Resource Simple Questions, Simple Answers Thread

How does Fling actually work? If I fling for example, a Leftovers Lando-T a Ring Target, will the effects of the ring target remain? Or would Lando have to be itemless, so the immunity negating effect can last? Or does it not get the effect at any point?
Here is smogon page about Fling | SS | Smogon Strategy Pokedex

Since the mon has to be holding Ring Target to suffer its effects, it only does nothing but damage when flung.
 
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blooclipse

formerly Bluecliqse
What are some good partners for scarf kartana other than magnezone?
Rillaboom, Electric types, Pivots, Fliers, Slowbro, Future Sight, Strong Breakers, Hazard setters, etc.
Rillaboom forms a nice grass-spam core and boosts kartana's Leaf Blades.
Electric types can come in on Fliers and Pex that like to switch into Kartana
Flying-types can come in on Buzzwole that is almost always a perfect switch to Kart
Slowbro resists both of Kartana's weaknesses and can be fallen on as a defensive backbone and also can be used as a pivot to get it in.
Future Sight lets Kartana break through Buzz and other walls like Pex.
Since Scarf Kart doesn't have great breaking power, strong breakers (physical means you can overwhelm shared checks, Special means you can kill eachothers' checks) are great teammates
Hazards can accentuate Kartana's power.

Specific mons include Garchomp or Tapu Lele (strong breakers) Slowbro (Pivot, FS), Mew (Spikes and SR), Landorus-T (SR), Tornadus-T (Flying-Type),Tapu Koko (Pivot, Electric Type, Buzz check), Rillaboom (Breaker, terrain support), and Tapu Lele (Buzz check, Breaker, FS)
 
Rillaboom, Electric types, Pivots, Fliers, Slowbro, Future Sight, Strong Breakers, Hazard setters, etc.
Rillaboom forms a nice grass-spam core and boosts kartana's Leaf Blades.
Electric types can come in on Fliers and Pex that like to switch into Kartana
Flying-types can come in on Buzzwole that is almost always a perfect switch to Kart
Slowbro resists both of Kartana's weaknesses and can be fallen on as a defensive backbone and also can be used as a pivot to get it in.
Future Sight lets Kartana break through Buzz and other walls like Pex.
Since Scarf Kart doesn't have great breaking power, strong breakers (physical means you can overwhelm shared checks, Special means you can kill eachothers' checks) are great teammates
Hazards can accentuate Kartana's power.

Specific mons include Garchomp or Tapu Lele (strong breakers) Slowbro (Pivot, FS), Mew (Spikes and SR), Landorus-T (SR), Tornadus-T (Flying-Type),Tapu Koko (Pivot, Electric Type, Buzz check), Rillaboom (Breaker, terrain support), and Tapu Lele (Buzz check, Breaker, FS)
Thanks!
 
what makes rain teams so much more viable than other weather synergies?
There are more ways to abuse rain than other weathers, and its easier to run a full rain team.

The problem with other weathers is that they don't have good enough abusers. Here's a list of pokemon you'd run on other weathers:

Sun: Torkoal, Venusaur, Tran, Mandi, Zard
Sand: Hippo, Ttar, Drill, Dracozolt
Hail: Atales, Arctozolt, Alolan Sandslash?

Also, with the other weathers, it's hard to run a full team due to weakness stacking and lack of abusers. For sand, all abusers are easy to wall (excadrill, dracozolt) and weaknesses are stacked. On hail, you can only run ice type abusers, which is not good. Sun lacks good abusers and putting a bunch of stealth rock weak pokemon together might not be the best. On the other hand, with rain, pelipper + ferro forms a good defensive core and many of your abusers have some defensive prescence (zapdos, seismitoad).

It's also harder to wall rain teams. Most teams will only have one or two resists. Water and grass types get killed by zapdos and most dragon types in the tier drop quickly. It's super easy to wall excadrill and dracozolt, and heatran has a great match up against sun.

tldr Rain teams have good defensive synergy and have good abusers. It's also harder to wall. You can easily win by spamming water moves and hurricane.
 
what makes rain teams so much more viable than other weather synergies?
Rain isn't the best team archetype but it is the easiest team archetype to use effectively and even easier to build. Basically everything myself12 said about rain is valid + the added bonus of literally not having to use your brain 90% of the time.
 
how can I circumvent rillaboom? i'm currently running rain, with ferro and zapdos as checks. However, grassy glide still does 40% on zapdos, and ferro can easily be predicted using superpower.
 
how can I circumvent rillaboom? i'm currently running rain, with ferro and zapdos as checks. However, grassy glide still does 40% on zapdos, and ferro can easily be predicted using superpower.
the specific tactics will vary depending on Rillaboom's teammates, but generally speaking the strategy will be to maintain superior positioning and momentum to limit it's free opportunities and keeping ferro and Zapdos as healthy as possible. Rillaboom is tough for rain, and sometimes you need to out predict it. Calling out U-Turn or Superpower or knock off and staying in to hit Rillaboom is sometimes a viable, and necessary tactic. Very few people actually click Grassy Glide when a Ferrothorn is around.

Here are some high level replays of Rain's strategy and tactics against Rillaboom in action.

https://replay.pokemonshowdown.com/gen8ou-1525751039-qwz5m44pf32du7onvzdb3wxof61t9tipw
https://replay.pokemonshowdown.com/gen8ou-1525840160-n3b2phagivfja4tap0cy8xf220vbujspw
https://replay.pokemonshowdown.com/gen8ou-1525632898-oioe0qfviytly94pwmkneoyc6byzc1mpw
 
This isn't related to OU specifically, but how do I not mess up in the early game? Idk if it's just me, but I'm noticing that more often than not, my losses come from me either misplaying or playing a bit too reactively early on. I can get my act together in the mid-late game, but my brain kinda just doesn't function in the first few turns. How do I go about fixing this? It's not like I can magically tell my brain to start playing well.
 
This isn't related to OU specifically, but how do I not mess up in the early game? Idk if it's just me, but I'm noticing that more often than not, my losses come from me either misplaying or playing a bit too reactively early on. I can get my act together in the mid-late game, but my brain kinda just doesn't function in the first few turns. How do I go about fixing this? It's not like I can magically tell my brain to start playing well.
Team Preview is where you set the road-map for the game. You have to look at your team and your opponent's team, see what threatens your team heavily, and vice versa. Identify mons that put in a lot of work against your opponent's team and the ones that don't. An offensive win conn could be due to one of your mon's ability to set up and sweep if 1-2 of your opponent's mons are eliminated or sufficiently chipped, or because you have a pivot/ wall that walls their, say, Blacephalon, but if you let it get too weak or faint Blace sweeps the rest of your team. Then decide which pokemon are generally putting in a lot of value against the enemy team. Then choose a lead that does well against your opponent's team, and won't make you start off on the backfoot if they lead with the biggest offensive threat to your team.

Once you have identified you're winning and losing conditions, you need to come up with a game plan for executing the goal you have at team preview. once you have a gameplan, be flexible as you gain more information during the battle, but following a plan, even if it needs to be updated, is how you decide which mons to sack at critical ventures, which mons need to be kept healthy for you to win, and which enemy pokemon you need eliminated or weakened. That way, when an important turn comes, you know what to prioritize. By having a carefully thought out plan from the start, you aren't gonna become too reactive during the game or start overpredicting and sacking important mons when it isn't necessary. you'll be in the driver's seat from turn 1, making the opponent react to you and play on your terms.


When working on these skills, don't rush and always take some time each turn to consciously think about the risk/reward of a given play as it pertains to achieving the win condition layed out by your gameplan and minimize risk. You get better with experience as you will start to memorize and quickly recall what general plays you need to do against certain team structures.
 
The team I'm running gets demolished by Trick Room teams. I'd like to slot in one or two "Trick Room counters" to try and up my odds against the archetype. What are some good Pokemon that might help up my winrate against Trick Room?
 
The team I'm running gets demolished by Trick Room teams. I'd like to slot in one or two "Trick Room counters" to try and up my odds against the archetype. What are some good Pokemon that might help up my winrate against Trick Room?
Some team compositions sort of just. inherently cannot deal effectively with trick room, such as HO in general- this is most likely your issue.

Outside of this, generally adding more bulk is useful, and perhaps adding something that can beat a marowak-alola (such as a toxapex/some other water types) may be worthwhile.
 
The team I'm running gets demolished by Trick Room teams. I'd like to slot in one or two "Trick Room counters" to try and up my odds against the archetype. What are some good Pokemon that might help up my winrate against Trick Room?
It would depend what type of TR you're facing, but basically every good TR team to my knowledge uses at least Lunar Dance Cresselia, and Porygon 2 as setters. Sash Hatterne with a suicide move is generally the best third setter (and usually a good lead). There are a lot of potential attackers, but Marowak-A is pretty much on every TR team. The other sweepers you'll see tend to be a toss up, but Melmetal is probably the safest second option. Some other sweepers people will use are Conkeldurr, Dhelmise, Glastrier, and Azumarill.

As for some splashable options on how to deal with TR, Melmetal matches up insanely well against all the good TR setters, can give you a free 6/5 lead if the opponent tries to lead with a setter and DiB flinches. Melm KO's Hatterne through its sash, and Porygon/Cresselia pose zero offensive threat to it, allowing it to fish for DiB flinches with almost no risk. At the very least, it puts a lot of pressure on the TR team to not lead with a setter. Taunt Heatran (especially Balloon Heatran) also matches up very well against all the setters.

TR teams tend to have awful defensive synergy and extremely limited defensive switch-in options, if any, instead relying more on being willing to sack sweepers after TR ends. As such, beast-boost Pokemon that threaten most of the team put massive offensive pressure on Trick Room. TR tends to be fine with sacking Pokemon to bring their setters in, but Pokemon like Blacephalon and Kartana can threaten a sweep if the TR player opts to sack something to them, putting them between a rock and a hard place.

Screens are very potent against TR because it tends to not run Defog. So despite Alolan-Ninetails getting destroyed by most of the TR sweepers, it's surprisingly valuable against TR in general. The same goes for any other screen setter you might be using. It's very easy for a Screener to come in against a TR setter, so if you have a screen setter, make sure to abuse it as much as possible.

You often have to pivot against TR, but on the other hand, TR tends to be unable to fit in hazards, making switching easier than it could be. There is also no shortage of options in OU that can be used against various TR sweepers, including Landorus, Heatran, Zapdos, Ferrothorn, Toxapex, Corviknight, Slowbro, Tapu Fini, Dragonite, etc... In general, most TR sweepers are physical, so physically defensive spreads fare better.

Also, if you really want to give the middle finger to Trick Room teams, Crawdaunt is incredibly abusable against pretty much any TR team.
 

Red Raven

I COULD BE BANNED!
How do you guys ran Lando-T? For utility with Stealth Rock and Defog or Offensively with Stone Edge?
Most of the time Landorus is max hp max spdef with u turn, eq, knock off or toxic and defog or rocks. Offensive sets face competition from Garchomp because they require more support than sharky boi given Landorus' meh speed
 

blooclipse

formerly Bluecliqse
How do you guys ran Lando-T? For utility with Stealth Rock and Defog or Offensively with Stone Edge?
Both.

Usually offensive Lando is outclassed by Chomp, but there are lots of situations that it isn't, such as being a Choice Scarfer.
If running a more defensive set, Lando usually uses a specially defensive EV spread to better check electric-types and other special attackers. It is used as a pivot with U-Turn and can also use Stealth Rock or Defog to good effect. Lando-T is a great Rocker because of its great typing and good natural bulk alongside Intimidate.

The Landorus-T Analysis Page is a bit outdated, beacuse it was written when lando was running physdef spreads. It does explain what Lando is good at though, and it can help you understand.
 
Hi, what kind of Balance or BO builds would Ferro+Pex be better than Ferro+Slowtwin? Because can't you always also use like Tran+Lando, or a similar combo, to cover anything that threatens both Ferro+Slowtwin?
 
I was at 1750+elo but i haven't been playing that format for a while and when i check it fell to 1720, do the Elo deteriorate over time
 
I was at 1750+elo but i haven't been playing that format for a while and when i check it fell to 1720, do the Elo deteriorate over time
There is rating decay. The showdown page states:

Above 1400, we have rating decay. Every day at 9 AM GMT+0:
  • If you played over 5 games, there is no decay
  • If you played 1-5 games, you lose 1 point for every 100 points above 1500 you are
  • If you played 0 games, you lose 1 point for every 50 points above 1400 you are
 
Can someone tell me the "Double Weather + Terrain + Garchomp" post, where is it? I saw it somewhere and wanted to use it as a guideline for ladder OU games.
 

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