Books

RossW

formerly TerraWard19
#77
Recently read The Maze Runner triology along with the prequels. The Maze Runner, The Fever Code (direct prequel to The Maze Runner) > Scorch Trails >>>>> The Death Cure >>>> x infinity The Kill Order.

The Maze Runner was able to grab my attention and hold it throughout the whole book, an amazing book that makes you bond with the characters for the most part. Never had an empty moment or anything that could’ve been considered pointless filler. The Fever Code (while repetitive at times, how can you repeat [SPOILER="TFC spoiler"Thomas waking up inside his bedroom two dozen times over without it feeling dull at times? An exaggeration, I swear.[/SPOILER] ) is one of the greatest prequels I’ve ever read, usually they aren’t very interesting or at times just a money grab. Looking at you, The Kill Order and HP: The Cursed Child.

The Fever Code is a MUST read if you ever finish even just The Maze Runner. The movies serve the books no justice at all, they’re basically using the characters as namesakes and nothing more past the first 10 minutes. It’s like taking the HP books and stripping away everything but the core character names and magic then making them based in a Pirates of The Caribbean movie.

Another book I love is The Martian, never encountered a book like this before. It reads like a journal for the first good half of the book, wish there were more like this since I really enjoyed it. The writer consulted with countless different professionals while making the book to make it as lifelike as possible. Good amount of comedy mixed in with one of the worst situations someone can find themselves in.

Also, I have duct tape. Ordinary duct tape, like you buy at a hardware store. Turns out even NASA can’t improve on duct tape.
 

Audiosurfer

I'd rather be sleeping
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#78
things i've been reading and enjoying lately

poetry:

other people's comforts keep me up at night + there are more beautiful things than beyonce by morgan parker
phrasis + the hero poems by wendy xu
indictus by natalie eilbert
if not, winter by sappho (translated by anne carson)
awe + black life + milk by dorothea lasky
the performance of becoming human by daniel borzutsky
i'm so fine: a list of famous men and what i had on by khadijah queen
there should be flowers + i'm alive / it hurts / i love it by joshua jennifer espinoza
she had some horses by joy harjo
i am not a war by sophia terazawa
eye level by jenny xie
satan says by sharon olds
diving into the wreck by adrienne rich
virgin by analicia sotelo


prose:

my year of rest and relaxation by ottessa moshfegh
sour heart + hags by jenny zhang
poetry is not a project by dorothea lasky
the story of the lost child by elena ferrante
 
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Surgo

goes to eleven
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#80
Martha Wells just won a Hugo award for The Murderbot Diaries. She was also nominated for the Books of the Raksura (but did not win it), which is how I was introduced to her.

I really recommend these heavily and got a couple people in Discord to start in on them. If you like the SFF genre, you won't find much more original or interesting than this. First book starts here; it's standalone so don't worry about needing to read a giant series: https://www.amazon.com/Cloud-Roads-One-Books-Raksura/dp/1597802166
 
#81
I can't recommend Into This River I Drown by T.J. Klune enough! It really tugs at your heartstrings. And if you're looking for a M/M romance (or a romance in general), this is a pretty good one that I've read
 
#82
Currently on the 3rd book of the Mistborn trilogy and been enjoying it a good deal, the ending of the second book in particular was great.

Also reading Atlas Shrugged, thus far it's been kinda heavy-handed with the characters it's set up (there are capitalistic people who are smart and hard-working and socialistic people who are incompetent and lazy) but I'll have to see if it does anything interesting with them.
 

Mimas

formerly Sellon
#83
Honestly, I never had a habit of reading and rarely read any books I bought or won. But when I celebrated my birthday a few years ago, I received a collection of Diary of a Wimpy Kid, and I simply read all six books in less than a week. That's a good record! Currently in 2018, I read a few books, recently I finished reading The Diary of Anne Frank and I'm reading a book called Psychology for Teens, I recommend reading both books friends! The next book I will be reading will portray the homosexuality, I am very anxious, but let's go! :heart:

#Socialization
 
#84
id love to start reading some books again but as ive gotten older my ability to stay focused while reading has plummeted to record lows. i used to read a ton when i was a kid in elementary school and had no issues focusing. i recently picked up a book called "The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck" and tried giving it a read but constantly had to reread lines bcuz my mind wondered. i get so focused on trying to stay focused that i just mindlessly look at the lines and retain 0 of the information. it also prevents me from being able to analyze the book on any level deeper than surface. was wondering if anyone else had this issue and if so what helped them?
 
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#85
id love to start reading some books again but as ive gotten older my ability to stay focused while reading has plummeted to record lows. i used to read a ton when i was a kid in elementary school and had no issues focusing. i recently picked up a book called "The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck" and tried giving it a read but constantly had to reread lines bcuz my mind wondered. i get so focused on trying to stay focused that i just mindlessly look at the lines and retain 0 of the information. it also prevents me from being able to analyze the book on any level deeper than surface. was wondering if anyone else had this issue and if so what helped them?
Sometimes, especially when I just force myself to read when I don’t want to, or for some specific books (mostly written in the 1800s). I find reading in bed in your underwear helps, for some reason.
 
#86
id love to start reading some books again but as ive gotten older my ability to stay focused while reading has plummeted to record lows. i used to read a ton when i was a kid in elementary school and had no issues focusing. i recently picked up a book called "The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck" and tried giving it a read but constantly had to reread lines bcuz my mind wondered. i get so focused on trying to stay focused that i just mindlessly look at the lines and retain 0 of the information. it also prevents me from being able to analyze the book on any level deeper than surface. was wondering if anyone else had this issue and if so what helped them?
Years of constantly bombarding myself with alerts from messaging services and constantly exposing myself to new content from dawn to dusk of every day poisoned my brain's ability to focus on a single passive task for any reasonable amount of time. Consuming long-form audio content sort of helped me reclaim that part of my brain. In my case, it was listening to 2+ hour long podcast interviews while going on long walks/commutes, but I've found listening to audiobooks to be similarly therapeutic (and in the same vein as reading). So, maybe try an audiobook, and see if you can focus on that, and that might improve your ability to focus on reading physical books/ebooks as well.

Recently I've been listening to Brandon Sanderson's The Way of Kings in audiobook form, which has allowed me to enjoy some really good storytelling without spending 20+ hours with my face indoors buried in a book, I've enjoyed it about 30-60 minutes at a time on long walks.
 
#87
Years of constantly bombarding myself with alerts from messaging services and constantly exposing myself to new content from dawn to dusk of every day poisoned my brain's ability to focus on a single passive task for any reasonable amount of time.
me af
i have a 30-45 min drive to and from work so i could give audiobooks a try during my drives
 
#88
I recently read Challenger Deep by Neal Shusterman, Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock by Matthew Quick, and More Than This by Patrick Ness.

On the year, I've read 91 books, so I'm hoping to hit 100 by the end of the year.
 
#89
I recently read Challenger Deep by Neal Shusterman, Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock by Matthew Quick, and More Than This by Patrick Ness.

On the year, I've read 91 books, so I'm hoping to hit 100 by the end of the year.
Genuinely curious how you've kept this up. Well done! It's pretty difficult for me to keep up something like this ngl.

I'm currently reading The Last Black Unicorn by Tiffany Haddish and Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman
 

Audiosurfer

I'd rather be sleeping
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#90
some other books i've enjoyed recently:

poetry:

the dream of reason by jenny george
mucus in my pineal gland by juliana huxtable
the compleat purge by trisha low
nox by anne carson
don't let me be lonely by claudia rankine
sorrowtoothpaste mirrorcream by kim hyesoon
a timeshare by margaret ross
hollywood forever by harmony holiday

prose (+ one photo book):

freshwater by akwaeke emezi
slouching towards bethlehem by joan didion
a small place by jamaica kincaid
pity the animal by chelsea hodson
the ballad of sexual dependency by nan goldin
 
#92
Dan Wells' I Am Not a Serial Killer series ended last year (he finished the "sequel trilogy"). A short and mildly-spoilery pitch for the series would be that it's about a
teenage Dexter who fights demons
. A less-brief pitch for the first book (that doesn't really spoil anything beyond the first chapter) is this: John Wayne Cleaver is a teenage sociopath who is obsessed with serial killers from a young age. With the help of his therapist, he's realized that he's at risk for becoming a serial killer, so he creates rules for himself to prevent himself from behaving violently, but all of that comes crumbling down when a new visitor comes to town and he finds himself breaking all of his old rules.

I enjoyed the series a lot. It's one of those books that is, technically speaking, a YA urban fantasy novel, but it doesn't really match exactly what comes to mind when I think "YA urban fantasy." The books live on the strength of the characters, which lead to some variability of my enjoyment of the series (especially in the later books where a significant portion of the cast changes for each book), but I enjoyed the series from start to finish, books 1, 3, and 5 being my favorites. (Book 3.5, which is a novella telling some of the events of book 4 from a different character's perspective, is also very good.)

The first book in the series (I Am Not a Serial Killer) got a movie adaptation which I would say actually rivals the original book in terms of my enjoyment of it, even though it's very different from the original book: it was interesting to see the filmmakers take a book where a significant portion of the story is focused on the main character's internal thoughts and adapt it into a film that doesn't have any voice-over to tell you what the character is thinking. The film is dreary, tense, slow-paced, and full of suspense. It's a lower-budget movie without any big special effects, but it's well-acted and it's got Christopher Lloyd (the dude who plays Doc from the Back to the Future movies). It's a good winter and/or Halloween movie.
 

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