Ultra Sun & Ultra Moon In-Game Tier List

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I've got a few comments on the Pokemon I used in my playthrough.

Decidueye: I got really unlucky, since mine had a -Atk nature and a really, really low Attack IV (I believe 1). It didn't hit nearly as hard as it should have, but it's got a nice movepool and good typing. Factoring in mine's lack of firepower, I'd say A or B.

Jolteon: Holy moses, Jolteon is good. It was easily the MVP of my team since it's so damn fast and hits hard as well. I don't think it's S-tier material, mainly because it needs to be babied for a bit before becoming useful and doesn't get Discharge until level 37, but it can get Signal Beam via Move Tutor pretty early on. I think Eevee (Jolteon) can reside comfortably in A.

Mantine: Mantyke is really annoying to catch (25 Catch Rate why?), but if you backtrack you can get it before Lana's trial and evolve it immediately. Incidentally, Mantine absolutely destroys Totem Araquanid and does decently against Marowak as well. Stats-wise, it can tank Special hits all day, but its damage output is underwhelming. I think C is good for Mantine.

Lopunny: Lopunny is an interesting and very fun Pokemon to use. It gets Z-Splash very early-game, making it a decent sweeper. Unfortunately, its damage output is very underwhelming until it evolves, which takes awhile because Buneary starts with 0 happiness. Upon evolving it gets Return immediately and Jump Kick right around that point, and also Baton Pass (great synergy with Z-Splash). All that being said, it really doesn't hit that hard unboosted and it's really frail as well, so I'd say B or C.

Salazzle: I got lucky with getting a Male Cute Charm Lopunny, which made hunting for a Female Salandit much easier; Because I didn't actually add it to my team until immediately before Togedemaru, it was severely underleveled, and so I can't speak much about its performance as a Salandit. After evolution, though, it's a great Special attacker; Flame Burst and Venoshock honestly aren't terrible for midgame, and you get the TM for Sludge Bomb in Po Town. Given how it can be a pain to find and evolve, though, I think it should be in B.

Zoroark: You know, Zoroark would be a lot better if it got more Special moves before the E4. Its main STAB for most of the game is Night Slash, which isn't that bad, although like Decidueye I think it was cursed with a below-average Attack stat. That being said...

Zoroark absolutely cheeses the Necrozma fight. Because of Illusion, in theory it'll keep trying to use Photon Geyser, letting you get free Night Slashes or Punishments off against it. In practice, it actually switched to Dragon Pulse after the first Photon Geyser failed, but I was still able to beat it by sac'ing a bunch of other team members to keep bringing Zoroark in. I would say C for Zoroark because of its lack of good moves, but since it nearly auto-wins against one of the most brutal boss fights in any Pokemon game, I think Zoroark is B.
 

Xen

Fish Pokémon Connoisseur
is a Top Smogon Social Media Contributor Alumnus
I don’t know how well-known this is, but I just found out in my casual playthrough that if you hatch the Paniola Eevee egg and take it to the cowgirl in the nursery (right side of the counter), she lets you choose one of the evolution stones for the Gen I Eeveelutions.

Figured it was worth bringing up in case it wasn’t well known, since that’s a big boon to Eevee, whether you use the egg or catch a wild one. Hatching the egg with Tauros in the little fence doesn’t take very long either since Rotom gives you a scripted Rotopower when you obtain the egg.
 
I'm working through my game right now, Munchlax is either C or B tower - came underlevelled and didn't matter whatsoever it's rank as fuck and hits pretty hard with a phenomenal move pool. You'd think it's item reliant for being so slow but things are hitting it for like 5-10 damage out of it's 80+ HP so it barely matters

Update: given soothe bell and evolved at level 23, just before the Fire totem. Still tank as fuck. A Tier?

Drifloom is mediocre, not very strong, alright bulk and a really good typing. Hoping it gets better on Evo. Could be D, C at best. I will say that's it's east to train since you get one at level 19 through the haunted trainer school side quest

Update: Drifloon blows but Drifblim is a lot better. Super tanky and can actually kill things. Feels C

Update 2 into Ula Ula:
Snorlax definitely A, Drifblim definitely C, Smoochum should be A, a lull from 24-30 but Jynx is a buzzsaw, Torracat maybe B? Not super impressed. Arbok barely gets used but comes in clutch in boss fights and hits decently with Crunch and venoshock, Charjabug has been a tank, is starting to fall off a bit but I expect Vika stage will improve, A tower so far with good doveristy of attacking options

Update 3: Snorlax still a tank by Aether raod, drfiblim got boring so dropped it in favour of Jellicent which is just above average all around, easy B tier
 
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Xen

Fish Pokémon Connoisseur
is a Top Smogon Social Media Contributor Alumnus
So I buckled down and finished my casual UM run over the weekend (except for TRR) while I was out with the flu. Since I used some Pokémon on my team that haven’t really been discussed, I figured I’d throw my two cents here. I did bank over Sync Abras in order to catch my team members with ideal natures for post-game competitive use (and in one case, I SOS chained), but I’ll try to keep it as non-biased as possible.

Litten: Not much to really explain here that hasn’t already been said/known. Solid stats and movepool make it a reliable starter from start to finish. The addition of Double Kick in its early movepool makes the Normal trial easy if you don’t carry a fighter, and Z-Fire moves make Totems like Lurantis and Togedemaru trivial. A for sure; I honestly like it better than Popplio in these games.

Petilil: I honestly wasn’t expecting much from Petilil in these games since the Sun Stone comes late (at Blush Mountain), but it was a lot better than I thought it’d be. I tutored Giga Drain when I first reached Heahea so it could have it earlier, and Petilil was surprisingly potent with it. It didn’t seem to start dropping off until Malie, which is around when it’ll evolve anyway. And once it does evolve you have a fast and strong Grass type that eventually gets Petal Dance (hopefully with Own Tempo). The low speed is a little annoying, but Giga Drain helps mitigate that somewhat. Evolving past the threshold for Quiver Dance is also disappointing, but I didn’t find myself missing it that much, and in cases where the boost was needed, Growth (and especially Z-Growth) was more than sufficient. The bigger issue with Petilil is that it doesn’t have many favorable matchups against the game’s bosses; even Olivia can be a shaky matchup with her fossils. I’d probably say C mostly because of the late evo and matchups against important trainers/totems, but I wouldn’t complain with B.

Horsea (Island Scan): I had a love/hate relationship with Horsea. On one hand it comes pre-packaged with Water Pulse, and Bubble Beam and Brine come not too long after, which is nice since Scald is locked away at Poni in these games. On the other hand Horsea’s SpD is absolutely awful, which often led to it getting smacked around even with resisted moves; to put it in perspective, even Luvdisc’s Water Gun was dealing decent damage against it. The late evolution to Seadra doesn’t really help either.

Fortunately once you reach Malie, you should Seadra, and the Dragon Scale is available in the Kantonian Gym (albeit it’s a little inconvenient since you have to challenge it twice). Once it evolved into Kingdra, it really took off and became one of the most reliable members of the team, especially once it picked up Scald, Draco Meteor, and your Ice move of choice (I tutored Icy Wind to it, but I didn’t really use it until I got the Ice Beam TM). C

Comfey So I had the itch to SOS a Shiny Comfey after Mallow’s trial, which was a fucking awful experience at this point in the game, but that’s a different gripe for a different day. Anyway I ended up catching a Shiny Modest 4 IV Comfey (conveniently missing SpA and SpD), but even with favorable IVs, Comfey...wasn’t all that great. By the time you catch it, it no longer has Draining Kiss, so I ended up having to tutor it Giga Drain, which was okay but not great. Unfortunately Comfey’s movepool is trash; you won’t be seeing any good STAB (or any good move for that matter) until you get the Dazzling Gleam TM at the Vast Poni Canyon. It does have pretty decent stats overall for a Pokémon that isn’t terribly difficult to obtain, and it levels up fast, but the movepool holds it back quite a bit. D

Honedge (Island Scan): Not as dominant as it is in X/Y, but still good. Honedge needed some babying since it was rather weak, but I think that might’ve been because mine was Modest. Doublade was better, especially with Eviolite boosting its Bulk, and Aegislash is..well, it’s Aegislash. Aegis evolves right before the Aether raid (unless you get Lucky with Pelago), which was later than I thought or wanted it to be, but Aegislash is great once it does evolve. It quickly became the MVP of my team in later important matchups thanks to its hybrid bulk and strength, and it also handily took out Ultra Necrozma with a combination of Toxic and Shadow Ball. I’m on the fence between A and B, leaning more towards B; perhaps someone with experience using Honedge with a more beneficial in-game Nature can give a second opinion on the Honedge stage.

Komala: This Pokémon is criminally underrated imo. At first I used the Sleep Talk+Last Resort combo with Normalium-Z as a hilarious nuke button, but I ended up filling out its movepool before the Ghost trial and kept Last Resort to use as a Breakneck Blitz nuke. That along with Brick Break and Shadow Claw made Komala the team’s resident wrecking ball, and U-Turn was also very useful since I was playing under Set settings. One might find a second, more reliable Normal STAB to be better, but I liked U-Turn more as I never really found myself in a scenario where I needed to use a Normal move more than once. Komala’s stats outside of Atk aren’t outstanding though; the Speed was okay overall, but meh defenses were troublesome since Komala would need healing if it eats an attack, especially a physical hit. I also used refresh to bump its affection to two hearts for the Exp boost since Komala comes late and is in the slow Exp group; I would recommend others to do the same since an underleveled Komala isn’t a good Komala. C
 
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I'm sorry if this is off-topic, I will gladly move this to another threat if it is, but since we're making a tier list (I say "we", but I have yet to put in my two cents), I was wondering if we could have a look at the best possible team to tackle Alola. I've been experimenting with this idea, and on paper Primarina, Magnezone, Alolan Muk, Hawlucha and Mudsdale seem to have amazing synergy. Haven't found a 6th member yet though. If you guys are interested, I'll run this team through a teambuilder and post a screenie.
 
Finished my playthrough through the E4

Incineroar: Agree with A. Slightly underwhelming for a long time but carried the late game phase pretty well, Darkest Lariat is a clutch move and it was the ideal route cleaner even if it couldn't contribute much to boss fights.
Final moveset: Darkest Lariat (Malicious Moonsault) / Flare Blitz / Leech Life / Cross Chop

Jynx: A tier. Can see the B argument because it has a couple issues with late game power once the level curves spike and there's a bit of a point before its evolution where it struggles on Akala but overall its got a phenomenal typing and movepool and does a great job of outspeed and illing things without issue.
Final moveset: Psychic / Blizzard (Subzero Slammer) / Focus Blast (Grass Knot) / Lovely Kiss

Arbok: Agree with C tier. Pretty much useless for the majority of the game in regards to route clearing but carries major weight as a controller for major boss fights between Glare, Screech, and later one with Haze. Crunch and Sludge Bomb did fine as attacking moves and Focus Band+Glare+Haze triviallized the U-Necrozma fight. Actually swept a couple E4 with the late game moveset.
Final moveset: Gunk Shot / Crunch / Coil / Glare

Vikivolt: Agree with B. The biggest disappointment on the team. Grubbin blew. Charjabug was phenomenal. Vikavolt would usually kill something when it hit it but not always and it was always taking hits and getting interfered with and just being a slow glass cannon type of mon. Thunderbolt nuke was very valuable but that, and the Levitate typing covering the ground type matchups were all it had going for it.
Final moveset: Thunderbolt / Bug Buzz / Energy Ball / Flash Cannon

Jellicent: Recommend B tier. Replaced Drifblim when I got bored with it (C tier) and it performed well. Guaranteed encounter at level 35 prior to Acerola trial so trivial to obtain. Eviolite Frillish is tanky and then Jellicent arrives 5 levels later. Doesn't hit too hard but can consistently 2HKO enemies while enemies often fail to do any kind of significant damage. Very important role on my team with no other water resists, this despite having Cursed Body and not Water Absorb. The standard competitive moveset performs very well, in addition to Jellicent's large variety of coverage options including Psychic and Dazzling Gleam.
Final moveset: Scald / Shadow Ball / Will-o-wisp / Recover

Snorlax: Easiest A tier of my life. Absolutely stomped the entire game pretty much up to Vast Poni Canyon where the power level started to catch up to its bulk at which point it dropped from dominant to good. Spoke earlier about how Munchlax comes underleveled and slow and it couldn't matter less because things are poking it for 10% damage. Evolved by level 23 with the Soothe Bell you already have available. Body Slam and Crunch worked just fine with RestTalk for most of the game, coverage came online late game. Would sit and be fat and hit hard all game until late where it just 1v1ed most things. Great mon, only real knock is it can't really route solo efficiently. Heavy Slam vs Totem Ribombee was just mean.
Final moveset: Body Slam / Brick Break / High Horsepower / Heavy Slam
 
I'm looking to do a speed run of both US and UM preferably with some/all Alolan starters now the HA has been released. If any bred mon is in the mix, what would be the best 6 plus a couple of subs to add to the team if I did go with the starters?

I was thinking a final team of Incineroar, Decidueye, Primarina, Medicham, Magneton, Garchomp plus ? to provide as much coverage as possible but I'm not sure I'm on the right track with so many physical attackers so thought I'd ask. Thanks for any help.
 

pilica12

Buriallusion: Phantomic Killer in Night Mist
is a Top Smogon Social Media Contributor Alumnusis a Community Contributor Alumnus
I'm looking to do a speed run of both US and UM preferably with some/all Alolan starters now the HA has been released. If any bred mon is in the mix, what would be the best 6 plus a couple of subs to add to the team if I did go with the starters?

I was thinking a final team of Incineroar, Decidueye, Primarina, Medicham, Magneton, Garchomp plus ? to provide as much coverage as possible but I'm not sure I'm on the right track with so many physical attackers so thought I'd ask. Thanks for any help.
Sort of a far-reaching point, but my personal philosophy where in-game runs of USUM were concerned was to prepare everything solely for the Ultra Necrozma fight for the end (which actually turned the fight surprisingly trivial, despite my fears). On paper, your team appears sufficiently diverse and with good enough coverage to reliably handle most things (although I would be slightly concerned about Totem Lurantis, off the cuff). 4-2 Phys-Spec isn't really having "too many", and I don't think there should be any concern there.

So the real question is: how do you intend to take on Ultra Necrozma? Just basing off the assumption that you will be slightly underlevelled in that fight, and assuming an Eviolite Magneton strategy (that's my best guess, you may have something else in mind altogether):

+1 0 Atk Necrozma-Ultra Photon Geyser vs. 252 HP / 252 Def Eviolite Magneton: 42-51 (22.5 - 27.4%) -- 49.7% chance to 4HKO (note that these are equal-levelled)
252 SpA Magneton Thunderbolt vs. +1 0 HP / 0 SpD Necrozma-Ultra: 29-35 (14.1 - 17%) -- possible 6HKO

(This is making the unrealistic assumption that you can invest greater than 510 EVs, depending on the EV spread/natures you end up taking, things may turn out differently - also, I'm not entirely sure if Necro has EVs or IVs anywhere)

So I guess the real question is: are you comfortable with only having ONE reasonable answer to Necrozma? (Given that the rest of your team is demolished outright by it?)

Just speaking from experience, my own team consisted of Aegis, AloMuk and Sylveon, which basically formed a loop that theoretically allowed me to drain it of PP (mainly Geyser). As fate would have it though, Muk's first hit poisoned, so the loop only lasted four turns before it died (a hilariously anticlimactic end). As far as suggestions go, I would honestly get rid of Medicham. I don't really feel as if it contributes to the synergy of the team (since it isn't particularly sturdy, and I'm a bit uncomfortable with its two main STABs being imperfectly accurate, with one carrying that well-known drawback). Since Fightings can be reliably be handled by either Prima or Deci, and Poisons comfortably taken by Magneton or Garchomp, there is no reason to replace it with another Psychic. I personally think adding a Flyer (Hawlucha, perhaps, especially since Fighting; Staraptor too comes to mind, as a good all-round Flyer) would be reasonably in order. While I am aware this doesn't really solve the Ultra Necrozma problem, the only real solution involves a strategy rather than any single 'mon. The plan for that one is entirely up to you.
 
Sort of a far-reaching point, but my personal philosophy where in-game runs of USUM were concerned was to prepare everything solely for the Ultra Necrozma fight for the end (which actually turned the fight surprisingly trivial, despite my fears). On paper, your team appears sufficiently diverse and with good enough coverage to reliably handle most things (although I would be slightly concerned about Totem Lurantis, off the cuff). 4-2 Phys-Spec isn't really having "too many", and I don't think there should be any concern there.

So the real question is: how do you intend to take on Ultra Necrozma? Just basing off the assumption that you will be slightly underlevelled in that fight, and assuming an Eviolite Magneton strategy (that's my best guess, you may have something else in mind altogether):

+1 0 Atk Necrozma-Ultra Photon Geyser vs. 252 HP / 252 Def Eviolite Magneton: 42-51 (22.5 - 27.4%) -- 49.7% chance to 4HKO (note that these are equal-levelled)
252 SpA Magneton Thunderbolt vs. +1 0 HP / 0 SpD Necrozma-Ultra: 29-35 (14.1 - 17%) -- possible 6HKO

(This is making the unrealistic assumption that you can invest greater than 510 EVs, depending on the EV spread/natures you end up taking, things may turn out differently - also, I'm not entirely sure if Necro has EVs or IVs anywhere)

So I guess the real question is: are you comfortable with only having ONE reasonable answer to Necrozma? (Given that the rest of your team is demolished outright by it?)

Just speaking from experience, my own team consisted of Aegis, AloMuk and Sylveon, which basically formed a loop that theoretically allowed me to drain it of PP (mainly Geyser). As fate would have it though, Muk's first hit poisoned, so the loop only lasted four turns before it died (a hilariously anticlimactic end). As far as suggestions go, I would honestly get rid of Medicham. I don't really feel as if it contributes to the synergy of the team (since it isn't particularly sturdy, and I'm a bit uncomfortable with its two main STABs being imperfectly accurate, with one carrying that well-known drawback). Since Fightings can be reliably be handled by either Prima or Deci, and Poisons comfortably taken by Magneton or Garchomp, there is no reason to replace it with another Psychic. I personally think adding a Flyer (Hawlucha, perhaps, especially since Fighting; Staraptor too comes to mind, as a good all-round Flyer) would be reasonably in order. While I am aware this doesn't really solve the Ultra Necrozma problem, the only real solution involves a strategy rather than any single 'mon. The plan for that one is entirely up to you.
Oh heck thanks for reminding me, I'd completely blocked tackling Totem Lurantis out of my memory; it took 5 tries and a lot of rng luck to beat that thing the first time with my unplanned team. I can't remember that much of the Necrozma battle but thinking about it I'll probably breed substitute mons that can handle them specifically.

I like the idea of Hawlucha (Mold Breaker maybe?) and I haven't used that before so I think I might go with Incineroar, Decidueye, Primarina, Magneton, Garchomp (Rough Skin) and Hawlucha as the mains and have a think about the Lurantis and Necrozma specific teams. Maybe Incineroar, A-Muk & Foul Play Contrary Malamar as a start of an anti-Necrozma team plus Hawlucha and maybe Salazzle & ? for Laurantis would work?
 
Turtonator should probably be C. It comes way later than you want it to, but mine was a brute. Too slow to take advantage of Shell Smash, but the typing is really good, it hits like a truck(with very interesting coverage), and it lives everything. Worked out very similarly to my Metagross overall.

Has anyone used Growlithe the entire game? I only used it until I caught Turtonator, but Intimidate was good and it killed what I needed it to. It was still doing work at the power plant, but if someone else has used it the entire way, please weigh in, the 30-45 stretch looks painful.

I also used the in-game traded Trevanant, but I couldn’t tell you where to rank it/Phantump. It was a good grass type, had the weird utility moves I want from my grass types, but there’s a lot of coverage to watch out for and getting an actual Trevanant requires either waiting or work.
 
Sort of a far-reaching point, but my personal philosophy where in-game runs of USUM were concerned was to prepare everything solely for the Ultra Necrozma fight for the end (which actually turned the fight surprisingly trivial, despite my fears). On paper, your team appears sufficiently diverse and with good enough coverage to reliably handle most things (although I would be slightly concerned about Totem Lurantis, off the cuff). 4-2 Phys-Spec isn't really having "too many", and I don't think there should be any concern there.

So the real question is: how do you intend to take on Ultra Necrozma? Just basing off the assumption that you will be slightly underlevelled in that fight, and assuming an Eviolite Magneton strategy (that's my best guess, you may have something else in mind altogether):

+1 0 Atk Necrozma-Ultra Photon Geyser vs. 252 HP / 252 Def Eviolite Magneton: 42-51 (22.5 - 27.4%) -- 49.7% chance to 4HKO (note that these are equal-levelled)
252 SpA Magneton Thunderbolt vs. +1 0 HP / 0 SpD Necrozma-Ultra: 29-35 (14.1 - 17%) -- possible 6HKO

(This is making the unrealistic assumption that you can invest greater than 510 EVs, depending on the EV spread/natures you end up taking, things may turn out differently - also, I'm not entirely sure if Necro has EVs or IVs anywhere)

So I guess the real question is: are you comfortable with only having ONE reasonable answer to Necrozma? (Given that the rest of your team is demolished outright by it?)

Just speaking from experience, my own team consisted of Aegis, AloMuk and Sylveon, which basically formed a loop that theoretically allowed me to drain it of PP (mainly Geyser). As fate would have it though, Muk's first hit poisoned, so the loop only lasted four turns before it died (a hilariously anticlimactic end). As far as suggestions go, I would honestly get rid of Medicham. I don't really feel as if it contributes to the synergy of the team (since it isn't particularly sturdy, and I'm a bit uncomfortable with its two main STABs being imperfectly accurate, with one carrying that well-known drawback). Since Fightings can be reliably be handled by either Prima or Deci, and Poisons comfortably taken by Magneton or Garchomp, there is no reason to replace it with another Psychic. I personally think adding a Flyer (Hawlucha, perhaps, especially since Fighting; Staraptor too comes to mind, as a good all-round Flyer) would be reasonably in order. While I am aware this doesn't really solve the Ultra Necrozma problem, the only real solution involves a strategy rather than any single 'mon. The plan for that one is entirely up to you.
I'd assume Ultra Necrozma, and all the Totems, have IV's of 30 across the board, but may have neutral natures. I also agree to leave Medicham out in favor of Hawlucha and perhaps picking up Zoroark to cheese Ultra Necrozma by putting Hawlucha in the back for that fight, leaving it wondering why its Photon Geyser is having no effect on the apparent Fighting type in front of it. Hawlucha is S rank in this list for very good reason, despite the in-game trade being marred a bit by the Brave nature. Even with no investment, a Supersonic Skystrike from Hawlucha will OHKO Lurantis before it has a chance to call any allies, making that fight a breeze.
 
They’re actually slightly better than that. Clamperl evos are about 12% from bubbling spots (35% chance of encountering Clamperl, 35% chance of it SOSing one of the two), Gengar is 9% (30%/30%) and Slowking is 4% (20%/20%). Politoed is the only 1% SOS-only on that list.
Responding a few months late, but this might still be useful.

I don't believe it's actually understood how the SOS'd mon is chosen, and the tables aren't being interpreted properly. For example, I decided (arguably stupidly, but oh well) that I wanted to catch a Gengar, so off to the haunted Thrifty Megamart I went.

The first SOS chain ended somewhere after more than 20 successful SOS calls of more Haunters because I screwed up counting in my head and the last Haunter Struggled itself to death. If we assume that my chain had exactly 20 successful SOS calls, the chance of none of them being Gengar if Gengar has a 30% chance to be chosen by a successful SOS call from a Haunter is approximately 0.08%, so 30% is probably wrong.

For the second SOS chain, I kept track of each successful SOS call so I wouldn't screw up and let it end in Struggle. I finally had a Gengar SOS call on the 107th or 108th (I may have missed marking down one successful call in the 70s). If Gengar really has a 30% chance of being chosen on a successful call, the chance of that not happening 106 times in a row needs to be expressed in scientific notation, and is approximately 3.8 x 10^-17. To put that number in perspective, if all 7.4 billion people on the planet decided to try this at once, if the 30% was correct the chance it would happen at all to only one person is still 0.0000028%.

I suspect the actual number is as mentioned previously in the thread, 1% for the rare call mon. In my second example, a 1% call rate means my outcome has about a 34% chance of happening. At a 1% chance, you have a 50% chance of seeing the rare call in 69 calls. As such, I wouldn't consider rare calls available in a casual run considering it takes hours of SOS battle chaining to reliably get just one.
 
Responding a few months late, but this might still be useful.

I don't believe it's actually understood how the SOS'd mon is chosen, and the tables aren't being interpreted properly. For example, I decided (arguably stupidly, but oh well) that I wanted to catch a Gengar, so off to the haunted Thrifty Megamart I went.

The first SOS chain ended somewhere after more than 20 successful SOS calls of more Haunters because I screwed up counting in my head and the last Haunter Struggled itself to death. If we assume that my chain had exactly 20 successful SOS calls, the chance of none of them being Gengar if Gengar has a 30% chance to be chosen by a successful SOS call from a Haunter is approximately 0.08%, so 30% is probably wrong.

For the second SOS chain, I kept track of each successful SOS call so I wouldn't screw up and let it end in Struggle. I finally had a Gengar SOS call on the 107th or 108th (I may have missed marking down one successful call in the 70s). If Gengar really has a 30% chance of being chosen on a successful call, the chance of that not happening 106 times in a row needs to be expressed in scientific notation, and is approximately 3.8 x 10^-17. To put that number in perspective, if all 7.4 billion people on the planet decided to try this at once, if the 30% was correct the chance it would happen at all to only one person is still 0.0000028%.

I suspect the actual number is as mentioned previously in the thread, 1% for the rare call mon. In my second example, a 1% call rate means my outcome has about a 34% chance of happening. At a 1% chance, you have a 50% chance of seeing the rare call in 69 calls. As such, I wouldn't consider rare calls available in a casual run considering it takes hours of SOS battle chaining to reliably get just one.
I think this table is correct (empirically, I've done some of the 10%'s and 1%'s and they seem about right). Slots are 1-4-5-10-10-20-50 (percent to get on a successful call).

I.E. Gengar, Politoed, and Slowking are awful, while Huntail and Gorebyss (and other things like Lush Jungle cave Crobat) are not bad. Worth noting that Mareanie and Sableye are 50% so there's a pretty good chance of finding them (esp. Sableye --- it's available before Adrenaline Orbs). Considering Deep Sea Tooth/Scale aren't available without SOS anyways (and later than Clamperl with SOS, iirc) just SOSing a Huntail/Gorebyss sounds better than evolving Clamperl.

(btw someone should look into all those cases where SOS>normal catch in efficiency)
 
I think this table is correct (empirically, I've done some of the 10%'s and 1%'s and they seem about right). Slots are 1-4-5-10-10-20-50 (percent to get on a successful call).
Ahh, that makes a lot more sense. This is also the first time I've seen an explanation of those tables. The tables showing a percentage next to each SOS entry is highly confusing, since it doesn't have anything to do with the SOS call, it's just copied down from the main encounter rate for some reason.
 
I’m not sure if my luck was bullshit or the AI at that point knew my illusion cheese strategy, but Zoroark did absolutely nothing better than dying in the Necrozma fight. I ended up using Togedemaru hax to beat it.
 
I've completed my 2nd USUM in-game run with more pokemon!

I used Primarina, Incineroar (with a shiny Litten that I bred just before the hidden abilities were released (y tho Ninentdo?)), Vikavolt and Arbok. They've already been talked about extensively and I agree with their current rankings (A, A, B and B respectively).

Petilil - C tier - Xen has already covered most of what I wanted to say here and I agree with that summary. It comes early and starts off strongly with Giga Drain, Sleep Powder and Growth and continues to be decent. It does unfortunately have several drawbacks however that prevent it from going any higher than C tier IMO, including terrible coverage (limited to grass moves, Hidden Power and Nature Power), poor match-ups against most major boss fights (Both Totem Araquanid and Olivia's pokemon have dual types that make Petilil less effective), a fairly late Sun Stone (Blush Mountain) and (most likely) missing out on Quiver Dance until the move relearner at Mount Lanikila. Despite all this, it is a solid special sweeper for in-game purposes.

Klefki - C tier - Klefki has great Steel/Fairy typing, with an amazing ability (Prankster). It also has a decent movepool, including offensive options such as Foul Play, Play Rough and Flash Cannon, as well as supportive options to abuse it's awesome ability, such as Reflect / Light Screen, Thunder Wave and Toxic. The latter is a foolproof way to deal with Ultra Necrozma and Thunder Wave is a great panic button to have in tight situations. Unfortunately though, it comes very late, as you get it in the Thrifty Megamart after you've beaten Totem Mimikyu. It also just doesn't stand out, aside from the occasional important use of a status move, with it's average stats and that fact that it's a supportive pokemon that comes after most of the totems; Whilst it's strong enough for route trainers, it isn't going to be sweeping any boss fights by itself. The thing is, if you're going for a fairy-type Pokemon from the Thrifty Megamart that's good in a crisis, why would you not choose Mimikyu over this? Klefki was fun to use however, and it can contribute to some extent in all of the remaining major battles.

I would also like to contribute over Poipole, which I swapped Arbok out for. It comes very late, underlevelled and is total dead weight until it evolves into Naganadel! Naganadel is very good during the Elite Four but not as good as other late game options (thinking of you, Ultra Necrozma). Cannot go higher than E tier.
 
Is it worth ranking the different forms of Oricorio separately? I’ve been using Oricorio-G for my Ultra Sun playthrough and I have to say I’m very underwhelmed by it. Ghost types don’t seem to have a good time in this game at all - sucker punch is rife it would seem. A lot of the reasoning to make it S Tier seems to be based on Oricorio-E.

Agree with other placements at this time other than maybe a slight increase for Cutiefly. With Psychic and early access to half decent Fairy moves, literally any hidden power other than Psychic will offer more coverage. I lucked out and got Fire on mine, so it works similarly to Gardevoir in ORAS.
 
Is it worth ranking the different forms of Oricorio separately? I’ve been using Oricorio-G for my Ultra Sun playthrough and I have to say I’m very underwhelmed by it. Ghost types don’t seem to have a good time in this game at all - sucker punch is rife it would seem. A lot of the reasoning to make it S Tier seems to be based on Oricorio-E.

Agree with other placements at this time other than maybe a slight increase for Cutiefly. With Psychic and early access to half decent Fairy moves, literally any hidden power other than Psychic will offer more coverage. I lucked out and got Fire on mine, so it works similarly to Gardevoir in ORAS.
Not really. In a normal play through, the Sensu Style (the Ghost style) and Purple Nectar are both post-game, (you can't get to Poni Meadow before becoming the champion) so there's no reason to consider this style's performance at all. There's also no reason to wait to use Oricorrio when its best important match ups are well before the other styles are available. (Hala and Totem Araquanid)
 
I have played through both games now and I wanted to try to contribute to this a little. I have never posted in an in-game tier list thread for real before but I guess you must start somewhere. I am not sure if the rules I play with are the ones that are the optimal ones when ranking Pokemon for these threads (I play with Exp. Share off, I max the affection of all my Pokemon in Refresh and I only use Z-moves in important battles) so keep that in mind. I have understood that trading over stones to evolve certain Pokemon early is not accepted for these lists, so I will not rank the Pokemon for which I did that.

Here are the Pokemon I used:

Ultra Moon

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Litten
Final moveset: Flare Blitz / Darkest Lariat / Brick Break / Flamethrower
Available early with good stats all-round, the only lacking one is Speed. It's movepool was good too, the only real problem was that it learned Flare Blitz very late. I decided to not go with Fire Punch which meant I had to go with Fire Fang for a long while. Darkest Lariat was a great secondary STAB move, then I went with Brick Break for coverage and Flamethrower in the last slot because I couldn't think of anything better. It was one of the better members of the team, it felt like it helped in many important battles and I had great success with it. Not sure what else to say, the Litten line is just really great. A

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Abra (with trade)
Final moveset: Psychic / Shadow Ball / Dazzling Gleam / Energy Ball
Available early, could potentially be a bit of a pain to catch but I managed to catch the first Abra I met in the first Ultra Ball I threw. It needed a bit of babying before it evolved into Kadabra but it became really strong afterwards. It then got even stronger once it had evolved into Alakazam, I traded to evolve mine after beating Hala but I guess the optimal time to fully evolve it would be right after it has evolved into Kadabra. Stat-wise, it has really high Sp.att and Speed as well as a pretty good movepool. I went with Recover instead of Energy Ball for a long while but scrapped Recover late in the game since I rarely used it. The bad thing is that Alakazam has terrible defenses, especially on the physical side. In the late stages of the game, if it couldn't KO the opponent, it would very likely get KO'd in return. Overall, it was quite good but not the best. B

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Petilil
Final moveset: Petal Dance / Giga Drain / Quiver Dance / Sleep Powder
Not going to rank this since I traded over a Sun Stone to evolve it early, before it would learn Quiver Dance as a Lilligant. That said, if the Sun Stone had been available earlier in the game, I think it would be A for sure. Quiver Dance was the recipe for success it needed to break the game in half. Lilligant was easily the best member of my Ultra Moon team, it took care of many situations where the others couldn't do much. Even without Quiver Dance, I can see it working decently with Giga Drain, Sleep Powder, Growth/Z-Growth and Petal Dance+Own Tempo. Probably B or C, but as said, I won't rank it.

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Lillipup
Final moveset: Return / Crunch / Rock Tomb / Giga Impact
Available almost directly on Akala Island, so early mid-game. Good Attack, decent Speed and bulk, Intimidate was also helpful to lower the Attack of opposing Pokemon. Sadly, it's movepool was a bit lacking. It takes a long while for the Return TM to be available, so I was stuck with Take Down for a large chunk of the game. I used Facade alongside Take Down for a while, it doesn't cause recoil and it is more accurate, but comes at the cost of being a bit weaker. Regarding other moves, the only useful one it gets through level-up is Crunch. There's also Play Rough but it comes very late. The same goes for Giga Impact but I think it is better to just use the TM. I used it to get the most powerful Z-move that was possible. I also used Work Up to raise its Attack for a short while but I scrapped it as I found it better to just attack right away. Rock Tomb was the final move, it was surprisingly useful. Lowering the Speed of opposing Pokemon is never bad. Overall, I find Stoutland to be quite good but it was not without issues. B/C

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Mantyke
Final moveset: Scald (Surf after beating the game) / Air Slash / Ice Beam / Roost
I backtracked to Melemele to catch one after getting the ability to Surf on Lapras (so I would have it before the Fire Trial), though I'm not sure if that is the best moment to catch one. It also requires a Remoraid to evolve but finding one is not hard since you already have the Fishing Rod at that point. As for Mantine, it has insane Sp.def while its other stats are a bit lackluster. It is slow and has lacking offenses. Like most Water-types, it also takes forever before it gets a good Water-type move. Air Slash and Roost are cool, but they are not enough. Water Absorb was also fun since the AI was sometimes stupid enough to use Water-moves against Mantine. I won most battles with Mantine but the majority of them were slow victories since it didn't do much damage with its moves and had to heal itself with Roost throughout the battles. Still, its Special bulk should not be underestimated as it took a +4 Dazzling Gleam from Totem Ribombee like nothing. Mantine is not the best, but not completely useless either. D

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Mimikyu (regular, not the Totem version)
Final moveset: Play Rough / Shadow Claw / Leech Life / Hone Claws (Swords Dance after beating the game)
Available quite late, after beating the Ghost Trial. It also has a low chance of appearing but I got lucky and found one quickly. Unfortunately, it felt underwhelming as it rarely did enough damage. After I had beaten the game and unlocked the IV Judge, I found out that my Mimikyu had a 0 IV in Attack, that's probably one reason. It needed Hone Claws to do more damage, but by the time it had set up it still didn't feel like it did enough. Either that, or it had already fainted from the damage it took while setting up. Play Rough also had a tendency to miss at the worst possible moments if I didn't use Hone Claws to raise Mimikyu's Accuracy first. Leech Life could be good to recover HP but I rarely found use for it in the later stages of the game. Disguise is a great Ability, but it never felt like it helped all that much. I can see Totem Mimikyu being really good in these games, but sadly I didn't quite feel it with regular Mimikyu. I still love it though. B

Ultra Sun

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Buneary
Final moveset: Return / High Jump Kick / Fire Punch / Splash (Thunder Punch after beating the game and getting the Mega Stone)
Available very early, on Route 1. Mine evolved very quickly, not too long after the Normal Trial. Though I did use some Vitamins from Festival Plaza and a Friendship Power from Rotom to speed up the process. It gets Return upon evolving, which reaches full power soon afterwards. Sadly, Lopunny doesn't have very good stats. Z-Splash is pretty cool but it wasn't enough. Bulky opponents still survived a +3 move and it rarely felt worth setting up since many trainers in the game only have 1 Pokemon on their team. Lopunny is also really frail, so setting up was risky. That said, it usually survived more hits than I expected. Jump Kick rarely missed, which was another good thing. Overall an okay starter replacement and early team member but it is far from perfect. C

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Oricorio (not
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since it is post-game only)
Final moveset: Revelation Dance / Air Slash / Hurricane / Roost
Probably the best member of my team on this game. It only has Flying-moves for the majority of the game but it doesn't need much more. Air Cutter/Air Slash and Roost was usually good enough. The ability to change form and type was interesting but never super useful since you can only change between there types during the game and it takes a while before you can change at all. Still, it was sometimes useful to change its type into something else before a boss battle. Revelation Dance was also good for secondary STAB in the later stages of the game. Very good overall, though I'm not sure if it is quite worthy of S rank. A

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Tentacool
Final moveset: Scald (Surf after beating the game) / Sludge Wave / Ice Beam / Giga Drain
Available after clearing the Water Trial, early mid-game. Stat-wise, it has good Sp.def and quite good Speed, but its other stats are lacking. I expected it to be at least somewhat decent, but it was not. It was utter garbage. It needed a lot of babying at first and it never really got better once it had caught up with the rest of the team in terms of level. It suffers from the same problem as most Water-types with the TMs for Scald and Surf being available too late, and it never really gets anything good before that either. Lowering opposing Pokemon's Sp.def with Acid Spray looks cool in theory, but it doesn't work in practice. Tentacool will either die in the time it takes to lower their Sp.def, or it will still not do enough damage afterwards. Giga Drain also looks great but it is too weak without STAB or a boost in some form. Icy Wind is a great way to lower opposing Pokemon's Speed for team support but it doesn't have much other uses. And once Tentacruel finally gets the better moves like Scald and Sludge Wave, they are still not doing enough damage. I hate to say anything positive about Tentacruel, but it had a few positive things going for it. Icy Wind was great for team support. Clear Body is also a good Ability since a lot of opponents will try to lower the stats of your Pokemon. It was also one of the two fastest members of the team. Overall, it felt like it worked the best mid-game, surprisingly. It just didn't work early- or late-game. Even during the post-game, it failed to OHKO a Mudsdale at 10 levels lower with Surf and got destroyed by Earthquake in return. I can't remember the last time I was this disappointed with a Pokemon I used on an in-game team. Looking back, I really regret not using another Water-type, or another Poison-type. Easily the worst Pokemon of this team, as well as the worst Pokemon I have used on my in-game teams across all four Gen 7 games. I will probably never use it again. E

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Eevee (Leafeon)
Final moveset: Leaf Blade / X-Scissor / Bite (Knock Off after beating the game) / Swords Dance
Definitely one of the better members of the team. It has great Attack and Defense, its Speed is also quite good. Its Sp.def is terrible though, I could never expect it to survive neutral or even resisted special moves. I'm not sure about the best point to catch an Eevee if you want to use Leafeon, I caught mine after completing the Grass Trial so I could evolve it immediately afterwards. It get Razor Leaf upon evolving, then Seed Bomb through the Ula'ula Move Tutor and then finally Leaf Blade later on, so it will always have a pretty strong STAB move. It has decent movepool but it is hard to know what to use. I went with the moves listed above but Synthesis and Aerial Ace are also alternatives. Leafeon is strong but its non-STAB moves apart from X-Scissor are quite weak and won't do much damage unless it boosts its Attack with Swords Dance first. Overall, it felt very useful at many times, I could count on it to be useful when other members of the team couldn't do much. B

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Pineco
Final moveset: Bug Bite / Heavy Slam / Rock Slide / Drill Run (Earthquake after beating the game)
Available early on Ula'ula Island. It has fantastic Defense and decent Attack but lower Sp.def and very low Speed. It evolves quickly after capture which is good. Bug Bite is unfortunately very weak for a main STAB move, and it is in an awkward position when it comes to Gyro Ball. It is too slow to outrun anything, but too fast for Gyro Ball to do any significant damage. Heavy Slam is better, but it becomes available very late. It does get Rock and Ground-type moves for coverage so that's at least something. I could always count on Forretress to survive any Physical hit, and even any Special hit thanks to Sturdy as long as it had full HP. Unfortunately, it could rarely KO anything back. Most opponents were 2-3HKO'd if Forretress survived long enough. Overall it was not the best, but definitely not the worst either. D

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Vulpix (Alolan)
Final moveset: Ice Beam / Dazzling Gleam / Psyshock / Nasty Plot
Like with Lilligant, I traded over an Ice Stone to evolve it early so I won't rank it. But unlike Lilligant, it didn't feel like the earlier Ice Stone helped that much. Vulpix was pathetically weak, Ninetales was a bit better but still lacking. It learns Ice Beam quickly after capture, then Dazzling Gleam upon evolving. Psyshock for coverage and then I used Calm Mind to set up, later replaced with Nasty Plot. Unfortunately, the Z-Crystals for both its STAB types are among the last ones to be found in the games. It would probably be D or C, but I won't rank it.
 
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Nominating Slowking for at least B or A tier.
Availability: Very early. You get Slowpoke on the south side of route 1, and you find a King’s Rock in Trainer’s school.
Offense: 100 Special Attack is nothing to scoff at. It gets a great offensive Moveset, as it gets Confusion at level 14, and Water Gun at level 9. As soon as you get to Ula’ula island, you have access to Psychic, and you’ll be able to use it for the rest of the game. However, you can’t get Surf or Scald until very late, so the best water move you’ll have access to for a while is Water Pulse.
Defense: Its defenses are absurd, having 95 HP, 80 defense, and a whopping 110 special defense. Also, if you don’t evolve it until level 36, it gets access to Slack Off, which is great in the long run. However, 36 is a late level, and you’ll probably have a Slowking by level 5, anyway.
Typing: This is the one thing holding it back. Its typing is bad. Having 5 weaknesses (including bug) is not good. You shouldn’t use it against Totem Lurantis, Togedemaru, Mimikyu, or Ribombee. It’s great against Team Skull’s non-dark Poison types.
You get the King's Rock in the aftergame. Please use the Pokémon before nominating it.
 
You get the King's Rock in the aftergame. Please use the Pokémon before nominating it.
Just looked it up, and it can be held by Hawlucha 5% of the time. Also, Thief can be acquired right after Hala.

Original Post:
Nominating Slowking for at least B or A tier.
Availability: Early. You get Slowpoke on the south side of route 1, and you find a King’s Rock in Trainer’s school. from wild Hawlucha 5% of the time.
Offense: 100 Special Attack is nothing to scoff at. It gets a great offensive Moveset, as it gets Confusion at level 14, and Water Gun at level 9. As soon as you get to Ula’ula island, you have access to Psychic, and you’ll be able to use it for the rest of the game. However, you can’t get Surf or Scald until very late, so the best water move you’ll have access to for a while is Water Pulse.
Defense: Its defenses are absurd, having 95 HP, 80 defense, and a whopping 110 special defense. Also, if you don’t evolve it until level 36, it gets access to Slack Off, which is great in the long run. However, 36 is a late level, and you’ll probably have a Slowking by level 5, anyway.
Typing: This is the one thing holding it back. Its typing is bad. Having 5 weaknesses (including bug) is not good. You shouldn’t use it against Totem Lurantis, Togedemaru, Mimikyu, or Ribombee. It’s great against Team Skull’s non-dark Poison types.
 
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Just looked it up, and it can be held by Hawlucha 5% of the time. Also, Thief can be acquired right after Hala.

Original Post:
Nominating Slowking for at least B or A tier.
Availability: Early. You get Slowpoke on the south side of route 1, and you find a King’s Rock in Trainer’s school. from wild Hawlucha 5% of the time.
Offense: 100 Special Attack is nothing to scoff at. It gets a great offensive Moveset, as it gets Confusion at level 14, and Water Gun at level 9. As soon as you get to Ula’ula island, you have access to Psychic, and you’ll be able to use it for the rest of the game. However, you can’t get Surf or Scald until very late, so the best water move you’ll have access to for a while is Water Pulse.
Defense: Its defenses are absurd, having 95 HP, 80 defense, and a whopping 110 special defense. Also, if you don’t evolve it until level 36, it gets access to Slack Off, which is great in the long run. However, 36 is a late level, and you’ll probably have a Slowking by level 5, anyway.
Typing: This is the one thing holding it back. Its typing is bad. Having 5 weaknesses (including bug) is not good. You shouldn’t use it against Totem Lurantis, Togedemaru, Mimikyu, or Ribombee. It’s great against Team Skull’s non-dark Poison types.
You still haven't used it, however. This is purely theorymon -- early Slowking does sound fun and powerful, but you don't know that until you've tried it out.
Even in theorymon, Hawlucha's 5% chance to hold it severely impacts your nomination. It means you're not getting to evolve it until after the 1st island, and it's very inefficient to go farming for a 5% chance from a Pokémon that has a 10% encounter rate.
 
Some quick recommendations based on some Pokemon I'm using

Drowzee: E (or whatever the lowest tier is). Psychic's have it hard enough as is in Alola, and Drowzee was never a good Pokemon in the first place. Has some pretty awful matchups against all the totems since they can all hit it either super effectively or on its much weaker physical defense. Even with it having a advantageous matchup against Hala and Totem Kommo-o, its weak offenses and defenses don't do all that much to them. It's best use is being able to poison both Pokemon in totem battles with Poison Gas, but Drowzee is usually so slow it will most likely never pull it of as it proceeds to get OHKO.

Flabébé : D in Ultra Sun, E in Ultra Moon. A boring level up movepool, low physical defense makes it not very useful for most of the Totem battles and the move relearned being moved to the very last stretches of the game make the Flabébé line a chore to use. Flabebe being ranked a bit higher in Ultra Sun is for the Shiny Stone being found earlier in Ultra Sun, but you still need to beat Nanu to obtain it.

Carbink: D but probably around the higher end of the tier. Carbink's very high defenses, a nice ability in Clear Body and a good offensive typing prove to be very useful for the early to mid game where some Pokemon hit pretty hard and love to abuse stat lowering moves. It has some weird matchups against half the totems, but it can typically survive at least one super effective hit from most that can it it like that. It starts to lag behind on the third island where its low offenses really start to show, and the evolved Pokemon generally hit harder. It has some good matchups here and there but they are pretty few and far between starting Island 3 so its generally best to find a replacement for Carbink once that happens.

Bisharp: C. Bisharp is an interesting Pokemon because its found in the wild between level 33-36 where it normally doesn't evolve until level 52. Pawniard goes way beyond its usefulness starting round the early 30's so another 20 levels is just pure torture. Luckily, Bisharp can be caught, but unluckily it has a 5% encounter rate, and is found mid-late into the game where you'd most likely have your full team by then. It doesn't really have that much battling from the point of capture but overall it has a half and half in the game. There are some mid-late and late game encounters it doesn't want any business with, such as the fighting and fire types in Aether Paradise, Hapu, Totem Kommo-o and part of Mina's trial, but it also wants to be front and center for the other half of the encounters such as the other portion of Aether Paradise, most of Nanu, Ultra Necrozma, Totem Ribombee and the entire portion of the Elite Four. It does require a bit of move tutor investment but at that point in the game, most people should have loads of Battle Points to use and is at the most a 10 minute detour to acquire more.
 
*Sees Seel, Tyrunt, and Slowpoke don't have official ranks yet*

Well, time for another run of US!

*Two weeks later*

... Boy, one of these mons is good, and two are pretty freaking bad. Let's go over this gongshow.

Seel and Slowpoke both for E tier.

I'm pairing these two water types in the same nomination because you get both of them on island 1, and they're both... lackluster. Early Water Pulse sounds pretty good... until you remember Slowpoke has base 40 special attack, and Seel has base 45. This means even Waterium Z's are unlikely to down even SE targets unless it's a quad weakness, your opponent is made of paper mache, or you're overleveled. Both are also very slow, so they get outsped and blown up by foes they should have an advantage against. Seel requires backtracking as well, which also doesn't help, and the lv. 20's and 30's are by far their worst period, with enemy mons just far too much for them to take on, and the pleathora of ghost and dark moves meaning Slowpoke gets blown up even in random trainer battles. And just when you think it gets better upon evolving them? Congratulations, your Slowbro is still weak to Totem Mimikyu and Guzma, and Dewgong STILL lacks the offensive power to put down all but the easiest targets with Brine(though Blizzard sort of helps). Their weaknesses are everywhere, they are practically dead weight until you find those super specific matchups in the Elite 4 they CAN do work in with their coverage moves and STABs, and raising them takes too long.

Tyrunt for B

I agree with this nomination. When you get it, Tyrunt is only lv. 15, which hurts, and it needs to be babied a little bit. Thankfully, you get it right in time for the Eviolite, so it can actually take a hit or two, and its high offense lets it still do damage with moves like Rock Tomb, Bulldoze, and Bite/Crunch. It has an OKAY matchup against Guzma's bugs, though it doesn't want to take on Vikavolt's Flash Cannon, pubstomps the Team Skull grunts and most random trainer battles, but then falters in the late game when the game really starts to hate it with Kommo-o, Ultra Necrozma, and Ribombee. Strong Jaws lets it handle some of Acerola's ghosts alright, and its rock typing pays against Kahili and Earthquake gives it at least opportunities to handle Olivia and Molayne's crew at times. Solid bulk, great offensive power, and a nice movepool makes this a pretty okay Dragon type to use.
 
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