played them. I don't know if you ever said that you hadn't played the games, and if you did, I missed it completely. Now that I have learned that you said all of those things in the past without having played the games, I find it very disappointing. In comparison, whenever I rant about Pokémon games (notably HG/SS), it is always based on my own experiences from having played the games in question. And if I talk about games I haven't played (such as LGP/E), I always make sure to include that somewhere just to let everyone know that what I am talking about regarding the games is not based on my own experiences from having played them.

But I am still happy in the end. You learned a lesson, admitted that you were wrong, and you like US/UM! Yay!

 

Ema Skye

The only Qwilfish fan on Smogon
is a Pre-Contributor
A rave on Pokemon selection in Johto, and the level curve.

Let's look at where we get them in Gold/Silver:
  1. Before Falkner: Starters, Sentret, Hoothoot, Ledyba, Spinarak, Dunsparce (1% encounter)
  2. Before Bugsy: Togepi, Mareep, Hoppip, Wooper, Unown, Qwilfish (needs a swarm to get pre-Kanto)
  3. Before Whitney: Pineco, Heracross, Aipom (headbutt trees), Yanma (1% encounter or swarm), Sunkern, Stantler
  4. Before Morty: Sudowoodo, Shuckle, Marill (1% encounter), Girafarig, Miltank, Chinchou, Corsola (both Good Rod), Snubbull (1% encounter)
  5. Before Radio Tower: Natu, Smeargle, Mantine, Remoraid (need swarm to get pre-Kanto), Swinub, Delibird, Gligar, Teddiursa, Phanpy, Skarmory, Wobbuffet [Remoraid and onward require 7 badges first, but you can get them before you do the Radio Tower]
  6. Kanto-only: Houndour, Slugma, Murkrow
  7. Silver Cave only: Sneasel, Misdreavus, Larvitar
  1. Before Falkner: Starters, Sentret, Hoothoot, Ledyba, Spinarak, Hoppip, Phanpy, Teddiursa
  2. Before Bugsy: Togepi, Wooper, Unown, Qwilfish (still need a swarm pre-Kanto) [Mareep isn't in Crystal]
  3. Before Whitney: Pineco, Heracross, Aipom, Yanma, Sunkern, Stantler, Snubbull (no longer Swarm)
  4. Before Morty: Sudowoodo, Shuckle, Marill (no longer Swarm), Miltank, Chinchou, Corsola [Girafarig isn't in Crystal]
  5. Before Radio Tower: Natu, Smeargle, Mantine, Swinub, Delibird, Gligar, Skarmory, Wobbuffet, Sneasel [Remoraid isn't in Crystal]
  6. Kanto-only: Houndour, Slugma, Murkrow
  7. Silver Cave: Misdreavus, Larvitar
Really, only three of them gain much from this: Phanpy, Teddiursa and Sneasel.


I want to talk about the midgame because that's where the level curve arguments come from. GSC, in my opinion, really lets you take the training wheels off midgame, in contrast to newer games that have a defined path they want you to go in. Its well known that you can do Chuck, Jasmine and Pryce's gyms in whatever order you want (which is why they all are around the same level, because if they weren't, there would still be a defined pathway they want you to take. And once you defeat the seventh gym, you do get the request to go to the Radio Tower, but you can totally skip it and go explore Ice Path and Route 45 first (unlike in HGSS, the Slowpoke Tail guy only blocks you until you have the seventh badge). All of this has to be in consideration when designing the wild Pokemon because GameFreak left you the option to get them early. If you want to get a Girafarig before Morty (great choice btw!), go for it. If you need that Swinub to do the Rocket Tower to get some extra levels before Clair, go for it. That's why grinding for Clair is a pain, because they gave you the option to get here at the early 30s.

"But why not just do a more linear game and boost the level curve?"
Why is that worth limiting player choice and exploration. This is a game that wanted to take some risks and it paid off, big time. There really isn't a mainline game that gives you this much freedom. You do have the Celedon/Fuschia/Saffron/Cinnabar gyms being relatively up to player choice (though Fuschia must be cleared before Cinnabar due to Surf. There is also a well defined level curve that encourages doing Celedon first and Cinnabar last). Otherwise there really isn't much room in other games that GameFreak lets you explore. In Gen 2, this flatter level curve is a conscious design choice to really encourage player exploration.

"But why are six of the families Kanto-only?"
Again, this encourages exploration. It makes these Pokemon feel special. As there isn't a Johto dex (its a renumbered National Dex), these are going to be some holes that need to be filled up in your PokeDex. Given the completely non-linear nature of Kanto, you do have some fun hunting for the last few new mons as you complete the dex.
  • The Rocket Executive's Houndour/Houndoom has made people want it, and now you finally can (at Night, because it's Gen 2).
  • Murkrow helps you out in the Mahogany hideout and now you can get one.
  • Sneasel has story significance with the Rival stealing one from Cianwood. Being able to get one is cool.
  • Larvitar is the pseudo so its location hidden in the final dungeon is almost like a prize for getting this far.
    • Of note, these four are also all Dark types and, I think, their rarity made Dark type feel special. You know they exist from the Kimono Girls and Karen, and being able to finally put your hands on one feels so good.
  • Misdreavus is the only new Ghost, and given that its identity has always been 'bad Gengar', putting it in the final dungeon makes it also seem special. Otherwise, it would probably just get forgotten about.
  • Slugma isn't super special on its own, especially when you get Growlithe/Vulpix/Magmar relatively close together, and Ponyta before the Elite 4, but I think Slugma's rarity probably made people more willing to try it out.
"But why do we care about exploration?"
Because that's how you find the new mons, silly.

Gen 2 does an amazing job at showcasing its new castmates through its new gameplay mechanics. We've got:
  • Swarm mons: Marill, Dunsparce, Qwilfish, Remoraid, Snubbull and Yanma. Using the PokeGear, they have given you a way to make rarer mons easier to find, and, in the case of Qwilfish and Remoraid, allowed them to be caught earlier than intended.
  • Headbutt Trees: Heracross, Aipom and Pineco are only found in these trees.
  • Rock Smash: Just Shuckle for this one.
  • Time of Day: this one is HUGE!
    • Morning only: Ledyba
    • Day only: Sunkern
    • Night only: Hoothoot, Spinarak, Misdreavus, Wobbuffet, Murkrow, Houndour
    • Not Day: Wooper
    • Not Night: Corsola, Sentret, Hoppip
Between these mechanics, we've actually covered most of the new families. The only ones left have to do with the cross-gen families, which, again, show off new mechanics!
  • Pichu, Cleffa, Smoochum, Igglybuff, Elekid, Magby and Tyrogue are all locked to the breeding mechanic. Togepi shows off this mechanic early by showing you 'hey, this is something you can do!'
  • Politoed, Slowking, Steelix, Porygon2, Kingdra and Scizor are all trade with items. Held items were new this gen, and it encouraged people to play around with them.
    • In the case of Poliwhirl, Slowpoke and Seadra, they can be found holding these items and so you know they have a connection.
    • Onix and Scyther both evolve with the Metal Coat and, given that you fight both of them before getting the item, you have an idea of what its for.
  • Crobat, Blissey, Umbreon and Espeon show off the expanded happiness mechanic from Yellow.
  • Bellossom shows off a new item, yay!
We know from the beta that this connection was going to be further emphasized. The new Pokemon were intentionally very complimentary towards the Kanto dex.

We know from the beta that babies were going to be further expanded on, really selling this as a mechanic. There were plans for babies for: Tangela, Vulpix, Goldeen, Paras, Doduo, Meowth, Ponyta, Growlithe, Grimer and Mr. Mime (while still keeping all of the current baby mons). This was supposed to be a huge mechanic.

All of the new evolutions were here as well, with new ones for: Tangela, Ditto, Lickitung, Farfetch'd and Pinsir, a split evolution Weepinbell, and proto-Leafeon. This adds up to 34 Pokemon (the real and the cut ones), or about a third of what was planned. This shows that Gen 2's identity in Pokemon design was always about complementing the existing Pokemon, rather than replacing them. Hell, we didn't even get Sentret as our regional rodent in the beta, nor Tyranitar as a psuedo (Dragonite keeps the spotlight). In contrary, Pidgey/Hoothoot were always complementary (time of day), which carried to the final build.


In closing of this probably quite unpopular opinion, I think GSC's level curve and Pokemon availability really show off the game's intended emphasis on exploration, and its a level of exploration that I still don't think has been passed by another Pokemon game.
 
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"But why are six of the families Kanto-only?"
Again, this encourages exploration. It makes these Pokemon feel special.
While there are some other things I disagree with (especially with how much the GSC/HGSS experience suffers from non-linearity), this one in particular is one that I don't understand.

By making them rare or locked into late-game, rather than make them feel special, they'll feel like a waste because it will be very difficult to find a reason to even use them. Whatever value they could have is lost because you have very little reason to use them unless you want to do PvP (Sneasel in GS/HGSS and Larvitar are extremely bad offenders because there's only one trainer left to beat by the time you can get them, and then there are a bunch of Pokémon exclusive to routes like Route 45 where you have virtually no reason to ever set foot in).

Super-rare Pokémon (including Mythicals in the list) should not be a thing. Gameplay-wise they hold no different value to any other Pokémon, and should be treated as such.
 
Time-of-day-based evolutions have a problem in that they don't consider that people can only play at certain times for various reasons, such as work or school.

Yes, I am entirely posting this because I am salty I can't evolve my Budew until Sunday because that's my next day off. (Except for clock manipulation, I know, I know.)
I wholeheartedly agree. I am always so annoyed when I have to change my clock to get an Umbreon or something
 

BIG ASHLEY

Formerly Total Clefairy
time of day (etc) evos are a cool world-building (is that the term i'm looking for? maybe. hmm ykwim) mechanic but also they massively suck for the reasons outlined above.

i have very un-fond memories of stalling out my fight against diantha in order to level up my amaura after 7pm (or whenever) so it could evolve before entering the hall of fame
 
Gee, if only time was in 20 minute intervals with a way to advance forward like a typical rpg
But nooo.....have to show off internal battery tech
That would be so nice if they did that. But there are some (presumably) rarely seen backgrounds that I've seen in USUM that represent the transition from day to evening to full night, with a very nice sunset background. I noticed this while spending two hours trying to get a Shiny Riolu, if you're wondering how I saw the whole thing. So it may be a flawed idea, but it has some cool parts at least
 
While there are some other things I disagree with (especially with how much the GSC/HGSS experience suffers from non-linearity), this one in particular is one that I don't understand.

By making them rare or locked into late-game, rather than make them feel special, they'll feel like a waste because it will be very difficult to find a reason to even use them. Whatever value they could have is lost because you have very little reason to use them unless you want to do PvP (Sneasel in GS/HGSS and Larvitar are extremely bad offenders because there's only one trainer left to beat by the time you can get them, and then there are a bunch of Pokémon exclusive to routes like Route 45 where you have virtually no reason to ever set foot in).

Super-rare Pokémon (including Mythicals in the list) should not be a thing. Gameplay-wise they hold no different value to any other Pokémon, and should be treated as such.
I think it makes sense if you view it from two lenses: it's a monster collecting (with monster using being secondary) game in a time before widespread internet, and it's a direct sequel to Gen 1 as opposed to its own thing.

A new Pokemon that's common is cool but nothing special. An old Pokemon that's rare is old news. A new Pokemon that's rare drums up hype on the playground and sells guide books.
 
and sells guide books.
Notably, this.

It's something a lot of younger people don't understand about older RPGs. (sorry I have to pull out my inner boomer)

Back 15-20 years ago (and honestly even to 10 years ago), it was super popular to sell game guides made by the same company or affiliated ones. Many old RPGs (including fan beloved ones like Final Fantasy, Dragon Quest, SMT, etc) had a lot of completely weird and hidden secret areas, bosses, items, even endings that would have been close to impossible to figure out on your own.
Internet wasnt really a thing, like sure there was online play and we used to hate each other on MSN messenger and IRC, but that was really the extend of it.
So guides sold a lot, as they were the best way to learn of whatever secret there was in games. And you know what, back then we actually had fun reading a guide, seeing "oh wow there's a super rare item you can get if you dance under the moon, sacrifice a gnome to the gods and count from 251 in reverse", and doing it, even if it served literally no purpose other than show off to a friend that we did it.

Ofc nowadays no designer would do this. With datamine and wikias being a thing, (almost) every game secret is discovered within a week from release, sometimes even before the game releases.
But back then... it was common, and widely accepted as fine merchandise.
Nowadays I think if they did that people would call the company "scummy" and "hiding content behind a paid guide" because that's how much people have changed over time.
 

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