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Utilizing Team Preview in GBU [GP 2/2] Done!

Discussion in 'Uploaded Analyses' started by BattleStar, Nov 24, 2012.

  1. BattleStar

    BattleStar

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2010
    Messages:
    637
    Introduction

    Team Preview is one of the new features implemented this generation that changed the nature of battling in all formats. Another addition in this generation is the Global Battle Union (GBU), which allows you to challenge players from around the world in various battle styles. When finally finding an opponent, you have ninety seconds to decide your team while also being able to view all the Pokemon your opponent has on his team. While the portion varies depending on the battle style, you will find that you will only be faced with a part of the opponent's team. This requires you to put more thought into analyzing the opposing team. Being able to predict and infer which Pokemon your opponent will choose puts you at an advantage. If you put insufficient effort into analyzing the opponent's team, you will be unprepared for the threats you might face.

    Analyzing the opposing team

    The ability to make intelligent predictions about the Pokemon you will be facing is a tremendous advantage in battle. Often times you can, without much effort, infer which Pokemon will be used against you and have a general overview of what their play style might be. There should be some line of thinking when analyzing the opposing team.


    First, one should look at the overall opposing team and then the individual Pokemon. Ask yourself some of these questions: What is the general look of this team? Hyper offensive? Balanced? Gimmicky? Does the team look like it has good synergy? Which three Pokemon seem like they are one team and what are the other Pokemon for? What is the threat you have to watch for? Which Pokemon will best counter the other team? Asking these will already give you the advantage and help you better understand what you are up against.

    I will now elaborate on the analysis of which Pokemon go well together. The key is to see if there are certain cores, pairs, etc. on a team. This mindset will inform you of combinations such as: "If I see X, then Y is here too". For example, if I see a Kingdra and Politoed in the Team Preview and the opponent sends out Politoed, then I almost know for certain that I will be facing Kingdra too. This allows me to plan accordingly in order to counter this dangerous pair.

    There are a couple of other attributes that should be taken into account when analyzing the opponent's team. The first of these would be to "identify the outliers." An outlier is a Pokemon that doesn't fit in with the rest of the team. An example would be a team of rain sweepers, then seeing a random Krookodile among them. The second circumstance that must be taken into regard is when your opponent possesses "bad Pokemon" on his team. Don't forget that time when you saw a Patrat or some other competitively nonviable Pokemon. You can quickly dismiss such team members, because your opponent is very unlikely to use them and they won't be threats even if he does.If he does use these Pokemon, consider yourself lucky.

    Utilizing Team Preview for Yourself

    It requires a lot more effort to analyze an opponent's team than to craft your own. Nevertheless, there are still a couple tricks that you should use and some checkpoints to follow.

    This might at times seem like a no-brainer but you can always come across people that make these mistakes. One of the first steps you should do is always bring in six Pokemon. Don't just bring in the minimum amount you need, even if there is only one specific team you plan on using. Bringing three Pokemon for singles or four Pokemon for doubles is a gift to your opponent. You basically saved them some thinking and told them what to expect, thus allowing them more time to plan. Finding outliers on an opponents team is a good way to narrow down what type of team you will face. However, just because your opponent sometimes has these doesn't mean that you should. Always make sure you have no Oddish or another competitively unviable Pokemon on your team. To a more specific extent, always have Pokemon that seem to be able to fit into your team and create various effective combinations. Try to make this figuring out which Pokemon you will choose as difficult for your opponent as you can; make them think hard about what they will have to plan around.

    The second part to utilizing Team Preview is being as misleading as you can. There are a couple ways you can do this. One way to do this is to have a "six Pokemon team". This would be having a team that has great synergy. Not only can this stump your opponent but it leaves you better prepared. In general, try to make sure your team looks like it can work together.

    Finally, there are quite a few miscellaneous concepts that you can use. You can have Pokemon that don't necessarily synergize with the entire team, but synergize well with one or two other Pokemon. For example, you might have one half of your team work well in rain and another in sand. This will let you pivot [as you see fit for various situations all while forcing the opponent to decide which team he will most likely face and needs to prepare against. Better yet, try to have a member that synergizes well with both teams. One last miscellaneous item someone might want to note is Zoroark. You might not want to use it for battling, but anytime this Pokemon appears, the opponent will think to himself "is this the Pokemon or an imposter?"

    Conclusion

    The Global Battle Union's Team Preview can't always be looked at the same as the version found in standard battling. This leads to a variety of situations, tricks, and strategies that you can only find in the GBU. Once you start utilizing all the aspects of GBU, such as Team Preview, you will soon find yourself successful!
  2. Oglemi

    Oglemi THE DREAM IS REAL
    is a Tournament Directoris a member of the Site Staffis a Community Contributoris a Pokemon Researcheris a Contributor to Smogonis a Smogon Media Contributoris an Administratoris a Tiering Contributor Alumnus
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    Just a heads up that while I realize this is a WIP, you really need to be careful with the sloppiness, particularly spacing. Also remember that Team Preview is capitalized, as is Pokemon.
  3. BattleStar

    BattleStar

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2010
    Messages:
    637
    Got it Oglemi. Before I put this up for GP and QC checks I will give a run through on things like that.
  4. Yonko7

    Yonko7 Guns make you stupid. Duct tape makes you smart.
    is a Contributor Alumnus

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2012
    Messages:
    651
    Diff (open)

    Introduction

    Team pPreview is one of the new features implemented in this generation that changed the nature of battling of all formats. Another edition to this generation that has is the Global Battle Union (GBU), which allows you to challenge players from around the world in various battle styles. When finally finding an opponent you have ninety seconds to decide your team while also being able to view all the pPokemon your opponent has on his team. While it varies due to the different sorts of styles, you will find that you will only be faced with a portion of the opponent's team. This requires you to put more thought into analyzing the opposing team. Being able to predict and infer which pPokemon your opponent will choose puts you at an advantage. If you put insufficient effort into analyzing the opponent's team, you will be unprepared for the threat you might face.


    Analyzing the opposing team
    Being
    The
    ableility to make intelligent predictions as to whatbout the Pokemon you will be facing is a tremendous advantage to possess in battle. The opposite of this is poorly or not predicting at all, which will leave you at a disadvantage. Often times you can, without much effort, infer which pPokemon will be used against you and have a general overview of what their play style might be. There should be some line of thinking when analyzing the opposing team.


    First thing, one should do is look at the team overall, but opposing team and then at the individual Pokemon. Ask yourself some of these questions: What is the general look of this team? Hyper offensive? Balanced? Gimmicky? Does the team look like it has good synergy? Which three Pokemon seem like they are one team and what are the other pPokemon for? What is the threat you have to watch for? Which Pokemon will best counter the other team? Asking these will already givet you andthe advantage and better understand what you are up against.

    I will now elaborate on the analysis of what pich Pokemon go well together. The key is to see if there are certain cores, pairs, etc. on a team. This mindset will inform you of combinations such as: "If I see X, then Y is here too". For example, if I see a Kingdra and Politoad in the Team Preview and the opponent sends out Politoad , then I can know almost know for certain that I will be facing Kingdra too. This allows me to plan accordingly in order to counter this infamdangerous pair.


    There are a couple of other attributes that should be taken into account when anyalyzing the opponent's team. The first of these would be to "identify the outliers." An outlier is a pPokemon that doesn't coordinate with the rest of the team. An example would be to a team of rain abusweepers, then seeing a random Krookodile among them. The second aspect that must be taken into regard is when your opponent possesses "bad pPokemon" on their team. Don't forget that time when you saw a Patrat or some other competitively nonviable Pokemon. You shouldcan quickly dismiss this, because it eliminates the possibilities of what your opponent's team willcould be. TAlthough if they do use these pPokemon, consider yourself lucky.

    Utilizing Team Preview for yYourself

    It requires a lot more effort to analyze an opponent's team than crafting your own team. Nevertheless, there are still a couple tricks that you should use and some checkpoints to follow:.

    This mayight at times seem like a no-brainer but you can always come across people who make these mistakes. One of the first thingsteps you should do is always bring in six Pokemon. Don't just bring in the minimum amount you need, even if there is only one specific team you plan on using. Bringing three Pokemon for singles or four Pokemon for doubles is a gift to your opponent. You basically saved them some thinking and told them what to expect, thus allowing them more time to plan. Finding outliers on an opponents team is a good way to narrow down what type of team you will face. Just because your opponent does this doesn't mean that you should. Always make sure you have no Oddishes or another competitively unviable pPokemon on your team. To a more specific extent, always have pPokemon that seem to be able to fit into your team and create various, effective combinations. Try to make this as difficult for your opponent as you can; make them think hard about what they will have to plan around.

    The second part to utilizing tTeam pPreview is being as misleading as you can. There is a couple ways you can do this. One way to do this is to have a "six-Pokemon team". This would be having a team that has great synergy. Not only can this stump your opponent but it leaves you better prepared. In general, try to make sure your team looks like it can work together.

    Finally, there are quite a few miscellaneous concepts that you can use. You can have Pokemon that don't necessarily synchronize with the entire team, but synchronize well with one or two other Pokemon. For example, you mayight have one half of your team work well in rain and another in sand. This will let you pivot on the different teams as you see fit for various situations all while occasionally forcing the opponent to decide which team will most likely face and prepare against. Better yet, try to have a member that synergizes well with both teams. One last miscellaneous item some one might want to note is Zoroark. You mayight not want to use it for battling, but anytime this Pokemon appears, the opponent will think to himself "is this the pPokemon or an imposter?"

    Conclusion

    The Global Battle Union tTeam pPreview can't always be looked att the same as standard battling. This leads to a variety of situations, tricks, and strategies that you can only find in the GBU. Once you start utilizing all the aspects of GBU, such as Team Preview, you will soon find yourself successful!


    C/P (open)

    Introduction

    Team Preview is one of the new features implemented this generation that changed the nature of battling of all formats. Another edition to this generation is the Global Battle Union (GBU), which allows you to challenge players from around the world in various battle styles. When finally finding an opponent you have ninety seconds to decide your team while also being able to view all the Pokemon your opponent has on his team. While it varies due to different styles, you will find that you will only be faced with a portion of the opponent's team. This requires you to put more thought into analyzing the opposing team. Being able to predict and infer which Pokemon your opponent will choose puts you at an advantage. If you put insufficient effort into analyzing the opponent's team, you will be unprepared for the threat you might face.

    Analyzing the opposing team

    The ability to make intelligent predictions about the Pokemon you will be facing is a tremendous advantage to possess in battle. The opposite of this is poorly or not predicting at all, which will leave you at a disadvantage. Often times you can, without much effort, infer which Pokemon will be used against you and have a general overview of what their play style might be. There should be some line of thinking when analyzing the opposing team.


    First, one should look at the overall opposing team and then the individual Pokemon. Ask yourself some of these questions: What is the general look of this team? Hyper offensive? Balanced? Gimmicky? Does the team look like it has good synergy? Which three Pokemon seem like they are one team and what are the other Pokemon for? What is the threat you have to watch for? Which Pokemon will best counter the other team? Asking these will already give you the advantage and better understand what you are up against.

    I will now elaborate on the analysis of which Pokemon go well together. The key is to see if there are certain cores, pairs, etc. on a team. This mindset will inform you of combinations such as: "If I see X, then Y is here too". For example, if I see a Kingdra and Politoad in the Team Preview and the opponent sends out Politoad, then I almost know for certain that I will be facing Kingdra too. This allows me to plan accordingly in order to counter this dangerous pair.

    There are a couple of other attributes that should be taken into account when analyzing the opponent's team. The first of these would be to "identify the outliers." An outlier is a Pokemon that doesn't coordinate with the rest of the team. An example would be a team of rain sweepers, then seeing a random Krookodile among them. The second aspect that must be taken into regard is when your opponent possesses "bad Pokemon" on their team. Don't forget that time when you saw a Patrat or some other competitively nonviable Pokemon. You can quickly dismiss this, because it eliminates the possibilities of what your opponent's team could be. Although if they do use these Pokemon, consider yourself lucky.

    Utilizing Team Preview for Yourself

    It requires a lot more effort to analyze an opponent's team than crafting your own. Nevertheless, there are still a couple tricks that you should use and some checkpoints to follow.

    This might at times seem like a no-brainer but you can always come across people who make these mistakes. One of the first steps you should do is always bring in six Pokemon. Don't just bring in the minimum amount you need, even if there is only one specific team you plan on using. Bringing three Pokemon for singles or four Pokemon for doubles is a gift to your opponent. You basically saved them some thinking and told them what to expect, thus allowing them more time to plan. Finding outliers on an opponents team is a good way to narrow down what type of team you will face. Just because your opponent does this doesn't mean that you should. Always make sure you have no Oddishes or another competitively unviable Pokemon on your team. To a more specific extent, always have Pokemon that seem to be able to fit into your team and create various, effective combinations. Try to make this as difficult for your opponent as you can; make them think hard about what they will have to plan around.

    The second part to utilizing Team Preview is being as misleading as you can. There is a couple ways you can do this. One way to do this is to have a "six-Pokemon team". This would be having a team that has great synergy. Not only can this stump your opponent but it leaves you better prepared. In general, try to make sure your team looks like it can work together.

    Finally, there are quite a few miscellaneous concepts that you can use. You can have Pokemon that don't necessarily synchronize with the entire team, but synchronize well with one or two other Pokemon. For example, you might have one half of your team work well in rain and another in sand. This will let you pivot on the different teams as you see fit for various situations all while occasionally forcing the opponent to decide which team will most likely face and prepare against. Better yet, try to have a member that synergizes well with both teams. One last miscellaneous item someone might want to note is Zoroark. You might not want to use it for battling, but anytime this Pokemon appears, the opponent will think to himself "is this the Pokemon or an imposter?"

    Conclusion

    The Global Battle Union Team Preview can't always be looked at the same as standard battling. This leads to a variety of situations, tricks, and strategies that you can only find in the GBU. Once you start utilizing all the aspects of GBU, such as Team Preview, you will soon find yourself successful!


    Great job keep them coming BattleStar!

    [gp]1/2[/gp]
  5. melvni

    melvni
    is a Site Staff Alumnusis a Forum Moderator Alumnusis a Contributor Alumnus

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2010
    Messages:
    1,148
    GP check. Good job on writing this.
    Additions in Blue
    Subtractions in Red
    Comments in Purple

    Show Hide
    Introduction

    Team Preview is one of the new features implemented this generation that changed the nature of battling of in all formats. Another edition to addition in this generation is the Global Battle Union (GBU), which allows you to challenge players from around the world in various battle styles. When finally finding an opponent (add comma) you have ninety seconds to decide your team while also being able to view all the Pokemon your opponent has on his team. While it the portion varies due to different styles depending on the battle style, you will find that you will only be faced with a portion part of the opponent's team. This requires you to put more thought into analyzing the opposing team. Being able to predict and infer which Pokemon your opponent will choose puts you at an advantage. If you put insufficient effort into analyzing the opponent's team, you will be unprepared for the threat threats you might face.

    Analyzing the opposing team

    The ability to make intelligent predictions about the Pokemon you will be facing is a tremendous advantage to possess in battle. The opposite of this is poorly or not predicting at all, which will leave you at a disadvantage. Often times you can, without much effort, infer which Pokemon will be used against you and have a general overview of what their play style might be. There should be some line of thinking when analyzing the opposing team.


    First, one should look at the overall opposing team and then the individual Pokemon. Ask yourself some of these questions: What is the general look of this team? Hyper offensive? Balanced? Gimmicky? Does the team look like it has good synergy? Which three Pokemon seem like they are one team and what are the other Pokemon for? What is the threat you have to watch for? Which Pokemon will best counter the other team? Asking these will already give you the advantage and help you better understand what you are up against.

    I will now elaborate on the analysis of which Pokemon go well together. The key is to see if there are certain cores, pairs, etc. on a team. This mindset will inform you of combinations such as: "If I see X, then Y is here too". For example, if I see a Kingdra and Politoad Politoed in the Team Preview and the opponent sends out Politoad Politoed, then I almost know for certain that I will be facing Kingdra too. This allows me to plan accordingly in order to counter this dangerous pair.

    There are a couple of other attributes that should be taken into account when analyzing the opponent's team. The first of these would be to "identify the outliers." An outlier is a Pokemon that doesn't coordinate fit in with the rest of the team. An example would be a team of rain sweepers, then seeing a random Krookodile among them. The second aspect circumstance that must be taken into regard is when your opponent possesses "bad Pokemon" on their his team. Don't forget that time when you saw a Patrat or some other competitively nonviable Pokemon. You can quickly dismiss this such team members, because it eliminates the possibilities of what your opponent's team could be opponent is very unlikely to use them and they won't be threats even if he does. Although if they do If he does use these Pokemon, consider yourself lucky.

    Utilizing Team Preview for Yourself

    It requires a lot more effort to analyze an opponent's team than crafting to craft your own. Nevertheless, there are still a couple tricks that you should use and some checkpoints to follow.

    This might at times seem like a no-brainer but you can always come across people who that make these mistakes. One of the first steps you should do is always bring in six Pokemon. Don't just bring in the minimum amount you need, even if there is only one specific team you plan on using. Bringing three Pokemon for singles or four Pokemon for doubles is a gift to your opponent. You basically saved them some thinking and told them what to expect, thus allowing them more time to plan. Finding outliers on an opponents team is a good way to narrow down what type of team you will face. Just However, just because your opponent does this sometimes has these doesn't mean that you should. Always make sure you have no Oddishes Oddish or another competitively unviable Pokemon on your team. To a more specific extent, always have Pokemon that seem to be able to fit into your team and create various, (remove comma) effective combinations. Try to make this figuring out which Pokemon you will choose as difficult for your opponent as you can; make them think hard about what they will have to plan around.

    The second part to utilizing Team Preview is being as misleading as you can. There is are a couple ways you can do this. One way to do this is to have a "six-Pokemon six Pokemon team". This would be having a team that has great synergy. Not only can this stump your opponent but it leaves you better prepared. In general, try to make sure your team looks like it can work together.

    Finally, there are quite a few miscellaneous concepts that you can use. You can have Pokemon that don't necessarily synchronize synergize with the entire team, but synchronize synergize well with one or two other Pokemon. For example, you might have one half of your team work well in rain and another in sand. This will let you pivot on the different teams as you see fit for various situations all while occasionally forcing the opponent to decide which team he will most likely face and needs to prepare against. Better yet, try to have a member that synergizes well with both teams. One last miscellaneous item someone might want to note is Zoroark. You might not want to use it for battling, but anytime this Pokemon appears, the opponent will think to himself "is this the Pokemon or an imposter?"

    Conclusion

    The Global Battle Union Union's Team Preview can't always be looked at the same as the version found in standard battling. This leads to a variety of situations, tricks, and strategies that you can only find in the GBU. Once you start utilizing all the aspects of GBU, such as Team Preview, you will soon find yourself successful!


    [gp]2/2[/gp]
  6. Jukain

    Jukain .leaf
    is a member of the Site Staffis a Forum Moderatoris a Community Contributoris a Tiering Contributoris a Contributor to Smogonis a Smogon Media Contributor
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2011
    Messages:
    4,349
    battlestar told me what he wants done with the HTML (he asked me to do it) and dittocrow told me what I needed to include. cheers.

    Show Hide

    HTML:
    [title]
    Utilizing Team Preview in GBU
    [head]
    <meta name="description" content="A guide to Team Preview in the GBU metagame">
    [page]
    
    <div class="author">by <a href="http://www.smogon.com/forums/member.php?u=60007">BattleStar</a</div>
    
    <h2>Introduction</h2>
    
    <p>Team Preview is one of the new features implemented this generation that changed the nature of battling in all formats. Another addition in this generation is the Global Battle Union (GBU), which allows you to challenge players from around the world in various battle styles. When finally finding an opponent, you have ninety seconds to decide your team while also being able to view all the Pokemon your opponent has on his team. While the portion varies depending on the battle style, you will find that you will only be faced with a part of the opponent's team. This requires you to put more thought into analyzing the opposing team. Being able to predict and infer which Pokemon your opponent will choose puts you at an advantage. If you put insufficient effort into analyzing the opponent's team, you will be unprepared for the threats you might face.</p>
    
    <h2>Analyzing the opposing team</h2>
    
    <p>The ability to make intelligent predictions about the Pokemon you will be facing is a tremendous advantage in battle. Often times you can, without much effort, infer which Pokemon will be used against you and have a general overview of what their play style might be. There should be some line of thinking when analyzing the opposing team.</p>
    
    <p>First, one should look at the overall opposing team and then the individual Pokemon. Ask yourself some of these questions: What is the general look of this team? Hyper offensive? Balanced? Gimmicky? Does the team look like it has good synergy? Which three Pokemon seem like they are one team and what are the other Pokemon for? What is the threat you have to watch for? Which Pokemon will best counter the other team? Asking these will already give you the advantage and help you better understand what you are up against.</p>
    
    <p>I will now elaborate on the analysis of which Pokemon go well together. The key is to see if there are certain cores, pairs, etc. on a team. This mindset will inform you of combinations such as: "If I see X, then Y is here too". For example, if I see a Kingdra and Politoed in the Team Preview and the opponent sends out Politoed, then I almost know for certain that I will be facing Kingdra too. This allows me to plan accordingly in order to counter this dangerous pair.</p>
    
    <p>There are a couple of other attributes that should be taken into account when analyzing the opponent's team. The first of these would be to "identify the outliers." An outlier is a Pokemon that doesn't fit in with the rest of the team. An example would be a team of rain sweepers, then seeing a random Krookodile among them. The second circumstance that must be taken into regard is when your opponent possesses "bad Pokemon" on his team. Don't forget that time when you saw a Patrat or some other competitively nonviable Pokemon. You can quickly dismiss such team members, because your opponent is very unlikely to use them and they won't be threats even if he does. If he does use these Pokemon, consider yourself lucky.</p>
    
    <h2>Utilizing Team Preview for Yourself</h2>
    
    <p>It requires a lot more effort to analyze an opponent's team than to craft your own. Nevertheless, there are still a couple tricks that you should use and some checkpoints to follow.</p>
    
    <p>This might at times seem like a no-brainer but you can always come across people that make these mistakes. One of the first steps you should do is always bring in six Pokemon. Don't just bring in the minimum amount you need, even if there is only one specific team you plan on using. Bringing three Pokemon for singles or four Pokemon for doubles is a gift to your opponent. You basically saved them some thinking and told them what to expect, thus allowing them more time to plan. Finding outliers on an opponents team is a good way to narrow down what type of team you will face. However, just because your opponent sometimes has these doesn't mean that you should. Always make sure you have no Oddish or another competitively unviable Pokemon on your team. To a more specific extent, always have Pokemon that seem to be able to fit into your team and create various effective combinations. Try to make this figuring out which Pokemon you will choose as difficult for your opponent as you can; make them think hard about what they will have to plan around.</p>
    
    <p>The second part to utilizing Team Preview is being as misleading as you can. There are a couple ways you can do this. One way to do this is to have a "six Pokemon team". This would be having a team that has great synergy. Not only can this stump your opponent but it leaves you better prepared. In general, try to make sure your team looks like it can work together.</p>
    
    <p>Finally, there are quite a few miscellaneous concepts that you can use. You can have Pokemon that don't necessarily synergize with the entire team, but synergize well with one or two other Pokemon. For example, you might have one half of your team work well in rain and another in sand. This will let you pivot as you see fit for various situations all while forcing the opponent to decide which team he will most likely face and needs to prepare against. Better yet, try to have a member that synergizes well with both teams. One last miscellaneous item someone might want to note is Zoroark. You might not want to use it for battling, but anytime this Pokemon appears, the opponent will think to himself "is this the Pokemon or an imposter?"</p>
    
    <h2>Conclusion</h2>
    
    <p>The Global Battle Union's Team Preview can't always be looked at the same as the version found in standard battling. This leads to a variety of situations, tricks, and strategies that you can only find in the GBU. Once you start utilizing all the aspects of GBU, such as Team Preview, you will soon find yourself successful!</p>
    


    He told me to use bolded section headers instead of normal headers, idk.

    I can do this, right?
  7. Oglemi

    Oglemi THE DREAM IS REAL
    is a Tournament Directoris a member of the Site Staffis a Community Contributoris a Pokemon Researcheris a Contributor to Smogonis a Smogon Media Contributoris an Administratoris a Tiering Contributor Alumnus
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    Joined:
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