Other Pokemon Terminology Database

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Term n-0 (where n is any number from 1-6)
Explanation: When you defeat your opponent with n pokemon remaining, it is an n-0
Example: My Gyarados just 6-0'd (pronounced "six oh-ed") my opponent's team
Reference: Common use (phrase has been published in the Smog)
 

bb skarm

oh oh EVACUATE THE DANCE FLOOR
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Term: Gimmick
Explanation: An unreliable set that functions on very certain circumstances and is usually more cost than reward
Example: Fire Blast Gyarados; may seem good to KO Ferrothorn and Skarmory but ends up costing a moveslot and is still very weak
Reference: Literally every thread on this forum people use this as an excuse to everything
 
Term: Niche
Explanation: A specific role or set that a Pokemon can have in the OU metagame
Example: Mega Altaria has a well-defined niche as a Dragon Dancer
Reference: Myself
 
Term: Offense
Explanation: Offensive teams rely on outspeeding and outdamaging the opponent directly. Players using this style of play will often utilize hard-hitting Pokemon and use resistances and immunities to switch into attacks as opposed to defined walls to take hits. Tactics include: lures to eliminate counters, using stat boosters, and utilizing a quick Stealth Rock in order to facilitate kills. The suicide lead is an expansion of the quick Stealth Rock concept and is often used by offensive teams. A suicide lead is essentially a Pokemon in the lead position whose role is to stop the opponent from setting up Stealth Rock and at the same time set up its own Stealth Rock, such as Aerodactyl and Azelf.
Example: Sand Offense teams
Reference: The Pokemon Dictionary

Term: Balance
Explanation: This type of team does not rely on any single type of Pokemon. Generally speaking, balanced teams have a couple of sweepers, backed up by a number of walls and/or tanks. Most teams of this type will utilize a form or two of entry hazards. The most successful balanced teams often revolve around a certain threat, while the other teammates seek to help guarantee a sweep by the said threat.
Example: CB Tyranitar supports RP Landorus-I to sweep a team, with Ferrothorn setting up hazards and Unaware Clefable as a Cleric
Reference: The Pokemon Dictionary

Term: Stall
Explanation: Stall teams are based off of residual damage. This damage can come in many forms, including: sandstorm, hail, Toxic Spikes, Spikes, and Stealth Rock. The majority of Pokemon on a team like this will have good defenses and contribute to the overall goal of indirectly fainting the opponent's team. Tactics include using Ghosts to block Rapid Spin (a move which can eliminate entry hazards), setting up entry hazards as fast as possible, and using Pseudo-Hazing (Phazing) moves, such as Perish Song, Whirlwind, and Roar.
Example: Standard Stall team: Mega Sableye, Jirachi, Tentacruel, Hippowdon, Chesnaught, Heatran
Reference: The Pokemon Dictionary

this is fun :]

Term: Pivot (Defensive / Offensive)
Explanation: A pivot is a Pokemon that is generally only used for switching. Due to good defensive stats and a solid defensive typing, they can usually take little damage as they switch in, and the opposing switch they force allows the player to switch again safely to another Pokemon. An offensive pivot will force a switch by threatening KO on the opponent, thus obtaining momentum, whereas a defensive pivot will be difficult to break past, and thus will slow the opponent's momentum.
Example: Mega Ampharos (Defensive), Scarf Landorus-T (Offensive)
Reference: The Pokemon Dictionary

Term: Supporter
Explanation: A Pokemon who uses non-offensive moves which benefit the team.
Example: Ferrothorn, Heatran
Reference: The Pokemon Dictionary
not to derail thread or anything but for offense you might wanna mention keeping momentum is a major part of offense, and same with stall I guess but its much easier to recover except for when you give free turns to lando-i, gengar, and tornadus a lot ofc. A mention of the types of cores utilized would probably work for all three of the playstyles like offense overlapping and such.
 
not to derail thread or anything but for offense you might wanna mention keeping momentum is a major part of offense, and same with stall I guess but its much easier to recover except for when you give free turns to lando-i, gengar, and tornadus a lot ofc. A mention of the types of cores utilized would probably work for all three of the playstyles like offense overlapping and such.
Done.
 
Term: Momentum
Explanation: The advantage held by a player that's generated over the course of multiple turns by forcing the opponent's mons into unfavorable 1v1 match-ups, thus forcing them to frequently switch and give up free turns.
Example 1: An offensive team has momentum when it has forced the opponent to make frequent defensive switches due to offensive pressure, resulting in mons taking damage from switching into attacks without dealing out damage in return.
Example 2: A stall team has momentum when it forces the opponent to make frequent switches into mons that have a chance of breaking a defensive mon, resulting in mons taking damage from racking up Hazard damage and/or damage from small attacks without dealing out damage in return
Reference: Myself + http://www.thefreedictionary.com/momentum
 
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DarkNostalgia

Fading in, fading out, on the edge of paradise
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Ok I'm editing the OP rn, thanks for your entries :] I will sort them all out into seperate tags when I have time.
 
Term: Volc
Explanation: Short for Volcorona
Example: I used a team with an offensive Volc
Reference: Personal experience
 
HALLE FUCKING LUJAH, SOMEONE PIN THIS SHIT SO WE NEVER HAVE TO ARGUE ABOUT THIS STUFF AGAIN

Term: Check
Explanation: Pokémon A checks Pokémon B if, when Pokémon A is given a free switch into Pokémon B, Pokémon A can win every time, even under the worst case scenario, without factoring in hax. In some scenarios if a Pokemon can switch into the opposing Pokemon's move and proceed to OHKO it then it is also a check.
Example: An example of a check would be Mega Charizard X and Choice Scarf Garchomp. If given a free switch into Garchomp, it can OHKO Mega Charizard X even at +1. It can manually switch into Flare Blitz/Earthquake/Dragon Dance but isn't a counter since Dragon Claw OHKOs.
Reference: MattL, on the Smogon Webzine.
Wording's off a bit here as it implies Charx is switching into Chomp. I'd change to "If Garchomp is given a free switch-in".
 

DarkNostalgia

Fading in, fading out, on the edge of paradise
is a Contributor Alumnus
This is cool except I shouldn't be listed as a sole credible source lol
Well this is kind of a universal definition now on smog, and the fact that it was on the webzine is credible enough :]

HALLE FUCKING LUJAH, SOMEONE PIN THIS SHIT SO WE NEVER HAVE TO ARGUE ABOUT THIS STUFF AGAIN


Wording's off a bit here as it implies Charx is switching into Chomp. I'd change to "If Garchomp is given a free switch-in".
Oops spelling mistake :3
 

Imperator Romanum

formerly Grains of Salt
Term: Pseudo Legendary
Explanation: A pokemon with the total base stat of 600 or more, without being an event pokemon or legendary.
Example: Pseudos usually represent generation. Having at least one every generation, with the exception of generation 3 with Metagross and Salamence? It's usually used to described Pokemon who are often viewed as controversial, as most of them have been victim to a suspect test.
Reference: Personally I have no clue where I heard this the first time. It was sort of passed by in coversation.
 
Term: Pseudo Legendary
Explanation: A pokemon with the total base stat of 600 or more, without being an event pokemon or legendary.
Example: Pseudos usually represent generation. Having at least one every generation, with the exception of generation 3 with Metagross and Salamence? It's usually used to described Pokemon who are often viewed as controversial, as most of them have been victim to a suspect test.
Reference: Personally I have no clue where I heard this the first time. It was sort of passed by in coversation.
Only Salamence and Garchomp have been banned, and that was for one gen a piece iirc. TTar, Goodra, Hydreigon, and DNite have never been suspected (outside of that one BW DNite one that no one every talks about).
 

DarkNostalgia

Fading in, fading out, on the edge of paradise
is a Contributor Alumnus
metagross tho :] yeah should've looked over the definitions b4 just c/p ing into the OP, i'll do a look over tomorrow since i'm tired now.
 

bludz

a waffle is like a pancake with a syrup trap
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Cool thread :)

Term: Status Absorber
Explanation: A pokemon that is a dedicated switch-in to status inducing moves.
Example A: Gliscor is a good status absorber, because once its Toxic Orb has activated it cannot be inflicted with another status ailment.
Example B: Clefable's ability Magic Guard makes it immune to passive damage from Toxic and Will-O-Wisp, making it a good status absorber.
Reference: Personal Experience

Term: Death Fodder
Explanation: A pokemon that is either not useful in the current match up or is weakened, so it is saved as a sacrifice to allow a free switch-in at the opportune moment.
Example: My Hippowdon was greatly weakened, but I decided to save it as death fodder for later to get up my sand and a free switch into my Excadrill.
Reference: Personal Experience

BTW I think that the Reference category should be optional; unless there is a specific reference such as MattL's article on checks and counters or The Pokemon Dictionary, it doesn't really seem necessary. That is just my opinion.

Edit: I notice Dual Screens / Dual Screeners are separate terms but maybe they should be listed together.
 
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Imperator Romanum

formerly Grains of Salt
Only Salamence and Garchomp have been banned, and that was for one gen a piece iirc. TTar, Goodra, Hydreigon, and DNite have never been suspected (outside of that one BW DNite one that no one every talks about).
They were all top tier threats at one point, except Goodra.
 
I don't think Pseudo-Legendary should be included regardless as it's more a terminology used among the entire Pokémon fanbase, rather than a competitive-specific one.
 
Term: AV
Explanation: A shortened version of Assault Vest
Example: In my team I am using an AV Conkeldurr
Reference: Watching, playing and reading about Pokemon

Term: Assault Vest user
Explanation: A pokemon that uses the item Assault Vest to increase its ability to take hits. It is usually used to create Tanks.
Example: Conkeldurr is a good Assault Vest user as has a high HP and Attack stat allowing it to take and deal lots of damage. It also has access to recovery in Drain Punch and can absorb status like burns due to its ability Guts.
Reference: Watching, playing and reading about Pokemon
 
Term: GeoPass
Explanation: The use of Geomancy and Baton Pass together.
Example: Smeargle
Reference: Forums

EDIT: Removed repeated entries.
 
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boxofkangaroos

this is the day of the expanding man
Term: 4MSS
Explanation: Four Move Slot Syndrome. When a Pokémon has a vast collection of viable moves from which the user can only choose four.
Example: Mega Metagross
Reference: Personal Experience and Other Users

EDIT:
Term: Entry Hazards
Explanation: Any of the attacks that deal damage as a Pokemon switches in
Example: Stealth Rock, Spikes, Toxic Spikes
Reference: The Pokemon Dictionary
 
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