SM UU Simple Questions Thread

I've been tinkering around with altering EV spreads lately, just so I can beat certain speed tiers. However, I'm not entirely sure if this is for the best for making a stallbreaker/defensive hybrid out of Togekiss. 4-move syndrome aside, I'm unsure if there's any big risks in changing from say, a 252 HP / 4 SpA / 252 Spe Timid spread to my idea of a 252 HP / 60 Def / 196 Bold Spread. Is it better to specialize in one set or the other?
 

Accelgor

An ounce of action is worth a ton of theory.
is a Community Contributoris a Tiering Contributor
In general, it's better to use the standard 252 HP / 4 SpA / 252 Spe Timid spread since you can still tank almost every neutral hit as well as some SE ones while outspeeding a healthy portion of the tier. Your spread hits 245 speed, which should be sufficient for a stall matchup, however it leaves you vulnerable to stuff like Jolly Bisharp, which you can 1v1 if you get lucky enough (while running max speed ofc). Besides, the investment into your physical bulk won't let you live anything significant, to my knowledge, so it's better to stick to the norm in this case.
 
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I'm a little confused about something in regards to bans. I understand that UU's banning structure is different from OU's, but why exactly was Drizzle banned and not Politoed?
For clarification on why I'm confused, Blaziken was banned due to having Speed Boost while only banning Speed Boost would be considered "too complex", yet it's not the same for Politoed, only banning Drizzle was not seen as "too complex"?
 
Speed Boost isn't broken on everything that gets it, while the only two non-uber drizzle users are/would be broken in UU. Therefore, it was determined that the ability itself was the broken element.

Also, wrt complexity, one ban would have to be "Speed Boost + Blaziken" whereas the Drizzle ban is a simple blanket ban on the ability.
I'm dumb, didn't think about that. Thank you for the clarification! Speaking of which, why exactly was Drizzle banned?
 
I'm dumb, didn't think about that. Thank you for the clarification! Speaking of which, why exactly was Drizzle banned?
Drizzle is banned because rain teams were dominating the very end of UU beta. Very little on offense could stand up to drizzle-boosted rain teams. Instead of banning Politoed, UU decided to ban Drizzle due to the risk that Pelipper might fall down (rain is getting less popular in OU) and cause the exact same problem. Banning an ability would be better than banning two pokemon broken only because of the ability (as supportive threats). A turn used to set up Rain Dance can be exploited much more easily than Drizzle. SUMO UU Stage 1 has the full explanation. That's why Drizzle is banned.

Is non-drizzle rain still viable in UU?
 
Drizzle is banned because rain teams were dominating the very end of UU beta. Very little on offense could stand up to drizzle-boosted rain teams. Instead of banning Politoed, UU decided to ban Drizzle due to the risk that Pelipper might fall down (rain is getting less popular in OU) and cause the exact same problem. Banning an ability would be better than banning two pokemon broken only because of the ability (as supportive threats). A turn used to set up Rain Dance can be exploited much more easily than Drizzle. SUMO UU Stage 1 has the full explanation. That's why Drizzle is banned.

Is non-drizzle rain still viable in UU?
Thank you for the additional clarification. I would argue that with Z-Rain Dance, or utilizing a bulky rain setter with Damp Rock, that Rain is still very viable in UU. It's still working wonders in OU (while UU doesn't have access to Manaphy, there's plenty of Pokemon with additional set-up moves that could benefit from the +1 speed that Z-Rain Dance gives.)
 

Accelgor

An ounce of action is worth a ton of theory.
is a Community Contributoris a Tiering Contributor
Drizzle is banned because rain teams were dominating the very end of UU beta. Very little on offense could stand up to drizzle-boosted rain teams. Instead of banning Politoed, UU decided to ban Drizzle due to the risk that Pelipper might fall down (rain is getting less popular in OU) and cause the exact same problem. Banning an ability would be better than banning two pokemon broken only because of the ability (as supportive threats). A turn used to set up Rain Dance can be exploited much more easily than Drizzle. SUMO UU Stage 1 has the full explanation. That's why Drizzle is banned.

Is non-drizzle rain still viable in UU?
Somewhat. Obviously rain has the edge over most of the offensive teams running around as they have limited counterplay to rain. There aren't too many options to swing the momentum in the favor of the player not using rain in the matchup. You either have 1v1 a rain sweeper with something that doesn't mind rain too much, such as Primarina or Celebi, or methodically sack the most expendable members of the team and then hoping to control the pace of the match after the rain turns are over.

On the other hand, rain struggles heavily against bulkier teams that employ the use of Amoonguss, Tsareena, Volcanion, etc, or even something like Hippowdon that can help to halt a sweep. In my opinion, it isn't too solid of a strategy since it's heavily matchup dependent, as it's always been. Most of the classic rain abusers just don't have the raw firepower to punch through teams as they did in previous gens of UU/other lower tiers, and their impact isn't as significant given the introduction of so many more powerful and bulkier mons to this generation's iteration of UU.
 
Also, most of it's use seems to come from ScoliPass. If BP get's nerfed/banned in OU, Xurkitree is gonna drop like a fly.

+--------------+ | Xurkitree | +--------------------+
+--------------+ | Teammates | +-----------------+
| Scolipede +37.321% |
| Manaphy +33.901% |
| Excadrill +27.779% |
| Magearna +17.567% |
| Metagross-Mega +15.086% |
| Kartana +7.814% |
| Smeargle +7.008% |
| Pinsir-Mega +3.459% |
| Goodra +1.178% |
| Shuckle +0.962% |
| Necrozma +0.683% |
| Celesteela +0.638% |
+------------------------------------------------------+
 

Accelgor

An ounce of action is worth a ton of theory.
is a Community Contributoris a Tiering Contributor
would it have a place in UU or would it still be not good enough? would be kinda sad for a mon with 173 SpA :/
If Xurkitree were to drop to UU, I really believe that it'd be a hell of a force to be reckoned with. It has just enough speed to run an effective Scarf set, which seems like a nightmare matchup for offense on paper while taking its satisfactory coverage and Beast Boost into account. The Tail Glow set, while obviously scary to switch into, might be subpar since Xurk usually won't find too many opportunities to set up freely. It does demolish stall though, as it can set up and break Blissey, while Z-Thunderbolt just blows Unaware Clefable away.

252 SpA Xurkitree Dazzling Gleam vs. 0 HP / 4 SpD Latias: 172-204 (57.1 - 67.7%) -- guaranteed 2HKO after Stealth Rock
252 SpA Xurkitree Hidden Power Ice vs. 0 HP / 4 SpD Latias: 130-154 (43.1 - 51.1%) -- 98% chance to 2HKO after Stealth Rock

252 SpA Xurkitree Grass Knot (120 BP) vs. 248 HP / 240+ SpD Hippowdon: 290-342 (69.2 - 81.6%) -- guaranteed 2HKO after Stealth Rock and Leftovers recovery
252 SpA Xurkitree Energy Ball vs. 248 HP / 240+ SpD Hippowdon: 218-258 (52 - 61.5%) -- guaranteed 2HKO after Stealth Rock and Leftovers recovery

+3 252 SpA Xurkitree Thunderbolt vs. 252 HP / 4 SpD Blissey: 349-412 (48.8 - 57.7%) -- guaranteed 2HKO after Stealth Rock and Leftovers recovery
+3 252 SpA Xurkitree Gigavolt Havoc vs. 252 HP / 4 SpD Blissey: 679-801 (95 - 112.1%) -- guaranteed OHKO after Stealth Rock

252 SpA Xurkitree Thunderbolt vs. 252 HP / 192+ SpD Clefable: 288-340 (73 - 86.2%) -- guaranteed 2HKO after Stealth Rock and Leftovers recovery
252 SpA Xurkitree Gigavolt Havoc vs. 252 HP / 4 SpD Clefable: 385-454 (97.7 - 115.2%) -- guaranteed OHKO after Stealth Rock

252 SpA Xurkitree Hidden Power Ice vs. 248 HP / 92 SpD Amoonguss: 176-208 (40.8 - 48.2%) -- 6.6% chance to 2HKO after Stealth Rock and Black Sludge recovery


On the other hand, Xurkitree's bulk and speed leaves a lot to be desired. Setup opportunities won't be too easy to find in most matchups, and although UU doesn't have access to any notable Arena Trap users, Pursuit trapping alone still makes short work of Xurxitree. I'm not going to theorize about Xurkitree too much here since its drop to UU isn't even guaranteed, but I can assure you that it'd definitely find its way onto a lot of teams if it ended up dropping to UU.
 

esche

AKA Wang Fire
is a Tiering Contributor
There are several options: 264 is the minimum I'd go with on any Gliscor since it lets you outspeed Jolly Bisharp and Timid Volcanion, 280 for Adamant Lucario, 286 for Chandelure, Togekiss & other max speed base 80s, which you should definitely hit if you're a Taunt+Toxic variant, and 297 is an option if you like sniping stuff like Nidoking (especially useful for SD variants from my experience). Honestly, Gliscor's speed can and should be specifically adjusted to the needs of your team which is why I listed multiple options, check what gives you trouble and decide from there. The numbers above are achieved using a Jolly Nature (most of them are jump points) which gives you more points to work with UNLESS you want to go physically defensive in which case an Impish nature is recommended.
 

TSR

⎛ ´●  ω ●` ⎞
is a Tiering Contributoris a Contributor to Smogon
I understand the opportunity cost for megas is far less now, but what makes Megapedo so good in this meta?
to answer this question, gonna break this down into a couple points:

- Sharpedo just has a lot going for it that makes it a lot better than it was in ORAS. The instant 105 speed tier is amazing, so things like Scarf Hydreigon and Staraptor (though this one may or may not be relevant in the future) makes it a much more potent lategame sweeper.

- The addition of Psychic Fangs helped it out a lot too, since now it has a super strong move to hit some more bulky Fighting-types with. Stuff like Keldeo and Toxicroak would've been decent checks to it but find themselves falling over to a Psychic Fangs (Keldeo needs 1% of chip damage to be a guaranteed KO). It still can't OHKO the really bulky Fighting-types like Cobalion or Bewear, but they tend not to be the greatest switch ins in the first place thanks to not actually resisting any of Sharpedo's moves. Things that DO resist both of Shark's STAB moves tend to get worn down pretty easy, stuff like Primarina (which has to pretty much be at full to take Psychic Fangs) and even some more niche checks all hate taking residual damage like Toxic or Burn. However, Ice Fang is still a good option for it, so things like Hydreigon still have to watch out, even if Psychic Fangs is more common.

- Sharpedo loves support from extra hazards, and with stuff like Bisharp and Decidueye around, hazards can be a real pain to remove. They help Sharpedo get a ton of clean KOs where a healthier Cobalion or Scizor might be able to stop a sweep.

- The Prankster nerf is also helpful in a way, whereas Klefki can still prove annoying to Mega Sharpedo (since they typically run phys def now), it's impossible to stop Sharpedo with Prankster Thunder Wave, Will-o-wisp, or Encore, making you kinda have to rely on offensive means to take it out.

In general, the transition from ORAS to SuMo, along with some of the mechanic changes made the metagame a lot more Sharpedo-friendly, if you will. Lastly, more of the specific state of the metagame rather than a buff Sharpedo got, a lot of mons like Clefable and Cobalion that check it decently blanket check a lot of threats in the current meta, making it pretty easy to overwhelm them to help Sharpedo win games.

Hope this was enough to clear up any confusion!
 

Highways

Eric Dier sucks
is a Tiering Contributoris a Smogon Media Contributor Alumnus
Hey guys, which Celebi Stealth Rock set would go better with Mega Aero? A defensive or offensive one?

Also, is Aqua Tail or Earthquake better on Aero?
Literally depends on what your team needs. I like Offensive Stealth Rock more because it isn't a setup bait to things such as Swords Dance Cobalion and Calm Mind Suicune, but Defensive has a strong niche to take hits from things such as Specs Raikou and Life Orb Latias. Earthquake and Aqua Tail are solid options on Mega Aerodactyl too. Earthquake is usually better, but if you feel your team is weak to Krookodile, go for Aqua Tail.
 

Cheryl.

Celesteela is Life
On a Sticky Web team, what would work well as a check to Mega Aerodactyl? I've been trying to build a Webs team but it's really weak to Mega Dactyl since it doesn't get affected by Webs.
 
On a Sticky Web team, what would work well as a check to Mega Aerodactyl? I've been trying to build a Webs team but it's really weak to Mega Dactyl since it doesn't get affected by Webs.
Try bulky Swords Dance Scizor. Only fears the rare Fire Fang, while it can one shot Aero with Bullet Punch. The set is:

Scizor @ Leftovers
Ability: Technician
EVs: 248 HP / 124 Def / 136 SpD
Impish Nature
- Swords Dance
- Bullet Punch
- U-turn / Bug Bite
- Roost

EVs mean you're never 2HKOed by Mega Aerodactyl's Stone Edge, even after Stealth Rock.
 
I know this isn't the best place to ask since Shiinotic dropped to RU but what do you guys think is the best ability for it? I'm making a physically defensive set and I'm thinking that Effect spore might be useful since I'm switching in on a physical attack but then again the opposing pokemon might get a unwanted status and I can't use spore. While Rain dish is only useful on rain teams and very situational.
Thoughts?
 
Effect spore would still probably be better overall, since you may be able to get a couple paras out of it. Even if your spore is useless on that turn, you'd still be spreading status everywhere.
 

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