Post college grads come here

I used to play competitively and frequent here a few years back.

Now in my 4th year of medical school. Yesterday, I decided to open my 3DS to play pokemon x again. Also just bought Omega Sapphire. Starting from scratch is really neat; I really miss this game alot.
 

Ender

pelagic
is a Contributor Alumnus
I used to play competitively and frequent here a few years back.

Now in my 4th year of medical school. Yesterday, I decided to open my 3DS to play pokemon x again. Also just bought Omega Sapphire. Starting from scratch is really neat; I really miss this game alot.
Awesome! Where at, if you don't mind me asking (feel free to PM too).
 
I used to play competitively and frequent here a few years back.

Now in my 4th year of medical school. Yesterday, I decided to open my 3DS to play pokemon x again. Also just bought Omega Sapphire. Starting from scratch is really neat; I really miss this game alot.
Hey, I'm in med school too! Alpha Sapphire has me hooked lately. Great to know I'm not the only kid at heart around here. You interested in any residencies or specialties? I'm loving surgery and OB/GYN rotations so far.
 

Sam

i say it's all just wind in sails
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Just completed my graduation checklist, which pretty much verifies that after I finish the classes I've signed up for this semester I'll graduate. There was never an issue but it's just something that's made me realize how little time I have left in college. While I'm not a 'post college grad' just yet I've been thinking about it a lot.

I've already accepted a job that I'll be starting sometime in the summer. It's a pretty niche field that's more tangentially related to my major but it seems interesting and pays well. I have a few more months to decide what time I'll actually be starting - my boss said any time before September would be acceptable. This will truly be my last free time for the foreseeable future so I've been thinking of taking a big vacation. The only problem with that is I'd have to borrow money to go somewhere like Europe and I'd rather use my bonus as a starting point for an energy fund or something of the sort. I don't want to start immediately but I don't want to sit around and do nothing either.

My biggest worry right now is adjusting to life as an adult and meeting new people. Right now I could get placed in one of two location (I'll find out where in March). If I end up in one I know a friend who works there, but at the other location I know no one. Regardless, I'm going to more or less be on my own and know no one in whatever new city I end up at and that thought is pretty terrifying. I'm not exactly an antisocial person but between working a 9-5 and adjusting to new responsibilities I have no idea how I'll make friends quick. I like to get out but the idea of meeting new people in a city I'm new to just seems difficult. Most of the people at this company are from my school and major, but there's only 2 others from my class this year. I guess everyone has had to go through this transition at some point but on the surface it is somewhat scary. I knew no one coming in to college but at least then there were dorms and classes to get you to meet new people. I'm not opposed to the idea of getting roommates to live in a nicer apartment but I don't know any way to find people besides craigslist.

One thing I've noticed is a lot of my friends are trying very hard to stay as close to home as possible. Some of them are even moving back in with their parents. This just seems weird to me as we've had 4 years of independence in college and that's seemingly going in the opposite direction. I understand wanting to save money, and if you happen to end up working close to home I guess I could see it for a year or two. But I know people who only searched for jobs that were commutable from their parents' house - one of my friends even turned down his only job offer because it was like an hour away. I know I just said how worried I am about starting in a new city but it's also exciting to a degree and I recognize it's necessary. Just seems a little odd to me.

After writing this there doesn't seem to be a point besides me complaining but whatever.
 

Bughouse

Like ships in the night, you're passing me by
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Just completed my graduation checklist, which pretty much verifies that after I finish the classes I've signed up for this semester I'll graduate. There was never an issue but it's just something that's made me realize how little time I have left in college. While I'm not a 'post college grad' just yet I've been thinking about it a lot.

I've already accepted a job that I'll be starting sometime in the summer. It's a pretty niche field that's more tangentially related to my major but it seems interesting and pays well. I have a few more months to decide what time I'll actually be starting - my boss said any time before September would be acceptable. This will truly be my last free time for the foreseeable future so I've been thinking of taking a big vacation. The only problem with that is I'd have to borrow money to go somewhere like Europe and I'd rather use my bonus as a starting point for an energy fund or something of the sort. I don't want to start immediately but I don't want to sit around and do nothing either.

My biggest worry right now is adjusting to life as an adult and meeting new people. Right now I could get placed in one of two location (I'll find out where in March). If I end up in one I know a friend who works there, but at the other location I know no one. Regardless, I'm going to more or less be on my own and know no one in whatever new city I end up at and that thought is pretty terrifying. I'm not exactly an antisocial person but between working a 9-5 and adjusting to new responsibilities I have no idea how I'll make friends quick. I like to get out but the idea of meeting new people in a city I'm new to just seems difficult. Most of the people at this company are from my school and major, but there's only 2 others from my class this year. I guess everyone has had to go through this transition at some point but on the surface it is somewhat scary. I knew no one coming in to college but at least then there were dorms and classes to get you to meet new people. I'm not opposed to the idea of getting roommates to live in a nicer apartment but I don't know any way to find people besides craigslist.

One thing I've noticed is a lot of my friends are trying very hard to stay as close to home as possible. Some of them are even moving back in with their parents. This just seems weird to me as we've had 4 years of independence in college and that's seemingly going in the opposite direction. I understand wanting to save money, and if you happen to end up working close to home I guess I could see it for a year or two. But I know people who only searched for jobs that were commutable from their parents' house - one of my friends even turned down his only job offer because it was like an hour away. I know I just said how worried I am about starting in a new city but it's also exciting to a degree and I recognize it's necessary. Just seems a little odd to me.

After writing this there doesn't seem to be a point besides me complaining but whatever.
  1. Yes, making friends in a new location is hard. Not gonna sugarcoat that. Join some sort of club in your new place. I've been playing a lot of soccer and met some people through that.
  2. Meeting roommates off of craigslist is fine. The fact that you might have to do it that way suggests that people like you, meaning "normal" non-serial killers, do use it for roommate matching. I found mine that way. Alternatively, just go through friends of friends of friends, etc. Cast a wide net asking about who knows who in that new city. Even if you find people, but they aren't looking for a roommate, maybe they can be friends instead. Roommates are great not only for keeping rent down, but also for avoiding isolation. You get an opponent for video games, a dinner partner, etc.
  3. Well, yeah, most people DO stay close to home. You and I are the exception, not the norm. http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2015/12/24/upshot/24up-family.html?_r=0
 
Just completed my graduation checklist, which pretty much verifies that after I finish the classes I've signed up for this semester I'll graduate. There was never an issue but it's just something that's made me realize how little time I have left in college. While I'm not a 'post college grad' just yet I've been thinking about it a lot.

I've already accepted a job that I'll be starting sometime in the summer. It's a pretty niche field that's more tangentially related to my major but it seems interesting and pays well. I have a few more months to decide what time I'll actually be starting - my boss said any time before September would be acceptable. This will truly be my last free time for the foreseeable future so I've been thinking of taking a big vacation. The only problem with that is I'd have to borrow money to go somewhere like Europe and I'd rather use my bonus as a starting point for an energy fund or something of the sort. I don't want to start immediately but I don't want to sit around and do nothing either.

My biggest worry right now is adjusting to life as an adult and meeting new people. Right now I could get placed in one of two location (I'll find out where in March). If I end up in one I know a friend who works there, but at the other location I know no one. Regardless, I'm going to more or less be on my own and know no one in whatever new city I end up at and that thought is pretty terrifying. I'm not exactly an antisocial person but between working a 9-5 and adjusting to new responsibilities I have no idea how I'll make friends quick. I like to get out but the idea of meeting new people in a city I'm new to just seems difficult. Most of the people at this company are from my school and major, but there's only 2 others from my class this year. I guess everyone has had to go through this transition at some point but on the surface it is somewhat scary. I knew no one coming in to college but at least then there were dorms and classes to get you to meet new people. I'm not opposed to the idea of getting roommates to live in a nicer apartment but I don't know any way to find people besides craigslist.

One thing I've noticed is a lot of my friends are trying very hard to stay as close to home as possible. Some of them are even moving back in with their parents. This just seems weird to me as we've had 4 years of independence in college and that's seemingly going in the opposite direction. I understand wanting to save money, and if you happen to end up working close to home I guess I could see it for a year or two. But I know people who only searched for jobs that were commutable from their parents' house - one of my friends even turned down his only job offer because it was like an hour away. I know I just said how worried I am about starting in a new city but it's also exciting to a degree and I recognize it's necessary. Just seems a little odd to me.

After writing this there doesn't seem to be a point besides me complaining but whatever.
Craigslist doesn't serve you justice, man. I have a couple of friends who've also graduated from affiliated institutions in the past. They say that either on Facebook or other places, there are a lot of groups for alumnis from all eight schools and similar institutions, so finding a roommate won't be too hard, especially if you're working in the city (or a city). If you're working in the city, you can get a decent single apartment in Queens for a reasonable price (not a crack den). Frankly speaking, if you're making over a certain number, you can live in an apartment independently and comfortably. It really all comes down to budgeting. Cities (either on the east coast or west coast) have such a diverse population. It won't be hard for you to find a group you'll fit into. It's all about putting yourself out there. I've been to a lot of casual events in NYC, whether it'd be No-Pants Subway or Concert in the Parks during the summer, and it's quite easy to strike up a conversation about anything. As long as you become involved in your community, friends will come naturally. I know my input is heavily biased toward NYC, but many cities offer similar environments for you to meet new people.

Regardless of your decisions, congrats on your next step in life! Truly wish you the best.
 

Hulavuta

I hid myself while I tried to repair myself
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Apologies for the bump; I didn't feel like this warranted a new thread.

I will be graduating next Spring with a BA in Humanities and minor in film. It's liberal arts, I know. Employment never concerned me much though, because I knew from the outset that I would be going into teaching. There are a lot of community colleges in my area (including one school with like 4 different campuses in the same city) and humanities is a general education requirement, so I figure employment shouldn't be too scarce. I am kind of pigeonholed in a competitive field, but it's something I know I'll be happy doing. Along the way I can do things like substitute teacher-ing, work in tutoring/academic success centers, etc. so I'm not all that worried.

Originally, my major was Social Work, and I wanted to go into counseling. I know my interpersonal skills are by far my main strength; I'm pretty high in agreeableness and tact and people find me approachable and easy to confide in. I definitely wanted a career that involved spending time with other people and leaving a positive impact on them. Cool, those are all things that apply to teaching as well, so the transition wasn't hard for me. Especially as in my last year of gen ed, I had a professor who I would say really did leave an impact on my life (she is how I decided to focus on humanities in particular as well).

I think what put me off Social Work at first was thinking maybe I was romanticizing it a bit too much in terms of it being "helping people". I was worried I would be dealing with crazy people or some extremely ungrateful and difficult people and it would get draining pretty quickly. I felt like if I taught a class I'd be getting back rather than just giving, and it'd be easier to build rapport with students, rather than patients. I don't think this is the case anymore after meeting and becoming close friends with a lot of people I would describe as "normal" (as in, not mentally ill or overly difficult), both on this site and in real life, that have told me that they attend counseling. After looking into it more it seems the really crazy people go to psychiatrists and plenty of well-adjusted people (as in, enough for there to be a market) go to therapy just to deal with stress, family troubles, etc. I feel like that would be something really rewarding.

So it's something I'm interested in doing again. I think for me the biggest issue was not really understanding what the whole world of this field was like, and being quite lazy in terms of getting to know it. I did officially declare Social Work as my major, but was just finishing up the prerequisites by the time I switched. At this point, I'm one year away from my undergrad and I've never done any interning or shadowing or volunteer work or anything like that. I'm worried it might be a bit too late.


I already know that I'll be going to grad school, because no matter which path I choose, I will need at least a Master's degree. And I know undergrad really doesn't matter that much (aside from a few prerequisites) so the best course right now is to finish my Humanities degree and then go from there. But both are still a realistic possibility for me. I know there isn't really a specific question here, but I am feeling somewhat conflicted right now. So any advice would be appreciated.
 

Roy

streetpkmn
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Apologies for the bump; I didn't feel like this warranted a new thread.

I will be graduating next Spring with a BA in Humanities and minor in film. It's liberal arts, I know. Employment never concerned me much though, because I knew from the outset that I would be going into teaching. There are a lot of community colleges in my area (including one school with like 4 different campuses in the same city) and humanities is a general education requirement, so I figure employment shouldn't be too scarce. I am kind of pigeonholed in a competitive field, but it's something I know I'll be happy doing. Along the way I can do things like substitute teacher-ing, work in tutoring/academic success centers, etc. so I'm not all that worried.

Originally, my major was Social Work, and I wanted to go into counseling. I know my interpersonal skills are by far my main strength; I'm pretty high in agreeableness and tact and people find me approachable and easy to confide in. I definitely wanted a career that involved spending time with other people and leaving a positive impact on them. Cool, those are all things that apply to teaching as well, so the transition wasn't hard for me. Especially as in my last year of gen ed, I had a professor who I would say really did leave an impact on my life (she is how I decided to focus on humanities in particular as well).

I think what put me off Social Work at first was thinking maybe I was romanticizing it a bit too much in terms of it being "helping people". I was worried I would be dealing with crazy people or some extremely ungrateful and difficult people and it would get draining pretty quickly. I felt like if I taught a class I'd be getting back rather than just giving, and it'd be easier to build rapport with students, rather than patients. I don't think this is the case anymore after meeting and becoming close friends with a lot of people I would describe as "normal" (as in, not mentally ill or overly difficult), both on this site and in real life, that have told me that they attend counseling. After looking into it more it seems the really crazy people go to psychiatrists and plenty of well-adjusted people (as in, enough for there to be a market) go to therapy just to deal with stress, family troubles, etc. I feel like that would be something really rewarding.

So it's something I'm interested in doing again. I think for me the biggest issue was not really understanding what the whole world of this field was like, and being quite lazy in terms of getting to know it. I did officially declare Social Work as my major, but was just finishing up the prerequisites by the time I switched. At this point, I'm one year away from my undergrad and I've never done any interning or shadowing or volunteer work or anything like that. I'm worried it might be a bit too late.


I already know that I'll be going to grad school, because no matter which path I choose, I will need at least a Master's degree. And I know undergrad really doesn't matter that much (aside from a few prerequisites) so the best course right now is to finish my Humanities degree and then go from there. But both are still a realistic possibility for me. I know there isn't really a specific question here, but I am feeling somewhat conflicted right now. So any advice would be appreciated.
A few thoughts:

It’s extremely admirable you get fulfillment out of helping others, whether by teaching students or offering advice to those who are going through troubles in life. However, it seems you aren’t fully grasping what life as a professional counselor would entail – particularly apparent in your statement delineating “crazy” from “non-crazy” people.

As a counselor, you don’t get to choose what “level” of stress your clients are going through before agreeing to see them. In fact, there are functioning “crazy” people with diagnosed disorders and non-functioning “non-crazy” folks who are struggling just as much, if not more. For example, someone with undiagnosed depression, Bipolar Disorder, ADHD, or perpetual difficulties stemming from negative self-image might seek help for dealing with a divorce – the adept psychotherapist will uncover these deeper issues and leverage natural tact and acquired skills / experience necessary to communicate back to the individual in a solution oriented manner. If you’re an effective counselor, you will be drained. Additionally, there will be times where people refuse to listen to your advice for whatever reason, or are incapable of carrying out the actions you’ve proposed. That’s the reality of the job, so spend some time reflecting if this is something you really want to do.

In regards to “next steps,” given your situation I think it would make sense to teach full-time for a few years and then re-visit the idea of a Master’s later on.

My field is different from yours, but I was dead set on getting an MBA while I was in undergrad before discovering it’s something I will never need in my field. You never know what will change in a few years and might be in a better position to return to school after a few years of work under your belt.

Secondly, I’d reach out and network with professional counselors to learn as much as you can about the industry while doing some research on your own.

Hope that makes sense.
 

Hulavuta

I hid myself while I tried to repair myself
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Thanks for the advice Roy, it actually made me think a lot. I assume you are involved somewhere in this area as well?

A few thoughts:

It’s extremely admirable you get fulfillment out of helping others, whether by teaching students or offering advice to those who are going through troubles in life. However, it seems you aren’t fully grasping what life as a professional counselor would entail – particularly apparent in your statement delineating “crazy” from “non-crazy” people.

As a counselor, you don’t get to choose what “level” of stress your clients are going through before agreeing to see them. In fact, there are functioning “crazy” people with diagnosed disorders and non-functioning “non-crazy” folks who are struggling just as much, if not more. For example, someone with undiagnosed depression, Bipolar Disorder, ADHD, or perpetual difficulties stemming from negative self-image might seek help for dealing with a divorce – the adept psychotherapist will uncover these deeper issues and leverage natural tact and acquired skills / experience necessary to communicate back to the individual in a solution oriented manner.
Yeah, as I admitted earlier, this field is totally unknown to me. Saying "crazy" and "normal" wasn't meant to be offensive or categorical, just the best way I felt to distinguish at the time. I guess what I meant were the severe "horror story" cases, like schizophrenia, psychopathy, or anti-social disorders. I don't think I have the stomach for that (though from what I'm aware of, these things are better dealt with by prescribed medicine anyway). Things like depression, low self-esteem, etc. I am more open to. This may be a false delineation as well, but hopefully you understand what I am trying to mean.

If you’re an effective counselor, you will be drained. Additionally, there will be times where people refuse to listen to your advice for whatever reason, or are incapable of carrying out the actions you’ve proposed. That’s the reality of the job, so spend some time reflecting if this is something you really want to do.
Yep, this is my primary concern. Unfortunately, I don't think I can honestly know if this will be a problem for me until I'm actually in that situation. I just honestly don't know how well I'd deal with that. But yeah, this is definitely what has me caught up. Can't just fail someone like in teaching. I think a lot of it will also depend on a support system that is, at the moment, unforeseeable. Wife, family, friends, etc.

In regards to “next steps,” given your situation I think it would make sense to teach full-time for a few years and then re-visit the idea of a Master’s later on.

My field is different from yours, but I was dead set on getting an MBA while I was in undergrad before discovering it’s something I will never need in my field. You never know what will change in a few years and might be in a better position to return to school after a few years of work under your belt.
Well, this is actually what got me thinking most. The thought to take a break hadn't even occurred to me at first. I've been going to school every year since preschool so I guess I never actually really thought about stopping. My scholarships only cover an undergrad degree, so taking some time off while working actually seems like an appealing idea. Doesn't seem like there is a big loss to it and it seems like there can be some important things to be gained. I'll definitely be considering this.

I wanted to get my master's as soon as possible so I could teach college, but I guess there really is no reason to be in such a rush. Probably a good thing to start off with "lower" jobs and start building up experience. In terms of being a long-term plan, doing it one or two years later is not awful. I'm not in any serious financial difficulties either, thankfully, so there's no need to take things too quickly. I'll still live with my parents/grandfather so rent shouldn't be a significant problem. Thankfully, I'm Vietnamese; in Asian culture, it's more socially acceptable to stay with your parents for a longer period of your life (until marriage, I suppose).

Secondly, I’d reach out and network with professional counselors to learn as much as you can about the industry while doing some research on your own.

Hope that makes sense.
I'll admit I'm somewhat embarrassingly clueless when it comes to this. What places and avenues would you suggest? I've heard things like hospitals and schools and such, but what about people in private practice? I am really quite lost on exactly where to start.
 

Colonel M

Anime pfps discredit your value
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I'll admit I'm somewhat embarrassingly clueless when it comes to this. What places and avenues would you suggest? I've heard things like hospitals and schools and such, but what about people in private practice? I am really quite lost on exactly where to start.
I would not claim myself an expert, but I do have some advice for this.

LinkedIn, though some people mock it, is a powerful tool that can help you with insides as well as getting a start with an inner circle of a network. Networking is something I've learned and experienced to be a powerful asset. LinkedIn is also booming with recruiters, too.

I would also hit up your College or University too if you can. They can help a lot with insides if needed as well.

Also when in doubt for hospitals and schools - walk in and ask. More than likely they can help provide additional information and / or find someone that can. If you can volunteer - people really like seeing that on a resume because it shows you're passionate about your profession and not in it solely for the pay.

Research is huge too. The internet can help a lot with that, though the tools I provided above can help with that too.

Also definitely keep your resume updated.

I guess as a source I'm a post grad who's done this after I was laid off from an IT company. It helped extend potential options for me while also giving me leverage at my new job. I only have an associates. Conflicted on where to pursue from here.
 
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Hulavuta

I hid myself while I tried to repair myself
is a Site Staff Alumnusis a Community Leader Alumnusis a Community Contributor Alumnusis a Contributor Alumnus
I would not claim myself an expert, but I do have some advice for this.

LinkedIn, though some people mock it, is a powerful tool that can help you with insides as well as getting a start with an inner circle of a network. Networking is something I've learned and experienced to be a powerful asset. LinkedIn is also booming with recruiters, too.

I would also hit up your College or University too if you can. They can help a lot with insides if needed as well.

Also when in doubt for hospitals and schools - walk in and ask. More than likely they can help provide additional information and / or find someone that can.

Research is huge too. The internet can help a lot with that, though the tools I provided above can help with that too.

Also definitely keep your resume updated.

I guess as a source I'm a post grad who's done this after I was laid off from an IT company. It helped extend potential options for me while also giving me leverage at my new job. I only have an associates. Conflicted on where to pursue from here.
Thanks Colonel M. I actually looked up some applications and they actually did have an option to apply with LinkedIn so it does seem like something worth checking out.

So are you yourself planning to pursue a higher level degree? I'm actually impressed how far you got with just an Associate's; your advice must be pretty good, haha.

Pretty wild for me to be posting in this thread, considering it went up while I was still in high school. Never really thought the day would come where I would be needing to post here. Kinda mad to think I am in the same spot a lot of these guys were in back then. Guess it's one upside to getting older.
 

Colonel M

Anime pfps discredit your value
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Thanks Colonel M. I actually looked up some applications and they actually did have an option to apply with LinkedIn so it does seem like something worth checking out.

So are you yourself planning to pursue a higher level degree? I'm actually impressed how far you got with just an Associate's; your advice must be pretty good, haha.

Pretty wild for me to be posting in this thread, considering it went up while I was still in high school. Never really thought the day would come where I would be needing to post here. Kinda mad to think I am in the same spot a lot of these guys were in back then. Guess it's one upside to getting older.
Personally I think I haven't really gotten very far in life. I mean, I wouldn't say I have it bad, but truth of the matter is my laziness and everything is starting to catch up to me. I guess for what it's worth now that I actually work somewhat in my career it will become a bit easier to find prospective jobs in the future, but I probably should still invest in the damned A+ Certification (even though I really find its efforts pointless).

As for the degree question - I definitely plan to pursue it, but I am rather torn. I guess to explain my current situation - I have a job that's about 40 minutes away from my current living place, but honestly I wouldn't want to live there (cmon, it's Flint...). I feel some attachment to the close friends I have because I'm quite anti-social in a way and shut myself in often. I kind of want to attend school physically and not online, but I feel that I have to do some of it online anyway. I was doing classes at Ferris State University online, but I wouldn't mind going to University of Michigan or Michigan State University either. I kind of refuse to go to the University nearby me - the math teachers are legit fucking garbage, and if Synre is lurking around and went there he can attest to it too.

I guess the problem is I can't make up my own goddamn mind because life decisions require a lot of risk and thought process, and I'm not a person that really enjoys taking risks. I guess eventually I have to buckle down and do it, though.

I'd like to pursue Information Security, but part of me wonders if I should just settle for something else. I guess I'm rather torn on the end result myself - I just at least knew IT was the way to go.
 
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Acklow

I am always tired. Don't bother me.
It is that time of year. I just wanted to say that it's been a long time coming. I finally graduated with my Bachelor's of Science in English Teaching from Metropolitan State University in St. Paul, MN. I also received my TESOL/TEFL certification from Oxford Seminars, and I'm currently working on the online component before I start up my job search abroad. I'm looking to teach in Japan, Korea, or Taiwan.

Since I am so early in my job placement/search for teaching abroad, I wanted to see if there are any other post-grads that are currently working abroad as educators and if you have any tips/pointers for me. I've already taught as a volunteer for several months both in the U.S. and in Thailand, so I know I have the background to back me up.

Other than that, I'm really excited for this next step in my life. Putting on the "big boy trousers" and getting out of the house is such a near reality that motivates me a lot but also makes me a little nervous. I had put off finishing college for a few years so having finally finished uni with a degree is nice. I don't have plans on getting a Master's Degree quite yet, as I want to actually use my youth to travel a bit. My plans are to finish up the Master's sometime down the line in a few years.

I also want to make a point to anybody out there that is in high school and is unsure of what they want to do with their life after getting that diploma: stop worrying! Seriously. I'm already 26 years old, and I finally have my degree. Yes, there's a lot of pressure to get a degree, but there is absolutely nothing stopping you from doing something different. I have worked my rear end off in sales, finance, retail, and now I'm working as a service advisor at a car dealership. You only miss out on the opportunities you do not take. If you end up in jobs you end up hating because of the work, instead of dreading the job, think about what kinds of things you learned from the job that you can further your career in other areas of life. I certainly can tell for certain that learning the properties of hail damage on a roof will help me later in life when I am owning a house. Simple jobs go a long way in helping you to gain skills you may need in life. They also help you to learn how to understand other people better.

Anyways, that's my old man Acklow rant. Enjoy it at your leisure. Hit me up if you are a post-grad with tips about teaching abroad. Peace.
 

Eraddd

One Pixel
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Graduation for me is a kick in the nuts since there exist no job prospects for the degree I'm obtaining in my hometown; I'd have to move down to the States to get a job with a competitive wage and at the moment, since I'm unwilling to move in order to attend medical school at the soonest possible moment, it's put me in a bit of a jam, especially missing the medical school cutoff by a hair.

As for graduate school, I've received offers from across Canada but doing research for another 2 to 6 years (depending on Masters versus PhD) is not one that I relish especially considering the abysmal job markets for graduate students in my field. I would consider going to graduate school if American schools offered it since it's a two to three year commitment as opposed to a four to six year. I'll probably end up taking the GREs and applying to Stanford, Berkeley, Harvard etc anyways.

This summer is the last summer in which my grant money is available so at this point, I think I'll travel abroad afterwards and teach English in a third world country (I have something lined up potentially) for a few months and get some experience in a completely different environment. Afterwards, either travel to South Korea to teach more English for decent money or head back home and work as a tech washing test tubes and dishes for the next couple of months and see if I get into medical school then.

Graduation is more real than it seems like when you're entering university for the first time. Damn those years went by fast.
I got baited into coming back to Smogon because of a Harsha OverwatchTMZ post.

Anyways, for those looking for optimism, I have a bit to offer. 4 years ago, I graduated from a BSc with literally shit prospects except getting punted to graduate school. 2 years of putting my head down and getting to work, I graduated with a kick ass MSc with publications. 2 years later after that, I'm in medical school. I don't really have much to say other than keep your head up, put in the work, and go for opportunities when they present themselves to you.

Somewhere, Aldaron is shaking his head I'm sure.
 
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Mr.E

im the best
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Figured I'd stop into an old thread I posted in at one time, during my monthly-ish visits to Cong/Firebot. Little optimism from me though, I'm still floundering.

Original post, Oct 2013: Originally went to school for a Pharm D, got massively fucked over by a couple of my authority figures (one malicious, one incompetent), ultimately salvaged a B.S. Biochemistry out of the ordeal. Got an okay job shortly after graduating, but screwed over by a jealous co-worker turning management against me. Unable to find more suitable work, jump around crummy temp jobs doing shitty factory work to pay the bills (mostly the student loans for the aforementioned degree that was supposed to earn me better jobs in the first place).

At present, nearly five years later? Well, I found a slightly less crummy factory job at least that I wouldn't necessarily mind staying in long term, had I not already wasted years of time and buried myself in student loan debt to obtain a respectable STEM degree so I didn't fucking have to do shitty manual labor as a career in the first place. It's a good backup job at least. I took a short-term contract in another lab position that didn't lead to a long-term opportunity, and I'm currently unemployed again after taking a third lab position that didn't last past my 90-day probationary period (between which I returned to "backup job" after exhausting last year's unemployment benefits). At least nobody claimed I did anything wrong this time; they simply hired me to deal with a heavy workload and they just happened to lose half that work right after they offered me the job, so they didn't have any reason to keep me around. The pay/benefits were actually reasonable enough to make me believe I was finally getting somewhere in my career, but I guess not.

A couple weeks ago I had my first interview of this unemployment stint for a similarly promising position as the last. I'm not expecting anything, as I've learned at this point not to no matter how well I thought the interview went, but I'm supposed to hear back this Friday whether or not they've finished interviewing candidates and/or made a decision. Fingers crossed or whatever, I guess.

Things are looking up for me since hitting rock bottom, which you could either take as the bullshit that happened to me in school (2008-2009) or when I had to borrow money from a friend to pay my monthly bills immediately before my first stint at the "backup job," (July 2014; my original post, incidentally, was right before getting fired from the previous temp job and that company also lied about why they fired me to fuck me out of unemployment benefits) but it's been at a fucking glacial pace.

Remember kids, life isn't fair and nobody owes you anything. That isn't an excuse to not try, reflect on your actions and always strive to improve, but don't hate yourself just because things didn't work out for you. Outside factors outnumber the circumstances you can control that lead to one's ultimate success or failure, all you can do is maximize your odds of good things happening by concentrating on the latter.
 
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NixHex

Ever since I was born, I was dope.
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I had a lead at Northrup Grumman as they were waiting for me to graduate, but gave up on it after moral and religious convictions got the best of me. Like most American conservative Christians, I respect our soldiers and know several vets (friends in high school, bros. In law)... but I can't bring myself to design missiles that will literally rip people to shreds and destroy homes and businesses of innocent civilians.
LOL I'm at Raytheon now, go figure. Guess I'm a sellout. I sort of remember posting this but I don't remember the Northrop lead. Anyway shortly before that post I got my MS, started teaching soon after, then started my current job in early 2017. My recommendation for new post-grads is to apply everywhere you can. It's going to take some discipline, keeping multiple drafts of your resume, a skeleton cover letter etc, endless rejection emails (you grow numb to them after a while). It's tireless work and it'll feel like you're going nowhere, but it really is the only way to get in.
 
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Mr.E

im the best
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If you're actually getting rejection notices instead of dead silence, you're already ahead of the curve!

Never did get that notice last Friday myself, guess I'll call tomorrow just to confirm that I presumably didn't get the job (shocker).
 

NixHex

Ever since I was born, I was dope.
is a Site Staff Alumnusis a Forum Moderator Alumnusis a Researcher Alumnusis a Top Contributor Alumnusis a Battle Simulator Moderator Alumnus
If you're actually getting rejection notices instead of dead silence, you're already ahead of the curve!

Never did get that notice last Friday myself, guess I'll call tomorrow just to confirm that I presumably didn't get the job (shocker).
Is calling in a thing? I don't think I ever tried it. It seems that a company might see you as desperate... or they may see you as tenacious and will give you a chance based on it. Are there any hiring managers who could post their opinions on this? Genuinely want to know!
 

Mr.E

im the best
is a Pre-Contributoris a Past SPL Champion
I am certain of two things. 1) It could go either way, just depends on the individual manager. 2) Whatever I do is the wrong decision. :pikuh:
 

Acklow

I am always tired. Don't bother me.
Is calling in a thing? I don't think I ever tried it. It seems that a company might see you as desperate... or they may see you as tenacious and will give you a chance based on it. Are there any hiring managers who could post their opinions on this? Genuinely want to know!
Not a hiring manager, but I can say for certain that calling the company to follow up on you submitting your resume is a smart idea. The worst that could happen is that they tell you they had other candidates and it’s not the end of the world. On the flip side, it shows your interest and eagerness to get involved in the company. As a former office manager myself/supervisor, I would rather that new hires actually show that they are and can stay motivated after getting hired.
 

Celticpride

Got no anger, got no malice
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Is calling in a thing? I don't think I ever tried it. It seems that a company might see you as desperate... or they may see you as tenacious and will give you a chance based on it. Are there any hiring managers who could post their opinions on this?
Not a hiring manager but following up (tactfully and with a level head) is never frowned up. However, I’d recommend doing it via email for most on here, keeping your composure in that kind of situation requires a lot of gusto and confidence. And if they blow off your email follow up, screw ‘em.
 
I have 2 years more to study, i think in 10 years i will be still in my bedroom, in looking for ideas to make business, i don't want to study a lot
 

Mr.E

im the best
is a Pre-Contributoris a Past SPL Champion
Recruiter day before interview she set me up on: They're so impressed with your credentials they'll probably offer you the job on the spot!
Recruiter day after interview: Sorry, they decided to go in another direction.

Apparently asking questions makes me appear apprehensive about the position because I'm not lapping up everything said to me and mindlessly nodding along. Yet, I can't very well ask no questions because that makes me look like I'm not enthusiastic enough about the job because I feel like there's no substantial information left I can learn without actually getting out there and doing it. :smogthink:

Can't show too much enthusiasm without looking desperate, can't be too restrained without appearing disinterested. Not enough critical thinking skills to creatively solve unusual problems, too willing to stand up for their rights and not allow us to take advantage of them. Not charismatic and outgoing enough to be a good team player, too talkative and liable to rumormonger. There's such a fine line between too little and too much expression of every action or behavior, and the line is different for every job/company/interviewer and moves on a daily basis.

I am certain of two things. 1) It could go either way, just depends on the individual manager. 2) Whatever I do is the wrong decision. :pikuh:
In a world where education and experience are seemingly completely and utterly irrelevant, I am clearly utterly stumped with regard to actually obtaining a position of employment befitting of me.
 

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