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Fidgit (Full Revamp)

Discussion in 'Create-A-Pokémon Project' started by Namso, Sep 30, 2009.

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  1. Namso

    Namso
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    Note: I have really cut down on the sets for Fidgit, because many of them were quite redundant. However, if you feel that I've removed a viable set, please provide good reasoning as to why I should include it, and I will.

    Also, if I need to expand upon anything throughout the analysis, please let me know!


    Gosh, Fidgit was a pain in the ass to write. It's so easy to use, yet so hard to explain, the irony! So happy it's done now though (I think).

    Status: COMPLETE! (ready for upload)
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    [SET]
    name: Entry Hazard Supporter
    move 1: Spikes
    move 2: Toxic Spikes / Stealth Rock
    move 3: Encore
    move 4: Earth Power
    item: Leftovers
    ability: Vital Spirit
    evs: 252 HP / 4 Def / 252 Spe
    nature: Timid

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>Fidgit is one of the most, if not the most, successful dual entry hazard supporter in the CAP metagame. This is because of its excellent defensive typing (which allows it to absorb sleep (via ability), paralyze, and poison status), great overall bulk, and insanely large supporting movepool. Not many Pokemon boast all three different types of entry hazards, which really makes Fidgit a reliable Pokemon for a team in need of any specific type. Not only that, but its characteristics mentioned above give it many opportunities to switch in and spill out entry hazards onto the opponent’s field, making Fidgit a very threatening supporter.</p>

    <p>Since Fidgit’s purpose with this set is to set up two types of entry hazards, its moveset will obviously reflect this. The main selling point with Fidgit is its access to both Spikes and Toxic Spikes, which this set tends to abuse. Spikes is the primary entry hazard to use, because it’s capable of scraping off up to 25% health from the majority of the metagame. As for choosing the second entry hazard, it really depends on your team. Toxic Spikes is useful for Pokemon that have more stall-oriented sets, such as Calm Mind Jirachi, SubRoost Zapdos, or RestTalk Gyarados, since the constant poison damage will aid them in scoring more KOs. However, Stealth Rock is one of the most common moves used in the current metagame and always damages the opposing Pokemon (aside from Magic Guard Clefable), which is always beneficial. Also, with the combination of Stealth Rock and Spikes, your opponent is guaranteed to be affected by either or both of them. Flying-types that try to avoid the grounded hazards will most likely take 25% damage from Stealth Rock, while the Pokemon resistant to Stealth Rock will be scraping 25% of their health from Spikes, assuming there’s a full layer. Even though Spikes is the primary entry hazard to use, it doesn’t mean that you can’t use Toxic Spikes and Stealth Rock instead. If your team already uses a Spikes supporter, then it would be fine to use both of those entry hazards. However, it’s generally recommended to use Spikes and Toxic Spikes, since there already a vast amount of Stealth Rock users in the metagame you can use. Also, because of Fidgit’s excellent typing, stats, and support moves, it has an easier time setting them up, unlike Pokemon like Forretress.</p>

    <p>The third moveslot is open to Encore. With Encore, Fidgit becomes much more threatening as a supporter and helps it achieve many more layers of entry hazards than usual. For example, it can always switch right into Blissey’s Softboiled, Rotom-A’s Thunderbolt, Snorlax’s Curse, or Jirachi’s Calm Mind, and threaten to force them into using that same move for up to 8 turns, buying Fidgit enough time to set up as much hazards as it can. However, this strategy comes at its own cost, because your opponent can just as easily suspect Encore and switch out to a Pokemon to threaten Fidgit, leaving it to accomplish nothing. These aren’t the only moves Fidgit can use though, as it has other viable moves such as Wish, Knock Off, dual screens, Block, and most importantly, Rapid Spin. However, Encore has been proven more useful as it helps Fidgit accomplish its task the most. Finally, the last moveslot is given to Earth Power so it won’t be completely vulnerable to Taunt. Earth Power serves as a reliable STAB attack to use in an emergency, and its chance to drop the opponent’s Special Defense by one stage can always help.</p>

    <p>Fidgit is one of those Pokemon that can be fit into virtually any team and be successful at its job, but there are a variety of team options for Fidgit being used on defensive teams, and Fidgit being used on offensive teams. On defensive teams, Fidgit can definitely benefit from Wish support, due to the fact that it lacks an instant recovery move outside of Rest. By providing it with Wish support, Fidgit can be much more effective at setting up multiple layers of entry hazards, since it now has the support to stick around longer. Vaporeon is a great Wish passer, thanks to its excellent overall bulk. Also, Vaporeon can easily take on Gyarados if it uses Hidden Power Electric, a Pokemon that Fidgit does not want to be up against. Blissey is another excellent Wish passer, as she can easily sponge up special attacks fired at Fidgit thanks to her amazing Special Defense and HP stats. Besides supporting Fidgit with Wish, Fidgit can return the favor by supporting its team as well. With defensive teams commonly being weak to big set up threats, like Suicune or Jirachi, Fidgit can easily stop them right into their tracks by Encoring their Calm Mind, making them vulnerable to a Pokemon that can defeat them. On offensive teams, Fidgit’s ability to set up multiple entry hazards will aid its sweepers to potentially turn their 2HKOs into OHKOs. Not to mention that it can spin away entry hazards and absorb Toxic Spikes, making Pokemon like Gyarados and Infernape last longer. Also, its typing and ability allow Fidgit to be immune to sleep, poison, and paralysis statuses, which sweepers will hate to be affected by.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Rapid Spin Supporter
    move 1: Rapid Spin
    move 2: Encore
    move 3: Shadow Ball
    move 4: Earth Power
    item: Leftovers
    ability: Vital Spirit
    evs: 236 HP / 56 SpA / 216 Spe
    nature: Timid

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>Fidgit is basically one of the best, if not the best, Rapid Spinner in the entire metagame. It has all of the necessities that support this statement; excellent defensive typing that packs numerous amounts of resistances and immunities, great overall bulk, and an insanely large supportive movepool. Also, Fidgit serves as a great check to some of the most threatening sweepers in OU, such as Calm Mind Suicune, Swords Dance Lucario, and Substitute + Focus Punch Breloom, by using an extremely helpful move in Encore, something that other Rapid Spinners will never boast.</p>

    <p>This set is dedicated to successfully removing entry hazards upon your field, so the moveset reflects this to a great extent. Encore is perhaps the crux of this set and what differentiates Fidgit from the rest of the Rapid Spinners. With Fidgit, like mentioned above, packing an excellent typing, it can switch into a vast amount of moves that can be Encored. For instance, Blissey will be caught using Thunder Wave, Jirachi will be stuck to use Calm Mind, and Skarmory will be have to use Spikes, meaning Fidgit has the perfect opportunity to remove any entry hazards for free with Rapid Spin. Since Ghost-types are the only Pokemon that are immune to Rapid Spin, Shadow Ball serves as an excellent check to these threats as they no longer hold the ability to completely wall Fidgit. Lastly, Earth Power is an excellent STAB attack to use when needed, and also has the handy chance at lowering the opposing Pokemon’s Special Defense by one stage. However, Earth Power is definitely not necessary on this set, as Fidgit can run any other support move in that slot, such as Spikes or Wish.</p>

    <p>When using this set, there’s a pretty helpful tip to keep in mind that will almost always guarantee Fidgit to remove all entry hazards your opponent has set up. When Rotom-A (the most common spin blocker) is out on the field, this is when the process begins. By using Pokemon that can lure in Rotom-A’s Electric-type attacks, Fidgit can safely switch right into them and use Encore. Once that has been accomplished, start to repeatedly use Rapid Spin. Rotom-A will most likely switch out because it doesn’t want to be stuck into using Electric-type moves that Fidgit laughs at, which means Fidgit will be spinning away the hazards for sure.</p>

    <p>Fidgit uses a different EV spread than the common max HP and Speed with this set; the only similarity being the high HP investment to provide as much overall bulk as possible. With 58 Special Attack, Fidgit is guaranteed to 3HKO the standard 252 HP minimum Special Defense Rotom-A with Shadow Ball, while the remaining 216 EVs are dumped into Speed so Fidgit can still act as one of the fastest supporters, outpacing all positive base 100s. However, this is not to say Fidgit is incapable of using a bulkier spread. By using an EV spread of 252 HP / 120 Def / 136 Spe with a Bold nature, Fidgit becomes considerably bulkier on the physical side, and still retains enough Speed to outpace Adamant Lucario. It really comes down to personal preference for the selection of Fidgit’s EV spread, either one with that outpaces more threats and cripple them with Encore, or one that takes a defensive approach to take hits more reliably.</p>

    <p>There are several team options to use in conjunction with Rapid Spin Supporter Fidgit. Even though it may be built to deal with Ghost-types with Shadow Ball, that doesn’t mean Pursuiters should be overlooked. Tyranitar is the perfect example of a strong Pursuit user that completely penetrates Rotom-A and some variations of Gengar; and with its excellent Special Defense, it doesn’t really have a hard time switching into them either. As a bonus, Tyranitar's Sandstream ability ensures a 3HKO for Fidgit with Shadow Ball against max HP Rotom-A without 60 Special Attack EVs. Since Fidgit doesn’t have much room to use Wish to heal itself, it can definitely use other Pokemon that can support it with Wish. Blissey is a common Pokemon that uses Wish extremely well, thanks to her insane Special Defense and HP, which gives her many opportunities to set up and heal its teammates. Offensively, using Pokemon that benefit from entry hazard removal is definitely not a bad idea either, since Fidgit almost always removes them. Examples of these include Salamence, Gyarados and Infernape. Salamence really enjoys it when it won’t scrape off 25% of its health from Stealth Rock, making Salamence have an easier time to gather Dragon Dance boosts and sweep. Same goes for Gyarados, it will no longer have to worry about taking 25% damage upon switching in. Also, Gyarados and Fidgit have great synergy with each other; Fidgit absorbing Electric- and Rock-type attacks aimed at Gyarados, while Gyarados gains a free switch-in against Ground- and Water-type moves fired at Figit. On the other hand, Infernape gladly appreciates the disposal of Toxic Spikes and Spikes, since it no longer has to worry about taking repeated damage that hinder its chances to stay on the battlefield and switch in.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Field-Effect Supporter
    move 1: Trick Room / Gravity
    move 2: U-turn
    move 3: Wish
    move 4: Earth Power
    item: Leftovers
    ability: Persistant
    evs: 252 HP / 4 Def / 252 Spe
    nature: Timid

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>Fidgit has several qualities that make it a fantastic candidate for setting up the field-effecting moves it has access to. It also has a unique ability, Persistant, which increases the duration of field-effecting moves by two turns, solid defensive typing and stats, and a massive support movepool.</p>

    <p>Fidgit’s moveset is dedicated to setting up one of the field-effecting moves and supporting the team at the same time. Trick Room and Gravity are the two most competitively viable field-effecting moves, since they can be extremely threatening if used correctly. Also, Fidgit’s ability increases the duration of those moves, making them last for seven turns, rather than five. U-turn is an excellent scouting move, especially once you used Trick Room or Gravity, since you can potentially scout the opponent’s switch-in if they attempt to counter the respective field-effecting move. It’s not always easy for the sweepers that take advantage of Trick Room or Gravity to switch in, as they can be hit for big damage, making it harder for them to sweep. However, this problem can easily be remedied with the use of Wish. Since it takes two turns for it to take effect, Fidgit can set it up, use U-turn, and heal up the switch-in for 50%, leaving it with a high amount of health left to sweep. Lastly, Earth Power serves as a means of a reliable offensive STAB attack, so it won’t become vulnerable to Taunt. Trick Room and Gravity aren’t the only field-effecting moves Fidgit can use though, since there is the uncommonly seen Tailwind. Even though it may not be as viable as the others (considering how short it is, only lasting for 3 turns without the help of Persistant), it may still be used if you feel the need to try something new.</p>

    <p>If you opt to use Trick Room, you may think that it’s counter-productive to invest in maximum Speed, since it will be moving last most of the time. However, there is one huge benefit from moving after the opponent; the fact that Fidgit can use U-turn after the opponent moves means that the sweeper that will be abusing Trick Room will be unscarred, allowing it to wreak havoc with a great amount of health. But with that being said, there’s definitely no harm in using a bulkier EV spread to give Fidgit more survivability so it can set up more often.</p>

    <p>Depending on which field-effect move you use, there are different team options to go with each of them. For Trick Room, it’s obvious to use Pokemon that are extremely slow so that they are guaranteed to move first. There are many Pokemon you can abuse Trick Room with, however, some of the most common and viable ones are Snorlax, Slowbro, Marowak, and Tyranitar. Snorlax is one of the slowest Pokemon in the whole game, reaching a pathetic Speed stat of 86, which means that it will probably always be the one moving first under Trick Room; Slowbro is capable of using a threatening sweeping set with Calm Mind and Slack Off, and is the slowest Pokemon that has a great base Special Attack stat of 100; Marowak holds the title as the strongest physical attacker, hitting a massive Attack stat of 568 with Thick Club, and it also has Swords Dance to make it Attack even more insane; lastly, Tyranitar is a fantastic mixed sweeper, being able to rip through stall with its huge offensive movepool. Gravity is an interesting field-affect move, since you can use it either offensively, or defensively. By playing Gravity offensively, using Pokemon that have access to moves like Hydro Pump, Thunder, Blizzard, and Fire Blast are worth considering. Starmie is a good example of a Pokemon that has high powered low accuracy moves, and can be a huge offensive threat with Life Orb. Rotom-F and Rotom-W can abuse 100% accurate STAB Thunder attacks, and the former can whip up Blizzard, while the latter can soak opponents with Hydro Pump. As for using Gravity with a defensive bias, setting up Toxic Spikes and Spikes is definitely worth it. The reason for this is because Gravity disables Flying-types and Levitators from being immune to grounded hazards, meaning Pokemon like Zapdos and Flygon will be poisoned from Toxic Spikes and will take up to 25% damage from Spikes. Roserade and Skarmory are two great examples of setting up Toxic Spikes and Spikes, respectively. Roserade’s high Speed and access to Sleep Powder almost always guarantees it to set up a full layer of Toxic Spikes (not with Spikes do to illegality with Sleep Powder), while Skarmory’s fantastic Defense gives it many opportunities to throw out several layers of Spikes. Skarmory also has access to Whirlwind, meaning it can repeatedly use it to keep scraping off 25% (aside from Magic Guard Clefable) health from every Pokemon on the opponent’s team (assuming Gravity is in play and if there’s a full layer of Spikes on the opponent’s field).</p>

    [SET]
    name: Dual Screen Supporter
    move 1: Reflect
    move 2: Light Screen
    move 3: Wish / Taunt / Encore
    move 4: U-turn / Earth Power
    item: Light Clay / Leftovers
    ability: Vital Spirit
    evs: 252 HP / 4 Def / 252 Spe
    nature: Jolly / Timid

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>As a dual screener, Fidgit has all the essentials to become a successful one. Its amazing defensive typing gives it many opportunities to switch in and set up, not to mention its solid stat spread. Its gigantic support movepool also comes into play, since it has many options it can use to aid its teammates and itself. This also differentiates Fidgit from other common dual screeners like Bronzong and Jirachi, they just don’t have the wide era of support moves that Fidgit boasts.</p>

    <p>Reflect and Light Screen are of course mandatory on this set, as Fidgit is being used to set both of them up. They also provide Fidgit with massive overall bulk, making it one heavy tank to take down. The third moveslot is where Fidgit can basically use any support move in its movepool, literally. However, Wish, Taunt, and Encore are the ones that stand out the most, as they are basically the most helpful. With Wish, Fidgit can reliably heal itself and its teammates, and it works fantastically in conjunction with dual screens because with the defensive support they provide, Fidgit doesn’t have to worry about the fact that Wish takes two turns to activate. When someone is up against a dual screener, they tend to react to it by sending in a Pokemon that use moves to gain the advantage in the situation, such as using stat boosters, pHazers, or Substituters. With that being said, Fidgit can eliminate this risk by using Taunt, disabling the opposing Pokemon from using these type of moves. Finally, Encore can be used to give Fidgit many opportunities to set up Reflect and Light Screen, since it can easily switch into Pokemon that aren’t using damaging moves, like Blissey’s Thunder Wave for example. This allows it to force a switch, giving Fidgit the perfect time to set up the screen of your choice. To keep Fidgit away from being vulnerable to Taunt, the last moveslot is open to an offensive move; U-turn or Earth Power. U-turn is recommended as it gives Fidgit the ability to scout the opponent’s switch-ins and deal a bit of damage upon switching out at the same time, while Earth Power is an excellent STAB attack to use when needed.</p>

    <p>Light Clay is the superior item for Fidgit, since it provides an extra three turns to both Light Screen and Reflect, which can be crucial for winning the battle. However, if you feel that Fidgit needs extra survivability, Leftovers is still a great choice. As for the nature, it really depends on what move you use in the last moveslot. U-turn works well in tandem with Jolly, because it doesn't lower Fidgit's Attack like Timid does, while Timid is the better way to go when using Earth Power.</p>

    <p>Teaming up Fidgit with Pokemon that can abuse the dual screens is definitely recommended, as they can make sweepers much more threatening. Pokemon like Jirachi, Gyarados, and Salamence can use the dual screens to their advantage by using stat boosting moves with relative ease. Jirachi can set up an extremely sturdy Substitute, allowing it to set up Calm Mind much more efficiently, while Gyarados and Salamence can gather multiple Dragon Dance boosts, enough for them to rip unprepared teams to shreds. Besides using Pokemon that stat boost and sweep, using Baton Passing Pokemon is also a great way to abuse Reflect and Light Screen. For instance, Gliscor with the standard Rock Polish / Swords Dance / Taunt / Baton Pass set will be very hard to take down, buying it enough time to set up multiple Speed and Attack boosts. It can then pass them onto a sweeper, like Metagross, with a couple of turns of dual screens left for the sweeper to abuse.</p>

    [Team Options]

    <p>Fidgit can generally be used on a vast amount of teams, ranging from stall teams to teams that take a more offensive bias. With that being said, its team options can be divided into two categories; defense, and offense.</p>

    <p>Fidgit plays a relatively big role on defensive teams, mostly because of its ability to counter common stall threats like Substitute + Calm Mind Jirachi and Swords Dance Lucario. With Fidgit commonly having entry hazards in its moveset, it’s definitely a good idea to have Pokemon with pHazing moves, like Skarmory, Swampert, or Celebi. Skarmory boasts a pretty high Defense stat, can set up Spikes if Fidgit isn’t already using it, and can spam Whirlwind to force the opponent to take constant entry hazard damage. Swampert works the same way, except it uses Stealth Rock and Roar instead. Celebi takes a slightly different approach, using Perish Song to force switches. It can also take on many versions of Gyarados, which Fidgit definitely hates being up against. Using Pokemon that can lure in things that Fidgit can handle is also a reasonable addition. For example, Blissey can lure in Calm Mind Suicune or Toxic Stall Zapdos, allowing Fidgit to switch right into their Calm Mind or Toxic respectively, Encore, and force a switch, giving Fidgit the perfect opportunity to spill out more entry hazards or Rapid Spin. Speaking of Rapid Spin, Fidgit is an extremely viable entry hazard remover (absorbing Toxic Spikes), because it has so many opportunities to do so with its solid typing and stat distribution. With that being said, its teammates will have an easier time to stall, especially when using Pokemon like Blissey and Celebi, since they will no longer fear Toxic Spikes draining their health every turn.</p>

    <p>Offensively, Fidgit normally doesn’t receive any support from its teammates, but its teammates enjoy the support Fidgit provides for them instead. Sweepers that enjoy Fidgit’s set up entry hazards are recommended, since the entry hazards can potentially turn 2HKOs into solid OHKOs. Gyarados is an excellent example of this. It’s one of the best Pokemon to pair Fidgit with, as they basically provide great synergy with each other. Gyarados hates being hit by Electric- and Rock-type moves, but Fidgit can switch into them with impunity and force a switch with Encore, while Gyarados can gain a free switch-in from Water- and Ground-type attacks fired at Fidgit. Sweepers often find themselves being faced with a defensive wall that pack moves that may cripple the sweeper, such as Thunder Wave or Toxic. Fidgit can thankfully switch into these type of Pokemon, like Blissey or Cresselia, and use Encore to make them keep using that same move; in the end, forcing them switch out. This is very beneficial for your sweepers, since they won’t necessarily have to worry about these type of threats, and Fidgit benefits from it to since it has a free turn to set up whatever it needs to. Instead of having entry hazards set up on the field, Fidgit's ability to reliably remove of entry hazards will be very beneficial towards your sweepers as well, like Salamence and Gyarados. Also, with Fidgit not really receiving much support on offensive teams, it does receive one: Pursuit. Pursuit users like Tyranitar can easily demolish Ghost-types that like to switch in to absorb Earth Power and Rapid Spin, particularly Rotom-A. This makes Fidgit's job as a supporter much easier, as it doesn't have to worry about being walled any longer.</p>

    [Other Options]

    <p>Fidgit is commonly seen to be using some sort of support set, since Fidgit’s role is dedicated to supporting its team and itself. However, this does not mean Fidgit can’t be used offensively, because it can potentially surprise its opponents by hitting reasonably hard with a Choice Specs set. Even though it may not have the best offensive movepool out there, it does have moves such as Earth Power, Energy Ball, Sludge Bomb, and the obvious Hidden Power to use. However, this should always be looked away from, since there are much better Pokemon that can do this job much more effectively than Fidgit.</p>

    <p>As for the supporting side, Fidgit still has a wide array of moves it can use. Knock Off can be proven useful in knocking off the opponent’s held item, such as Tyranitar’s Choice Band or Blissey’s Leftovers, which both of them would hate to happen. Safeguard is a decent supporting option for the team, but Fidgit won’t find it very beneficial for itself, due to the fact that it’s already immune to paralysis, poison, and sleep (assuming it has Vital Spirit). Fidgit can make great use of Whirlwind too, being able to mess around with the opponent’s team, forcing them to take repeated entry hazard assaults. Lastly, a RestTalk Fidgit with Spikes and Toxic Spikes is a possibility, however, it’s severe Taunt bait, so it would be better to use an offensive attack instead of one of the entry hazards.</p>

    <p>Rain Dance and Sunny Day are definitely viable options Fidgit can run on the Field Affect Supporter set. Since Fidgit packs a multitude of support options, a fantastic typing, and a great stat spread, many rain and sun sweepers will definitely enjoy having Fidgit’s supporting capabilities to aid them in their sweep. Sadly, Persistant doesn’t increase the duration of Rain Dance or Sunny Day, meaning Fidgit will have to use Damp Rock or Heat Rock to set up 8 turns of rain or sun.</p>

    <p>Torment is a pretty interesting move Fidgit can abuse. Since it stops the opponent from selecting the same move twice, it can easily force the opposing Pokemon to switch out if they have been Encored. Not only that, but since Fidgit packs a solid defensive typing with a great amount of resistances and immunities, it can have a much easier time setting up entry hazards, since the opponent may not have access to two moves that hit Fidgit super effectively in their moveset. As a bonus, it can easily force switches from Choiced users, since they are no longer capable of attacking twice.</p>

    <p>Block is quite beneficial in tandem with Fidgit’s entry hazard moves, since Fidgit can potentially trap a Pokemon that doesn’t harm it in any way and start to set up full layers of entry hazards. Not only can it trap the opposing Pokemon, but Fidgit can also trap them into using one move with Encore, meaning they won't be able to switch out nor alternate between moves. This gives Fidgit a great opportunity to set up multiple entry hazards with relative ease.</p>

    [EVs]

    <p>Fidgit’s standard EV spread uses 252 HP / 4 Def / 252 Spe, because this is one of the most efficient EV spreads Fidgit can hope for. Since it boasts such a great Speed stat, it’s often recommended to make Fidgit as fast as possible, as it’s capable of setting up entry hazards faster and can even Encore Pokemon like Jirachi’s Thunder Wave.</p>

    <p>Besides using max Speed, Fidgit has a plentiful amount of Speed areas to hit. With 136 Speed EVs, Fidgit reaches just enough Speed to outrun Adamant Lucario and Timid Heatran, while 244 Speed EVs allows Fidgit to outrun Jolly Lucario. Lastly, a Speed EV of 212 guarantees Fidgit to outpace Timid Rotom-A and Jolly Heracross.</p>

    <p>However, Fidgit does not always have to use Speed investment in its sets. It can easily be used as a very sturdy supporter Pokemon that can be difficult to take down. Although, running Speed investment is generally the better way to go, since Fidgit can stop more Pokemon from setting up with Encore and set up entry hazards more reliably.</p>

    [Cap Metagame]

    <p>Fidgit’s supporting capabilities, typing, and stat spread can sometimes become quite threatening against most of the CAP Pokemon. Revenankh, Pyroak, Arghonaut, Kitsunoh, and Cyclohm are examples of CAP Pokemon that generally dislike being put up against Fidgit. With Revenankh’s common movesets containing Rest and Bulk Up, it easily falls in the trap of Encore, forcing it to remove all of its gathered boosts. Pyroak is commonly seen as a Leech Seeder, meaning Fidgit can once again Encore it and proceed to set up entry hazards. Arghonaut works the same way as Revenankh, because most of the time, Arghonaut is using Bulk Up, Rest, Recover, or any of its Fighting-type moves. With that being said, it also hates being Encored into using one of the said moves, buying Fidgit time to set up more hazards. Kitsunoh generally doesn’t carry any supportive moves, however, Fidgit’s great defensive bulk and STAB Earth Power usually threatens Kitsunoh, and will most likely force it to switch out. Lastly, Fidgit can fearlessly switch into Cyclohm's Thunderbolt or Slack Off, and can either use Encore to set up more hazards, or hit it for heavy damage right away with Earth Power.</p>

    <p>Stratagem and Syclant are the two CAPs Fidgit absolutely hates being put up against, mainly because Fidgit can’t do anything against them with Earth Power. Stratagem can easily threaten a KO with Earth Power, while Syclant can penetrate Fidgit with STAB Ice Beam. Also, with their Speed considerably higher, they don’t have to fear Fidgit switching into their Calm Mind or Tail Glow respectively, because they will attack before Fidgit has a chance to use Encore. As funny as it may seem, Fidgit against Fidgit is a pretty interesting pair up. They can either hope to take out one another with Earth Power because of their Speed tie, each of them absorb Toxic Spikes, each of them can use Rapid Spin instead of Earth Power, and each of them can just set up against each other. Usually, the one with better luck tends to come out victorious.</p>

    <p>Fidgit is a fantastic Pokemon in the OU metagame, mainly because of its unique characteristics. There are many Pokemon that abuse stat boosting moves, status, and Substitute, meaning Fidgit can easily use Encore and trap them into using that move again for up to 8 turns (assuming Fidgit outpaces). For example, Breloom’s Substitute, Celebi’s Thunder Wave, and Electivire’s ThunderPunch can all be Encored, giving Fidgit the perfect opportunity to start setting up entry hazards or use Rapid Spin to get rid of entry hazards. Speaking of Rapid Spin, Fidgit is one of the few Pokemon that can put the hurt in Ghost-types that tend to try and absorb Rapid Spin by using Shadow Ball, which makes the opponent think twice before switching in.</p>

    [Opinion]

    <p>Fidgit is a very unique Pokemon to use, mainly because of its massive amount of support moves, meaning it can run basically any set it wants to. Backed up by its great Speed, overall bulk, typing, and abilities, Fidgit can potentially become an extreme nuisance towards the opponent. One of the great things about Fidgit is that it's movesets can be tailored to your team's liking. For example, you can use Wish and an entry hazard move on the first set if your team needs it, or can just use whichever you feel your team needs the most. Furthermore, its numerous resistances and immunities allow it to switch in to moves like status effects with relative ease; giving Fidgit several opportunities to switch in and set up whatever it needs to in the situation it's in.</p>

    <p>However, the biggest difficulty with Fidgit is what set it should run. Like mentioned above, Fidgit can use any set it wants to, but there are endless possibilities for Fidgit to use, which can be a problem. The reason it’s a problem is because Fidgit suffers from the fact that the maximum amount of moves in a set is four; there’s so much Fidgit should use, but there’s just not enough room.</p>

    [Counters]

    <p>With Fidgit being made to support, it doesn’t really have many specific answers; however, it does have a few general counters.</p>

    <p>Taunt is a big issue for Fidgit to be put up against, mainly because it will likely shut down 3/4 of Fidgit’s moveset, making it close to useless in that situation. Gyarados is probably the best example of a Taunter that makes Fidgit complete set-up bait, allowing Gyarados to gather Dragon Dance boosts for free.</p>

    <p>The ever so common Trick cripples Fidgit’s effectiveness greatly. Now it will have to keep switching out after it’s done setting up, which leaves it as perfect set-up bait for Pokemon like Salamence and Lucario. Rotom-A is one of the most common Trick abusers, and it can trick Fidgit into thinking it will use Thunderbolt, only to leave it holding a Choiced item.</p>

    <p>Since Fidgit lacks a reliable healing move outside of Wish, it’s good to note that it’s possible to take advantage of this issue. Fidgit can’t always switch into Lucario’s Close Combat or Rotom-A’s Shadow Ball for example, because soon enough, it will eventually fall under a KO. Aside from that, packing Pokemon that can instantly threaten Fidgit is worth noting as well, particularly Rapid Spin Starmie. It can either force Fidgit to switch out, allowing it to remove any entry hazards Fidgit has set up, or nail it with a very powerful Hydro Pump.</p>
  2. TEA_DEMON

    TEA_DEMON

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    For the DS set, wouldn't Light Clay be a better option?
  3. TekkenStorm

    TekkenStorm

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    Also for the DS set, shouldn't Jolly be the main Nature? Timid would lower U-turn's power, which is putted above Earth Power in the set.
  4. Umbreon Dan

    Umbreon Dan 〉λ=
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    Shadow Ball isn't an option on the first set. Encore shouldn't even be slashed. It's too useful. Also, I wouldn't say "Stealth Rock is mandatory on Fidgit" as I feel using Fidgit to stealth rock is a waste of talent. There are a gajillion other SRers, put it somewhere else on your team.

    I believe the dedicated Rapid Spinner deserves a set. It's the only set that will ever use Shadow Ball, and sometimes runs some SpA (60 EVs guarantees a 3HKO on max hp/min sdef Rotom-a, counting SR + Leftovers).

    Also, 252 / 252 Timid is terribly outdated. Most players run bold 252 hp / 120 def / 136 speed, maximizing physical bulk while still outrunning adamant lucario.
  5. Flamestrike

    Flamestrike

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    Second paragraph of the entry hazards supporter set, added by
    Third paragraph of the same set, should take the of out
    Same paragraph (right after the last one in fact), should just be healthier
    Still same paragraph, get rid of the apostrophe
    Last paragraph for that set, not sure what you meant here
    Same paragraph, forgot the s
    First paragraph of the dual screen set, get rid of the apostrophe
    Third paragraph of the team options, that apostrophe shouldn't be there
    That's all I found, also I agree that Jolly Nature should at least be mentioned for the dual screen set. Good job, as always
  6. Plus

    Plus been cookin with the sauce
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    Professor of B101

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    I'm kinda agreeing on UD here concerning Stealth Rock; Spikes and Toxic Spikes are Fidgit's main selling points. Stealth Rock is definitely an option if you can't stick it in there, but I really don't see how it is more viable than Spikes on Fidgit of all pokemon.

    I'd like you to beef up the Opinions section as well, mentioning that although there are four slots in a set, the sets shown above can be specifically tailored to a team's liking. For example, on the first set, you are able to stick both Wish and an entry hazard on that set, yet slashing it isn't necessary.

    Another thing you could probably discuss is the way Fidgit uses its numerous resistances and immunities to status to switch in and set up whatever it needs to easily.
  7. Namso

    Namso
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    Ok, this is what I'm going to do:

    1) Start up discussions/gather opinions about which standard EV spread Fidgit should be using.

    2) Write up a dedicated Rapid Spinner set.

    3) Fix the Entry Hazard Supporter by making Spikes the mandatory option, and Stealth Rock slashed in with Toxic Spikes.

    4) Expand upon the Opinion section.

    Thanks for the quick comments guys.
  8. zarator

    zarator Credits to Mos-Quitoxe for the cute sprite^^
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    I hope I didn't miss anything. Also, why you use "era" where "array" would be more appropriated?
  9. Namso

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    Fantastic, thank you zarator.

    I finished fixing the dual screen set to, and I'm now going to work on the Entry Hazard Support set.

    Everything is done.
  10. Umbreon Dan

    Umbreon Dan 〉λ=
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    196 speed? eww. 324 speed doesn't outrun anything notable. (luvdisc?) 216 outruns the entire base 100 group. aim for that imo. Take from HP, it's only 20 evs. also, it's 58, not 60

    you can't do that rofl

    earth power isn't wholly necessary on this set (though it helps a ton against lucario). i would mention that you could use any support move like spikes here

    this set uses 232 HP

    if you're going for bulk, don't use satk. 252 / 120 / 136 bold outruns adamant lucario. that said, i actually wouldn't recommend lower than 216 speed EVs on this particular set if you're going bold, because that outruns all non-scarfed rotom-a (as well as adamant salamence). 252 / 40 / 216.

    mention that with sand stream support, Fidgit doesn't need the 60 satk evs to 3hko rotom-a.

    no gyarados mention, our favourite electric lure?

    this is all from the rapid spin set. looks good overall. you could definitely stress the 252 / 120 / 136 bold spread a little more throughout the whole thing. also, fidgit should never run 212 speed, because that ties with the base 100s. wherever you mentioned 212, change it to 216.
  11. HD

    HD

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    Good job Fuzz. And I'll try to tell people to stop poking your nipples.
  12. Namso

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    Awesome, thanks a bunch HD. Thanks for your hilarious comment to.

    Locking, because this is ready for upload!
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