(Little) Things that annoy you in Pokémon

I fought Whitney in HGSS. I have a Heracross. That's the Gym battle.

I feel cheated. Like, that's it? No unstoppable Rollout chain? No Stomp/Attract stunlock? No Scrappy reveal to outsmart your outsmarting of bringing a Gastly? No laughing and drinking milk as your attacks bounce off her 95/80/70 defenses?

I guess you're supposed to feel cathartic from sending the demon of your childhood to the Shadow Realm, but...I just feel sorry for her.
HGSS Whitney still shouldn't be a cakewalk with Heracross unless you raised it to Level 19 for Brick Break (which ime is a major slog since you catch it at a super low level after already beating Bugsy and there aren't that many decent grinding options immediately afterwards).

Having said that, I remember having the same 'that wasn't as cathartic as I was expecting' moment when I OHKO'd Miltank with a crit Fire Blast from Quilava lol.
 
HGSS Whitney still shouldn't be a cakewalk with Heracross unless you raised it to Level 19 for Brick Break (which ime is a major slog since you catch it at a super low level after already beating Bugsy and there aren't that many decent grinding options immediately afterwards).

Having said that, I remember having the same 'that wasn't as cathartic as I was expecting' moment when I OHKO'd Miltank with a crit Fire Blast from Quilava lol.
Headbutt is your friend with this. If you're lucky enough to find a Group B tree in Ilex Forest, you can beat up Butterfree/Beedrill and Noctowl, which have pretty hefty XP yields even at low levels. It's not as bad as you might think.

I'm still pretty astonished that you can find an "I Win" button against one of the most notorious leaders in series history, and all it takes is Cut, Headbutt, and a fair bit of patience. That Miltank is at level 19--you're hardly "overleveling".
 
Headbutt is your friend with this. If you're lucky enough to find a Group B tree in Ilex Forest, you can beat up Butterfree/Beedrill and Noctowl, which have pretty hefty XP yields even at low levels. It's not as bad as you might think.

I'm still pretty astonished that you can find an "I Win" button against one of the most notorious leaders in series history, and all it takes is Cut, Headbutt, and a fair bit of patience. That Miltank is at level 19--you're hardly "overleveling".
Oof I guess, but that's still beating like 50 Pokemon with a cumulative 20% encounter rate on a specific Headbutt tree group. You're more patient than I am haha.

On another note, I'm replaying X at the moment and it's a little frustrating that they went back to requiring a ton of field moves for progression and exploration in the same generation where they made a very clear pivot towards encouraging players to build a full team and experiment with different moveslot choices. The huge regional Dex, access to tons of TMs from relatively early on, and the updated Exp Share (if you choose to use it) all create opportunities for teambuilding that are stymied by the need to carry mons with Cut, Fly, Rock Smash, Strength, Surf, etc if you don't want to have to spend ages backtracking.

In fairness it's mostly a me problem because a) I tend to use theme teams that don't have access to Fly and/or Surf and b) I hate leaving items behind even when I'm playing a game for like the 34th time haha, hence why I only consider it a small annoyance.
 
Oof I guess, but that's still beating like 50 Pokemon with a cumulative 20% encounter rate on a specific Headbutt tree group. You're more patient than I am haha.

On another note, I'm replaying X at the moment and it's a little frustrating that they went back to requiring a ton of field moves for progression and exploration in the same generation where they made a very clear pivot towards encouraging players to build a full team and experiment with different moveslot choices. The huge regional Dex, access to tons of TMs from relatively early on, and the updated Exp Share (if you choose to use it) all create opportunities for teambuilding that are stymied by the need to carry mons with Cut, Fly, Rock Smash, Strength, Surf, etc if you don't want to have to spend ages backtracking.

In fairness it's mostly a me problem because a) I tend to use theme teams that don't have access to Fly and/or Surf and b) I hate leaving items behind even when I'm playing a game for like the 34th time haha, hence why I only consider it a small annoyance.
Back to? Gen 5 also used HMs.
 
So the thing about Pokémon names that popped up in the "things you like" thread reminded me of this.

It's about the inability to nickname traded Pokémon.

I can let it slide that we can't change the nickname of a traded Pokémon that already has a nickname because, well, that's what they decided to name it.

But why the heck can't we nickname a traded Pokémon that doesn't have a nickname?
 
So the thing about Pokémon names that popped up in the "things you like" thread reminded me of this.

It's about the inability to nickname traded Pokémon.

I can let it slide that we can't change the nickname of a traded Pokémon that already has a nickname because, well, that's what they decided to name it.

But why the heck can't we nickname a traded Pokémon that doesn't have a nickname?
SwSh let you rename traded mons don't they?

But honestly, even though I generally nickname my mons, I think it's neat that choosing not to is just as valid. The Pokemon Adventures manga, for instance, is pretty consistent that in every grouping of Pokedex holders there's usually at least one who doesn't nickname their Pokemon.
 
Well, I just tried giving a nickname to a Pokémon I brought from Gen 7 (that doesn't have one) and it doesn't let me give it a nickname.

Although I just checked with an Arctozolt and it lets me nickname with no issues. Weird.
it's a little finnicky
In Pokémon Sword and Shield, the Name Rater can give a nickname to any unnicknamed Pokémon, even outsider Pokémon, as long as the Pokémon name is in the same language as the current Trainer's game language and it was not met in a fateful encounter; however, once an outsider Pokémon is given a nickname this way, it is now a nicknamed Pokémon, so its name cannot be changed anymore.
 
It doesn't. Rock music is called "Rock" though, so maybe some know?
Considering Mega Man's name in Japanese is "Rockman," the girl robot most commonly aligned with him is "Roll," Bass is called "Forte," and Proto Man is "Blues," I'm fairly certain they know and use the terminology "rock music."

EDIT: better read what your original post was replying to. I'm fairly certain that, while they definitely know the association the English word "Rock" has with music, I'm not sure how commonly it's connected to their words for rocks.
 

AquaticPanic

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I have sort of a nitpick with a certain shiny trend in recent games

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Yeah these kinda blow imo. I can understand why they'd have their fans and I can somewhat see the appeal; I've heard some say they like it for highlighting the design differences between the forms and the originals and I can respect that take. But to me they're rather uninteresting and kind of harm Regional Variants' core idea of having a new take on an older mon by stripping it part of its individuality and uniqueness as a design by making it just look like the original. If anything it makes me feel kind of robbed, there's these rare palette swaps that take you some time to find, and when you do finally find them (3 out of these 7 being event only), they're just very visually similar to the common form these species already has in another region. I feel its kind of visually boring too, while all these forms have their own unique aspects to them, having their shinies be similar to existing common pokémon doesn't excite me much since when I first see the shinies, it just makes me think of another design that has already existed for years at this point

Now, I don't think all of the forms that pull this with their shiny are bad shinies. I think Grimer, Muk and Lilligant have this trend perfected: Their usual forms have colours from the original's shiny and their shinies have colours from the original's usual forms; but they mix in more colours into the palette so its not a full palette swap and keep the colours mostly as accents rather than as their main colour. Muk has a ton of colours in it and only swaps the Green for Purple, Lilligant has colours reminescent of Unovan Lilligant's shiny but swaps the Pink for Orange, like how Unovan Lilligant's shiny swaps Orange for Pink. This gives them new palettes and still keeps the reference to the originals, just that in small doses so that the new form can have its own identity instead of basing the shiny entirely off of an already-existing design. I know this does apply to some of the 7 I used as examples earlier, but in general Muk/Lilligant keeps their references to the OG in smaller bits of the designs rather than screaming their references to the older designs

I should clarify that I don't think any of these look visually unnapealing, after all if these palettes didn't work, their original designs wouldn't have used said palette. Its just that I rather am not a fan of them conceptually and would be more interested to see the new forms take on new palettes with their shinies so they can have more uniqueness to them and stand out as their own individuals instead of mostly looking like designs we've seen before
 
I think it's even more egregious with the Hisuian starters, since they have an immediate point of comparision in their prevos, and it just makes them stick out even harder than they already do. They don't just look bad compared to non-regional members of their species. They look bad compared to younger versions of themselves, on an individual level.

Like, in a regular Cyndaquil, it's the same shade of greenish blue for its whole life in its regular form and the same shade of reddish brown in its shiny form. In Hisui, it's blue as a Cynaquil and Quilava and purple as a Typhlosion (and also its fire looks radically different) but then when it's shiny, it's brown as a Cynaquil and Quilava, while as a Typhlosion is the same shade of blue that it would have been had as a Cynaquil and Quilava had it not been shiny instead of committing to the idea of "it gets a slight color shift when it reaches stage three" and making its shiny maroon or something.
 
Weirdly enough, this reminds me how weirdly sudden post Gen 3 Charizards shiny is compared to the preevos
For GSC it started with Yellow Charmander, a suvdued red purple Charmeleon, then finally a pale purple Charizard. It felt like a gradual evolution shiny wise
But Gen 3 on it's yellow Charmander, Yellowish Charmeleon...then suddenly a black Zard

Not that black Zard isn't cool, especially compared to so many trash yellow green shinies, but it definitely is disconnected from the rest of the line
 
In most games, friendship evos require a friendship of 220 or greater to evolve. However, the friendship checker in most games uses a chart similar to the one below in order to decide what message to give. Since the second-highest range starts at 200 and ends at 254, you can't necessarily use that message to tell that a Pokemon is ready to evolve (unless you've gotten it all the way to 255).

friendship1.png


This is changed in Sword and Shield, where they finally changed the highest interval to 220-254.
friendship2.png

However, they changed the evolution requirement to 160 friendship at the same time, which is not on the bound of any of these intervals, meaning that the friendship check message still cannot be used to (precisely) determine when a Pokemon is ready to evolve by friendship.

Sure you could just wait until you've reached the next highest interval, but why not just put the requirement at 180? That way there's a good in-game indicator as to when your Pokemon is ready to evolve. (Some checkers use alternative intervals, but there aren't any with an interval that starts at 220 except for in Sword and Shield)
 
If they keep anything from Legends Arceus it would be nice if they kept the "evolution ready!" message, because the millisecond you reach the proper happiness threshold it will tell you without needing to level up or backtrack to the happiness checker (+ because of how evolution works in LA, you don't even need to level up anymore!).

Though if they keep it the same I'd rather they keep the lower 160 threshold and just, like, have a special messsage for when you get there.
 
In most games, friendship evos require a friendship of 220 or greater to evolve. However, the friendship checker in most games uses a chart similar to the one below in order to decide what message to give. Since the second-highest range starts at 200 and ends at 254, you can't necessarily use that message to tell that a Pokemon is ready to evolve (unless you've gotten it all the way to 255).

View attachment 417383

This is changed in Sword and Shield, where they finally changed the highest interval to 220-254.
View attachment 417384
However, they changed the evolution requirement to 160 friendship at the same time, which is not on the bound of any of these intervals, meaning that the friendship check message still cannot be used to (precisely) determine when a Pokemon is ready to evolve by friendship.

Sure you could just wait until you've reached the next highest interval, but why not just put the requirement at 180? That way there's a good in-game indicator as to when your Pokemon is ready to evolve. (Some checkers use alternative intervals, but there aren't any with an interval that starts at 220 except for in Sword and Shield)
179 is the cap for non-camp friendship in SwSh (ie 180 is where the previously affection based mechanics start).
 

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