Pokémon Colosseum In-game Tier List

Karxrida

Corruption of Shadows
is a Community Contributor Alumnus
Bump I guess.

This thread nor myself have exactly been super active recently, but I still wanted to post saying that my general activity will probably be down severely during the holiday season. You guys are still free to post write-ups, which OrangeGuru will probably go over if I'm not around.
 
How consistently was this happening? Was it just the normal mook AI or did it also affect bosses?
It affected bosses too, yeah. It happened to such a ridiculous extent it was happening at least once a video and became a meme fairly quickly; but I'm not entirely sure how reliable this would be and hence I'm hesitant to say it should affect Misdreavus' ranking.
 
Exactly, it happens all the time with Misdreavus. And that's why I was so adamant about its B-tier ranking. Its bulk and staying power is way better in practice than it looks on paper.
 
Prefacing this by saying I haven't gotten around to using Misdreavus yet, but I think the AI tendency to be stupid for lack of a better term when targeting Missy with normal / fighting moves really helps it. It is very frequent and helps Missy's efficiency; it's a wall similar to Umbreon that the AI seems to want to keep alive and I honestly think B is fine for it.
 

Karxrida

Corruption of Shadows
is a Community Contributor Alumnus
Since I don't have time to watch Chugga's LP (which has 45-ish parts with at least a 15 minute video average) right now, I'm going to trust Kurona's assessment and go with Guru on a ranking rise.
 
I bring thee life!

So I guess I'm the first one to make a write up, and for many reasons I think the first shadow Pokemon one obtains should have the honors, so here is Makuhita

Makuhita
Availability
: Phenac City via Miror B. Peon Trudley at level 30, or postgame in the same area.
Overview: Makuhita has some pretty rubbish stats with its only base stat being above 70 is its HP and will spend a lot of its time getting OHKO'd, but once you're able to purify it, if you raise it at least one level, it will evolve into Hariyama it gets a massive increase in all of its stats, except for speed. With it being able to take hits as well as dish them out, a great offensive STAB and two great abilities, it shows its worth through the majority of situations as a well rounded tank.
Additional Comments: with 3000 points in its heart gauge, Makuhita takes the least amount of effort into the purification process. Since its the tutorial mon, it also has a 100% capture rate so you can just simply chuck a Pokeball at it with no worry. You can beat the Pyrite Colosseum a few times to nab the TMs for Focus Punch and Brick Break if you don't want to deal with Cross Chops low PP and funky accuracy. Due to the double battle mechanics, one may opt to have belly drum for a moveslot.


That's one down, only like 40 or so more to go (45 if people actually want to write an analysis for Miltank through Metagross)

Some of you may be thinking "what does 3000 points in its heart gauge mean?" Well the gist of it is that every Shadow Pokemon has a certain amount in their bar, while early game Pokemon require little amounts (with few exception) while later Pokemon typically require more. In the games mechanics, it is measured by points, and doing certain actions such as sending it out to battle, using the call function while its in hyper mode, and other things will decrease the gauge by a certain amount, with the Pokemon's nature influencing how much certain actions take.

https://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Heart_Gauge

For right now, one can look at the Heart Gauge article in Bulbapedia that goes further in detail into the mechanics and shows exactly how many points actions tank. The link is only temporary, until one one us can create a page on this website or a downloadable document for people to view.
 
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I'll do another one since I like doing this anyway.

Availability: Shadow Pokemon Lab via Cipher Peon Lare at level 43. Mid-Late Game with a 30 Capture Rate.
Overview: Murkrow sadly is not good. It comes around a point where you're facing a lot of enemies with electric and ice coverage so it's very difficult to use in the immediate area. Murkrow does have some good points as it is fast and has good offensive stats as well as a good offensive typing, but it's movepool lacks in both power and status/support. Because of these reasons, Murkrow ends up being a liability in most, if not all matchups.
Additional Notes: 6000 points in the heart gauge means that Murkrow takes quite a bit of effort to purify (just stuff it in the day care to be honest). Murkrow is one of the seven Pokemon that can learn TM49 Snatch, but to use Snatch reliably one needs to know the AI's moveset extensively, and the very few Pokemon you can obtain that can boost their own stats, they are better off using those boosted stats than Murkrow ever could. It's ability also does more harm than good since it's Insomnia, coupled with a low 30 capture rate.
 
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Availability: The Under Subway via Bodybuilder Lonia at level 43; Mid Game (or post-game in Snagem Hideout).
Overview: Ice/Ground is a fantastic offensive typing, hitting 9 types super effectively, but pretty bad defensively, being hit by 5 types, 3 of them being fairly common to see. It has a beefy base 100 HP as well as 80/60 defenses so it can take quite a number of its, and its base 100 attack attack lets it hit quite hard physically while 60 base sp.attack is just good enough to take advantage of its Ice STAB. Pilo's biggest issue is its unreliability as well as its slow leveling curve. It can learn dual screens, but its slow speed and common weaknesses means it won't always get them off. Blizzard has shoddy accuracy and reduced power due to it being a multi hitting move, which is very apparent coming off of 60 base sp.attack. Dig is not advisable due to all the EQ spam in the game and Odor Sleuth/Endure are pretty much pointless.
Additional Notes: 6000 points in the heart gauge, similar to most mid to mid-late game shadow's but is easier to progress than most due to the huge amount of electric and flying types in the Shadow Pokemon Lab as well as having a hard hitting shadow rush. Pilo's EQ hits hard, but you're better off teaching that move to someone like Flygon, who has a vastly better movepool, typing, and stats.


Availability: Pyrite Cave via Hunter Zalo at level 33. Early Game. Can be rematched if you leave Pyrite Town entirely and come back.
Overview: Swablu and Altaria's biggest strength is its movepool and versatility. Being able to learn a wide variety of typings such as Solarbeam, Iron Tail/Steel wing, Fire Blast/Flamethrower, Ice beam, and Earthquake lets it hit many Pokemon pretty hard even with its average offensive stats. Having a good TM support movepool consisting of sunny day/rain dance, and safeguard has its uses. Dragonbreath has some good utility with its high paralysis rate, but Dragon Dance is especially notable due to Altaria being one of the very few Pokemon in the game that can boost its stats. Altaria also has the unique Dragon typing, which is also only shared with Flygon in this game. Its combination of stats, movepool, and typing, has a good showing for all of the major battles in the game being able to avoid EQ spam, mitigate status spam with safeguard (or even by switching) and can soak up many powerful moves. It being able to use DD multiple times in a match due to its defenses can lead to an easy sweep too.
Additional Notes: Swablu is pretty weak with only base 40 offenses and 5000 points in the heart gauge, making it pretty annoying to purify but with an Erratic leveling curve (meaning the higher the level, the lower amount of exp required to level up), a near effortless catch (as Swablu, having 255 capture rate), a huge amount of variety, and evolving only 2 levels after its capture, Swablu/Altaria can fit on almost any team with almost any role. It can be fairly TM hungry, but can work just fine without them. If you teach Altaria DD, you can pair it with a Psych Up Medicham to create some very deadly results.
 
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Just nitpicking here, but I'm pretty sure blizzard only bypasses accuracy checks in Generation 4 onward.
Yes, but in gen 3 it instead made it 100%. So accuracy only becomes a problem if your opponent is a double team user.
 
Yeah, I saw blizzard miss in Emerald even though it was hailing and nobody had any accuracy or evasion changes. Bulbapedia also has no mention of blizzard's accuracy ever being affected by hail anytime before Generation 4.
 
Yeah, I saw blizzard miss in Emerald even though it was hailing and nobody had any accuracy or evasion changes. Bulbapedia also has no mention of blizzard's accuracy ever being affected by hail anytime before Generation 4.
My mistake. My mind was just assuming that it did because of Thunder's whole thing with rain. Gosh, Hail really did suck back then. Well I mean Hail has always sucked but it was even worse than I imagined. Let me go fix that up. And slip in another write up

Availability: Pyrite Square via Rider Vant. Early Game at level 30. Optional battle, but can be rematched as many times as you transition through buildings.
Overview: Misdreavus is the onlyobtainable ghost type in the game, which really sets it apart from the rest of your options. With 3 immunities (thanks to Levitate), and all of them being pretty common moves from the AI, it has many opportunities to switch in or support. it gains some useful and unique level up moves, being pain split(37), perish song(45), and grudge(53). They all have their usefulness here and there.
Additional Notes: With 4000 points in the heart gauge that makes Misdreavus tied for the second lowest amount in the game. The Psychic and Thunderbolt TM one would typically want to teach Misdreavus are sadly stuck in the Mt. Battle exchange shop, which do take a decent amount of time and effort to accumulate Poke Coupons for. With a base 85 speed, one could make use of Sunny Day/Rain Dance which are easily obtained in the Phenac Colosseum battles.
 
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Karxrida

Corruption of Shadows
is a Community Contributor Alumnus
MellowBusiness while I greatly appreciate your enthusiasm and contributions, your write-ups are far too long with some formatting issues, and you aren't using the layout I gave on the end of Page 3. (The latter is admittedly somewhat my fault since I never updated the OP.)

I'll get back to this later since my schedule is almost back to normal.
 
MellowBusiness while I greatly appreciate your enthusiasm and contributions, your write-ups are far too long with some formatting issues, and you aren't using the layout I gave on the end of Page 3. (The latter is admittedly somewhat my fault since I never updated the OP.)
Alright, I can fix em up to make them shorter.
*and edited they now are. I always meant to go back to Makuhita to clean it up, but I kept forgetting)
 
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Availability: Mt. Battle via Admin Dakim at level 40, or Realgam Tower or even Under Colosseum in the postgame. A point directly after you get to purify your Pokemon.
Overview: Four fire types in the entire game, and Entei stands out from the others due to being a legendary. With a high BST, with great offenses, very solid defenses and one of the fastest Pokemon you can catch, it holds up well, even against EQ spam. Witha base 115 attack stat, Entei has one of the hardest hitting Shadow Rush in the game. It gets Sunny Day when its purified so its Fire Blast becomes one of the hardest hitting moves in the entire game even though it only comes off of a base 90 sp. attack. Entei is held back by its awkward movepool having to rely on its weaker offensive stat in most situations. Certain TMs like Iron Tail are fairly inaccurate as well as taking quite a detour to obtain. Even with the oddities in its movepool it still can power through most encounters fairly easily due to its overwhelming stats and most encounters NFEs through the game. Fire in general is a great offensive typing to have for the major battles. It also comes at a high level of 40 so it takes no grinding at all to get it within levels of the team.
Additional Notes: Entei does have a whopping 13,000 points in the heart gauge so it takes quite a while to actually purify. The only Pokemon that require more are Metagross and Tyranitar. Lucky enough if Entei is captured, a Time Flute is obtained immediately after so Entei can be instantly purified. Because it comes with Sunny Day, it pairs well with Jumpluff and Meganium. Entei is also a good user of the Return TM but it does require beating the annoying evasion spamming Justy. Happiness can be brought up fairly easily with Vivid Scent usage. Interestingly enough, the Beasts have a somewhat higher capture rate due to the fact that the Pokeball always shakes at least once.
 
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Colosseum sure is an interesting game. It has a lot of flaws, but its a game that's held pretty dearly to my heart. XD improves on Colosseum in almost everyway but I do prefer Colosseum just slightly more. Probably due to it being a tougher experience during the story part, and that for the most part you have to use these ragtag groups and fight against bosses and trainers who use legitimate strats which the mainline games rarely touch upon. XD didn't do it either until you mess around with the brutally frustrating Orre Colosseum.

Availability: Realgam Tower via Snagem Leader Gonzap at level 47. Late Game
Overview: Skarmory is the very last Shadow Pokemon one will catch before the gauntlet that awaits. With a hefty 140 base defense, it can take any physical move the AI throws at it. Its extremely late encounter hurts its viability a lot, but its not completely useless. With its high defense and great steel/flying defensive typing, it makes for a good wall to heal up teamates.
Additional notes: The AI in Colosseum is very interesting. If a team member is at a substantially lower level than the other, the AI will tend to gang up on said low level mon. Due to Skarmory being caught at level 48, it will most likely be lower than your team. One can use this to their advantage as the other Mon will be able to get off damage without getting hurt themselves, most of the time. Skarmory will also easily be able to survive hits unless they hit it with two powerful special attacks or one super effective special attack. Skarmory's first move when the shadow gauge's first bar is depleted is metal sound, which will let your special attackers like Espeon and Ampharos tear through, but that first bar does take quite a few usages of the Vivid Scent due to it having 13,000 points in the Heart Gauge.


Availability: Phenac City via Cipher Peon Rosso. Potentially found early game at level 30. Can also be found at Realgam Tower. If Bayleef/Croconaw are chosen instead it can be found at Snagem Hideout/Shadow Pokemon Lab during the Postgame
Overview: Quilava is potentially the second shadow Pokemon you can obtain. The moves it comes with are smokescreen, dig and flame wheel, while obtaining Sunny Day when its completely purified. Quilava struggles during the early game because it has unfavorable matchups against the early game bosses but it does get a well rounded movepool consisting of fighting, ground, as well as its STAB. When it evolves into Typhlosion, its best quailty is its base 100 speed, tied for fourth place for the fastest Pokemon you can obtain. In the end it being fast and having good coverage, even though its fairly TM reliant, makes it a good choice if you're tired of Croconaw.
Additional notes: 3000 points in the Heart Gauge makes it a very easy Pokemon to purify. Since Quilava does take the longest to evolve, being level 36, there is a good chance Quilava might still be Quilava when the Dakim fight appears its head. Quilava/Typholsion is sadly mostly outclassed by Entei, but can edge out during certain matchups due to its better offensive movepool and Blaze for some desperation strats.


Availability: Under Subway via Rider Nelis. Mid Game at level 43.
Overview: Ironically enough, Sneasel is one of the very few examples where its a better Shadow Pokemon, than a Standard Pokemon. With a base 115 speed stat, its one of the fastest Pokemon in the game, also tying with Raikou. Its got a nice 95 base attack which lets it hit hard with Shadow Rush. It gets screech to make its shadow rush hit even harder, and icy wind hitting both opponents as well as slowing them down. Sadly, this is where Sneasel's praise ends. Ice and Dark are special moves in gen 3, and with Sneasel's dreadful 35 base special attack, it won't be doing anything with its STAB, even if it manages to hit with 4x effectiveness. With fighting, rock, fire being common offensive moves of the AI as well as physical moves being a common offenses with its frail defenses, Sneasel also struggles to survive major battles as well.
Additional notes: Sneasel has 6000 points in the Heart Gauge, whiich isn't too high but its still twice as much as the early game shadow mons. Sneasel is also arguably the most TM hungry/dependent Pokemon in the game. It can learn some interesting moves like Iron Tail, Shadow Ball, and Focus Punch, but they all take investment to obtain due to them being earned through the Colosseums and are also one time obtainable. If you have a high Attack based team, Beat Up is a nice gimmick move to use, that is if you bother with Sneasel for 14 levels to get it to that point.
 
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I'd take out the stuff about Flamethrower, 'potentially' being the second shadow Pokemon and being outclassed by Entei in Quilava's writeup because they're fairly irrelevant especially for in game. The starting moveset also doesn't need to be there, just give a general idea of how its moveset will be throughout the game -- the only reason to list it like that is if it's something terrible you're stuck with for ages, which isn't particularly true.
 
The main point of the write ups is "how well will this Pokemon perform if granted that it is going to be used," so side stepping comparisons about comparing mons to other mons down the line.

If I may ask, what in particular puts Entei in A-tier compared to S-tier? Fire is a very good typing offensively with all the Sunny Day options available, and if you take a detour for the Solarbeam TM Entei can have perfect coverage under the Sun. The next two Major battles of Venus and Ein are stomped hard by Entei abusing Sun and Solarbeam, and the two major battles he misses would have been unfavorable anyway (Ludicolo spam and EQ spam). He comes at Level 40 to ensure he keeps pace with your team fairly well, and compared to the other two dogs he's closer to early-mid than mid-late game in arrival. Is it the Time Flute? Lower PP for his best offense? Or something else?

This isn't so much a nomination so much as an inquiry into what flaws hold him down.
 
I'd take out the stuff about Flamethrower, 'potentially' being the second shadow Pokemon and being outclassed by Entei in Quilava's writeup because they're fairly irrelevant especially for in game. The starting moveset also doesn't need to be there, just give a general idea of how its moveset will be throughout the game -- the only reason to list it like that is if it's something terrible you're stuck with for ages, which isn't particularly true.
I understand your points Kurona, but throughout the thread we've discussed that Colosseum and XD are different from the mainline games due to the Shadow Pokemon mechanics and the games being primarily doubles based which leads to a different analysis and the need to point out certain things. In the mainline games, all Pokemon caught or gifted come with their level up moves, unless stated otherwise or in extremely rare exceptions. Colosseum does have a few Pokemon when purified, come with TM moves or Egg Moves, even more so in XD where pretty much every Shadow Pokemon caught in that game come with at least one egg move and one TM move.

With the shadow mechanics, unless you use the Time Flute, you get these moves one at a time so at least I think its worth noting the movepool, at least for the early game shadows since you can't purify any of them until you reach Agate Village, which takes a few hours to do. I can take out flamethrower tho.

For adding "potentially", I'm keeping it there because its true. You have a choice between Quilava, Bayleef, and Croconaw. If you choose any of the following at the beginning, you cannot obtain them until the Postgame. This is a major reason why Croconaw is in S tier, because its the best of the starters you get to choose from, even though in the end you will obtain all three of them. This also led to us who discussed the tiers eariler in the thread that it's okay to rank Pokemon in certain tiers due to being better or being outclassed by other choices. In the mainline games, the only Pokemon you are required to see and obtain is your starter, (and in XY/SM the box legend) while all other Pokemon are encountered by choice. In the Gamecube games, you will always come across these Pokemon, 100% of the time. In a theoretical playthrough if you were trying to make the strongest team possible there's not much of a reason to choose Quilava due to Croconaw being the better starter in most situations and the fact that you will encounter Entei sometime after.

Availability: It's your trusty starter Pokemon, at level 25.
Overview: There are many reasons why its unanimously agreed upon all Colosseum players that Espeon is the best Pokemon in the game. With a massive base 130 special attack and quick 110 base speed it has no issues OHKOing a lot of the standard mooks seen throughout the game (it helps that the majority of the game is also filled with NFEs). With it being Psychic as well as Gen 3, it still is a pretty strong offensive typing due to dark types and steel types still being fairly uncommon throughout the game. Espeon even has Syncronize as an ability, which comes in handy more often than one thinks, due to the AI's tendency to try and status it. Espeon's support movepool is pretty well varied varied, being able to use Reflect, Light Screen, and Helping hand to help out its teammate during the very few moments that Espeon struggles.
But not everything is sunshines and rainbows for the purple cat-thing. Espeon's offensive movepool is very shallow on the special side, and sadly missing out on Bite due to not coming with the move unlike Umbreon, but in most cases, its psychic moves are really the only moves it needs for offense, heavily damaging even Pokemon that resist it, unless they have good special bulk on their side. Espeon is also pretty frail on the physical side which can lead it to being OHKO'd itself in a good amount of situations, but Reflect mostly patches that up. Due to its very high strengths, Espeon will always have a place in major battles and on the team in general.
Additional Notes: The AI seems to love double targeting Espeon, which is something noticed when playing through the game. One should keep this in mind during certain battles as being KO'd early can lead it to missing out on valuable EXP in the major battles. It's best to pair Espeon with a Pokemon that can handle ghost and dark types easily as they are usually Espeon's biggest worry.


Availability: Also your trusty starter Pokemon, at level 26
Overview: With a fantastic 95/110/130 bulk, Umbreon is one of the bulkiest Pokemon in the game, being able to shrug off any neutral hit, and able to tank even the most powerful of super effective hits. The bulk also comes in handy when trying to capture the Shadows as well as for healing up your back row as it can take a very thorough beating. Umbreon does learn a good variety of status moves such as Confuse Ray, Screech, Snatch, Taunt, and the only Pokemon in the game with Secret Power, which mostly acts like a pseudo Body Slam in Colosseum. Confuse Ray and Taunt are especially notable as many major battles tend to rely on status moves such as Protect, Rain Dance/Sunny Day and Attract/Toxic. In most of Colosseum's situations. 65 base speed is quicker than one would think due to a lot of Pokemon in the game being slower, as well as the random speed EV's one will get throughout the game. The low offenses also are very useful for capturing Shadow Pokemon but the lack in power is very noticable in major battles where Pokemon are beefier and hit harder and can lead to KO's on your side of the field. Just like Espeon, it comes with Synchronize which Umbreon takes status generally better. 65 base speed may not seem like much, but its quicker than you'd think due to a lot of Pokemon in the game being slower, as well as the random speed EV's one will get throughout the game.
Additional Notes: Opposite to Espeon, the AI tends to avoid double targeting Umbreon unless they can get multiple super effective hits on it. This does let Umbreon last even longer on the field and spread around status debuffs or stack on the damage, but one must take this into consideration when it is on the field as it can lead to an untimely demise of the other teammate.
 
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I understand your points Kurona, but throughout the thread we've discussed that Colosseum and XD are different from the mainline games due to the Shadow Pokemon mechanics and the games being primarily doubles based which leads to a different analysis and the need to point out certain things. In the mainline games, all Pokemon caught or gifted come with their level up moves, unless stated otherwise or in extremely rare exceptions. Colosseum does have a few Pokemon when purified, come with TM moves or Egg Moves, even more so in XD where pretty much every Shadow Pokemon caught in that game come with at least one egg move and one TM move.

With the shadow mechanics, unless you use the Time Flute, you get these moves one at a time so at least I think its worth noting the movepool, at least for the early game shadows since you can't purify any of them until you reach Agate Village, which takes a few hours to do. I can take out flamethrower tho.

For adding "potentially", I'm keeping it there because its true. You have a choice between Quilava, Bayleef, and Croconaw. If you choose any of the following at the beginning, you cannot obtain them until the Postgame. This is a major reason why Croconaw is in S tier, because its the best of the starters you get to choose from, even though in the end you will obtain all three of them. This also led to us who discussed the tiers eariler in the thread that it's okay to rank Pokemon in certain tiers due to being better or being outclassed by other choices. In the mainline games, the only Pokemon you are required to see and obtain is your starter, (and in XY/SM the box legend) while all other Pokemon are encountered by choice. In the Gamecube games, you will always come across these Pokemon, 100% of the time. In a theoretical playthrough if you were trying to make the strongest team possible there's not much of a reason to choose Quilava due to Croconaw being the better starter in most situations and the fact that you will encounter Entei sometime after.

Availability: It's your trusty starter Pokemon, at level 25.
Overview: There are many reasons why its unanimously agreed upon all Colosseum players that Espeon is the best Pokemon in the game. With a massive base 130 special attack and quick 110 base speed it has no issues OHKOing the majority of the game (it helps that the majority of the game is also filled with NFEs). With it being Psychic as well as Gen 3, it still is a pretty strong offensive typing due to Darks and Steels still being fairly uncommon typing's seen ingame. Espeon even has Syncronize as an ability, which comes in handy more often than one thinks, due to the AI's tendency to try and status Espeon.
But not everything is sunshines and rainbows for the purple cat-thing. Espeon's offensive movepool is very shallow on the special side, and sadly missing out on Bite due to not coming with the move unlike Umbreon, its Psychic moves are really the only moves it needs for offense, heavily damaging even Pokemon that resist it, unless they have good special bulk on their side. Espeon is also pretty frail on the physical side which can lead it to being OHKO'd itself in a good amount of situations, but Reflect mostly patches that up. Luckily, Espeon's support movepool is pretty varied, being able to use Reflect, Light screen, and Helping hand to help out its teammate during the very few moments that Espeon struggles. Due to its very high strengths, Espeon will always have a place in major battles and on the team in general.
Additional Notes: The AI seems to love double targeting Espeon, which is something I've noticed in my many many playthroughs of this game. One should keep this in mind during certain battles as being KO'd early can lead it to missing out on valuable EXP in the major battles. It's best to pair Espeon with a Pokemon that can handle ghost and dark types easily as they are usually Espeon's biggest worry.


Availability: Also your trusty starter Pokemon, at level 26
Overview: Umbreon is the much less revered Eeveelution compared to Espeon, to the point where people simply abandon poor ol Blacky to the deepest parts of the box the moment a player gets the Shadow Pokemon they specifically want. Umbreon may not be nearly as appericated as Espeon due to not being an OHKO machine, but this does not mean Umbreon is bad in any way.
With a fantastic 95/110/130 bulk, Umbreon is one of the bulkiest Pokemon in the game, being able to shrug off any neutral hit, and able to tank even the most powerful of super effective hits. The bulk also comes in handy when trying to capture the Shadows as well as for healing up your back row as it can take a very thorough beating. Its 65/60 offenses may not seem like a lot but in most cases its actually "good enough" for most battles. The low offenses also are very useful for capturing Shadow Pokemon as you can safely whittled them down, even if an untimely crit comes along where as Espeon comes in danger of OHKOing them (unless you keep Return around). Just like Espeon, it comes with Synchronize.
Umbreon does good status moves such as Confuse Ray, Screech, Snatch, Taunt, and the only Pokemon in the game with Secret Power, which can act like a pseudo Body Slam in most of Colosseum's situations.
Additional Notes: 65 base speed may not seem like much, but its quicker than you'd think due to a lot of Pokemon in the game being slower, as well as the random speed EV's one will get throughout the game.
If you're going to mention the point about Espeon being a frequent victim of double targeting, then I think it would be fair to mention the exact opposite in Umbreon's case. I've mentioned this before, but the AI seems to avoid targeting Umbreon at all unless there is a bulkier mon to target (unlikely), is the last poke remaining, or has a super effective move (limited to rare bug moves or fighting moves). When coupled with the large bulk that you mentioned, this allows Umbreon to sit on the field for multiple turns and support the team with status moves, field effect moves (Sunny Day / Rain Dance), etc. Yes, it won't be dealing a ton of damage, but with how much support it can offer, it can still provide a lot and the damage output point is mitigated to some extent.
 
If you're going to mention the point about Espeon being a frequent victim of double targeting, then I think it would be fair to mention the exact opposite in Umbreon's case. I've mentioned this before, but the AI seems to avoid targeting Umbreon at all unless there is a bulkier mon to target (unlikely), is the last poke remaining, or has a super effective move (limited to rare bug moves or fighting moves). When coupled with the large bulk that you mentioned, this allows Umbreon to sit on the field for multiple turns and support the team with status moves, field effect moves (Sunny Day / Rain Dance), etc. Yes, it won't be dealing a ton of damage, but with how much support it can offer, it can still provide a lot and the damage output point is mitigated to some extent.
okay, I'll add that.
 

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