(Little) Things that annoy you in Pokémon

Everyone keeps jumping through hoops to justify it but at the end of the day I think they just wanted a new basculin that could evolve with a gender gimmick to emphasize salmon behaviors (though the male basculegion really needed an exaggerated hump)
 

qtrx

cadaeic
is a Battle Simulator Moderator Alumnus
An incredibly minor complaint: the internal ordering of Natures indicate that each of the five neutral natures are meant to be seen as increasing and decreasing the same stat:

Hardy (+Atk, -Atk)
Docile (+Def, -Def)
Serious (+Spe, -Spe)
Bashful (+SpA, -SpA)
Quirky (+SpD, -SpD)

However it bugs me a bit that Serious and Bashful seem like they should be swapped, considering the respective themes in other Spe (e.g. Timid, Naive) and SpA (e.g. Mild, Quiet) boosting natures.
 
I dislike how customization works in-game. The problem that I have with buying clothes and accessories is that they cost money, which means that you have less money for actually useful things like potions and tm's. I think there should be a different currency just for clothes, so that it doesn't interfere with the balancing of money.
 
I dislike how customization works in-game. The problem that I have with buying clothes and accessories is that they cost money, which means that you have less money for actually useful things like potions and tm's. I think there should be a different currency just for clothes, so that it doesn't interfere with the balancing of money.
Recent games are extremely generous with money, which i assume is the devs' way of giving you money for clothes.
 
Yeah, the economy of these games is it's own whole mess. Healing items are cheap relative to the money you get even in early games, because you're supposed to spend healing items to get through dungeons/caves. But people don't use those items for various reasons, so you end up with a lot of money in the hands of the players.
This means that anything that's supposed to be a real power spike, like TMs, need to be stupidly expensive so that players can't just buy all. But then anything else that's supposed to be "purchasable but limited" needs similar pricing, or else you run into issues. And if players are going to be buying both clothes and TMs, then the devs need to give them even more money, which means that someone who ignores customization breaks the game further, while someone who really wants a specific outfit literally can't afford anything else.
 

Yung Dramps

awesome gaming
>There is an entire side location that is an interactive riff on Hollywood and shows films being made in the Pokemon world
>There is also a major character, a champion no less who's a famous movie star
>These two entities are not in the same game

This may sound like me bitching about Kalos again, but honestly nah I'm mostly gonna blame BW2 here. I truly believe Diantha should've debuted in that game as a thematically relevant next-gen teaser. They could've even kept her Gardevoir!
 
>There is an entire side location that is an interactive riff on Hollywood and shows films being made in the Pokemon world
>There is also a major character, a champion no less who's a famous movie star
>These two entities are not in the same game

This may sound like me bitching about Kalos again, but honestly nah I'm mostly gonna blame BW2 here. I truly believe Diantha should've debuted in that game as a thematically relevant next-gen teaser. They could've even kept her Gardevoir!
Gen 5 was also the gen where a Frontier Brain from the previous gen became an Elite 4 member (despite no obvious connection between the two regions), so it wouldn't be too out of place for a character in Gen 5 to become the champion of Gen 6.
 

Samtendo09

Ability: Light Power
is a Pre-Contributor

My favorite follow up was noting that for a franchise based on bug catching and fighting, they sure don't respect them.
I don’t see why would Fairy resists Bug to begin with, and even with actual reasons, Bug is having an already bad offensive match-up.

Doesn’t help that Fairy went from “looking busted but ultimately just great” to being cracked for all the wrong reasons.
 
Things that been on my mind with type that resist Fairy is that the reason why Fire type resist Fairy.

It's only because they don't want hecking Mega Charizard X and Blaziken to not weak to Fairy. I have no other reasonable answer.
Fairy is kind of a "nature energy" and trickery type, and fire is known for just... indiscriminately going through nature. Fire isn't really going to care if you're pretending to be nice when you're actually devious, it's going to keep burning anyway.
 
I believe Fire is a traditional repellant of fairies, alongside cold iron, hence their weakness to Steel. Poison being a weakness could be a reference to nature spirits being weakened by pollution and environmental destruction. Coincidental, Fire, Steel, and Poison are all elements closely related to European Dragons (Fire-Breathing, Poisonous fumes and blood, Scales and Claws sharper than Steel), so Western Dragons aren't totally helpless against fairies. Just don't ask why Fairies have a vendetta against Asian Dragons, especially since most Asiatic Dragons are nature spirits themselves.
 
So after using Ducklett a while ago on Pokemon White, I've started to really take to this Pokemon. It's cuter than I first gave it credit for, learns several uncommon or unconventional moves, has a surprisingly nice shiny, and while Swanna isn't a top-tier mon by any means it's certainly competent enough to get by. It's one of those mons Dexit makes you appreciate more for having lost them, though it's pretty common in Pokemon Go where I live at the moment.

That said - I really wish they'd gone all in on the ugly ducking motif. It's clearly an intentional part of the design, but Ducklett isn't an ugly duckling. It's just a duckling. Swanna's nice and all, but it's not hyped up as a phenomenally beautiful Pokemon in the vein of Milotic. Unova's Water-types, by and large, are pretty underwhelming, but Ducklett could easily have been Unova's Magikarp and Feebas counterpart. This needn't even require any tweaking to its stats - it could just be seen as a pest that appears everywhere and is annoyingly common, yet takes some time and effort to evolve for a great payoff (perhaps using the Pretty Wing, which otherwise has no in-game purpose). In Gen VII (Swanna's last appearance), all the moves it learns by level are Water and Flying, without exception, and it learns no Fairy or Psychic moves other than Rest. Adding moves like Draining Kiss or Moonlight to its movepool would emphasise its beauty and grace in a pretty easy way, and give it more options to use in battle. But as it is, as much as I've come to like it, it's a Pokemon that feels like a wasted opportunity.
 
Maybe this is me being a bit petty or my logic working backwards, but something about Ice's type match ups bother me, namely a resistance it lacks, a weakness it has, and a SE Match-up I kind of question.

- Ground Neutral Hit: So many common Ground Type moves seem to have one of the following concepts to me: Shake the ground to generate force (Earthquake, Bulldoze), dig through the Earth or utilize a motion meant for such (Drill Run, Dig), and kicking up and weaponizing dirt or rocks in the ground (Precipice Blades, Mud Slap/Shot). Most of the time, Ice makes this harder to to, whether it's hard ice that's more resistant than normal soil, or melting/slush which adds a lot of weight and dampens impacts because of moisture softening. Like, try digging through typical soil compared to a sheet over Ice over it, it's going to make the job harder. Plus depending on the motion involved, stomping on mud can slow your feet, or ice can cause you to lose grip and balance. I feel like Ice would justify a Ground Resistance to match its SE Offensive match up.

- Rock SE Hit: This one is weird to me because it just seems to be based on "Heavy Rock break thing", but typically I find that with Ice forming sheets or otherwise thick coverage rather than small structures like Icicles or Snowballs, Rocks simply damage them the same as you would throwing them at anything else. Like, if you chuck a rock at a martial artist, it's probably going to hurt as much as a normal person (there's some discrepancy for like brick-house body builders, but usually the Superhuman Pokemon idea goes both ways for the attacker as much as the Defender); you can usually even damage a lot of metal structures, be it scratching or denting or what have you, with a rock, yet Steel always has an objective win over Rock (try swinging a sword at a stone and see what good that does). Rock being Strong on Ice just felt arbitrary to me because at most, what happens when Ice is hit with a Rock is "the same thing that happens to [almost] everything else".

- Fire Resisting Ice: This one is more the traditional JRPG nerd in me talking, but there's a degree of real life physics I would reference in this interaction as well. Fire hitting Ice makes natural sense, a concentrated heat attack -> Ice Structure melts and compromised. But Pokemon is a surprising outlier in the idea that Fire is Resistant to being hit by Ice attacks, even in the case of some RPG series like Final Fantasy where Ice/Water are often distinct elements. The logic I'd put forth is that a lot of Fire types are depicted as generating the Fire from something like a chemical reaction or some pseudo-magic in the body, which would mean biologically they could warm themselves back up but could be chilled about as dangerously without external heat: the incident in which Ash gained Charizard's trust/loyalty back was the result of spending an entire night treating it for Hypothermia after being frozen by a Poliwrath (albeit it did take a few water hits, but the Ice Beam Freeze was the big dramatic finish they put in focus). For Pokemon with more intrinsically Fire-y biology like Magcargo or Rapidash, Cold Air isn't necessarily friendly to a fire, as it can entail a front and breeze that can blow the fire out, moisture in the air, or simply Ice and Snow that would physically smother a fire faster than the heat would cause it to melt (ignoring that melting it to water would just cause that to drown/douse the Fire anyway). More subjectively I also just think this would make for some interesting offensive match up mind-games, since I don't think there are many cases where two types both hit each other super-effectively (Basically just Dragon and Ghost Mirrors, and like Gen 1 Bug vs Poison), so a Fire and Ice type staring each other down has a risk to consider on either side rather than always putting the latter on the backfoot.


I will say I don't necessarily think any of these are things they should have done or that would help balance, since Ice as a type seems ostensibly designed as a Glass Cannon (good offensive profile balanced by a weak defensive one), whether or not GF designs that when designing a lot of actual Ice Pokemon. These just bothered me when I stopped to think about the types and how their bases could interact rather than just going with the type chart and concluding "it works like this since X is Super Effective on Y"
 
Maybe this is me being a bit petty or my logic working backwards, but something about Ice's type match ups bother me, namely a resistance it lacks, a weakness it has, and a SE Match-up I kind of question.

- Ground Neutral Hit: So many common Ground Type moves seem to have one of the following concepts to me: Shake the ground to generate force (Earthquake, Bulldoze), dig through the Earth or utilize a motion meant for such (Drill Run, Dig), and kicking up and weaponizing dirt or rocks in the ground (Precipice Blades, Mud Slap/Shot). Most of the time, Ice makes this harder to to, whether it's hard ice that's more resistant than normal soil, or melting/slush which adds a lot of weight and dampens impacts because of moisture softening. Like, try digging through typical soil compared to a sheet over Ice over it, it's going to make the job harder. Plus depending on the motion involved, stomping on mud can slow your feet, or ice can cause you to lose grip and balance. I feel like Ice would justify a Ground Resistance to match its SE Offensive match up.

- Rock SE Hit: This one is weird to me because it just seems to be based on "Heavy Rock break thing", but typically I find that with Ice forming sheets or otherwise thick coverage rather than small structures like Icicles or Snowballs, Rocks simply damage them the same as you would throwing them at anything else. Like, if you chuck a rock at a martial artist, it's probably going to hurt as much as a normal person (there's some discrepancy for like brick-house body builders, but usually the Superhuman Pokemon idea goes both ways for the attacker as much as the Defender); you can usually even damage a lot of metal structures, be it scratching or denting or what have you, with a rock, yet Steel always has an objective win over Rock (try swinging a sword at a stone and see what good that does). Rock being Strong on Ice just felt arbitrary to me because at most, what happens when Ice is hit with a Rock is "the same thing that happens to [almost] everything else".

- Fire Resisting Ice: This one is more the traditional JRPG nerd in me talking, but there's a degree of real life physics I would reference in this interaction as well. Fire hitting Ice makes natural sense, a concentrated heat attack -> Ice Structure melts and compromised. But Pokemon is a surprising outlier in the idea that Fire is Resistant to being hit by Ice attacks, even in the case of some RPG series like Final Fantasy where Ice/Water are often distinct elements. The logic I'd put forth is that a lot of Fire types are depicted as generating the Fire from something like a chemical reaction or some pseudo-magic in the body, which would mean biologically they could warm themselves back up but could be chilled about as dangerously without external heat: the incident in which Ash gained Charizard's trust/loyalty back was the result of spending an entire night treating it for Hypothermia after being frozen by a Poliwrath (albeit it did take a few water hits, but the Ice Beam Freeze was the big dramatic finish they put in focus). For Pokemon with more intrinsically Fire-y biology like Magcargo or Rapidash, Cold Air isn't necessarily friendly to a fire, as it can entail a front and breeze that can blow the fire out, moisture in the air, or simply Ice and Snow that would physically smother a fire faster than the heat would cause it to melt (ignoring that melting it to water would just cause that to drown/douse the Fire anyway). More subjectively I also just think this would make for some interesting offensive match up mind-games, since I don't think there are many cases where two types both hit each other super-effectively (Basically just Dragon and Ghost Mirrors, and like Gen 1 Bug vs Poison), so a Fire and Ice type staring each other down has a risk to consider on either side rather than always putting the latter on the backfoot.


I will say I don't necessarily think any of these are things they should have done or that would help balance, since Ice as a type seems ostensibly designed as a Glass Cannon (good offensive profile balanced by a weak defensive one), whether or not GF designs that when designing a lot of actual Ice Pokemon. These just bothered me when I stopped to think about the types and how their bases could interact rather than just going with the type chart and concluding "it works like this since X is Super Effective on Y"
In the case of Ash's Charizard that was in the Orange Islands aka Gen 1. Fire didn't resist Ice in Gen 1, that was a Gen 2+ thing.
 
Maybe this is me being a bit petty or my logic working backwards, but something about Ice's type match ups bother me, namely a resistance it lacks, a weakness it has, and a SE Match-up I kind of question.

- Ground Neutral Hit: So many common Ground Type moves seem to have one of the following concepts to me: Shake the ground to generate force (Earthquake, Bulldoze), dig through the Earth or utilize a motion meant for such (Drill Run, Dig), and kicking up and weaponizing dirt or rocks in the ground (Precipice Blades, Mud Slap/Shot). Most of the time, Ice makes this harder to to, whether it's hard ice that's more resistant than normal soil, or melting/slush which adds a lot of weight and dampens impacts because of moisture softening. Like, try digging through typical soil compared to a sheet over Ice over it, it's going to make the job harder. Plus depending on the motion involved, stomping on mud can slow your feet, or ice can cause you to lose grip and balance. I feel like Ice would justify a Ground Resistance to match its SE Offensive match up.

- Rock SE Hit: This one is weird to me because it just seems to be based on "Heavy Rock break thing", but typically I find that with Ice forming sheets or otherwise thick coverage rather than small structures like Icicles or Snowballs, Rocks simply damage them the same as you would throwing them at anything else. Like, if you chuck a rock at a martial artist, it's probably going to hurt as much as a normal person (there's some discrepancy for like brick-house body builders, but usually the Superhuman Pokemon idea goes both ways for the attacker as much as the Defender); you can usually even damage a lot of metal structures, be it scratching or denting or what have you, with a rock, yet Steel always has an objective win over Rock (try swinging a sword at a stone and see what good that does). Rock being Strong on Ice just felt arbitrary to me because at most, what happens when Ice is hit with a Rock is "the same thing that happens to [almost] everything else".

- Fire Resisting Ice: This one is more the traditional JRPG nerd in me talking, but there's a degree of real life physics I would reference in this interaction as well. Fire hitting Ice makes natural sense, a concentrated heat attack -> Ice Structure melts and compromised. But Pokemon is a surprising outlier in the idea that Fire is Resistant to being hit by Ice attacks, even in the case of some RPG series like Final Fantasy where Ice/Water are often distinct elements. The logic I'd put forth is that a lot of Fire types are depicted as generating the Fire from something like a chemical reaction or some pseudo-magic in the body, which would mean biologically they could warm themselves back up but could be chilled about as dangerously without external heat: the incident in which Ash gained Charizard's trust/loyalty back was the result of spending an entire night treating it for Hypothermia after being frozen by a Poliwrath (albeit it did take a few water hits, but the Ice Beam Freeze was the big dramatic finish they put in focus). For Pokemon with more intrinsically Fire-y biology like Magcargo or Rapidash, Cold Air isn't necessarily friendly to a fire, as it can entail a front and breeze that can blow the fire out, moisture in the air, or simply Ice and Snow that would physically smother a fire faster than the heat would cause it to melt (ignoring that melting it to water would just cause that to drown/douse the Fire anyway). More subjectively I also just think this would make for some interesting offensive match up mind-games, since I don't think there are many cases where two types both hit each other super-effectively (Basically just Dragon and Ghost Mirrors, and like Gen 1 Bug vs Poison), so a Fire and Ice type staring each other down has a risk to consider on either side rather than always putting the latter on the backfoot.


I will say I don't necessarily think any of these are things they should have done or that would help balance, since Ice as a type seems ostensibly designed as a Glass Cannon (good offensive profile balanced by a weak defensive one), whether or not GF designs that when designing a lot of actual Ice Pokemon. These just bothered me when I stopped to think about the types and how their bases could interact rather than just going with the type chart and concluding "it works like this since X is Super Effective on Y"
Give in to this....

Seriously don't, Skarm is 4x weak to Electric now
 
We've discussed difficulty to death, but honestly, an AI with as simple instructions as "Hit the thing in front of you with the strongest move you have against it" would immediately provide a massive improvement. Even in the mid-gen titles when the games actually were "difficult".
 
We've discussed difficulty to death, but honestly, an AI with as simple instructions as "Hit the thing in front of you with the strongest move you have against it" would immediately provide a massive improvement. Even in the mid-gen titles when the games actually were "difficult".
I am pretty sure this is most of the AI who don't just default to random moves works, to the detriment of not using variable power moves because it doesnt see the "full strength" of the move.
 
We've discussed difficulty to death, but honestly, an AI with as simple instructions as "Hit the thing in front of you with the strongest move you have against it" would immediately provide a massive improvement. Even in the mid-gen titles when the games actually were "difficult".
I am pretty sure this is most of the AI who don't just default to random moves works, to the detriment of not using variable power moves because it doesnt see the "full strength" of the move.
To iterate, afaik the games have 3 "types" of AI right now, with most trainers usually having a variant of that (use whichever move hits hardest), wild pokemon generally having a literal "roll rand 4", and then there's the more advanced facility AI that we've been trying to ""decode"" for a decade and we managed to understand part of its workings in choosing status, offensive or being Florges2 and changing terrain every turn.

(It's also why as of recently GF has occasionally had trainers with less than 4 moves: in order to "force" the AI in a specific behaviour without needing to code a new AI altoghether. Can't fail to lock yourself in Scarfed Rock Slide if you only know Rock Slide...)
 
To iterate, afaik the games have 3 "types" of AI right now, with most trainers usually having a variant of that (use whichever move hits hardest), wild pokemon generally having a literal "roll rand 4", and then there's the more advanced facility AI that we've been trying to ""decode"" for a decade and we managed to understand part of its workings in choosing status, offensive or being Florges2 and changing terrain every turn.

(It's also why as of recently GF has occasionally had trainers with less than 4 moves: in order to "force" the AI in a specific behaviour without needing to code a new AI altoghether. Can't fail to lock yourself in Scarfed Rock Slide if you only know Rock Slide...)

The AI is a little more complicated than that. If none of its moves result in a KO on whatever Pokemon you have on the field, or if only one move will result in a KO, most NPCs will use whichever move hits the hardest. However, if more than one move would result in a KO, the AI in most games will randomly pick between any move that might KO. This can result in some pretty unpredictable situations if you happen to end up with a Pokemon with low health against an opponent that has a lot of coverage.

I'm also pretty sure there's more than one kind of non-facility trainer AI, as some notable NPCs heavily prefer set-up moves over damaging ones (The first gym leader in both B/W and B2/W2 are good examples) while others will rarely use set-up moves at all, even if they have them available. I'm not really sure about the finer details of how that works, tohugh.
 

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