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Swampert (Analysis)

Discussion in 'Uploaded Analyses' started by religiousjedi, Mar 14, 2012.

  1. religiousjedi

    religiousjedi #ZELDA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    is a Forum Moderatoris a Contributor to Smogon
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2010
    Messages:
    1,746

    Status: Done
    QC Approval: (In Cherub Agent's analysis)
    GP Checks: Calm Pokemaster, Stalfos


    Cherub Agent's Analysis

    [Overview]

    <p>Swampert's fall to UU took many by surprise. As one of the bulkiest Pokemon last generation, it was seen on many teams as a bulky lead. However, BW brought new threats that could handle Swampert, such as Ferrothorn. Meanwhile, older Pokemon, such as Quagsire, received new toys in their Dream World abilities to give the mudfish some competition. That's not to say that Swampert can't cut it: UU may have some familiar and new threats, but Swampert still has several coveted aspects. A great typing in Water / Ground leaves it with only one weakness and four useful resistances to Fire-, Rock-, Poison-, and Steel-type attacks, all in a tier wrought with such opposition, not to mention an immunity to Electric-type attacks. That great typing is backed by 100 / 90 / 90 defenses, allowing Swampert to take various hits and hit back hard from an oft-overlooked base 110 Attack. Middling Speed, a crippling Grass-type weakness, and a lack of a reliable recovery move aside, Swampert is a great addition to the tier, serving as a good counter to threats such as Rotom-H, Darmanitan, and Victini.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Tank
    move 1: Waterfall
    move 2: Earthquake
    move 3: Ice Punch / Roar
    move 4: Stealth Rock / Toxic
    item: Leftovers
    ability: Torrent
    nature: Adamant
    evs: 240 HP / 252 Atk / 16 Def

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>While the previous generation emphasized a defensive spread on Swampert, BW prefers one that takes hits and dishes back the pain. STAB Waterfall scores a reliable 2HKO on most variants of Heracross and an OHKO on most Rotom-H (with a 39.3% chance of an OHKO on bulky variants). Earthquake is a reliable secondary STAB move, easily taking out Darmanitan and Victini while 2HKOing even the bulkiest Roserade. Ice Punch provides a solid coverage move against Flygon, Togekiss, and any Zapdos not carrying Hidden Power Grass. It also deals 39.6% - 47% damage to the standard SubSeed Shaymin and 2HKOes offensive Shaymin. If the potential to take on Grass-types is unnecessary due to having reliable counters to them, Roar is an excellent alternative to Ice Punch, phazing out undesirable opponents and racking up passive damage through entry hazards. Speaking of which, Stealth Rock, another staple in Swampert's repertoire, is the main option for the fourth moveslot. This even makes a 2HKO possible on SubSeed Shaymin (when accounting Leftovers recovery) with Ice Punch in tow, so long as one gets a maximum damage roll (though Shaymin does outspeed Swampert). If another Pokemon sets up Stealth Rock, Swampert's option for the fourth moveslot is Toxic; this negates the walling capabilities of Tangrowth, defensive Zapdos, and most bulky Water-types as the poison damage gradually increases.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>The given EVs grant Swampert a Leftovers number as it sits at 401 HP. 252 Attack EVs and an Adamant nature bolster Swampert's unheralded Attack, while the rest of the EVs are stockpiled into Defense. This makes Swampert an offensive tank which can take a hit or two and retaliate with the appropriate move. If one prefers, an Impish or Relaxed nature allows Swampert to run a traditionally bulky spread, allocating 252 EVs in Defense and with the remaining 16 EVs in Attack, Special Attack, or Special Defense. However, this means Swampert loses out on a lot of power; the only real benefits are tanking Darmanitan and Victini better and, in the case of a Relaxed nature, enabling the use of special attacks such as Scald, Ice Beam, and Hydro Pump.</p>

    <p>Regardless of the choice of EV spread, Swampert cannot afford to take a hit from a Grass-type, while bulky Water-types do not mind either of its STAB moves or any move not named Toxic. Therefore, a sturdy Grass-type of your own is the premier answer, particularly if it carries a secondary Poison typing. Roserade is an excellent choice, tanking special attacks thanks to its superb Special Defense and scaring away the corresponding threats with Sludge Bomb and a Grass-type move. Zapdos is another option, as it carries Heat Wave for Grass-types and STAB Thunderbolt for Water-types. Both choices are complemented very well by Swampert, which can take on the Fire-type attacks aimed at Roserade and the Rock-type attacks aimed at Zapdos.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Choice Band
    move 1: Earthquake
    move 2: Waterfall
    move 3: Ice Punch
    move 4: Stone Edge / Superpower
    item: Choice Band
    ability: Torrent
    nature: Adamant
    evs: 80 HP / 252 Atk / 176 Spe

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>Swampert's great Attack is often overlooked due to its superb bulk and defensive typing. However, that very same typing is what makes Swampert such a potent attacker, enabling it to hit a wide range of Pokemon, notably Darmanitan, Victini, Nidoking, and Moltres, among others. Even with a more offensive spread compared to the previous set, it can still take a hit or two and retaliate hard with the boost provided by Choice Band. Earthquake is Swampert's most powerful physical attack (accounting for STAB), hitting a wide range of opponents for great damage. However, locking Swampert into an attack that Flying-types and Levitate Pokemon are immune to is not always a good idea. Therefore, Waterfall is the secondary STAB move of choice, enabling Swampert to take on Bronzong, which would laugh at the prospect of a Choice-locked Earthquake.</p>

    <p>Ice Punch makes a return to crush threats such as Flygon, and Grass-types also take a lot of damage from it, with Shaymin being 2HKOed. Meanwhile, the last spot is up for grabs. Stone Edge provides a stronger option against Pokemon such as Zapdos (overkill on Moltres!) while Superpower is Swampert's best move against Snorlax. However, the former has shaky accuracy, and the latter drops both Attack and Defense, requiring Swampert to switch out more often than not. In any case, these two moves should only be used for hitting the mentioned threats, meaning Swampert will likely be switching out after scoring the KO.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>The Speed EVs let Swampert outspeed minimum Speed Milotic, with maximum Attack EVs required to make the most of Choice Band's boost. The rest is placed in HP to provide some bulk. Other options include running 208 Speed EVs to outrun minimum Speed Suicune or simply maximizing HP to enhance Swampert's longevity. One may consider replacing Waterfall and Ice Punch with Aqua Tail and Avalanche, respectively. Regarding Aqua Tail, there is little reason to use a slightly more powerful physical Water-type move over Waterfall. While Swampert will rarely make use of Waterfall's flinch rate, Aqua Tail is mostly overkill and one must carry the risk of Aqua Tail's 90% accuracy. As for Avalanche, the move gets boosted to 120 Base Power if Swampert attacks second, a stronger damage output than Ice Punch would reach. It even has the benefit of defeating SubSeed Shaymin, dealing 95% - 111.9% damage to it if at maximum power and entry hazards are on the field. However, Avalanche has a -4 priority, and Swampert cannot take a Grass-type move at all.</p>

    <p>Pokemon that can set up entry hazards are once again excellent teammates, converting various 2HKOs into OHKOs. Roserade stands out, as it also has a lovely 4x Grass-type resistance and the ability to defeat the Pokemon that trouble Swampert, such as bulky Grass- and Water-types, with STAB Sludge Bomb and Leaf Storm, respectively. Regirock with STAB Stone Edge can take on Zapdos should you decide to run Superpower in the last slot, and also provides Stealth Rock support. It should be noted though that both share a Grass-type weakness, so a Zapdos of your own can alleviate this concern thanks to its access to Heat Wave. Weavile is an option to defeat the Grass- and Flying-types that can take Earthquake, but has trouble switching in. Finally, Snorlax beats most specially based Grass-types, and Swampert can deal with the Pokemon that give it trouble, such as Darmanitan with Superpower and Hitmontop.</p>

    [Other Options]

    <p>Swampert has a decent special movepool consisting of Hydro Pump, Surf, Scald, Earth Power, Ice Beam, Hidden Power, and Focus Blast, all usable thanks to a base 85 Special Attack. Of these, Ice Beam enables neutral-natured Swampert with 0 Special Attack EVs to 2HKO Tangrowth 83.98% of the time. Swampert naturally outspeeds Tangrowth too, so long as they share a similar nature. In reality, though, a mixed variant has little use other than surprise value in the tier, as Swampert will be hitting hard enough with physical moves. Scald does have the benefit of causing a burn, which would help out with Swampert's bulk.</p>

    <p>With access to Counter and Mirror Coat, Swampert can surprise most attackers with a quick KO. Given its superb bulk, it can take a hit or two and retaliate in earnest with the appropriate reflecting move. Yawn is an alternative move for phazing, but once an opponent is put to sleep, it is a wasted moveslot. In addition, if relying on Toxic Spikes for status, this move is rather pointless except on Flying-, Poison-, and Steel-types, plus any Levitate users. A RestTalk set with Curse and Waterfall makes Swampert a physical variant of the old CroCune set; however, Grass-types walk all over such a set. Finally, Refresh is an option for healing status, but Swampert rarely has a moveslot to spare for it, and it doesn't heal health like Rest either.</p>

    [Checks and Counters]

    <p>Grass-types scare the living daylights out of Swampert, especially those that can take an Ice Punch. Tangrowth is the number one counter, able to take an Ice Punch comfortably even from the Choice Band set. It must be wary of the rare Ice Beam though, which can 2HKO. Shaymin is next in line, having no fear of Ice Beam and only being 2HKOed by Ice Punch from the Choice Band set; however, unlike Tangrowth, Shaymin outspeeds Swampert no matter what set it runs, and immediately scares Swampert out with STAB Seed Flare. Roserade also outspeeds Swampert, but it can only switch into Waterfall, Toxic, or the rare special attacks. Status, particularly Toxic or Will-O-Wisp, also cripples Swampert for the rest of the match, as poison negates any Leftovers recovery and burn drastically reduces Swampert's offensive presence.</p>
  2. Calm Pokemaster

    Calm Pokemaster
    is a member of the Site Staffis a Forum Moderatoris a Smogon Media Contributoris a Contributor to Smogon
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2009
    Messages:
    1,708
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    Show Hide


    [Overview]

    <p>Swampert's fall to UU took many by surprise. As one of the bulkiest Pokemon last generation, it was seen on many teams serving as a bulky lead. However, the latest generation brought upon new threats that could handle Swampert, namely such as Ferrothorn. Meanwhile, older Pokemon, such as Quagsire, received new toys in their Hidden Abilities to give the mudfish some competition. That's not to say that Swampert can't cut it. UU may have some familiar and new threats, but Swampert still has several coveted aspects. A great typing in Water / Ground leaves it with only one weakness and four useful resistances in to Fire-, Rock-, Poison-, and Steel-type attacks, all in a tier wrought with such opposition, not to mention an immunity to Electric-type attacks. That great typing is backed by 100 / 90 / 90 defenses, allowing Swampert to take various hits and fire back with the hit back hard from an oft-overlooked base 110 Attack. Middling Speed, a crippling Grass-type weakness, and a lack of a reliable recovery move aside, Swampert is a great addition to the tier, serving as a great bulky Pokemon and generally a good counter to threats such as Rotom-H, Darmanitan, and Victini.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Tank
    move1: Waterfall
    move2: Earthquake
    move3: Ice Punch / Roar
    move4: Stealth Rock / Toxic
    item: Leftovers
    ability: Torrent
    nature: Adamant
    evs: 240 HP / 252 Atk / 16 Def

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>While previous generation emphasized a defensive spread on Swampert, this generation prefers one that takes hits and dishes back the pain. Therefore, a bulky Water / Ground-type wants to hit hard with the excellent STAB Waterfall, boosted by STAB and allowing scores a reliable 2HKO on most variants of Heracross and an OHKO on most Rotom-H (with a 39.3% chance of a OHKO on bulky variants). Earthquake is a reliable secondary STAB, easily taking out Darmanitan and Victini while easily 2HKOing even the bulkiest Roserade is easily 2HKOed. Ice Punch provides a solid coverage move against Flygon, Togekiss, and any Zapdos not carrying Hidden Power Grass. Meanwhile, It also deals 39.6% - 47% damage to the standard SubSeed Shaymin, indicating a 2HKO on offensive Shaymin. If the potential to take on Grass-types is forgone due to having reliable counters to them, Roar is an excellent and old staple on Swampert alternative to Ice Punch, enabling to phazing out undesirable opponents and racking up passive damage through entry hazards. Speaking of which, Stealth Rock, another staple in Swampert's repertoire, is up for a moveslot in the last spot. This even makes a 2HKO possible on SubSeed Shaymin (when accounting Leftovers recovery) with Ice Punch in tow, so long as one gets a maximum damage roll (though Shaymin does outspeed Swampert). If another Pokemon sets up Stealth Rock, Swampert's next option for the fourth moveslot would be Toxic; this ensures Tangrowth's, defensive Zapdos's, and bulky Water-type's walling capabilities are negated negates the walling capabilities of Tangrowth, defensive Zapdos, and most bulky Water-types as the poison damage gradually increases.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>The given EVs grant Swampert a Leftovers number as it sits at 401 HP. 252 Attack EVs and an Adamant nature bolster Swampert's unheralded Attack, while the rest of the EVs are stockpiled into Defense. This makes Swampert an offensive tank, able to which can take a hit or two and retaliate with the appropriate move. If one prefers, an Impish or Relaxed nature allows Swampert to run a traditionally bulky spread, allocating 252 EVs in Defense and 16 EVs (16 EVs in what?) with the rest in a choice of Attack, Special Attack, or Special Defense. However, this means Swampert loses out on a lot of power; as the only real benefit is tanking Darmanitan and Victini harder, and in the case of Relaxed nature, enabling Swampert to the use special based moves attackssuch as Scald, Ice Beam, and Hydro Pump.</p>

    <p>Regardless of the choice of EV spread, Swampert cannot afford to take a hit from a Grass-type, while bulky Water-types do not mind either of its STAB moves or any move not named Toxic. Therefore, a sturdy Grass-type of your own is the premier answer, particularly if it carries a secondary Poison typing. Roserade is an excellent choice, tanking specially based moves special attacks thanks to its superb Special Defense and scaring away the corresponding threats with Sludge Bomb and a Grass-type move. Zapdos is another option, as it carries Heat Wave for Grass-types and STAB Thunderbolt for Water-types. Both choices are complemented very well by Swampert, who can take on the Fire-type attacks aimed at Roserade and the Rock-type attacks aimed at Zapdos.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Choice Band
    move1: Earthquake
    move2: Waterfall
    move3: Ice Punch
    move4: Stone Edge / Superpower
    item: Choice Band
    Ability: Torrent
    nature: Adamant
    evs: 80 HP / 252 Att / 176 Spe

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>Swampert's great Attack is often overlooked due to its superb bulk and defensive typing. However, that very same typing is what makes Swampert such a potent attacker, as its Water / Ground typing enables it to hit a wide coverage range of Pokemon, notably Darmanitan, Victini, Nidoking, Moltres, among others. Even with a more offensive spread compared to the previous set, it can still take a hit or two and retaliate hard with the boost provided by Choice Band. Earthquake is Swampert's most powerful physical attack (accounting for STAB), hitting a wide range of opponents for great damage. However locking itself into an attack that Flying-types and Levitate users Pokemon, are immune to is not a good idea. Therefore, Waterfall is the secondary move of choice, backed by STAB and enabling Swampert to take on Bronzong, who would laugh at the prospect of a Choice-locked Earthquake.</p>

    <p>Ice Punch makes a return to crush stuff like threats such as Flygon, and Grass-types like Shaymin also take a lot of damage from it, with Shaymin being 2HKOed thanks to Choice Band. Meanwhile, the last spot is up for grabs. Stone Edge provides a stronger option against stuff like Zapdos (overkill on Moltres!), while Superpower is his Swampert's best move against Snorlax. The former has shaky accuracy, and while the latter drops both Attack and Defense, requiring Swampert to switch out more often than not. Either way, whatever choice is used in the last spot should only be resorted on when faced with such opponents In any case, these two moves should only be used for hitting the mentioned threats, meaning Swampert will likely be switching out after scoring the KO.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>The Speed EVs let it Swampert outspeed minimum Speed Milotic, with maximum Attack EVs required to make the most of Choice Band's boost. The rest is placed in HP to provide some bulk. Other options include running 208 Speed EVs for outspeeding minimum Speed Suicune or simply maximizing HP for survivability enhancing Swampert's longevity. One may consider replacing Waterfall and Ice Punch with Aqua Tail and Avalanche, respectively. Regarding Aqua Tail, there is little reason to use a slightly more powerful physical Water-type move over Waterfall. While Swampert will rarely make use of Waterfall's flinch rate, Aqua Tail is mostly overkill and one must carry the risk of Aqua Tail's 90% accuracy. As for Avalanche, if Swampert were to take any damage the move immediately gets boosted to 120 Base Power if Swampert attacks second, a stronger damage output than Ice Punch would reach. It even has the benefit of defeating SubSeed Shaymin, dealing 95% - 111.9% damage to it if at maximum power and entry hazards are on the field. However, Avalanche has a -4 priority, and Swampert cannot take a Grass-type move at all.</p>

    <p>Pokemon who can provide set up entry hazards are once again excellent teammates, converting various 2HKOs into OHKOs. Roserade stands out, due to having since it also has a lovely 4x Grass resistance and the ability to defeat the Pokemon that trouble Swampert, such as bulky Grass- and Water-types, with STAB Sludge Bomb and or STAB Leaf Storm, respectively. It can also lay up Spikes or Toxic Spikes, providing ease against grounded foes. Regirock with STAB Stone Edge can take on Zapdos should you decide to run Superpower in the last slot, and It also provides Stealth Rock support. It should be noted though that both share a Grass-type weakness, so a Zapdos of your own can alleviate this concern thanks to its access to Heat Wave. Weavile is an option to defeat the Grass- and Flying-types that can take Earthquake, but has trouble switching in. Finally, Snorlax beats most specially-based Grass-types, and Swampert can deal with the Pokemon that give it trouble, such as Darmanitan with Superpower and Hitmontop.</p>

    [Other Options]

    <p>Swampert has a decent special movepool consisting of Hydro Pump, Surf, Scald, Earth Power, Ice Beam, a Hidden Power of choice, and Focus Blast, all usable thanks to a base 85 Special Attack. Of these, Ice Beam enables a neutral-natured, no EV investment 0 SpASwampert to 2HKO Tangrowth 83.98% of the time. Swampert naturally outspeeds Tangrowth too, so long as they share a similar nature. In reality, though, a mixed variant has little use other than surprise value in the tier, since Swampert will be hitting hard enough with physical moves. Scald does have the benefit of causing a burn, which would help out with Swampert's bulk.</p>

    <p>With access to Counter and Mirror Coat, Swampert can surprise most attackers with a quick KO. Given its superb bulk, it can take a hit or two and retaliate in earnest with the appropriate reflecting move. Yawn is an alternative move for phazing, but once an opponent is put to sleep, it is a wasted moveslot. In addition, if relying on Toxic Spikes for status, this move is rather pointless except on Flying-, Poison-, and Steel-types, plus any Levitate users ability Pokemon. A RestTalk set with Curse and Waterfall Curse, alongside Sleep Talk / Rest / Waterfall, makes Swampert a physical variant of the old CroCune set; however, Grass-types walk all over such a set. Finally, Refresh is an option, in that a status affliction is cured, but Swampert rarely has the moveslot for it to thrive, not to mention it does not heal health like Rest would for healing status, but Swampert rarely a moveslot to spare for running it, and it doesn't heal health like Rest either.</p>

    [Checks and Counters]

    <p>Grass-types scare the living daylights out of Swampert (this sentence sounded quite bland otherwise), especially those which (use ''which'' since you use ''it'' to refer to Pokemon, indicating neutral gender) can take an Ice Punch. Tangrowth is the number one counter, able to take an Ice Punch comfortably even from the Choice Band set. It must be wary of the rare Ice Beam though, which can 2HKO as a neutral nature Swampert with no SpA investment can 2HKO Tangrowth (and may outspeed if Tangrowth goes Relaxed!). Shaymin is next in line, having no fear of Ice Beam and is only being 2HKOed by Ice Punch from the Choice Band set; however, unlike Tangrowth, Shaymin outspeeds Swampert no matter what set it runs, and immediately scares Swampert out with STAB Seed Flare. Roserade also outspeeds Swampert, but it can only switch into is not a safe switch in on anything but Waterfall, Toxic, or the rare special attacks based moves. Status affliction, particularly from Toxic or Will-O-Wisp, also cripples Swampert for the rest of the match, as poison severely negates any Leftovers recovery and burn ensures that Swampert won't be drastically reduces Swampert's offensive presence able to cause as much damage as it would like.</p>


    [​IMG]

    GP 1 / 2
  3. Stalfos

    Stalfos
    is a Pokemon Researcheris a Contributor Alumnus

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2011
    Messages:
    259
    placeholder

    Show Hide

    [Overview]

    <p>Swampert's fall to UU took many by surprise. As one of the bulkiest Pokemon last generation, it was seen on many teams serving as a bulky lead. However, the latest generationBW brought new threats that could handle Swampert, such as Ferrothorn. Meanwhile, older Pokemon, such as Quagsire, received new toys in their Hidden ADream World abilities to give the mudfish some competition. That's not to say that Swampert can't cut it.:(colon) UU may have some familiar and new threats, but Swampert still has several coveted aspects. A great typing in Water / Ground leaves it with only one weakness and four useful resistances to Fire-, Rock-, Poison-, and Steel-type attacks, all in a tier wrought with such opposition, not to mention an immunity to Electric-type attacks. That great typing is backed by 100 / 90 / 90 defenses, allowing Swampert to take various hits and hit back hard from an oft-overlooked base 110 Attack. Middling Speed, a crippling Grass-type weakness, and a lack of a reliable recovery move aside, Swampert is a great addition to the tier, serving as a good counter to threats such as Rotom-H, Darmanitan, and Victini.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Tank
    move(space)1: Waterfall
    move(space)2: Earthquake
    move(space)3: Ice Punch / Roar
    move(space)4: Stealth Rock / Toxic
    item: Leftovers
    ability: Torrent
    nature: Adamant
    evs: 240 HP / 252 Atk / 16 Def

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>While the previous generation emphasized a defensive spread on Swampert, this generationBW prefers one that takes hits and dishes back the pain. STAB Waterfall scores a reliable 2HKO on most variants of Heracross and an OHKO on most Rotom-H (with a 39.3% chance of an OHKO on bulky variants). Earthquake is a reliable secondary STAB move, easily taking out Darmanitan and Victini while easily 2HKOing even the bulkiest Roserade. Ice Punch provides a solid coverage move against Flygon, Togekiss, and any Zapdos not carrying Hidden Power Grass. It also deals 39.6% - 47% damage to the standard SubSeed Shaymin, indicating a 2HKO on and 2HKOes offensive Shaymin. If the potential to take on Grass-types is forgoneunnecessary due to having reliable counters to them, Roar is an excellent alternative to Ice Punch, phazing out undesirable opponents and racking up passive damage through entry hazards. Speaking of which, Stealth Rock, another staple in Swampert's repertoire, is up for a moveslot in the last spthe main option for the fourth moveslot. This even makes a 2HKO possible on SubSeed Shaymin (when accounting Leftovers recovery) with Ice Punch in tow, so long as one gets a maximum damage roll (though Shaymin does outspeed Swampert). If another Pokemon sets up Stealth Rock, Swampert's option for the fourth moveslot would beis Toxic; this negates the walling capabilities of Tangrowth, defensive Zapdos, and most bulky Water-types as the poison damage gradually increases.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>The given EVs grant Swampert a Leftovers number as it sits at 401 HP. 252 Attack EVs and an Adamant nature bolster Swampert's unheralded Attack, while the rest of the EVs are stockpiled into Defense. This makes Swampert an offensive tank which can take a hit or two and retaliate with the appropriate move. If one prefers, an Impish or Relaxed nature allows Swampert to run a traditionally bulky spread, allocating 252 EVs in Defense and with the remaining 16 EVs in Attack, Special Attack, or Special Defense. However, this means Swampert loses out on a lot of power; the only real benefit iss are tanking Darmanitan and Victini hardbetter,(remove comma) and,(comma) in the case of a Relaxed nature, enabling the use of special attacks such as Scald, Ice Beam, and Hydro Pump.</p>

    <p>Regardless of the choice of EV spread, Swampert cannot afford to take a hit from a Grass-type, while bulky Water-types do not mind either of its STAB moves or any move not named Toxic. Therefore, a sturdy Grass-type of your own is the premier answer, particularly if it carries a secondary Poison typing. Roserade is an excellent choice, tanking special attacks thanks to its superb Special Defense and scaring away the corresponding threats with Sludge Bomb and a Grass-type move. Zapdos is another option, as it carries Heat Wave for Grass-types and STAB Thunderbolt for Water-types. Both choices are complemented very well by Swampert, whoich can take on the Fire-type attacks aimed at Roserade and the Rock-type attacks aimed at Zapdos.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Choice Band
    move(space)1: Earthquake
    move(space)2: Waterfall
    move(space)3: Ice Punch
    move(space)4: Stone Edge / Superpower
    item: Choice Band
    Aability: Torrent
    nature: Adamant
    evs: 80 HP / 252 Atk / 176 Spe

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>Swampert's great Attack is often overlooked due to its superb bulk and defensive typing. However, that very same typing is what makes Swampert such a potent attacker, as its Water / Ground typing enablesenabling it to hit a wide range of Pokemon, notably Darmanitan, Victini, Nidoking, and Moltres, among others. Even with a more offensive spread compared to the previous set, it can still take a hit or two and retaliate hard with the boost provided by Choice Band. Earthquake is Swampert's most powerful physical attack (accounting for STAB), hitting a wide range of opponents for great damage. However,(comma) locking itselfSwampert into an attack that Flying-types and Levitate Pokemon are immune to is not always a good idea. Therefore, Waterfall is the secondary STAB move of choice, backed by STAB and enabling Swampert to take on Bronzong, whoich would laugh at the prospect of a Choice-locked Earthquake.</p>

    <p>Ice Punch makes a return to crush threats such as Flygon, and Grass-types also take a lot of damage from it, with Shaymin being 2HKOed. Meanwhile, the last spot is up for grabs. Stone Edge provides a stronger option against stuff likePokemon such as Zapdos (overkill on Moltres!) while Superpower is Swampert's best move against Snorlax. THowever, the former has shaky accuracy, and the latter drops both Attack and Defense, requiring Swampert to switch out more often than not. In any case, these two moves should only be used for hitting the mentioned threats, meaning Swampert will likely be switching out after scoring the KO.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>The Speed EVs let Swampert outspeed minimum Speed Milotic, with maximum Attack EVs required to make the most of Choice Band's boost. The rest is placed in HP to provide some bulk. Other options include running 208 Speed EVs for outspendingto outrun minimum Speed Suicune or simply maximizing HP forto enhancinge Swampert's longevity. One may consider replacing Waterfall and Ice Punch with Aqua Tail and Avalanche, respectively. Regarding Aqua Tail, there is little reason to use a slightly more powerful physical Water-type move over Waterfall. While Swampert will rarely make use of Waterfall's flinch rate, Aqua Tail is mostly overkill and one must carry the risk of Aqua Tail's 90% accuracy. As for Avalanche, the move gets boosted to 120 Base Power if Swampert attacks second, a stronger damage output than Ice Punch would reach. It even has the benefit of defeating SubSeed Shaymin, dealing 95% - 111.9% damage to it if at maximum power and entry hazards are on the field. However, Avalanche has a -4 priority, and Swampert cannot take a Grass-type move at all.</p>

    <p>Pokemon whothat can set up entry hazards are once again excellent teammates, converting various 2HKOs into OHKOs. Roserade stands out, sinceas it also has a lovely 4x Grass-type resistance and the ability to defeat the Pokemon that trouble Swampert, such as bulky Grass- and Water-types, with STAB Sludge Bomb orand Leaf Storm, respectively. Regirock with STAB Stone Edge can take on Zapdos should you decide to run Superpower in the last slot, and also provides Stealth Rock support. It should be noted though that both share a Grass-type weakness, so a Zapdos of your own can alleviate this concern thanks to its access to Heat Wave. Weavile is an option to defeat the Grass- and Flying-types that can take Earthquake, but has trouble switching in. Finally, Snorlax beats most specially-(remove hyphen)based Grass-types, and Swampert can deal with the Pokemon that give it trouble, such as Darmanitan with Superpower and Hitmontop.</p>

    [Other Options]

    <p>Swampert has a decent special movepool consisting of Hydro Pump, Surf, Scald, Earth Power, Ice Beam, Hidden Power, and Focus Blast, all usable thanks to a base 85 Special Attack. Of these, Ice Beam enables neutral-natured, 0 SpA Swampert with 0 Special Attack EVs to 2HKO Tangrowth 83.98% of the time. Swampert naturally outspeeds Tangrowth too, so long as they share a similar nature. In reality, though, a mixed variant has little use other than surprise value in the tier, sinceas Swampert will be hitting hard enough with physical moves. Scald does have the benefit of causing a burn, which would help out with Swampert's bulk.</p>

    <p>With access to Counter and Mirror Coat, Swampert can surprise most attackers with a quick KO. Given its superb bulk, it can take a hit or two and retaliate in earnest with the appropriate reflecting move. Yawn is an alternative move for phazing, but once an opponent is put to sleep, it is a wasted moveslot. In addition, if relying on Toxic Spikes for status, this move is rather pointless except on Flying-, Poison-, and Steel-types, plus any Levitate users. A RestTalk set with Curse and Waterfall makes Swampert a physical variant of the old CroCune set; however, Grass-types walk all over such a set. Finally, Refresh is an option for healing status, but Swampert rarely has a moveslot to spare for running it, and it doesn't heal health like Rest either.</p>

    [Checks and Counters]

    <p>Grass-types scare the living daylights out of Swampert, especially those whichthat can take an Ice Punch. Tangrowth is the number one counter, able to take an Ice Punch comfortably even from the Choice Band set. It must be wary of the rare Ice Beam though, which can 2HKO. Shaymin is next in line, having no fear of Ice Beam and only being 2HKOed by Ice Punch from the Choice Band set; however, unlike Tangrowth, Shaymin outspeeds Swampert no matter what set it runs, and immediately scares Swampert out with STAB Seed Flare. Roserade also outspeeds Swampert, but it can only switch into Waterfall, Toxic, or the rare special attacks. Status, particularly Toxic or Will-O-Wisp, also cripples Swampert for the rest of the match, as poison negates any Leftovers recovery and burn drastically reduces Swampert's offensive presence.</p>


    c/p (open)

    [Overview]

    <p>Swampert's fall to UU took many by surprise. As one of the bulkiest Pokemon last generation, it was seen on many teams as a bulky lead. However, the BW brought new threats that could handle Swampert, such as Ferrothorn. Meanwhile, older Pokemon, such as Quagsire, received new toys in their Dream World abilities to give the mudfish some competition. That's not to say that Swampert can't cut it: UU may have some familiar and new threats, but Swampert still has several coveted aspects. A great typing in Water / Ground leaves it with only one weakness and four useful resistances to Fire-, Rock-, Poison-, and Steel-type attacks, all in a tier wrought with such opposition, not to mention an immunity to Electric-type attacks. That great typing is backed by 100 / 90 / 90 defenses, allowing Swampert to take various hits and hit back hard from an oft-overlooked base 110 Attack. Middling Speed, a crippling Grass-type weakness, and a lack of a reliable recovery move aside, Swampert is a great addition to the tier, serving as a good counter to threats such as Rotom-H, Darmanitan, and Victini.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Tank
    move 1: Waterfall
    move 2: Earthquake
    move 3: Ice Punch / Roar
    move 4: Stealth Rock / Toxic
    item: Leftovers
    ability: Torrent
    nature: Adamant
    evs: 240 HP / 252 Atk / 16 Def

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>While the previous generation emphasized a defensive spread on Swampert, BW prefers one that takes hits and dishes back the pain. STAB Waterfall scores a reliable 2HKO on most variants of Heracross and an OHKO on most Rotom-H (with a 39.3% chance of an OHKO on bulky variants). Earthquake is a reliable secondary STAB move, easily taking out Darmanitan and Victini while 2HKOing even the bulkiest Roserade. Ice Punch provides a solid coverage move against Flygon, Togekiss, and any Zapdos not carrying Hidden Power Grass. It also deals 39.6% - 47% damage to the standard SubSeed Shaymin and 2HKOes offensive Shaymin. If the potential to take on Grass-types is unnecessary due to having reliable counters to them, Roar is an excellent alternative to Ice Punch, phazing out undesirable opponents and racking up passive damage through entry hazards. Speaking of which, Stealth Rock, another staple in Swampert's repertoire, is the main option for the fourth moveslot. This even makes a 2HKO possible on SubSeed Shaymin (when accounting Leftovers recovery) with Ice Punch in tow, so long as one gets a maximum damage roll (though Shaymin does outspeed Swampert). If another Pokemon sets up Stealth Rock, Swampert's option for the fourth moveslot is Toxic; this negates the walling capabilities of Tangrowth, defensive Zapdos, and most bulky Water-types as the poison damage gradually increases.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>The given EVs grant Swampert a Leftovers number as it sits at 401 HP. 252 Attack EVs and an Adamant nature bolster Swampert's unheralded Attack, while the rest of the EVs are stockpiled into Defense. This makes Swampert an offensive tank which can take a hit or two and retaliate with the appropriate move. If one prefers, an Impish or Relaxed nature allows Swampert to run a traditionally bulky spread, allocating 252 EVs in Defense and with the remaining 16 EVs in Attack, Special Attack, or Special Defense. However, this means Swampert loses out on a lot of power; the only real benefits are tanking Darmanitan and Victini better and, in the case of a Relaxed nature, enabling the use of special attacks such as Scald, Ice Beam, and Hydro Pump.</p>

    <p>Regardless of the choice of EV spread, Swampert cannot afford to take a hit from a Grass-type, while bulky Water-types do not mind either of its STAB moves or any move not named Toxic. Therefore, a sturdy Grass-type of your own is the premier answer, particularly if it carries a secondary Poison typing. Roserade is an excellent choice, tanking special attacks thanks to its superb Special Defense and scaring away the corresponding threats with Sludge Bomb and a Grass-type move. Zapdos is another option, as it carries Heat Wave for Grass-types and STAB Thunderbolt for Water-types. Both choices are complemented very well by Swampert, which can take on the Fire-type attacks aimed at Roserade and the Rock-type attacks aimed at Zapdos.</p>

    [SET]
    name: Choice Band
    move 1: Earthquake
    move 2: Waterfall
    move 3: Ice Punch
    move 4: Stone Edge / Superpower
    item: Choice Band
    ability: Torrent
    nature: Adamant
    evs: 80 HP / 252 Atk / 176 Spe

    [SET COMMENTS]

    <p>Swampert's great Attack is often overlooked due to its superb bulk and defensive typing. However, that very same typing is what makes Swampert such a potent attacker, enabling it to hit a wide range of Pokemon, notably Darmanitan, Victini, Nidoking, and Moltres, among others. Even with a more offensive spread compared to the previous set, it can still take a hit or two and retaliate hard with the boost provided by Choice Band. Earthquake is Swampert's most powerful physical attack (accounting for STAB), hitting a wide range of opponents for great damage. However, locking Swampert into an attack that Flying-types and Levitate Pokemon are immune to is not always a good idea. Therefore, Waterfall is the secondary STAB move of choice, enabling Swampert to take on Bronzong, which would laugh at the prospect of a Choice-locked Earthquake.</p>

    <p>Ice Punch makes a return to crush threats such as Flygon, and Grass-types also take a lot of damage from it, with Shaymin being 2HKOed. Meanwhile, the last spot is up for grabs. Stone Edge provides a stronger option against Pokemon such as Zapdos (overkill on Moltres!) while Superpower is Swampert's best move against Snorlax. However, the former has shaky accuracy, and the latter drops both Attack and Defense, requiring Swampert to switch out more often than not. In any case, these two moves should only be used for hitting the mentioned threats, meaning Swampert will likely be switching out after scoring the KO.</p>

    [ADDITIONAL COMMENTS]

    <p>The Speed EVs let Swampert outspeed minimum Speed Milotic, with maximum Attack EVs required to make the most of Choice Band's boost. The rest is placed in HP to provide some bulk. Other options include running 208 Speed EVs to outrun minimum Speed Suicune or simply maximizing HP to enhance Swampert's longevity. One may consider replacing Waterfall and Ice Punch with Aqua Tail and Avalanche, respectively. Regarding Aqua Tail, there is little reason to use a slightly more powerful physical Water-type move over Waterfall. While Swampert will rarely make use of Waterfall's flinch rate, Aqua Tail is mostly overkill and one must carry the risk of Aqua Tail's 90% accuracy. As for Avalanche, the move gets boosted to 120 Base Power if Swampert attacks second, a stronger damage output than Ice Punch would reach. It even has the benefit of defeating SubSeed Shaymin, dealing 95% - 111.9% damage to it if at maximum power and entry hazards are on the field. However, Avalanche has a -4 priority, and Swampert cannot take a Grass-type move at all.</p>

    <p>Pokemon that can set up entry hazards are once again excellent teammates, converting various 2HKOs into OHKOs. Roserade stands out, as it also has a lovely 4x Grass-type resistance and the ability to defeat the Pokemon that trouble Swampert, such as bulky Grass- and Water-types, with STAB Sludge Bomb and Leaf Storm, respectively. Regirock with STAB Stone Edge can take on Zapdos should you decide to run Superpower in the last slot, and also provides Stealth Rock support. It should be noted though that both share a Grass-type weakness, so a Zapdos of your own can alleviate this concern thanks to its access to Heat Wave. Weavile is an option to defeat the Grass- and Flying-types that can take Earthquake, but has trouble switching in. Finally, Snorlax beats most specially based Grass-types, and Swampert can deal with the Pokemon that give it trouble, such as Darmanitan with Superpower and Hitmontop.</p>

    [Other Options]

    <p>Swampert has a decent special movepool consisting of Hydro Pump, Surf, Scald, Earth Power, Ice Beam, Hidden Power, and Focus Blast, all usable thanks to a base 85 Special Attack. Of these, Ice Beam enables neutral-natured Swampert with 0 Special Attack EVs to 2HKO Tangrowth 83.98% of the time. Swampert naturally outspeeds Tangrowth too, so long as they share a similar nature. In reality, though, a mixed variant has little use other than surprise value in the tier, as Swampert will be hitting hard enough with physical moves. Scald does have the benefit of causing a burn, which would help out with Swampert's bulk.</p>

    <p>With access to Counter and Mirror Coat, Swampert can surprise most attackers with a quick KO. Given its superb bulk, it can take a hit or two and retaliate in earnest with the appropriate reflecting move. Yawn is an alternative move for phazing, but once an opponent is put to sleep, it is a wasted moveslot. In addition, if relying on Toxic Spikes for status, this move is rather pointless except on Flying-, Poison-, and Steel-types, plus any Levitate users. A RestTalk set with Curse and Waterfall makes Swampert a physical variant of the old CroCune set; however, Grass-types walk all over such a set. Finally, Refresh is an option for healing status, but Swampert rarely has a moveslot to spare for it, and it doesn't heal health like Rest either.</p>

    [Checks and Counters]

    <p>Grass-types scare the living daylights out of Swampert, especially those that can take an Ice Punch. Tangrowth is the number one counter, able to take an Ice Punch comfortably even from the Choice Band set. It must be wary of the rare Ice Beam though, which can 2HKO. Shaymin is next in line, having no fear of Ice Beam and only being 2HKOed by Ice Punch from the Choice Band set; however, unlike Tangrowth, Shaymin outspeeds Swampert no matter what set it runs, and immediately scares Swampert out with STAB Seed Flare. Roserade also outspeeds Swampert, but it can only switch into Waterfall, Toxic, or the rare special attacks. Status, particularly Toxic or Will-O-Wisp, also cripples Swampert for the rest of the match, as poison negates any Leftovers recovery and burn drastically reduces Swampert's offensive presence.</p>


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