Battle Tree Discussion and Records

Tapu Koko @ Electrium Z
Ability: Electric Surge
EVs: 252 SpA / 252 Spe
Timid Nature
IVs: 0 Atk
- Volt Switch
- Thunder
- Dazzling Gleam
- Nature's Madness

Tapu Lele @ Assault Vest
Ability: Psychic Surge
EVs: 252 Def / 252 SpA
Bold Nature
IVs: 0 Atk
- Psychic
- Hidden Power [Ice]
- Shadow Ball
- Moonblast

Kangaskhan-Mega (F) @ Kangaskhanite
Ability: Inner Focus
EVs: 252 Atk / 252 Spe
Adamant Nature
- Earthquake
- Sucker Punch
- Strength
- Power-Up Punch

So this is my team, I've reached ~50 wins with it. Any help?
 
And since tree runs megas and stuff, for example a Mega-Alakazam tracing Lightning Rod can result in a pretty big disaster.

Mega-kazam is often a big problem for Fake out leads because you are in a situation where if it's Specs Alakazam and is Inner focus, you might waste fake out completely, but if you don't fake out and it's Mega, it can trace one of your abilities, expecially dangerous on things like immunities to your stab or Beast Boost / Speed Boost.
Yes i know, i have him on my threat list ;) Definitely one of the most terrible threats that can show up. Thats partly the reason for Landorus' and Steelas EVs, it makes Lando survive Psychic from the Specs set and Steela can OHKO it. While the situation against the Mega is different, it still may help making decisions when an unknown set appears.

Since your team is using 2 of the Pokémon I've been using a ton recently, I thought I could give my comments on this. First, I think the team looks really fun to use, and I'd be totally willing to try it out. However, I don't have a Tapu Koko with HP Ground, nor an Impish Celesteela. I'm not sure how big of a deal that is, at least for testing, because from my understanding, my Careful Celesteela could be fine there, and I'd be kind of curious to hear what HP Ground on Koko is for specifically?
HP Ground is mostly a filler, i considered it mainly against A-Marowak, because he walls my leads badly and can OHKO my whole team.
At some point i even considered Pelipper in the back, because of the Fire Weakness :D Helping Hand + HP Ground OHKOs, altough one never wants to do this. It also may help against Electric Types and stuff, but i guess its one of the moves that get usage every 100 battles.
My Celesteela has this physical investment because it is supposed to counter EQusers and Grounds, but in the first place this shouldnt matter that much.


One thing I've noticed from using Specs Koko is that locking yourself into anything else than your 2 STABs to OHKO a threat in front of you can be very detrimental if using that move again on the following turn doesn't score you another OHKO. If you lack a switch-in for what's coming, it's really awkward and makes the quick KO not worth it. That's something I noticed from having Grass Knot in the first 100 battles, and every time I actually used it, I instantly regretted it on the following turn. Personally, I would probably never run Grass Knot on Specs Koko again, at least not in Doubles. If anything, I feel like Volt Switch could have more utility than both Grass Knot and HP Ground, but I'm not sure exactly what both aim at accomplishing for the team other than offer coverage, so maybe I'm wrong.
I think at this Electric team it is very important, and also i dont think Koko has much better alternatives.

I don't doubt Raichu's damage output if it can get a couple of Lightning Rod boosts, but as you mention, Ground-types are scary, and teams that feature a lot of them at once are extremely common (Hikers tend to have that a lot). They tend to be very bulky, so despite having Grass Knot / HP Ice in your lead, the lead would still lose to them in most occasions. Landorus and Celesteela are both great against these teams offensively, but my biggest concern would be the lack of Rock resist, since a lot of them have EdgeQuake coverage, and Sand Force boosted Stone Edge is no joke even for Celesteela. If I didn't have Swampert to tank Rock-type moves, I don't think my team could have gone that far, I feel like it was a crucial necessity - but since I had rain this is different, and I shouldn't compare the 2 teams too much.
Yes, no Rock resist hurts. When facing EQusers, it often may be the best to double switch out. I hope since the AI loves OHKOs it shows no reluctance to use EQ, so they chip eachother down in this turn, and i can clean up with the back - optimally.

As Worldie pointed out, I would also be concerned about Trick Room (especially when paired with Ground/Rock spam, which is fairly common), but Trick Room trainers might be manageable depending on the situation.
Hopefully. Wide Guard may help to stall out some turns.

In any case, just from the fact it looks like a lot of fun, I'd gladly give that team a try if you don't mind me having a few different things on it.
Feel free! I'm more than happy that one wants to give it a try :)

Edit: One last comment, I think Leftovers > Electric Seed on Celesteela, because 1. Electric Seed almost forces you to stay in, otherwise your item is just wasted, while Leftovers is good at any time and 2. You can get boosts from Beast Boost anyway to become really tanky. The instant extra bulk is very useful at times I'm sure, but Celesteela is such a useful pivot, I'd value the possibility of switching around more.
Yes i came to the same conclusion.
Thanks for your comments!
 
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NoCheese

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Tapu Koko @ Electrium Z
Ability: Electric Surge
EVs: 252 SpA / 252 Spe
Timid Nature
IVs: 0 Atk
- Volt Switch
- Thunder
- Dazzling Gleam
- Nature's Madness

Tapu Lele @ Assault Vest
Ability: Psychic Surge
EVs: 252 Def / 252 SpA
Bold Nature
IVs: 0 Atk
- Psychic
- Hidden Power [Ice]
- Shadow Ball
- Moonblast

Kangaskhan-Mega (F) @ Kangaskhanite
Ability: Inner Focus
EVs: 252 Atk / 252 Spe
Adamant Nature
- Earthquake
- Sucker Punch
- Strength
- Power-Up Punch

So this is my team, I've reached ~50 wins with it. Any help?
With respect to Tapu Koko, both Thunder and Nature's Madness seem questionable. Thunder gives you 10 more base power on Gigavolt Havoc, but leaves you with a pretty dead move afterwards, since Thunder's accuracy makes it a huge liability outside of a dedicated rain team. And HP halving effects like Nature's Madness are difficult to take advantage of, since they don't speed any KOs until you turn a hypotehtical 4HKO into a 3HKO. (The 3HKO being 1. Madness, 2. Madness, 3. move that normally only 4HKOs and can do the final 1/4). This is a narrow situation. I guess Koko can set things up for its partners too, but the situations where a partner can only win if Koko has previously halved the foe's HP with Nature's Madness, rather than hitting it with one of its other moves that turn or just straight switching, are also limited, especially with a well-built team. I'd suggest going with Thunderbolt over Thunder, and accepting the slightly weaker Z-move for the greater overall reliability. Grass Knot seems like a good option to replace Nature's Madness, since it can do a lot of damage to big Ground-types that your Electric-type attacks can't touch.

Your Mega Kanga looks reasonably standard, except for Strength. Max happiness and Return is strictly better. Alternatively, Double-Edge hits like an absolute tank, nabbing some extra OHKOs, but the recoil can be an issue. But either way, Strength just seems wrong.

Finally, with no Substitute and no Rest, your team is extremely vulnerable to status (and OHKO users too). It's difficult to sustain a long streak with such a vulnerability.
 
Hey guys. Long time lurker, first time poster, reporting in with a super singles streak of 162 thanks to my triple swords dance team. This was a while ago and my team has since been changed a bunch thanks to some help from the discord server, but I thought I might as well post it since it's gotten me my highest streak so far.

Battle no. 100: KSTW-WWWW-WWWG-JKBW
Nothing too special here. Just an easy win against Kiawe. I always save my 100th win

Battle no. 163: YEWG-WWWW-WWWG-JH3H
Trick room was this team's biggest enemy. I believe I could have made it through if mimikyu carried ghostium z rather than mimikium z, allowing kartana to KO heatran and then go into uxie at +1. I later added suicune to my team to absolutely destroy trick room teams like this one.

20180207_180152.jpg


Anyways, here's team triple D

garchomp.gif

Ragnir (Garchomp) @ Lum Berry
Ability: Rough Skin
EVs: 4 HP / 252 Atk / 252 Spe
Jolly Nature
- Outrage
- Earthquake
- Fire Fang
- Swords Dance

Garchy is a well-established lead that often 3-0's if given the slightest chance to set up. Lum berry was my only line of defense against status, letting him get to at least +2 against status users, sometimes even +3 if moves like WoW missed. If the opposing lead is an ice type, I could not risk breaking kartana's sash or mimikyu's disguise and would instead click an appropriate attack to weaken it as much as possible for kartana to come in and start snowballing. In fact, I would never switch chompy out at all unless I knew a poison or dragon type move was incoming. Fire fang was there for little reason in hindsight, mainly to have a way to hit a certain smiling mushroom fairy while also not sacrificing coverage on ferrothorn and the like.

mimikyu.gif

Boot Leg (Mimikyu) @ Mimikium Z
Ability: Disguise
EVs: 4 HP / 252 Atk / 252 Spe
Jolly Nature
- Shadow Sneak
- Play Rough
- Shadow Claw
- Swords Dance

As my failsafe against opposing setup and dragons faster than garchomp, mimikyu was used sparingly. I chose the exclusive Z move over Z-shadow claw due to its higher power against neutral targets and ability to kill opposing dragons without risking a miss. This did ultimately lead to my loss due to not being able to hit a heatran hard enough, but that's in the past now. Mimikyu's role as a boosting priority user was later taken on by the fatter and stronger mega scizor, since its power aside from the Z-move was consistently disappointing.

kartana.gif

CartéBlanche (Kartana) @ Focus Sash
Ability: Beast Boost
EVs: 4 HP / 252 Atk / 252 Spe
Jolly Nature
- Leaf Blade
- Smart Strike
- Sacred Sword
- Swords Dance

Kartana functioned as a great stop to evasiveness spam due to the combination of smart strike and sacred sword, while also being able to semi-reliably weaken/KO opposing fire types thanks to sash. It also set up very easily against opposing grass types that had no way to hit it. If garchomp went down, kartana would keep the sweep going, and if it could not KO something important, it would instead be weakened enough for mimikyu to come in and pick it off with an unboosted shadow claw or LSF. Even faster, frail special attackers fell to its mighty, papery edge. It fared poorly against WoW users that it could not immediately KO (many rotom formes), and stuff with priority that took it out after being knocked down to 1 HP.
 
Posting an ongoing streak of 1000 wins in USUM Singles in spite of the epic counterteam from Kukui. JK, he led with non-Defiant Braviary4, which is the best thing he could have led with aside from Snorlax. Surprisingly, I don't feel much of a sense of accomplishment at this milestone. Oh well, that only means I have to keep going until I lose.

Battle videos:
TBFG WWWW WWWB S8SR - Battle 330. Colress brings the worst possible lineup he can
HQ4G WWWW WWWD NGL5 - Battle 500. Dexio brings Defiant Braviary and Alolan Ninetales
B3FG WWWW WWWF KESA - Battle 794. In the closest battle in the entire run, Rotom-Cut3 Volt Switches out to Moody Glalie3, inducing panic.
N9YW WWWW WWWG LHNW - Battle 854. Reuniclus4.
LFGG WWWW WWWG DJBQ - Battle 900. Colress brings a lineup with a last-mon Metagross4
GE7W WWWW WWWG LH79 - Battle 1,000. An otherwise completely nondescript battle that I wouldn't have even saved if not for the milestone.

This is Team Stalwart. It has not changed since the last time I used it.

Salamence (F) @ Salamencite
Ability: Intimidate
Level: 50
EVs: 4 HP / 252 Atk / 4 Def / 12 SpD / 236 Spe
Jolly Nature
- Return
- Substitute
- Roost
- Dragon Dance

I'm not sure what I can say for this other than a direct quote from GG Unit: "This is not a 'Dragon Dance once or twice then sweep' mon. If you want that or are wondering how this beats Rocks or Steels, use Dragonite instead." Usually when you decide to set Mence up, you're aiming for a sweep, and you want to go all the way, or at least as much as feasible. There is a lot you want to set Salamence up against: Non-Rock type physical attackers, anything with a status-inducing move that can't OHKO you, weak Special attackers, Draco Meteor/Overheat/Leaf Storm users (although they may need to be coaxed into using that move). Half the time I can just stay in and set up on their lead, subbing when necessary. In spite of Mence's sweeping capability, it is the mon you will be sacrificing a lot of the time if you can't avoid losing a mon. The EVs outspeed Haxorus non-mega, Salazzle after mega evolving, and outspeed +1 Tyranitar3 at +0 after Mega evolving, while giving Downloaders an Attack boost.

Suicune @ Leftovers
Ability: Pressure
Level: 50
EVs: 196 HP / 252 Def / 60 Spe
Bold Nature
IVs: 1 Atk / 13 SpA (Hyper Trained)
- Icy Wind
- Calm Mind
- Scald
- Rest

This Suicune may have Calm Mind, but make no mistake: It is a PP staller first and a sweeper second. Scald's burn chance is not something you want to rely on either. It can (and probably will) fail you at the most crucial times. Suicune is my only Ice resist, and is thus the most valuable member of the team. Never leave it in to get killed by a potential Sheer Cold, even if it means that you'll lose Salamence in the process. I say that Suicune is not a sweeper, but at +6 you'll be able to take on the remaining 2 foes. Just don't leave it in to potentially get crit by Thunder and faint with a mystery mon left in the back. The EVs were originally meant to outspeed the Maison's Garchomp4 at -1 while surviving a +2 crit Earthquake from the same Mon, and I left them as is. The speed outspeeds the Tree's Garchomp4, meaning that you won't have to take a Sand-boosted Earthquake for half your health if it comes in as the second mon.

Gliscor (F) @ Toxic Orb
Ability: Poison Heal
Level: 50
EVs: 236 HP / 4 Atk / 4 Def / 252 SpD / 12 Spe
Careful Nature
IVs: 15 SpA
- Earthquake
- Substitute
- Protect
- Toxic

Unlike Suicune, this juggernaut doesn't try to hide what it does. It can PP stall nearly any move by itself. While it is best used in conjunction with Suicune to stall out certain move combos from faster Pokemon (Ice Beam/Thunderbolt from Starmie4, for example), it can usually do the same by itself, which helps with keeping Suicune's health high. Often stalling an Ice move out of all its PP is all Salamence needs to find a setup opportunity. However, should you be in a pinch against the lead, you can attempt a Gliscor sweep(which consists of PP stalling their lead until it gives you an opportunity to finish it off with a sub up, then Toxic stalling their backups). As Gliscor shares a 4x Ice weakness with Salamence, you would think it contributes less to the team's defensive synergy than something like Chansey. However, Gliscor provokes leads into using their Ice moves first, leading to less PP stalling required for Mence to set up, and thus, faster battles.
Threats:

Freeze-Dry: Freeze Dry hits my entire team for super-effective damage, often OHKOing Salamence and 2HKOing my reserves. If a Freeze-Dry mon shows up as the lead, Mence is often getting sacced. Against Aurorus2, you’ll have to pray that it uses its weather moves instead. Thankfully the Pokemon that have Freeze-Dry are all rare, with the most common(Ninetales4-Alola) also being the least threatening.


Glalie3: OHKOes Salamence and is bulky enough to avoid being OHKOed by return? Check. Outspeeds and heavily damages Gliscor? Check. Has an OHKO move preventing me from lowering its speed with Suicune? Check. Moody is just the icing on the cake here. The one time I faced this in 1600 battles, things went horribly right for me and I escaped defeat.


Metagross4: Still extremely scary to face, but it needs a significant amount of hax in order to blow my team wide open.


Salamence4: Needs substantially less hax to blow a hole in my team, but I have viable backup strategies in case of crits.


Pelipper4: If this comes out and Suicune is not healthy enough, I straight up lose thanks to its bulk, speed investment, and Ice Beam. It also has Hurricane for more hax.


Infiltrator: This team relies heavily on Substitute, and with Infiltrator nullifying one of my best defensive options, my safe strategies are more limited. Noivern4 is the big threat here thanks to Hurricane.


Certain pokes are not overtly threatening by themselves, but instead they can force me into a position that their backups are capable of exploiting. I call these “threat enablers”.


Volt Switch: Often does enough damage to break Salamence’s substitute, leaving me at 75% health with the foe at +0 attack. Some of these pokes also have moves that prevent me from going to Gliscor to block the Volt Switch (for example Rotom-Heat4’s Will-o-Wisp).


Explosion: Gets rid of any debuffs the user has sustained, deals massive damage to Gliscor in all likelihood, and brings in a fresh new poke that could be very nasty. Metagross3 is the biggest threat among Exploders, as it can’t be debuffed and has a very high attack stat (also metagross4 is the bigger threat overall so I have to plan for that instead).


Alakazam34: Set 4 has a 5/16 chance to OHKO Salamence with Dazzling Gleam, but I can’t switch Mence out in fear of set 3 running through my team with powerful Psychics. If set 4 gets a high roll I have to improvise based on what the trainer can use.


Pokemon that force me to immediately evolve Mence and OHKO without any setup: If something that I need Intimidate for comes out next, that’s a bad spot to be in.
 
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Just got my Super Multi Battle stamp for 50 wins after about a week. I'd like to thank Torqan for the general team setup, since it was convenient as I already had Wally, Thundurus, and I could breed a Magikarp up. I used his Thundurus-T/Mega-Gyarados sets as they were (with subpar IVs). Wally had a Garchomp-3 and Magnezone-4. This was really a very tedious challenge to go through, and it involves a ton of luck, so I'm glad it's over. Not much info to talk about since it's almost the same team, most of the problems can be identified at first glance, and most is already known, but I'll do my best.

BRUH (Thundurus-Therian) @ Life Orb
Ability: Volt Absorb
Level: 50
EVs: 4 Def / 252 SpA / 252 Spe
Timid Nature
IVs: 17 Atk
- Thunderbolt
- Sludge Bomb
- Dark Pulse
- Flash Cannon

Torqan summarized this Thundurus-T well in the original post. He is a powerful nuke that hits a lot super effectively and doesn't get hit by EQ. Garchomp's Earthquake damage lets Thundurus get easy kills most of the time. I leveled and hyper trained his SpA and Spe before the winning run, as I was tired of barely missing KOs on Ice types with Flash Cannon, and found that the extra 7 SpA and 1 Speed would make enough of a difference. Volt Absorb shenanigans with Gyarados were cool to use. I did notice that Alolan Golem-1 would keep ramming into me with Galvanized Double-Edges when it popped up, so I guess the AI doesn't understand that specific interaction.

Mr. fish (Gyarados) @ Gyaradosite
Ability: Intimidate
Level: 50
EVs: 252 Atk / 4 SpD / 252 Spe
Jolly Nature
- Waterfall
- Dragon Dance
- Crunch
- Ice Fang

This Gyarados has some bad IVs that I didn't really care to fix at. Ice Fang is nice for taking down other dragons. I don't have the specific Mega Gallade synergy that Torqan talked about, but Magnezone did take some pressure off Mr. fish sometimes. Mega evolving at the right time is something to keep in mind. The worst is when there's an enemy about to use Rock Slide or Stone Edge and Garchomp's busy Earthquaking.

Wally's team:

Garchomp-3 @ Choice Scarf
Ability: Sand Veil
Level: 50
EVs: 252 Atk / 252 Spe
Jolly Nature
- Outrage
- Earthquake
- Fire Fang
- Crunch

Solid guy, does great damage sets up a lot of kills with Earthquake. Usually uses Earthquake which is fine, but he seldom switches out if the enemy is immune. He has done it sometimes and even acknowledged Levitate, so who knows. Seems to use Fire Fang against 4x effective mons and Outrage if there's a dragon or EQ isn't the best choice according to its AI decisions. I've seen this guy use Crunch once. Sand Veil can be fun against a sand team opponent.

Magnezone-4 @ Assault Vest
Ability: Magnet Pull
Level: 50
EVs: 252 HP / 252 SpA
Modest Nature
- Thunderbolt
- Flash Cannon
- Tri Attack
- Volt Switch

This is where my team diverges from the strat I took, featuring this magnet guy instead of Mega Gallade. I'll take a mon with 4 attacking moves any day. I'd prefer Sturdy but Magnezone is actually pretty durable with its HP investment and Assault Vest. It even survives some Earthquakes if spread. Pretty good bait and hits hard too. Magnezone is the most likely to be in the situation where the AI has to win on its own. It has always lost.

Some pains included Dragon-types that I couldn't OHKO, Garchomp would try to target with Outrage, and end up with a coin flip. I found that some Ice types like Beartic/Glaceon/Glalie/Froslass barely survived Flash Cannon/would just outspeed Thundurus and usually retaliate with Blizzards or Ice Beams. Rotom-Frost basically gets a free Blizzard. Fairies at least tended to use Dazzling Gleam which never KOed Garchomp thanks to spread damage.

Rock types were another underlooked threat that were relevant if EQ didn't take them out. They can easily take out Thundurus and Gyarados, and usually pack a ground move that destroys Magnezone. Also Fake Outters and Trick Room teams just put a wrench in strategies in general. Also, Porygon2's bulky Ice Beam/Blizzards suck, Rotom forms other than Mow can be annoying, Mega Tyranitar survives an EQ/Flash Cannon, Tauros Giga Impacts hit hard, Wacan Braviary exists, and other Garchomp-3s add even more RNG.

Miscellaneous stuff: Sometimes Garchomp triggers a Marowak's Red Card and the Marowak slams Magnezone with Bone Rush. Landorus-2 getting locked into Earth Power can be fun thanks to my team being both Flying-types so Gyarados can set up once the other trainer is dealt with. A specific example of Magnezone "baiting" was a Mega Sceptile opting to Earthquake instead of finish off low HP Thundurus, allowing Thundurus to Sludge Bomb and Magnezone narrowly surviving.

Videos: 8YBG-WWWW-WWWG-QVMS - Winning battle. Easy Red/Blue sets to deal with
3MPG-WWWW-WWWG-QVPM - Battle 49, just surprisingly simple compared to everything else. The rest of the stuff I saved was losses and I ended up filling up my videos so eh.


This has been an interesting learning experience, Tree is serious stuff. Also used a QR Rental Team by Level 51 from here for the Super Doubles stamp so thanks!
 
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Just got my Super Multi Battle stamp for 50 wins after about a week. I'd like to thank Torqan for the general team setup, since it was convenient as I already had Wally, Thundurus, and I could breed a Magikarp up. I used his Thundurus-T/Mega-Gyarados sets as they were (with subpar IVs). Wally had a Garchomp-3 and Magnezone-4. This was really a very tedious challenge to go through, and it involves a ton of luck, so I'm glad it's over. Not much info to talk about since it's almost the same team, most of the problems can be identified at first glance, and most is already known, but I'll do my best.

BRUH (Thundurus-Therian) @ Life Orb
Ability: Volt Absorb
Level: 50
EVs: 4 Def / 252 SpA / 252 Spe
Timid Nature
IVs: 17 Atk
- Thunderbolt
- Sludge Bomb
- Dark Pulse
- Flash Cannon

Torqan summarized this Thundurus-T well in the original post. He is a powerful nuke that hits a lot super effectively and doesn't get hit by EQ. Garchomp's Earthquake damage lets Thundurus get easy kills most of the time. I leveled and hyper trained his SpA and Spe before the winning run, as I was tired of barely missing KOs on Ice types with Flash Cannon, and found that the extra 7 SpA and 1 Speed would make enough of a difference. Volt Absorb shenanigans with Gyarados were cool to use. I did notice that Alolan Golem-1 would keep ramming into me with Galvanized Double-Edges when it popped up, so I guess the AI doesn't understand that specific interaction.

Mr. fish (Gyarados) @ Gyaradosite
Ability: Intimidate
Level: 50
EVs: 252 Atk / 4 SpD / 252 Spe
Jolly Nature
- Waterfall
- Dragon Dance
- Crunch
- Ice Fang

This Gyarados has some bad IVs that I didn't really care to fix at. Ice Fang is nice for taking down other dragons. I don't have the specific Mega Gallade synergy that Torqan talked about, but Magnezone did take some pressure off Mr. fish sometimes. Mega evolving at the right time is something to keep in mind. The worst is when there's an enemy about to use Rock Slide or Stone Edge and Garchomp's busy Earthquaking.

Wally's team:

Garchomp-3 @ Choice Scarf
Ability: Sand Veil
Level: 50
EVs: 252 Atk / 252 Spe
Jolly Nature
- Outrage
- Earthquake
- Fire Fang
- Crunch

Solid guy, does great damage sets up a lot of kills with Earthquake. Usually uses Earthquake which is fine, but he seldom switches out if the enemy is immune. He has done it sometimes and even acknowledged Levitate, so who knows. Seems to use Fire Fang against 4x effective mons and Outrage if there's a dragon or EQ isn't the best choice according to its AI decisions. I've seen this guy use Crunch once. Sand Veil can be fun against a sand team opponent.

Magnezone-4 @ Assault Vest
Ability: Magnet Pull
Level: 50
EVs: 252 HP / 252 SpA
Modest Nature
- Thunderbolt
- Flash Cannon
- Tri Attack
- Volt Switch

This is where my team diverges from the strat I took, featuring this magnet guy instead of Mega Gallade. I'll take a mon with 4 attacking moves any day. I'd prefer Sturdy but Magnezone is actually pretty durable with its HP investment and Assault Vest. It even survives some Earthquakes if spread. Pretty good bait and hits hard too. Magnezone is the most likely to be in the situation where the AI has to win on its own. It has always lost.

Some pains included Dragon-types that I couldn't OHKO, Garchomp would try to target with Outrage, and end up with a coin flip. I found that some Ice types like Beartic/Glaceon/Glalie/Froslass barely survived Flash Cannon/would just outspeed Thundurus and usually retaliate with Blizzards or Ice Beams. Rotom-Frost basically gets a free Blizzard. Fairies at least tended to use Dazzling Gleam which never KOed Garchomp thanks to spread damage.

Rock types were another underlooked threat that were relevant if EQ didn't take them out. They can easily take out Thundurus and Gyarados, and usually pack a ground move that destroys Magnezone. Also Fake Outters and Trick Room teams just put a wrench in strategies in general. Also, Porygon2's bulky Ice Beam/Blizzards suck, Rotom forms other than Mow can be annoying, Mega Tyranitar survives an EQ/Flash Cannon, Tauros Giga Impacts hit hard, Wacan Braviary exists, and other Garchomp-3s add even more RNG.

Miscellaneous stuff: Sometimes Garchomp triggers a Marowak's Red Card and the Marowak slams Magnezone with Bone Rush. Landorus-2 getting locked into Earth Power can be fun thanks to my team being both Flying-types so Gyarados can set up once the other trainer is dealt with. A specific example of Magnezone "baiting" was a Mega Sceptile opting to Earthquake instead of finish off low HP Thundurus, allowing Thundurus to Sludge Bomb and Magnezone narrowly surviving.

Videos: 8YBG-WWWW-WWWG-QVMS - Winning battle. Easy Red/Blue sets to deal with
3MPG-WWWW-WWWG-QVPM - Battle 49, just surprisingly simple compared to everything else. The rest of the stuff I saved was losses and I ended up filling up my videos so eh.


This has been an interesting learning experience, Tree is serious stuff. Also used a QR Rental Team by Level 51 from here for the Super Doubles stamp so thanks!
Glad I could help a little bit! Congrats on the stamp, that one is a pain to get.
 
Posting an AI Multi streak of 83 wins with Pokémon Trainer Cynthia. This started as just a stamp run but managed to go 33 extra battles before losing.


Zapdos @ Life Orb
Ability: Pressure
EVs: 4 HP / 252 SpA / 252 Spe
Mild Nature
- Thunderbolt
- Discharge
- Heat Wave
- Tailwind
Standard pair as a lead alongside Garchomp, but still effective and leads to quick battles. In many battles, spamming Discharge + Earthquake mows through the opposing team without much effort. Discharge's high paralysis chance is also very convenient at times when the opponent lives a hit. Thunderbolt is useful for focusing more damage on a particular threat, or if Earthquake would OHKO one of the opposing Pokémon anyway. It's also useful if Garchomp goes down first and Lucario comes out. Heat Wave takes care of Bug/Grass types that resist Earthquake, Ice types that are major threats to the lead pair, and Ground types that Electric can't hit. Tailwind is filler for when Zapdos doesn't have much to do in a turn; it isn't quite as useful on this team since Garchomp is already Scarfed and Lucario is very fast as is, but Zapdos doesn't have that many options (maybe Protect or Light Screen, or Hidden Power if willing to look for one). The Mild nature is not ideal, but I haven't bothered to SR for a better one. Though, the lesser Speed isn't usually a problem and the extra power sometimes comes in handy.

Charizard @ Charizardite Y
Ability: Blaze
EVs: 4 Def / 252 SpA / 252 Spe
Modest Nature
- Flamethrower
- Solar Beam
- Dragon Pulse
- Protect
Charizard serves as another Pokémon that's strong and immune to Earthquake. It also deals better with certain types that Zapdos struggles with thanks to its coverage, like Ice, Ground, and Dragon types. Flamethrower because missing with Heat Wave is no good, Solar Beam for coverage, Dragon Pulse for coverage, and Protect helps bait Rock/Electric moves while Cynthia KOs them.

Cynthia:

Garchomp-3 (Garchomp) @ Choice Scarf
Ability: Sand Veil
EVs: 252 Atk / 252 Spe
Jolly Nature
- Outrage
- Earthquake
- Fire Fang
- Crunch
Scarf Earthquake wrecks many things and is used the vast majority of the time, even more so because the AI has an affinity for using spread moves when the partner is immune. Outrage is used on occasion when there are Dragon types weak to it or when there are opponents immune to Earthquake (although sometimes it uses Earthquake anyway). Fire Fang and Crunch are weak moves that you hope Garchomp doesn't lock into (Fire Fang happened a few times; Crunch was never used). The Scarf is also great as you know what Garchomp is going to use after the first move (barring the rare switch).

Lucario-3 (Lucario) @ Lucarionite
Ability: Inner Focus
EVs: 252 Atk / 252 Spe
Jolly Nature
- Close Combat
- Rock Slide
- Blaze Kick
- Bullet Punch
Close Combat OHKOes a silly number of Pokémon, although the defense drops make Lucario extremely frail. Bullet Punch is useful for priority, especially as a backup since the opponent is often weakened by the time Garchomp faints. Rock Slide and Blaze Kick are also weak moves that you hope Lucario doesn't use, especially since they can miss. Blaze Kick is the more commonly used of the two and occasionally gains a power boost from Drought, make it slightly less weak. Rock Slide was only ever used in one battle, and actually came through when it needed to (more on that later).
AI using bad moves: A common problem among most AI multi teams. Cynthia's Pokémon are actually quite reliable most of the time since Earthquake is a spread move and Close Combat is far more powerful than anything else, but battles instantly become more difficult when they choose weird moves. Outrage is the least problematic since it has a lot of power and is sometimes a necessary evil to hit Dragons. However, Garchomp becomes worthless if it locks into Fire Fang thanks to the low power, and will sometimes decide to on Fire-weak opponents. Crunch isn't a problem since I've never seen Garchomp use it. Lucario occasionally uses Blaze Kick for super effective hits, which can be an issue if it misses. There was also one battle where Garchomp inexplicably switched out of a lead Toxapex/Espeon and promptly got Lucario KOed by Espeon and my own Discharge. Unfortunately, I forgot to save this battle.
Trick Room: With all Pokémon on this team being at least decently fast, letting Trick Room go up is never good, and the leads aren't so great at taking down bulky setters like Cofagrigus. If this happens, you'd better hope that the opposing team can't hit very hard.
Blizzard: Double Ice weaknesses on the leads means that a single Blizzard will often take them both out (or force Zapdos to switch and take out Garchomp). Greninja and Froslass are particularly bad since they are faster than Zapdos. Glaceon has annoying items like Quick Claw, Focus Sash, and Bright Powder that often allow it to get off a Blizzard, and Frost-Rotom is immune to Earthquake and lives a spread Heat Wave.
Bulky Grounds: Immune to Discharge/Thunderbolt and neutral to Heat Wave, Earthquake, and Outrage. Often bulky enough to take multiple neutral hits. Common Rock-type coverage moves for both Zapdos and Charizard, and STAB Ground moves for Lucario. This combination lets Pokémon like Hippowdon and Mudsdale stick around for several turns and cause trouble. Landorus is also annoying since it is immune to Earthquake.
Dragons: By type alone, Dragon types often force Garchomp to use Outrage instead of Earthquake, and the many Dragon/Flying or Dragon/Levitate Pokémon make this even more likely. Many also resist all of Zapdos's moves, and hit hard enough to discourage switching to Charizard. Salamence can have Intimidate and a potentially destructive Mega Evolution. Mega Altaria is immune to Outrage. Mirror Garchomp-3 becomes a series of coin flips thanks to the speed tie and Outrage targeting randomness.
RBGW-WWWW-WWWH-BH29:
/
Red/Blue battle
HY2W-WWWW-WWWH-BH24:
/
Zapdos-2 gets out of hand with an Ancient Power boost. Lucario manages to pull through on its own with its only use of Rock Slide in the entire run (without missing!).
T8JG-WWWW-WWWH-BHXV:
/
Loss at battle 84. Lead Hippowdon-1/3 and Drampa-4 dispose of Garchomp, and Lucario falls to the backup Palossand-4. Charizard couldn't beat Alakazam-3 and Palossand by itself. Perhaps setting up Tailwind with Zapdos earlier would have allowed a win by letting Charizard outspeed/OHKO Alakazam.

Also posting a Doubles streak of 98 wins. This team was thrown together for the Doubles stamp and just happened to be over the streak cutoff by a small amount. It's not that interesting and just uses the same Pokémon that are in my Singles and Multi streaks, so I won't write too much about it.

Zapdos @ Life Orb
Ability: Pressure
EVs: 4 HP / 252 SpA / 252 Spe
Mild Nature
- Thunderbolt
- Discharge
- Heat Wave
- Tailwind

Garchomp @ Dragonium Z
Ability: Rough Skin
EVs: 252 Atk / 4 Def / 252 Spe
Jolly Nature
- Outrage
- Earthquake
- Swords Dance
- Substitute

Charizard @ Charizardite Y
Ability: Blaze
EVs: 4 Def / 252 SpA / 252 Spe
Modest Nature
- Flamethrower
- Solar Beam
- Dragon Pulse
- Protect

Aegislash @ Leftovers
Ability: Stance Change
EVs: 252 HP / 4 Atk / 252 SpA
Quiet Nature
- Shadow Ball
- Flash Cannon
- Shadow Sneak
- King's Shield

Basically Disquake again using my own Dragonium Z Garchomp instead of Cynthia's Scarfchomp. Aegislash was thrown in the back because it walls a stupid amount of Tree sets, and was still useful despite the hilarious amount of incompatibility with Zapdos's Tailwind, Garchomp's Earthquake, and Charizard's Drought.
7QBW-WWWW-WWWH-BH2M:
Blue battle, packing three Mega sets but choosing to Mega Evolve the worst one.
B8LG-WWWW-WWWH-BH2F:
Loss at battle 99. Bad matchup and luck with Garchomp-3 Outrage targeting takes down the leads turn 1, and everything goes downhill from there.
 
Hello everybody, long time no… posting? Let’s go with that. It’s going to be a long one yet again, so brace yourselves.
I’ve been busy trying to get a long Doubles streak with Mega-Pert and friends, but I’m still struggling finding time, as I’ve lost the streak multiple times over. It has potential, but certainly isn’t “free-to-win”.
But that is not the main attraction in this post. Rather than talking about my misventures in Doubles, I will talk to you about a Multi’s streak together with my good IRL friend lolnub .
He already told you [Link] a little bit about an ongoing multi’s streak in the 300’s, but up until this day things have been quiet from our side. Until now.
“Battle Tree Super Multi Records (with human partner)” is definitely NOT something you play for an easy way to amass those BP points. One battle alone could take 5 minutes if you’re carefully observing each possibility and play, not because it is difficult to win a game in multi’s with a human partner, but because the battle animations are NOT skippable. This is probably the biggest gripe we’ve had during this streak and definitely the biggest reason why progress is incredibly slow in this category of the Tree.

Now that the setting is out of the way, hereby:

Reporting a finished Super Multi [human partner] streak at 372 wins.
By lolnub and MrMarc

As a little sidenote before explaining the team, we also spend the first ~150 battles using a team with Phero Lele as leads with Mega Mence and Mega Gyara in the back, but it became boring after these first ~150 battles. After that we switched to the team we used until the losing battle. We do not have any proof that the Phero Lele team existed at all due to lack of battle videos on our side, so we would like to report this streak as being performed by the Pokémon noted below.

In my memory we had a conversation which went something along the lines of:
“What is more fun than choosing between Mega Kang and Mega Mence?
If you answered “Using them both (as a lead) at the same time.” – you would be correct!”

Although both of the Megas on our team were nerfed this generation, they still pack a mean punch, as demonstrated by the Doubles records we’ve set with our Megas. Mence in lolnub’s case and Kang in my case, although lolnub’s streak was AFTER using this team in multi’s.
lolnub’s Doubles records: [Link]
MrMarc’s Doubles record: [Link]
As we were familiar with these Megas, we’ve decided to use them on our team. Now, we needed a defensive switch in for both of these mons. After some debating between using Z-moves, as you could opt to use two of them in multi’s as well, we’ve settled on Tapu Fini in the back slot of Mega Mence and Aegislash in the back slot of Mega Kang. As I already had some experience with using trusty Mega Kang, I brought her and Aegislash, while lolnub used Mega Mence and Fini.
We decided that Aegislash either was a LO user OR a Z-move user. Ultimately we decided on Special Ghostium-Z with Wide Guard support, as Physical Aegi has no place in Doubles.
For Fini, we doubled between a few sets. Are we going for Calm Mind or Specs? Or would we want another Z user?
When we were testing things out, we found the extra firepower Specs had was the way to go, so we decided that Specs Fini was the one we wanted to finish our team.

As for the actual sets we quickly decided on Kang and Aegi’s movesets, while the team lolnub used was a bit more versatile, so we had to discuss some things there.


Kangaskhan @ Kangaskhanite
Ability: Inner Focus
EVs: 4 HP / 252 Atk / 252 Spe
Jolly Nature
- Power-Up Punch
- Sucker Punch
- Double-Edge
- Fake Out

The EV’s are self-explanatory. Hit hard. Hit fast.
Someone who hasn’t seen my Doubles report with Mega Kang might wonder: “Why Inner Focus? Isn’t Scrappy is better in almost every way?”
To you I say: “Nay!”
Inner Focus is there to punish the partners of Fake Out mons faster than (Mega) Kang. If they are slower than Mega Kang, then just Fake them out before they can Fake Out you. If they choose to Fake Out Kang, then their partner also doesn’t move, or it has to be a Ghost type or also an Inner Focus mon. If the Fake Outer chooses to Fake Out Mence, then we got a turn where we got damage on our opponents and a little bit on Mence.
So it is basically there to ensure nothing gets away with a “free” setup if Mence cannot KO the opponent. Ghosts are not the most scary of things anyway because of Sucker Punch and those few opponents who are scary are hit hard by Mence or the back two.
Whenever the situation arises where Mence can KO two opponents with Hyper Voice, Kang gets a free +2 by PuP’ing the mighty croissant Dragon. Now our opponents have to deal with a Mega Mence, AND a Kang at +2. It doesn’t always happen, but when it does, it is an instant game over for those who dare face the wrath of these unleashed Mega beasts MUHAH-- Ahem. Next member.


Alondite (Aegislash) @ Ghostium Z
Ability: Stance Change
EVs: 252 HP / 252 SpA / 4 SpD
Quiet Nature
IVs: 0 Atk / 0 Spe
- Flash Cannon
- Shadow Ball
- Wide Guard
- King's Shield

The lonely member of our team who had the luck of being nicknamed before entering the next generation of the Battle Tower.
Alondite does what it does best (Tellius fans anyone?). Tanking one hit from full if it is not a super effective Z-move (more on that later) and dishing out a powerful Z-move of his own, all the while protecting its teammates and itself from spread moves.
We needed a good switch in for Fighting types and Rock types and Aegi is always a good call on ANY team.
We went the special route with Flash Cannon and Shadow Ball because Kang already stomped on the special walls anyway. EV spread is for heavy Trick Room teams, which do not occur as often as the Tree has to draw two trainers out of its pool, so facing two TR teams at the same time is highly unlikely, coupled with FO support from Kang and TR is almost always a non-threat for this team. Nonetheless, a slow Aegi is also nice for taking a hit before changing your stance. EV spread is standard and simple.


Salamence @ Salamencite
Ability: Intimidate
EVs: 4 Atk / 252 SpA / 252 Spe
Hasty Nature
- Hyper Voice
- Double-Edge
- Flamethrower
- Protect

Oh Mega Mence, what did the world do to deserve a mon like you? Either we pleased Arceus or we made him REALLY pissed off. The end result stays the same: A dragon that does not use Dragon moves as his primary offense and tanking capabilities that not a lot of Pokémon can perform without the use of a hold item. This thing can take a weak Ice move and live to tell the tale to his brethren.
Fake Out support from Mega Kang and a Hyper Voice from this monster is enough to dent even the bulkiest of foes with his 252/252 spread in Sp Atk and Speed. And if Blissey thinks it is safe, then a Double-Edge is there to deal massive amounts of damage. It still won’t KO the pink blob, but it is in KO range of the next attack. There aren’t a lot of Pokémon who can tank a Hyper Voice + Fake Out followed by a Double-Edge from either of the frontline members.
We’ve chosen for mixed Mence and although you might expect that 4 Attack EVs Double-Edge hits a lot less hard, it still deals around the same damage as a Double-Edge from invested Mega Kang. Now THAT is playing with power.
We opted to use Flamethrower as our last attack on Mence for Ferrothorn and other Steels which hamper the damage output from the two Megas considerably.
Protect is Protect and is a must in a format where you send out two Pokémon at the same time, especially considering this Pokémon and Aegislash are the only ones who ran any form of Protect on our team.


Tapu Fini @ Choice Specs
Ability: Misty Surge
Level: 50
EVs: 220 HP / 4 Def / 252 SpA / 4 SpD / 28 Spe
IVs: 0 Atk
- Moonblast
- Dazzling Gleam
- Scald
- Ice Beam

Tapu Fini. It may very well be the best Tapu there is in the Tree. Dragons got you down? No problem, although Koko and Lele do the same. What really sets Fini apart from its other Island Guardians is that oh so sweet Misty Terrain. Feeling slowed down by Paralysis? Tired of Sleep? Freezes got you feeling cold? Not anymore with Misty SurgeTM! Invest now in your Tapu Fini and deal with so little hax that you know you’ll get crit the next time!
Enough weird analogies; Misty Terrain is a godsend. The support this Terrain alone offers to Mega Kang and Aegi in being status free is wild (do still note that Mega Mence still can get statused as it is Flying-type). No longer do Rotom Forms Burn you or Paralyse you. You get the gist.
But this is not the end of all the good stuff Fini is good for, it is also one of, if not THE best switch in for Mega Mence. It resists Ice and flat out is immune to Dragon type moves. The only typing that is not dealt with is Rock, but with a Aegi on the other side, even Rock types are no real threat. Couple this with the fact that opponents are split up, so you rarely face two Rock types at once.
Moonblast and Dazzling Gleam are pretty standard choices, nothing to see there. A powerful single target or a spread move. Choice is all yours. No pun intended.
Scald is chosen in favour of Muddy Water or Surf because it is more accurate than the former and does not hit partners in comparison to the latter.
The last move was a bit open for Fini. We have used Grass Knot for a while, but it didn’t really do anything. Grass Knot was not used very much at all, because Gastrodon-2 is not hit hard by it and could have Rindo, in which case Moonblast is the better option. Rotom-W is not hit hard by it at all and the occasional Swampert is easily dealt with with a double up.
After a while we opted for Ice Beam in the last slot, because when Mence was KO’d, we needed another Grass answer on Fini for the Grass/Poison types. Was it useful? Not really. Was there anything better on that slot? Hardly.

VS Instruct Oranguru who instructed Fini to attack him again:
U54G-WWWW-WWWH-3VPR
The losing one, battle 373:
LKPW-WWWW-WWWH-4W6Q

We chose to not Mega our Kang so Flame Body had a lower change to activate. You don’t have to have a lot experience in the tree to guess that we still got burned. Hyper Voice from Mega Mence failed to KO the Virizion and dented the Talonflame who used its Sitrus.
lolnub said half-jokingly that Virizion can crit its Sacred Sword. Jinxed it. Kang goes down and Aegi comes in. [We high five to celebrate the call out, not knowing that this was to be our last battle]
Hyper Voice kills both opponents and Aegi King Shields to keep itself in shield form.
Outcomes what will be our demise. Raikou and Rotom-Heat.
Because Aegi had just King Shielded, we had to attack. Sucks to be us, it was Rotom-Heat-4 with Firium-Z [Here’s that super effective Z-move that we were talking about in Aegi’s write-up]. That spelled the end of Aegi and now it was Mence and Fini vs two Electric types.
GG, no RE (at least in the near future). We brought it back to a situation where Fini had to dodge a Thunder from Raikou, but it still hit its mark.

If I was the one to give our exploits a name to fit with the team, it would be “Powerful but glad it is over”. Multis takes a lot out of a man’s life, boys and girls.
This have been MrMarc and lolnub, until next time, Treeclimbers.
 
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I'm reporting a completed doubles streak of 114 wins. Not really impressive, but it's actually my best performance in doubles to date in any of the facilities - and I'm glad good ol' Alakazam finally gets a spot on this gen's leaderboard.


Anyway,
My team's frontline revolved around abusing Tapu Lele's psychic terrain as much as possible. I had Lele and Alakazam (non mega, holding a sash) attacking and generally wreaking havoc with powerful psychic/psyshocks. Now for the back line, I had my mega - Gyarados.

I felt bulky psychics and ghosts were a singificant hurdle for this team, and that mega G's dark typing would solve this issue easily. That proved to be correct for the most part- shadow ball just doesn't harm the likes of annoying walls like Cresselia or Uxie that much, while mega G dealt with them easily.

As for my fourth mon, I had Bewear at first holding a Fightinium Z. I chose him for: a) his immunity to ghost, a weakness for the psychic frontline,
b) countering dark types, who could sometimes be problematic, and c) just the fact that I liked his physical bulk, of course, given my frontline's frailty.
I tried Bewear with the fighting z crystal and later the assault vest. My main problem with him was that he didn't gel with the team too well - he had the nasty psychic weakness, which was more powerful in Lele's terrain.

Another issue I had was that my two leads, being pretty fast, simply despised paralysis. I decided a thunder wave immunity was essential to keeping this team's hopes alive.

So I replaced Bewear with Mudsdale, and stuck on an Assault Vest on him. I still had troubles and lost the streak pre-50 twice, mostly due to my own unfamiliarity with how to play the team and my own clumsiness with doubles. Once I got the hang of it though, the team didn't look back. Lele, with a Life orb, seemed to be able to one-shot half the Tree. Alakazam also hit crazy hard, and I didn't usually have to bring in the backline.


Tapu Lele,
Holding life orb,
Timid nature,
Hyper Trained,
Move-set:
Psychic
Moonblast
Hidden power (fire)
Protect

Ev's: Max Sp attack and speed

Alakazam,
Focus Sash,
Hyper Trained,
Timid Nature,
Magic Guard (had synchronize at first but later switched),
Move-set:
Psyshock
Dazzling Gleam
Shadow Ball
Protect

Ev's: Max sp attack and speed


Gyarados, nicknamed Pseudodragon
Jolly nature,
Hyper Trained,
Intimidate/Mold Breaker,
Gyaradosite
Move-set:
Dragon Dance
Waterfall
Crunch
Protect

Ev's: Max attack and speed (should i shift some speed to hp?)

Mudsdale
Adamant nature,
Hyper Trained,
Stamina,
Assault Vest,
Move-set:
High horsepower,
Close Combat,
Heavy Slam
Rock Slide

Evs- Max attack and hp. (Thought of shifting some attack ev's over to defenses but never did so.)

BB4W-WWWW-WWWH-ECQP

A previous loss. Mixture of quick claw hax and just my backline being overwhelmed by its weakness to grass. Also, the terrain changed, which almost never happens, and it ended terribly for me.

KP3W-WWWW-WWWH-ECV8
A very close fight involving Trick Room. If you're going to watch only one vid from this team, it should be this one.

X8UG-WWWW-WWWH-ED3D
Uploaded this because it's the 100th win, and it's against Wally, who some teams have issues with.

NKEW-WWWW-WWWH-ED4A
My final loss. Very disappointing as I felt this team could do better. Still, I misplayed here so I guess I deserved it. You really can't let your guard down against those speed specialists, they're pretty dangerous in my experience (especially when Starmie4 is included).

Threats included very fast pokemon like Accelgor, and grass teams like Captain Mallow's, since the backline was weak to grass. Also, any pokemon which could potentially change the terrain was annoying to deal with, like one of Comfey's sets.
Thunder wave spammers were obnoxious and the reason I needed a ground type.

In conclusion, I recommend this team for people who want something fun to play around with in psychic terrain. I'm hopeful someone with a little more skill than me can take this team to 200 or beyond :)
 

turskain

activated its Quick Claw!
is a Community Contributor
We chose to not Mega our Kang so Flame Body had a lower change to activate. You don’t have to have a lot experience in the tree to guess that we still got burned. Hyper Voice from Mega Mence failed to KO the Virizion and dented the Talonflame who used its Sitrus.
lolnub said half-jokingly that Virizion can crit its Sacred Sword. Jinxed it. Kang goes down and Aegi comes in. [We high five to celebrate the call out, not knowing that this was to be our last battle]
Hyper Voice kills both opponents and Aegi King Shields to keep itself in shield form.
Outcomes what will be our demise. Raikou and Rotom-Heat.
Because Aegi had just King Shielded, we had to attack. Sucks to be us, it was Rotom-Heat-4 with Firium-Z [Here’s that super effective Z-move that we were talking about in Aegi’s write-up]. That spelled the end of Aegi and now it was Mence and Fini vs two Electric types.
GG, no RE (at least in the near future). We brought it back to a situation where Fini had to dodge a Thunder from Raikou, but it still hit its mark.
I think this loss involved key plays that would not be optimal in most circumstances:

1. Keeping in Kangaskhan against Virizion/Talonflame on Turn 1 - neither foe threatens Mega Salamence once intimidated, and both are likely 2HKO'd by Hyper Voice and outsped on Turn 2 with Gale Wings being gone by then. Switching in Aegislash on Turn 1 would at worst end up with Aegislash tanking a -1 Flare Blitz before the leads are taken out - but more likely Talonflame would use Swords Dance or a different attack in this situation.

2. Using King's Shield on Aegislash when double KOing Talonflame/Virizion with Hyper Voice - this one's more ambiguous, but I think purposefully entering Blade Form is overall more consistent, since it keeps King's Shield as an option for the back-ups, allows Blade Form baiting, and still retains the option of double protecting to take on the back-ups in Shield form if desired.

I've been struggling with proper lead preservation plays myself recently and this warstory reminded me of my own losses, heh.
 
I think this loss involved key plays that would not be optimal in most circumstances:

1. Keeping in Kangaskhan against Virizion/Talonflame on Turn 1 - neither foe threatens Mega Salamence once intimidated, and both are likely 2HKO'd by Hyper Voice and outsped on Turn 2 with Gale Wings being gone by then. Switching in Aegislash on Turn 1 would at worst end up with Aegislash tanking a -1 Flare Blitz before the leads are taken out - but more likely Talonflame would use Swords Dance or a different attack in this situation.

2. Using King's Shield on Aegislash when double KOing Talonflame/Virizion with Hyper Voice - this one's more ambiguous, but I think purposefully entering Blade Form is overall more consistent, since it keeps King's Shield as an option for the back-ups, allows Blade Form baiting, and still retains the option of double protecting to take on the back-ups in Shield form if desired.

I've been struggling with proper lead preservation plays myself recently and this warstory reminded me of my own losses, heh.
First off, you're absolutely right, we've made some pretty sub-optimal --- I would even call it huge critical mistakes --- during the battle we lost.
We also could've used FO on Virizion, as Talonflame is not much of a threat to Kang at -1. (Thanks for the correction Smuckem ). But alas, we totally made a/multiple mistake(s).
After the fight we had a quick reflection on the fight (and the corresponding loss) and what we could've done differently.
The points you bring to our attention are certainly things that crossed our minds, but that's 20/20 hindsight.
Although it definitely helps you/us get better by reflecting upon the actions you/we have taken during the fight.

It also does not really help that a multi streak really bums you out when you play multiple matches in a row. Keeping your concentration at top level is quite challenging and frankly, we're kinda glad that the streak is over lol
We're currently checking if we ever finished the XY/ORAS Battle Maison Super Multis, so we're taking a quick look back in time for this one :D
We're also kinda glad to reaffirm that we are not the only ones crumbling under the Tree and the lead preservation we all struggle with, so bring on the warstories ;)
Thanks for reading once again and good luck with the runs in the Tree y'all!
 
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Hey everyone! I've been a lurker here for a long time, and I finally have 3 completed streaks worth posting. For the sake of simplicity, I'll break it up into 3 posts. Very new to formatting here, so if I make a mistake let me know and I'll fix it.

First, posting a USUM Doubles streak of 172 wins.

dp172.jpg

This team is a very standard tree team. There are somewhere around 10 teams with Lele-Mosa leads and MegaMence + Aegislash/Celesteela on the leaderboard. I don't believe anyone has this exact same team, but it plays the same way. Tapu Lele and Pheromosa have insane synergy, are incredibly fast, and hit like trucks. Mega-Salamence has a decent defensive synergy with the leads, notably being immune to ground types, and resistant to fire types (although burns are not ideal). Finally, Aegislash completes the fantasy core, and walls an incredible amount of tree sets. Here are the individual sets and comments on each.


Tapu Lele @ Choice Scarf

Ability: Psychic Surge
Level: 50
IVs: 31/x/31/x/31/x (Hyper-Trained)
EVs: 252 SpA / 4 SpD / 252 Spe
Modest Nature
- Psychic
- Moonblast
- Shadow Ball
- Energy Ball
HP:145
Attack: 94
Defense: 95
Sp. Atk: 200
Sp. Def: 135
Speed: 147

I am a firm believer that scarfed Tapu Lele is the strongest battle tree set I have ever used. Psychic Surge is so incredibly valuable, negating any worry of fake-out or prankster, as well as keeping the relatively frail lLee and the glassiest of cannons Pheromosa safe from being picked off by a bullet punch or sucker punch. I almost exclusively use Lele as the base for my teams just because it removes so much of the headache of priority randomness throughout the tree. And psychic terrain also provides a substantial increase to power, allowing you to forgo the use of a boosting items such as life orb/choice specs/psychium-z in favor of going really fast. The IVs were originally meant for Hidden Power Fire, but it felt way too weak, with an 18.8% chance to OHKO Mega-Scizor and missing the OHKO completely on all Ferrothorn sets. A Modest nature provides as much damage as possible, while choice scarf and 252 EVs elevate your speed to a blistering 220, which is slower than only 16 sets in the whole tree. 252 EVs was used to speed tie with Darmanitan-4, but I reduced that in later teams (foreshadowing). If only we could just squeeze 1 more point in without giving up a modest nature, as the power drop is very noticeable. Nonetheless, it still outspeeds Mega-Beedrill and fast Accelgor, which is nothing to scoff at.

For this iteration of my Tapu Lele, I was focused on coverage. Click Psychic is the obvious number 1 strategy. Moonblast is used for dark types and sometimes opposing psychic types (although Pheromosa is usually able to deal with them alone, barring bulky sets like Slowbro-4 and Musharna-4). Shadow Ball was used to hit Metagross, Chandelure, and Delphox, and Energy Ball was used for Mega-Swampert and Gastrodon. These moves were used very sparingly, and were eventually removed.

Lele is used to grab kills fast. if something doesn't die on the first turn, things often go sour. Despite middling defensive stats, I found her surprisingly bulky. Not many moves kill her outright. Overall, Lele is definitely the most valuable member of the team.

1519260969861.png

Pheromosa @ Focus Sash

Ability: Beast Boost
Level: 50
IVs: 31/31/x/x/31/x (Hyper-Trained)
EVs: 252 Atk / 12 SpA / 244 Spe
Naughty Nature
- Low Kick
- Lunge
- Ice Beam
- Protect
HP: 146
Attack: 207
Defense: 57
Sp. Atk: 137
Sp. Def: 37
Speed: 202

I don't think there is a more purely offense-oriented mon that our beloved roach-lady. Beast Boost is an incredibly good ability, and a single boost can snowball a match out of control. She hits hard and fast, but falls over dead if someone looks at her too hard

I tried out a few different sets before I settled on this one. The one I had the most hope for was a special set using a Modest nature with Focus Blast, Bug Buzz, Ice Beam, Protect, and Fightinium-Z. Bug Buzz has 90 base power compared to Lunge at 80, and a 190 base power All-Out-Pummeling annihilated anything in it's path. Securing a special attack bonus that boosted Ice Beam in addition to the STABs was also a great bonus. However, as we all know Focus Blast will let you down in the worst ways. Not even close to consistent enough for the tree.

I eventually settled on a mixed focus sash set which combines great coverage, great accuracy, and a great big juicy target for the opponent. Pheromosa is just so perfect with Tapu Lele. Fighting and Bug STABS deal with the Dark and Psychic types that Lele can't handle. Ice beam was used for that sweet, sweet ice coverage, and protect was possibly the most useful move of all. Enemies loved to target Pheromosa, and a well predicted protect allowed her partner to fire with impunity. Low Kick was used over High Jump Kick for accuracy reasons, although it notably misses out on OHKOs of Porygon2 and Rotom-F. The slight loss of base power is partially made up for because the Steel and Rock types it is mainly used for are often big fat guys. Lunge is also sneaky useful for a guaranteed attack stat drop, sometimes allowing Lele to survive an extra physical attack.

I used a Naughty nature here to secure an attack boost without lowering special attack, and let's be honest defense is not one of her strong suits. Max attack EVs provide some power and grant her an attack boost on kill. 203 is an empty speed tier, so used 244 speed EVs to land at 202, outspeeding scarf skarmory and pretty much everything else. Only 10 sets sit between Pheromosa and Tapu Lele, so needless to say this thing is fast. More than 9 times out of 10 both of your leads will outspeed both of theirs, giving you complete control of the initial part of the battle. The remaining 12 EVs give a small bump to special attack for Ice Beam.

Focus Sash feels great on Pheromosa, giving her a kind of pseudo-bulk allowing her to tank almost anything turn one. Yes Darmanitan-4 Flare Blitz will deal upwards of 400% of her HP, but it only takes 1 HP to turn around and bop him with low kick. Playing around Sash is one of the biggest keys to success with this archetype, which admittedly is not my forte.

1519263481758.png

Salamence (M) @ Salamencite

Ability: Intimidate ==> Aerialate
Level: 50
IVs: 31/31/31/31/31/31
EVs: 44 Atk / 212 SpA / 252 Spe
Naive Nature
- Flamethrower
- Hyper Voice
- Double-Edge
- Protect
HP: 170
Attack: 161
Defense: 100
Sp. Atk: 157
Sp. Def: 90
Speed: 167

HP: 170
Attack: 171
Defense: 150
Sp. Atk: 167
Sp. Def: 99
Speed: 189

The first thing of note about Salamence is his ability Initmidate. Just 1 attack drop can make all the difference in a battle, and because he sits in the back, it doesn't activate any competitive/defiant abilities from Milotic, Bisharp, Tornadus, or Thundurus. Due to his high natural bulk and resistance to types the leads struggle with (namely fire), it can often be worth shuffling him in and out with Aegislash if the situation warrants.

The real reason for using Salamence here is of course his mega evolution. An additional 50 defense makes him a solid response to physical attacks, and with 252 EVs his speed is bumped up to a respectable 189 with a Naive nature. Naive is used to avoid dropping either attacking stat while maximizing speed, but I am actually wondering if a Hasty nature might be preferred to avoid lowering his mediocre special defense even further. Unfortunately there are many threats sitting just above Mega-Salamence in terms of speed, such as Mega-Aerodactyl, Weavile, Ribombee, Greninja, and Noivern, and he ties with important mons like non-mega Alakazam, Kanto Dugtrio, and opposing Mega-Salamence. Ideally, the leads will take care of these, but if they slip to the back two, it could be an issue.

One of the biggest draws to Mega-Salamence is Aerialte-boosted Hyper Voice. Although Aerialte did receive a nerf in Gen 7, a 1.2X bonus in addition to the new found flying STAB moves still hits very hard. In particular, the spread Hyper Voice dents the enemy team, with flying being a less often resisted attacking type. I chose Double-Edge to be able to hit a single target as hard as possible with physical damage. I know I benchmarked his 44 attack EVs for something, but I can't for the life of me remember what that was. Flamethrower is used to get rid of Scizor and Ferrothorn, as this team lacks fire coverage. Protect is protect. Always useful. The remaining EVs are dumped into special attack.


Aegislash (F) @ Ghostium Z

Ability: Stance Change
Level: 50
IVs: 31/30/31/31/31/0
EVs: 252 HP / 252 SpA / 4 SpD
Quiet Nature
- Shadow Ball
- Flash Cannon
- King's Shield
- Wide Guard
HP: 167
Attack: 70
Defense: 170
Sp. Atk: 112
Sp. Def: 171
Speed: 58

HP:167
Attack: 170
Defense: 70
Sp. Atk: 222
Sp. Def: 71
Speed: 58

Aegislash is the standard 4th to round out this team. His typing is incredible, and his stats are absurd. The real difficulty in Aegislash comes from knowing when to switch forms and predicting opponents moves. This was often an issue for me, but she is just so strong that it often didn't matter.

I went with a Quiet nature as a sort of soft answer to Trick Room (although I realized I was still way too fast. This EV set put me in a speed tie with a few pokémon who present a huge issue namely Dusknoir and A-Marowak. Just above this tier at 60 speed is not friendly company either with Probopass, Camerupt-1, Hippowdon-4, and Dhelmise. None of these should be the end of the world, but for a sustained streak it should be addressed. 6-7 speed IVs and 0 EVs puts Aegislash at the empty 61 tier, where it can operate with full knowledge of who will attack first. The rest of the EVs were used to max HP and Sp. Atk.

King's Shield is mandatory for Aegislash in order to switch between stances. The 2 stage attack drop on physical contact is wonderful and can make an opponent's mon worthless. Shadow Ball along with Ghostium-Z is used to nuke Ghost and Psychic types that could not be deal with, most notably Mega-Metagross. I took Flash Cannon here for the STAB steel coverage with the intention of dealing with the Ice and Rock types that give Salamence trouble. The Sp. Def drop actually was useful more than once, and I was glad to have it. The last move was Wide Guard, which was incredibly useful for dealing with Blizzard spam and keeping Salamence alive. Blocking Rock Slide, Earthquake, and Surf were nice bonuses.


Here is a battle that shows a bit of the team. I misplayed a bit, but managed to win comfortably.
Battle No. 158 against Punk Guy Dustin: 2K5G-WWWW-WWWH-KBL3
1519272080010.png

Intimidate teams can be difficult for this team, as my Pheromosa is effectively neutered by -2 Atk. Here I should've noticed that Gyarados didn't have intimidate, which usually means it is a non-mega Dragon Dance set (can someone back me up on this? Not sure if that is accurate). I could've used Psychic on Gyarados to lock into the more powerful move and get the kill with Pheromosa. I guessed that Manectric would Overheat into Pheromosa, so I planned to protect and attack with Tapu Lele. Instead it used T-bolt on Lele and paralyzed her. This was very worrysome as this team relies on speed, and Lele was essentially dead weight. I tried to put some damage on Tauros as the evasion boosts were becoming an issue, but no such luck. I brought in Aegislash for Lele, and switched out Pheromosa for Salamence because I thought I was at -2 Atk. I now knew that he has Tauros-4, meaning he could only attack with earthquake. I should've realized this sooner and left him be. Instead I used Hyper Voice with Shadow Ball to KO Manectric, but left Aegislash vulnerable. I started in on Scrafty with Hyper Voice since I couldn't KO with Double-Edge at -1 Atk, but I left Aegislash wide open for a dark STAB. Really careless play that could have cost me more than it did. Thankfully, I was able to just spam Wide Guard to never get hit by the Tauros Earthquake, guaranteeing the win after I knocked out Scrafty.

Here is the losing battle. I played this poorly.
Losing Battle No. 173 against Scientist Cal: MQNW-WWWW-WWWH-KBLT

Double trick room setters is a nightmare for this team. I could only take out one, and I was hoping for Oranguru to be the Z-move set. But I guessed wrong and unfortunately locked Tapu Lele into Energy Ball way too early. Oranguru gets off the Trick Room and the fun begins. I made the huge mistake of not protecting Pheromosa and gave her up for free. Really huge blunder. Energy Ball into Wishiwashi does nothing due to Rindo Bery, and for some reason I switch out Lele giving up any pressure I had. I bring in Aegislash to deal with Oranguru...but I forget that he is part Normal. So instead I blow my Z-move on Wishiwashi. In the end, Lele just couldn't take down the Slowking alone. Overall a close but really sloppy fight that I deserved to lose, but hey thems the breaks.


This team has potential for huge streaks, as evidenced by the leaderboard. Here is some more quick information about the common threats to the team, as well as changes to make the team stronger.

The biggest threat to this team is Trick Room. My leads can't kill a couple Trick Room setters turn 1, so if I see them I know I am in trouble. A few examples are Jellicent, Aromatisse, Audino, Bronzong, Dusknoir, Cofagrigus, and Carbink. The first adjustment this team needs is a better way to handle Trick Room, either by killing the setters or having a slower threat than Aegislash.

Fast Choice Scarf users are the next big issue. In a team built around outspeeding and eliminating, no speed kills. Garchomp, Darmantitan, Typholosion, and Entei, as well as Terrakion, Aerodactyl, and Rotom-Fan and Rotom-Wash to a lesser extent. Careful switching and protecting can maneuver around these threats, but they are incredibly dangerous and need to be addressed immediately.

Bulky Ghost, Dark, and Psychic types also present a challenge; Escpecially those that have a secondary type. Lele can deal a lot of damage to most ghosts, but often relies of Pheromosa to clean up the KO. Unfortunately Bug and Fighting are underwhelming against Ghost types to say the least, and is not an effective answer. The best response to this is better Aegislash play, which as I mentioned earlier is sometimes easier said than done.

I make some changes to Tapu Lele in my next team, and changes to Pheromosa in my third team, so I will wait to address them there.

Aegislash needs to have 6-7 speed IVs to avoid crowded speed tiers. For this team, I did not calc anything for her, so I am sure there are benchmarks in bulk that she would be able to hit without sacrificing offensive pressure. As for moves, the only one I would consider changing is Flash Cannon. Substitute could be a nice way to avoid status and have more flexibility in stance choice. Toxic could be used to stall out some bulkier threats. And while it is contradictory to Tapu Lele and Psychic Terrain, Shadow Sneak might be worth looking into to hit levitating and flying mons, or as a priority when the terrain wears out, although this team plays fasts and battles don't usually last that long. A physical set might also work, as Aegislash can find plenty of opportunities to set up Swords Dance in the tree.

Salamence can certainly run either a Dragon Dance or standard physical set, but I have trouble setting him up in doubles in this fast paced team. Many of the teams on the leaderboard feature physical Salamence, so I highly recommend looking at them. Tailwind is also worth considering, as it will make 3 out of the 4 outspeed everything. With proper planning, it might even be possible to get the choice scarf off of Tapu Lele and invest more into bulk and damage without sacrificing speed. Finally, I have also been toying with using a Modest set with Hyper Voice, Flamethrower, and Hyper Beam. 90% accuracy is troubling, and the recharge can be crippling, but the damage is just absurd coming off max Sp Atk, Aerilate, and STAB, as well as being a single target move unlike Hyper Voice. I will not commit to saying it's good at all. In fact I'd wager heavily that it isn't. But more poking around will have to be done to draw a safe conclusion.

Thanks for taking the time to read my write-up! I'm sure it's mostly information you already know, but I am just glad to finally be able to contribute. I still have two more streaks to report, but I will probably end up posting them tomorrow.

Cheers!
 
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turskain

activated its Quick Claw!
is a Community Contributor
Battle No. 158 against Punk Guy Dustin: 2K5G-WWWW-WWWH-KBL3
View attachment 102919

Intimidate teams can be difficult for this team, as my Pheromosa is effectively neutered by -2 Atk. Here I should've noticed that Gyarados didn't have intimidate, which usually means it is a non-mega Dragon Dance set (can someone back me up on this? Not sure if that is accurate). I could've used Psychic on Gyarados to lock into the more powerful move and get the kill with Pheromosa. I guessed that Manectric would Overheat into Pheromosa, so I planned to protect and attack with Tapu Lele. Instead it used T-bolt on Lele and paralyzed her. This was very worrysome as this team relies on speed, and Lele was essentially dead weight. I tried to put some damage on Tauros as the evasion boosts were becoming an issue, but no such luck. I brought in Aegislash for Lele, and switched out Pheromosa for Salamence because I thought I was at -2 Atk. I now knew that he has Tauros-4, meaning he could only attack with earthquake. I should've realized this sooner and left him be. Instead I used Hyper Voice with Shadow Ball to KO Manectric, but left Aegislash vulnerable. I started in on Scrafty with Hyper Voice since I couldn't KO with Double-Edge at -1 Atk, but I left Aegislash wide open for a dark STAB. Really careless play that could have cost me more than it did. Thankfully, I was able to just spam Wide Guard to never get hit by the Tauros Earthquake, guaranteeing the win after I knocked out Scrafty.

Here is the losing battle. I played this poorly.
Losing Battle No. 173 against Scientist Cal: MQNW-WWWW-WWWH-KBLT

Double trick room setters is a nightmare for this team. I could only take out one, and I was hoping for Oranguru to be the Z-move set. But I guessed wrong and unfortunately locked Tapu Lele into Energy Ball way too early. Oranguru gets off the Trick Room and the fun begins. I made the huge mistake of not protecting Pheromosa and gave her up for free. Really huge blunder. Energy Ball into Wishiwashi does nothing due to Rindo Bery, and for some reason I switch out Lele giving up any pressure I had. I bring in Aegislash to deal with Oranguru...but I forget that he is part Normal. So instead I blow my Z-move on Wishiwashi. In the end, Lele just couldn't take down the Slowking alone. Overall a close but really sloppy fight that I deserved to lose, but hey thems the breaks.
I believe abilities are randomly determined, and not related to which set you're facing, aside species that always announce ability not having one (Tyranitar without either Sand Stream or Unnverve) signaling that it's Zoroark.

Both Gyarados3 and Gyarados4 are Dragon Dance sets with a Jolly nature, and bad match-ups for PheroLele teams. I'm not sure how they should be approached - if Phero were running a +Speed nature, it would outspeed these at +1 and be able to get a move off before they attack or DD again. It's been a long time since I used these leads, but my personal preference would be going for a Speed-boosting nature on both Scarf Lele and Pheromosa, from having seen +Speed Lele proving itself on Josh's Sharkanine and theorymoning Speed boosts from Beast Boost to be more consistently useful than Attack boosts (outspeeding whole Tree at 1HP after a KO vs possibly being outsped by Scarfers with an Attack boost that doesn't help any in that situation). Naive/Hasty Pheromosa also outspeeds Mega Alakazam, a key threat against Tapu Lele teams.

Edit: after a discussion on Discord, against Gyarados lead there's the option of switching Pheromosa out for Salamence on Turn 1:

-1 252 Atk Life Orb Tauros Giga Impact vs. 0 HP / 0 Def Tapu Lele: 118-140 (81.3 - 96.5%) -- guaranteed 2HKO

Gyarados is most likely to use Dragon Dance, and getting rid of Pheromosa's Attack drops while keeping its Sash is not a bad option - locking Lele into Psychic when there's a possible Mega Gyarados on the field can be a risk, so Moonblast (or Dazzling Gleam if it were on the set) is the move that retains the option to deal damage to Mega Gyarados on Turn 2. From there, if it's Tauros3 using Giga Impact, this set has to recharge, and if it's Tauros4 the offense is low and Gyarados can be doubled into after. Tauros3 might also use something else but from my experience it has a preference for Giga Impact in the absence of strong super-effective choices.
 
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Battle Tree Super Doubles 1646 wins (completed)
Battle #1,337 32KG-WWWW-WWWH-SUZB
Battle # 1,647 8GKW-WWWW-WWWY-5NBX




Foreword:
After a 2 month hiatus from Pokémon I watched the latest "Pokémon - I choose you!" movie and somehow it triggered me to grab my New Nintendo 3DS to play Pokémon Ultra Moon. After not having touched my 3DS since december 2017 I wasn't that surprised to see myself in front of the receptionist of the Battle Tree. She rewarded me with the standard rewards you get for a finished 200+ streak; the last time I touched my 3DS was after losing battle #769 with the team below, the same team I used to beat the AI a thousand times in a row. I played Sun and Moon briefly, using different strategies. From good stuff teams (Tapu Koko / Mega Kang / Golisopod / Talonflame) to a variety of Trick Room strategies, mainly Dusclops / Aron / Mega Kang / Conkeldurr, the "solid four" that made me write history in ORAS Battle Maison with a 4.000+ streak. The change in AI mechanics and the introduction of Z-moves made Trick Room Endeavor seem to be a non-effective strategy for high record streaks. I came back to show you that this is not true.

I am not good at doing write ups so I hope you'll enjoy this post while reading it.
To make this slightly more interesting I encourage you to watch the battle videos and read along while things take place.

Team:


Dusclops @ Eviolite
Ability: Frisk
Nature: Relaxed
IVs: 31/31/31/07/31/00
EVs: 252 HP / 100 Def / 156 Sp.Def
- Trick Room
- Foresight
- Night Shade
- Brick Break

Dusclops, the Trick Room setter.
Same set as I used in Battle Maison, the EV spread is slightly different though.
Dusclops and I go way back; I have always considered it the best Trick Room setter there is because it has so much bulk thanks to Eviolite.
It also has the right move pool to do what I need it to do: Scout, set up Trick Room, identify Ghosts and finish those weakened by Endeavor.
The biggest drawback of Dusclops in comparison to other Trick Room setters is that, despite the insane bulk, it cannot set-up Trick Room when it flinches, get's frozen, paralysized or 1HKO'd by a STAB Z-Move or 1HKO move. And that is where Togedemaru comes in.



Togedemaru @ Berry Juice
Ability: Sturdy
Nature: Brave
IVs: 31/31/31/31/31/00
EVs: 100 Sp.Def
- Fake Out
- Endeavor
- Toxic
- Spiky Shield

Togedemaru, the "Aron replacement".
Just when you figured nothing would ever surpass a Pokémon like Aron as the number one, level one Endeavor baitmon, Gamefreak gave Togedemaru Endeavor in Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon via tutoring. Togedemaru outclasses Aron in multiple ways; most importantly by having Fake Out in it's move pool. I could write a book about the importance of having Fake Out in a Doubles team, be it in a Trick Room strategy or any other strategy. Togedemaru also has a "damaging protect" in the form of Spiky Shield, being able to break Focus Sash or deal just that bit of chip damage when a physical orientated Pokémon tries to damage Togedemaru. Togedemaru is also part Electric which means it is not affected by paralysis through Thunder(bolt), Thunder Wave or Pokémon carrying the Static ability. Being able to scout which sets I'm up against through Frisk and act to that accordingly with either Fake Out or Spiky Shield makes Dusclops + Togedemaru the deadliest Trick Room Endeavor couple to date.



Conkeldurr @ Assault Vest
Ability: Iron Fist
Nature: Brave
IVs: 31/31/31/25/31/00
EVs: 108 HP / 252 Atk / 148 Sp.Def
- Drain Punch
- Ice Punch
- Mach Punch
- Knock Off

Conkeldurr, the powerhouse.
Destroys Normal, Steel, Rock, Flying and Dark types and is my first answer to Ghosts types.
Conkeldurr does everything I need it to do; when Dusclops or Togedemaru faint it is always the first back-up Pokémon I send out because the amount of Pokémon it cannot hit effectively is so slim. Conkeldurr's bulk and movepool allow it to operate extremely well if Trick Room isn't even up, which is a very important in a AI generation where getting Trick Room up in the first place is not as easy as it was in ORAS Maison.



Kangaskhan @ Kangaskhanite
Ability: Scrappy (Parental Bond)
Nature: Brave
IVs: 31/31/31/05/31/00
EVs: 252 HP / 252 Atk / 4 Sp.Def
- Fake Out
- Double-Edge
- Drain Punch
- Sucker Punch

Kangaskhan, the Mega kangaroo.
Scrappy, Fake Out, Parental Bond Double-Edge and priority Sucker Punch in the same set; godlike.
Many criticized Mega Kangaskhan because of the drop in damage output from Parental Bond and the Sucker Punch nerf.
Mega Kang is not as good as it was in ORAS Maison but it was so good in ORAS Maison that it is still better than almost anything suitable for USUM Tree. Mega Kang is usually preserved to enter the battlefield as last member because it has multiple tools to turn a difficult battle around. Where Conkeldurr is slightly more Trick Room dependent, Mega Kangaskhan is less because of Fake Out and Sucker Punch.

Basic strategy:
The basic strategy is quite simple but quite hard in excecution.
On turn 1 you want to get Trick Room up and either Protect or Fake Out with Togedemaru, depending on the AI's Pokémon you're up against.
This was way simpler in the previous generation were the AI would almost always attack the Level 1 Endeavor Pokémon.
The introduction of Z-Moves and change in AI mechanics do not guarantee a simple Trick Room set-up which means you really need to think twice before you select the moves you're going to make.

Threats:
(1) (Jolly / Bright Powder / Shadow Claw / Slash / Double Team / Thunder Wave / Atk / Spd)
(3) (Jolly / Fairium Z / Play Rough / Shadow Claw / Wood Hammer / Swords Dance / Atk / Spd)
(4) (Adamant / Rocky Helmet / Play Rough / Shadow Claw / Destiny Bond / Shadow Sneak / Atk / Spd)

Mimikyu is the biggest threat. Any set needs to be Foresighted in order for Kangaskhan to actually damage it. Set 1 isn't assured for me to connect, set 3 completely destroys Conkeldurr while set 4 breaks Berry Juice and has a priority move. Mimikyu is usually paired with other Pokémon my team has trouble with, mainly Alolan-Ninetales. In order to actually hit it on top of all that I also need to break it's abillity: disguise.

(1) (Timid / Icium Z / Aurora Veil / Hypnosis / Dream Eater / Blizzard / HP / Def)
(2) (Timid / Psychium Z / Freeze Dry / Dazzling Gleam / Extrasensory / Ice Shard / HP / Spd)

Alolan Ninetales isn't difficult to beat but I cannot afford to get frozen or put to sleep by set 1 while set 2 comes with priority and both sets have a Z move. Alolan Ninetales also comes with Snow Warning 50% of the time which makes Togedemaru a lot less effective. Set 2 basically forces me to Endeavor the Ninetales or it's partner and if that partner is Mimikyu I am in a lot of trouble at the very beginning of the battle.

(4) (Bold / Lax Incense / Sheer Cold / Fissure / Rest / Sleep Talk / Def / SpD)

While it is slightly better to control thanks to Fake Out Togedemaru, Walrein 4 is still a big threat.

(2) (Bold / Leftovers / Double Team / Moonlight / Toxic / Protect / HP / SpD)

While it cannot beat Togedemaru 1 vs 1 Cresselia 2 is still one of the most annoying stallers to face.

(2) (Bold / Bright Powder / Charge Beam / Ancient Power / Double Team / Roost / HP / SpD)

Conkeldurr walls Zapdos for a great deal but Zapdos2 can become very powerful and hard to hit once it get's Charge Beam and Double Team boosts.

(4) (Modest / Waterium Z / Sparkling Aria / Dazzling Gleam / Blizzard / Aqua Jet / HP / SpA)

This thing completely walls Conkeldurr while it is "faster" than Mega Kangaskhan. It comes with Blizzard, Aqua Jet and Hydro Vortex.
Primarina 4 is a very dangerous Pokémon.

(4) (Adamant / Quick Claw / Flare Blitz / Cross Chop / Crunch / U-Turn)

In worst case scenario it sits in the back and comes with Intimidate. Incineroar has a thing for activating Quick Claw, hits very hard with Flare Blitz, Crunch and Cross Chop. Conkeldurr has a 75% chance to 1HKO it with Drain Punch while Flare Blitz in return does 55% - 65%. It is guaranteed to 2HKO Mega-Kangaskhan while Crunch only 2HKO's Dusclops 10% of the time, Dusclops however, cannot defeat it on it's own.

I have considered using Incineroar as a back up replacement with the set below:


Incineroar @ Assault Vest
Ability: Intimidate
Nature: Brave
IVs: 31/31/31/31/31/00
EVs: 200 HP / 252 Atk / 56 Sp.Def
- Fake Out
- Flare Blitz
- Knock Off
- Low Kick / Superpower

However: When I started looking for a HA Litten in january and not finding it I discovered it has not even been released yet...

(4) (Modest / Bright Powder / Nasty Plot / Shadow Ball / Grass Knot / Baton Pass / HP / SpA)

Deciduye 4 is an absolute nightmare. It has a tendency to flat-out attack Dusclops with Shadow Ball and when it boosts up via Nasty Plot it becomes public enemy #1. I know I simply hit it 80% of the time but only Conkeldurr 1HKO's it 25% of the time so I need to pray and hope I do not miss.

(1) (Rash / Quick Claw / Ice Shard / Blizzard / Mirror Coat / Helping Hand / HP / SpA)
(3) (Modest / Focus Sash / Hail / Blizzard / Mirror Coat / Hyper Beam / Def / SpA)
(4) (Modest Bright Powder / Blizzard / Shadow Ball / Aurora Veil / Detect / Def / SpA)

Glaceon is very tricky to play, I absolutely don't want it to Blizzard or Hail but need to watch out for Detect and Bright Powder too (set 4).

(3) (Relaxed / Leftovers / Moonblast / Giga Drain / Strenght Sap / Spore / HP / Def)
(4) (Sassy / Weakness Policy / Moonblast / Grass Knot / Moonlight / Spore / HP / SpD)

Shiinotic is a very dangerous enemy, set 3 and 4 both carry Spore and it may have Effect Spore as it's ability. Shiinotic cannot really damage me hard with attacking moves but the fact that these two sets carry Spore pretty much force me to Fake Out on it, hoping I do not end up being put to sleep through it's ability as well.

(2) (Timid / Bright Powder / Fissure / Toxic / Substitute / Sandstorm / HP / Spd)

I will not comment on this one, you all know what it is capable of doing.

(3) (Relaxed / Rocky Helmet / Rage Powder / Spore / Giga Drain / Sludge Bomb / HP / Def)
(4) (Calm / Black Sludge / Giga Drain / Spore / Clear Smog / Synthesis / HP / SpD)

Rocky Helmet, possible Effect Spore, Rage Powder (!!) ánd Spore make Amoonguss 3 and 4 really big threats. I lost to Amoonguss 3 before.

Battle videos:

Battle #116 vs.

GRJW-WWWW-WWWH-M3P3

This is a losing battle video where I did not figure out yet how to actually deal with Amoonguss 3 or actually understood how big of a threat it is/was. I lost at #116 against this and at #154 against Aurorus/Dhelmise/Talonflame/Mudsdale prior to winning 1.000 times in a row.

Battle #745 vs.

58NW-WWWW-WWWH-M9PP

In this battle the AI makes very weird decisions when it comes to the usage of priority and Z-moves.
This is a classic example to showcase how lucky I am for Alolan-Ninetales not to have the Snow Warning ability.


Battle #750 vs.

763G-WWWW-WWWH-M9QN

This battle is actually against a Snow Warning Alolan-Ninetales 1, paired with Decidueye 4, Incineroar 4 and Primarina 4. It involves quite some hax.

Battle #864 vs.

QAEW-WWWW-WWWH-M9QC

I go back way back when it comes to Pokémon, I have played each Frontier/Tower/Subway/Maison/Tree generation Gamefreak gave us and I've been upset, mad and emotional multiple times when the AI went massacre-haxing against me. But this must have been one out of thousands of battles were I was really emotional. I had one single mission and that mission was to get to 1.000 straight wins in a row. This is battle #864, this is 86.3% mission completed and this is Dugtrio 2.

Battle #945 vs.

C6WG-WWWW-WWWH-M9RF

As I stated in the comment of battle #864 my sole mission was to get to 1.000 straight wins. Every number below that would feel like a loss. Josh C. is too far out of reach to be even thinking of dethroning him and I have no single or double (Yea, you get that bad joke too) intention to even do so; all I wanted to do was to break the 1.000 win mark in two generations in a row, something no one ever did before in Doubles. But then you are at 944 straight wins and turskain is only 16 battles away from dethroning his second place. I want you to take that into account when watching this battle video, it ends with a 1 vs. 2 situation in the AI's advantage.

Battle #954 vs.

RJVW-WWW-WWWH-M9RP

This battle isn't that very interesting but it's a psychological battle -for me-, between me and Turskain. I'm still not at a thousand wins and I'm still not in second place. I make very bad decisions in this battle against Virizion 1, a Pokémon I used to Fake Out every time I faced it but I completely blurred in this battle because of the burden I carry to beat Turskain and get to a thousand wins.

Battle #958 vs.

XTHW-WWWW-WWWH-M9S7

One of the few battles were I am forced to send out Kangaskhan over Conkeldurr. I win this fairly easily but things could have gone into a different direction as easily too.

Battle #1,000 vs.

VAHG-WWWW-WWWH-M9SK

Mission accomplished! 1,000 straight wins in Super Doubles Battle Tree!

Afterword:
All in all this must have been the most thrilled run I ever did in "Eppie vs. AI" history.
Battle Tree is so much harder than Battle Maison to start with, getting to 1.000 wins is so much harder than getting to 2.000 wins in Battle Maison if you ask me. I went on a journey and this journey had to get me to 1.000 straight wins, everything below the 4-digit number would not have been good enough for me. If I would have lost during this last particular run before that 4-digit mark I honestly do not know if I would have ever made a post in this thread again, I even think that I would not have even tried to try again. My personal life and work don't allow me to play as much Pokémon as I want to do. This run was done in a three week period which means I averaged at 47-48 battles per day. I obviously played more in the weekend and less during work days. The last ~200 battles psychologically exhausted me as I could not or would not motivate myself again to actually try and achieve a thousand straight wins. Thankfully my team and the Pokégods have been kind to me to not ever worry about that personal dillema again.

I hope you enjoyed reading this as much as the time I spend to actually write this down because, once again, I am not really good at doing long write-ups.

I wish you all good fortune in achieving goals, be it in life or in Pokémon.
I have and will never forget the Pokémon series and the threads built for people like you and me that allow us joy or competition to achieve goals.

Kind regards,

Eppie
 
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I believe abilities are randomly determined, and not related to which set you're facing, aside species that always announce ability not having one (Tyranitar without either Sand Stream or Unnverve) signaling that it's Zoroark.

Both Gyarados3 and Gyarados4 are Dragon Dance sets with a Jolly nature, and bad match-ups for PheroLele teams. I'm not sure how they should be approached - if Phero were running a +Speed nature, it would outspeed these at +1 and be able to get a move off before they attack or DD again. It's been a long time since I used these leads, but my personal preference would be going for a Speed-boosting nature on both Scarf Lele and Pheromosa, from having seen +Speed Lele proving itself on Josh's Sharkanine and theorymoning Speed boosts from Beast Boost to be more consistently useful than Attack boosts (outspeeding whole Tree at 1HP after a KO vs possibly being outsped by Scarfers with an Attack boost that doesn't help any in that situation). Naive/Hasty Pheromosa also outspeeds Mega Alakazam, a key threat against Tapu Lele teams.

Edit: after a discussion on Discord, against Gyarados lead there's the option of switching Pheromosa out for Salamence on Turn 1:

-1 252 Atk Life Orb Tauros Giga Impact vs. 0 HP / 0 Def Tapu Lele: 118-140 (81.3 - 96.5%) -- guaranteed 2HKO

Gyarados is most likely to use Dragon Dance, and getting rid of Pheromosa's Attack drops while keeping its Sash is not a bad option - locking Lele into Psychic when there's a possible Mega Gyarados on the field can be a risk, so Moonblast (or Dazzling Gleam if it were on the set) is the move that retains the option to deal damage to Mega Gyarados on Turn 2. From there, if it's Tauros3 using Giga Impact, this set has to recharge, and if it's Tauros4 the offense is low and Gyarados can be doubled into after. Tauros3 might also use something else but from my experience it has a preference for Giga Impact in the absence of strong super-effective choices.
Thanks for the response! I definitely like the idea of switching into Salamence, that makes a lot of sense. I have read a lot of team reports praising +Speed Pheromosa, and I did try running a Naive set after this streak. I often felt like I was lacking power without the attack boost. A couple sets I struggled with and checked calcs for after the change were Mega-Aggron (85% 2HKO -> 8% 2HKO) , Bronzong-4 (97% 2HKO -> 45% 2HKO), Empoleon-4 (50% OHKO -> Misses OHKO), Incineroar-3 (Guaranteed OHKO -> 56% OHKO), Lickilicky (62% OHKO -> 12% OHKO), Porygon2-3 and -4 (45% 2HKO -> .4% 2HKO), PorygonZ (81% OHKO -> 37% OHKO (although Lele OHKOs clean so not as much of a problem)), Mega-Slowbro (75% 2HKO -> 5% 2HKO), Mega-Latios (Guaranteed OHKO -> 56% OHKO (Lele Moonblast is 98% OHKO), and probably most importantly Oranguru (68% OHKO -> 18% OHKO). Granted none of these are a dealbreaker by any means, but they all can cause a huge headache. I have tossed around the idea of running Low Kick and High Jump Kick to compensate, but that is another set of headaches. Mega-Alakazam is a huge risk for PheroLele, but thankfully I've only managed to drop one good streak to him. I've been lucky enough to be able to deal with him with my back two. And with more careful planning my back two should be able to deal with most of these threats without having to give up my precious, precious Attack boost.

And now time for team 2!

Reporting a USUM Doubles streak of 145 wins.

dp145.jpg

One of my favorites Mega-Alakazam makes the board. This team came out of the frustration of not being able to hit 200 and thinking "Screw this, be faster, hit harder, die quicker". I will be the first to say that this team is really sub-optimal and does not lend itself to long streaks. I was incredibly lucky this whole run. PheroLele was great to me, so I decided to stick with them for my leads. Pheromosa stayed the same, but I made a few adjustments to Tapu Lele that felt great. My goal here was to find another abuser of Psychic Terrain and get even more hyper-offensive. Who better than our 5,000IQ superstar Alakazam? Not only does it naturally outspeed my Scarf Lele, it also packs an even stronger...mind...punch. He would also be used to shore up some of the Ghost matchup with Shadow Ball. Doubling down on fast frail Psychic types was a risk that I knew wouldn't pay off for long, but they carried me to a respectable streak. My last three things I wanted to accomplish from my new team member were a Z-move user, Fire offensive and deffensive pivot, and some sort of bulk and support for the rest of the team. Of course the only option was our G O O D E S T B O Y E Arcanine. Here are the details of each set.

1519338288999.png
1519338308628.png

This set is identical to the last one, so I'll copy-paste the last write up.
Pheromosa @ Focus Sash

Ability: Beast Boost
Level: 50
IVs: 31/31/x/x/31/x (Hyper-Trained)
EVs: 252 Atk / 12 SpA / 244 Spe
Naughty Nature
- Low Kick
- Lunge
- Ice Beam
- Protect
HP: 146
Attack: 207
Defense: 57
Sp. Atk: 137
Sp. Def: 37
Speed: 202

I don't think there is a more purely offense-oriented mon that our beloved roach-lady. Beast Boost is an incredibly good ability, and a single boost can snowball a match out of control. She hits hard and fast, but falls over dead if someone looks at her too hard

I tried out a few different sets before I settled on this one. The one I had the most hope for was a special set using a Modest nature with Focus Blast, Bug Buzz, Ice Beam, Protect, and Fightinium-Z. Bug Buzz has 90 base power compared to Lunge at 80, and a 190 base power All-Out-Pummeling annihilated anything in it's path. Securing a special attack bonus that boosted Ice Beam in addition to the STABs was also a great bonus. However, as we all know Focus Blast will let you down in the worst ways. Not even close to consistent enough for the tree.

I eventually settled on a mixed focus sash set which combines great coverage, great accuracy, and a great big juicy target for the opponent. Pheromosa is just so perfect with Tapu Lele. Fighting and Bug STABS deal with the Dark and Psychic types that Lele can't handle. Ice beam was used for that sweet, sweet ice coverage, and protect was possibly the most useful move of all. Enemies loved to target Pheromosa, and a well predicted protect allowed her partner to fire with impunity. Low Kick was used over High Jump Kick for accuracy reasons, although it notably misses out on OHKOs of Porygon2 and Rotom-F. The slight loss of base power is partially made up for because the Steel and Rock types it is mainly used for are often big fat guys. Lunge is also sneaky useful for a guaranteed attack stat drop, sometimes allowing Lele to survive an extra physical attack.

I used a Naughty nature here to secure an attack boost without lowering special attack, and let's be honest defense is not one of her strong suits. Max attack EVs provide some power and grant her an attack boost on kill. 203 is an empty speed tier, so used 244 speed EVs to land at 202, outspeeding scarf skarmory and pretty much everything else. Only 10 sets sit between Pheromosa and Tapu Lele, so needless to say this thing is fast. More than 9 times out of 10 both of your leads will outspeed both of theirs, giving you complete control of the initial part of the battle. The remaining 12 EVs give a small bump to special attack for Ice Beam.

Focus Sash feels great on Pheromosa, giving her a kind of pseudo-bulk allowing her to tank almost anything turn one. Yes Darmanitan-4 Flare Blitz will deal upwards of 400% of her HP, but it only takes 1 HP to turn around and bop him with low kick. Playing around Sash is one of the biggest keys to success with this archetype, which admittedly is not my forte.

1519338604616.png
1519338614394.png

Again, copy-most of my last write up, but I'll mention the changes I made here.
Tapu Lele @ Choice Scarf

Ability: Psychic Surge
Level: 50
IVs: 31/x/31/x/31/x (Hyper-Trained)
EVs: 12 HP / 4 Def / 252 SpA / 4 SpD / 236 Spe
Modest Nature
- Psychic
- Psyshock
- Moonblast
- Taunt
HP:147
Attack: 94
Defense: 96
Sp. Atk: 200
Sp. Def: 136
Speed: 145

I am a firm believer that scarfed Tapu Lele is the strongest battle tree set I have ever used. Psychic Surge is so incredibly valuable, negating any worry of fake-out or prankster, as well as keeping the relatively frail lLee and the glassiest of cannons Pheromosa safe from being picked off by a bullet punch or sucker punch. I almost exclusively use Lele as the base for my teams just because it removes so much of the headache of priority randomness throughout the tree. And psychic terrain also provides a substantial increase to power, allowing you to forgo the use of a boosting items such as life orb/choice specs/psychium-z in favor of going really fast. The IVs were originally meant for Hidden Power Fire, but it felt way too weak, with an 18.8% chance to OHKO Mega-Scizor and missing the OHKO completely on all Ferrothorn sets. A Modest nature provides as much damage as possible, while choice scarf and max EVs elevate your speed to a blistering 220, which is slower than only 16 sets in the whole tree. 252 EVs Can be used to speed tie with Darmanitan-4, but I decided this wasn't worth it in the end, using 236 EVs instead to reach a boosted speed of 217. If only we could just squeeze 1 more point in without giving up a modest nature, as the power drop is very noticeable. Nonetheless, it still outspeeds Mega-Beedrill and fast Accelgor, which is nothing to scoff at. I gave Defense and Sp. Def 4EVs each for a free point, and put the rest into HP for slightly (almost insignificantly so) more bulk.

As always, click Psychic is plan number 1. Moonblast is used for dark types and sometimes opposing psychic types (although Pheromosa is usually able to deal with them alone, barring bulky sets like Slowbro-4 and Musharna-4). I noticed that my previous coverage moves, Shadow Ball and Energy Ball, were not really doing anything of value. For this team, I decided to try running both Psychic and Psyshock to be able to get around an opponent with better Sp. Def. This makes it possible to pick up a few nice OHKOs like most Florges sets and offensive Flareon sets; make OHKOs possible (or more likely) such as Goodra, Jolteon, and Sylveon; and dent Sp. Def oriented mons like Mega-Gardevoir, Blissey, Milotic, and Primarina. This is especially important as Pheromosa lacks a good way to deal strong damage to most of these. And lastly, I went with Taunt to stop Trick Room setters, status dealers, and evasion boosters. This was a really nice way to eliminate a significant amount of hax in the tree, and I highly recommend this build to anyone wanting to use PheroLele.


Alakazam (F) @ Alakazite

Ability: Inner Focus ==> Trace
Level: 50
IVs: x/x/x/x/x/x (Hyper-Trained)
EVs: 4 Def / 252 SpA / 252 Spe
Timid Nature
- Psychic
- Shadow Ball
- Focus Blast
- Energy Ball
HP: 130
Attack: 63
Defense: 66
Sp. Atk: 187
Sp. Def: 115
Speed: 189

HP: 130
Attack: 63
Defense: 86
Sp. Atk: 227
Sp. Def: 125
Speed: 222

Stronger and faster than both of the two leads. This thing is an offensive monster. Psychic Terrain and a 227 Sp. Atk Psychic is insanity. With full speed investment, she hits 222 speed, tying fast Electrodes and opposing Mega-Alakazam. And unlike Tapu Lele, she isn't choice locked. Using full Sp. Atk investment MegaZam can easily clear out a team without resists to her moves. The last 4 points in defense is like putting another sheet of newspaper on a papier-mâché suit of armor, but hey what can ya do. Ideally, the ability would be magic guard for a free turn immunity against sand or hail, or staying at full health through stealth rocks, but whatever. The mega ability Trace is actually pretty wonderful. It's just a grab bag full of treats that might be able to help your team. Maybe copy an Intimidate for a free Attack drop. Or mimic a Porygon2's download for a free Sp. Atk boost. Sturdy? Why not? And just wait until you hit the turbo button with Swift Swim against a rain team.

Psychic should be obvious at this point. Shadow Ball helps against Psychic types, particularly ones that Pheromosa also has trouble with like Chandelure, Bronzong, and Metagross. In the last write-up I was disparaging of Focus Blast. Surprisingly, I am here too. Perhaps even more so. It is used as a last ditch effort against Dark and Steel types, but it is unreliable as classmates during a group project. For some unknown reason, I went with Energy Ball here. I think I was still upset about letting a Wishiwashi walk all over me at the end of my last streak, and I wanted to make him pay. Clearly Protect would have been better here, or even Substitute.

Another disadvantage of using Mega Alakazam is you cannot switch in. She will die to everything, and the switch is a gamble that you will eventually lose. This set in particular really needs improvement if this team is to have any success with a long streak.


Arcanine (M) @ Firium Z
Ability: Intimidate
Level: 50
IVs: 31/x/31/31/31/31
EVs: 228 HP / 148 Def / 132 SpA
Timid Nature
- Burn Up
- Snarl
- Helping Hand
- Protect
HP: 194
Atk: 108
Def: 119
Sp Atk: 137
Sp Def: 100
Speed: 126

Inspiration for this set was taken from Josh C.'s team, so I'll post his original write-up here
Josh C. said:
The idea for a Burn Up Arcanine first came to fruition when turskain brought it up on the Discord server. At this stage the last member needed to be something that could handle the likes of Scizor and Ferrothorn, so a reasonably defensive Arcanine with Intimidate and Helping Hand support seemed ideal. Rather than simply using Flamethrower however, I was excited to get a little creative and test how much mileage I could get out of its newfound toy. Here's the two main reasons why Burn Up is good:
1. Thanks to its impressive 130 Base Power, I was able to focus on a more defensively oriented EV spread with minimal Sp. Attack investment; just enough to secure OHKO's on Mega Metagross & Mega Mawile. Yeah, I still need to run a Modest nature, but Calm/Bold would require significantly more SpA EVs and therefore less to dump elsewhere.
2. Burn Up's side effect makes Arcanine typeless after use, meaning he is now hit neutrally by every type and can't use Burn Up a second time (this resets upon switching out). In conjunction with the defensive investment, Sitrus Berry recovery, Toxic and Protect, this means he can actually 1v1 a slew of Water-types and other bulky annoyances that he is faster than, stalling them out if needed. Having to switch out Arcanine to use Burn Up again isn't great, so you need to make the most out of when and who you target with the move; by playing smartly enough however, you can still switch Arcanine out safely and preserve another Intimidate/Burn Up for later. Just be wary of that typeless status if you do stay in, since Ice or Grass moves will now deal neutral damage, for example. On the flipside to that, if I ever need to HH EQ while typeless Arcanine's on the field...

252 Atk Garchomp Helping Hand Earthquake vs. 228 HP / 156 Def Arcanine in Psychic Terrain: 96-114 (49.4 - 58.7%) -- 98.8% chance to 2HKO

... a very good chance of putting him into Sitrus Berry activation range from full HP.

Arcanine sits at 124 Speed with the EVs, allowing him to outspeed a large portion of things on the bulkier side up to Tyrantrum4, the majority of which he'd either Burn Up on or try for a last-ditch Toxic. Here's some calcs:
Since my Arcanine is Timid, I left him at 0 Speed EVs to sit at 126. With a little effort I could have bumped him up to 129 to sit in an empty tier outspeeding Pelipper-4, Cobalion-1, and Virizion-4, but I was not particularly worried about anything between 126 and 128. I kept my HP EVs the same despite not being at a calc that means anything to my team, but his bulk is great, sitting at 197 HP and 144 Defense (with slightly less Defense EVs). In order to make up for not having a Modest nautre, I put 132 EVs in Sp. Atk to catch Mega-Mawile and Mega-Metagross with Burn Up.

I loved the idea of Firium-Z to essentially give him the ability to use Burn Up twice (including the first time with more power). The only trade off here is that I lose the ability to become type-less after 1 Burn Up, which decreases his defensive utility. But this team barely acknowledges the existence of defense, so I was alright with keeping things fast and punishing. The other change I made to this set was for a similar reason, switching out Toxic for Snarl. I really didn't have the luxury of time to rack up poison damage, so I went hunting for other support options. I decided on Snarl to hit both opponents (useful for breaking sashes and sturdy) and to give a nice Sp. Atk drop. Between Intimidate and Snarl, the rest of the team was able to live through some weak hits that would otherwise annihilate them. Even one more turn of survivability could make all the difference.

Here are a couple of battle videos. The first one shows two things. First, Trick Room doesn't matter if you can just murder everything before they set it. And second, this team got continuously lucky throughout the run. If I wasn't able to kill Jellicent with a good damage roll on Psychic and a crit with Pheromosa, this battle is over. In addition, Cofagrigus doesn't go for trick room, saving my bacon once again. The second battle is an example of what should happen. I got taunts off to prevent Trick Room, but I just had no answers. I let Alakazam get destroyed on the switch in. Then I had to figure out how to deal with almost all of the common threats of this team in one fight. Bulky Ghost and Fairy types, Dark type without Pheromosa, Fire resists, and Double Trick Room leads were all just too much to overcome.

Battle No. 39 vs. Scientist Cal

SBAW-WWWW-WWWH-KBMY

Losing Battle No. 146 vs. Hiker Vivek

7CBW-WWWW-WWWH-KBMT

Overall, this was a very fun team to play. All offense and no defense. Unfortunately, that also makes it very unlikely to sustain a long streak. With more careful tuning and better play, this has some small potential. I'm glad to get Mega-Alakazam on the board at the very least. Thanks for reading, and I'll post my last streak tomorrow!
 
It's noteworthy that while it doesnt offer any answer to Steel types, Dazzling gleam can be learned by Alakazam and does offer acceptable coverage vs dark types. Not great, but it's something.
 
It's noteworthy that while it doesnt offer any answer to Steel types, Dazzling gleam can be learned by Alakazam and does offer acceptable coverage vs dark types. Not great, but it's something.
I did actually end up trying a second run with this team and used Psychic, Dazzling Gleam, Shadow Ball, and Protect. I think that's probably going to be the best set I can find. Unfortunately I used up all of my luck in the first run and bombed out somewhere in the mid 30s. Decided that was a sign I should probably abandon that team for now.
 
Battle Tree Super Doubles 1.000 wins


Dusclops @ Eviolite
Ability: Frisk
Nature: Relaxed
IVs: 31/31/31/07/31/00
EVs: 252 HP / 100 Def / 156 Sp.Def
- Trick Room
- Foresight
- Night Shade
- Seismic Toss

Eppie
Care to explain how you have Seismic toss, a gen 3 tutor move, on a pokemon with its Hidden ability?
 
Care to explain how you have Seismic toss, a gen 3 tutor move, on a pokemon with its Hidden ability?
Thank you for pointing that out, it's a mistake in my write-up.
Dusclops has Brick Break and not Seismic Toss, I fixed it now. You can watch the battle videos if you'd like to actually see for yourself that it has Brick Break and not Seismic Toss.
 
Hey again everyone. Coming back for my final team post.

Reporting a USUM Doubles streak of 206 wins.

dp206.jpg

I've finally managed to get my 200+ win streak. As per usual, I started out with PheroLele leads, but I gave Pheromosa an interesting little tech move that you might like. It actually made a pretty big difference, and I'm pretty happy with this set. Once again I scrapped my back two, and went on a search for a new pair to round out the team. I had a few important objectives.

1) Find something to make use of Psychic Terrain
2) Find a switch in to Fire, both offensively and defensively
3) Have a better answer to Trick Room
4) Something that can switch into an opposing boosted Psychic move without being obliterated
5) A Poison resist and a Steel resist for Tapu Lele if needed, as it is difficult to kill two Poison or Steel leads in one turn with the leads
6) Have a backup plan for dealing with bulky Steel and Rock types
7) Z-move nuke, if possible

The first thing I was looking for was another Psychic Terrain abuser. I first tried Mega-Gardevoir, but found that doubling up on Lele's weaknesses exactly felt pretty terrible. The boost in power to Psychic felt nice, but I quickly realized that Mega-Gardevoir is most useful when firing off Pixilate boosted Hyper Voice, rendering Psychic Terrain rather under-utilized. In addition, she sits in a very awkward speed tier. Not enough to keep up with the hyper offense pace of the leads, and too much to function as a reliable Trick Room answer. I was unwilling to try to work Tailwind or Trick Room into this team, so Gardevoir headed back to the box.

The next one I tried was Mega-Slowbro. This was closer to working. I had an answer to Fire types ready to switch in, and he was slow enough to not mind Trick Room at all. I used a set with Slack Off, with Psychic, Scald, and Flamethrower as my attacking moves. My main issue I found was that Scald, while being useful for fishing for a burn against physical attackers, did not do enough damage to reliably answer Fire types. Flamethrower did even less damage to anything not named Scizor or Ferrothorn. I dropped Flamethrower for Calm Mind in an attempt to boost up to respectable damage levels. Momentum ground to a screeching halt with this set. I couldn't spare enough time to boost up without my passivity being my downfall.

I don't know why this didn't occur to me right away, but I found the answer in Mega-Metagross. This thing is a juggernaut. So with criteria 1, 4, 5, and partially 6 answered already, I looked for either a slow offensive mon that resists Fire (especially with the addition of another Fire weakness in Metagross), or some kind of support with speed control or redirect or something of the like. After a bit of searching, I settled for a slightly unconventional Araquanid. To the sets!


This set is identical to the last one, so I will just copy and paste that part here.
Tapu Lele @ Choice Scarf

Ability: Psychic Surge
Level: 50
IVs: 31/x/31/x/31/x (Hyper-Trained)
EVs: 12 HP / 4 Def / 252 SpA / 4 SpD / 236 Spe
Modest Nature
- Psychic
- Psyshock
- Moonblast
- Taunt
HP:147
Attack: 94
Defense: 96
Sp. Atk: 200
Sp. Def: 136
Speed: 145

I am a firm believer that scarfed Tapu Lele is the strongest battle tree set I have ever used. Psychic Surge is so incredibly valuable, negating any worry of fake-out or prankster, as well as keeping the relatively frail lLee and the glassiest of cannons Pheromosa safe from being picked off by a bullet punch or sucker punch. I almost exclusively use Lele as the base for my teams just because it removes so much of the headache of priority randomness throughout the tree. And psychic terrain also provides a substantial increase to power, allowing you to forgo the use of a boosting items such as life orb/choice specs/psychium-z in favor of going really fast. The IVs were originally meant for Hidden Power Fire, but it felt way too weak, with an 18.8% chance to OHKO Mega-Scizor and missing the OHKO completely on all Ferrothorn sets. A Modest nature provides as much damage as possible, while choice scarf and max EVs elevate your speed to a blistering 220, which is slower than only 16 sets in the whole tree. 252 EVs Can be used to speed tie with Darmanitan-4, but I decided this wasn't worth it in the end, using 236 EVs instead to reach a boosted speed of 217. If only we could just squeeze 1 more point in without giving up a modest nature, as the power drop is very noticeable. Nonetheless, it still outspeeds Mega-Beedrill and fast Accelgor, which is nothing to scoff at. I gave Defense and Sp. Def 4EVs each for a free point, and put the rest into HP for slightly (almost insignificantly so) more bulk.

As always, click Psychic is plan number 1. Moonblast is used for dark types and sometimes opposing psychic types (although Pheromosa is usually able to deal with them alone, barring bulky sets like Slowbro-4 and Musharna-4). I noticed that my previous coverage moves, Shadow Ball and Energy Ball, were not really doing anything of value. For this team, I decided to try running both Psychic and Psyshock to be able to get around an opponent with better Sp. Def. This makes it possible to pick up a few nice OHKOs like most Florges sets and offensive Flareon sets; make OHKOs possible (or more likely) such as Goodra, Jolteon, and Sylveon; and dent Sp. Def oriented mons like Mega-Gardevoir, Blissey, Milotic, and Primarina. This is especially important as Pheromosa lacks a good way to deal strong damage to most of these. And lastly, I went with Taunt to stop Trick Room setters, status dealers, and evasion boosters. This was a really nice way to eliminate a significant amount of hax in the tree, and I highly recommend this build to anyone wanting to use PheroLele.


Here is my old Pheromosa write-up, I'll just focus on changes in this post.
I don't think there is a more purely offense-oriented mon that our beloved roach-lady. Beast Boost is an incredibly good ability, and a single boost can snowball a match out of control. She hits hard and fast, but falls over dead if someone looks at her too hard

I tried out a few different sets before I settled on this one. The one I had the most hope for was a special set using a Modest nature with Focus Blast, Bug Buzz, Ice Beam, Protect, and Fightinium-Z. Bug Buzz has 90 base power compared to Lunge at 80, and a 190 base power All-Out-Pummeling annihilated anything in it's path. Securing a special attack bonus that boosted Ice Beam in addition to the STABs was also a great bonus. However, as we all know Focus Blast will let you down in the worst ways. Not even close to consistent enough for the tree.

I eventually settled on a mixed focus sash set which combines great coverage, great accuracy, and a great big juicy target for the opponent. Pheromosa is just so perfect with Tapu Lele. Fighting and Bug STABS deal with the Dark and Psychic types that Lele can't handle. Ice beam was used for that sweet, sweet ice coverage, and protect was possibly the most useful move of all. Enemies loved to target Pheromosa, and a well predicted protect allowed her partner to fire with impunity. Low Kick was used over High Jump Kick for accuracy reasons, although it notably misses out on OHKOs of Porygon2 and Rotom-F. The slight loss of base power is partially made up for because the Steel and Rock types it is mainly used for are often big fat guys. Lunge is also sneaky useful for a guaranteed attack stat drop, sometimes allowing Lele to survive an extra physical attack.

I used a Naughty nature here to secure an attack boost without lowering special attack, and let's be honest defense is not one of her strong suits. Max attack EVs provide some power and grant her an attack boost on kill. 203 is an empty speed tier, so used 244 speed EVs to land at 202, outspeeding scarf skarmory and pretty much everything else. Only 10 sets sit between Pheromosa and Tapu Lele, so needless to say this thing is fast. More than 9 times out of 10 both of your leads will outspeed both of theirs, giving you complete control of the initial part of the battle. The remaining 12 EVs give a small bump to special attack for Ice Beam.

Focus Sash feels great on Pheromosa, giving her a kind of pseudo-bulk allowing her to tank almost anything turn one. Yes Darmanitan-4 Flare Blitz will deal upwards of 400% of her HP, but it only takes 1 HP to turn around and bop him with low kick. Playing around Sash is one of the biggest keys to success with this archetype, which admittedly is not my forte.

Pheromosa @ Focus Sash

Ability: Beast Boost
Level: 50
IVs: 31/31/x/x/31/x (Hyper-Trained)
EVs: 12 HP /252 Atk / 244 Spe
Naughty Nature
- Low Kick
- Lunge
- Throat Chop
- Protect
HP: 148
Attack: 207
Defense: 57
Sp. Atk: 157
Sp. Def: 51
Speed: 202

With Mega-Metagross now carrying Ice Punch (spoiler oops), I decided to drop Ice Beam on Pheromosa and go for a full physical set. Since I no longer needed Sp. Atk EVs, I just moved them to HP. Obviously Naughty nature is no longer ideal, and if I had an Adamant Pheromosa lined up I would have used that. Thankfully the difference between 57 and 51 Sp. Def is fairly negligible, but every bit matters in a long run. I first tried using U-Turn to get out of bad spots while preserving momentum. This worked pretty well, but I was thirsty for something more cool and innovative. Next I went with Bug Bite to steal some berries, but that was really underwhelming in terms of damage and felt like a wasted slot. I briefly considered Outrage for a good chunk of neutral damage, but remembered how much I hate using it in doubles due to the random targeting. Less random is always better. The same argument goes for High Jump Kick. That 10% miss chance is brutal. Drill Run was next on the list, and I have to say I actually liked this a lot and think it has potential. 80 base power and a high crit rate means it still hits pretty hard off of her 207 Attack, even without STAB. It managed to give a decent answer to some Fire types who either resisted Fighting like Chandelure (Guaranteed 2HKO) and Salazzle (guaranteed OHKO) or were not heavy enough to take much damage from Low Kick like Kanto-Ninetales (37.5% OHKO) and Flareon-3 (50% OHKO).

But I eventually settled upon my answer: Throat Chop. With a Dark type move, I finally had a way to hit Ghost types for significant damage. That meant I was able to consistently double-target down threats like Cofagrigus, Chandelure, Dusknoir, and Jellicent. I ain't afraid of no Ghosts!! It also managed to provide a slightly better answer to Psychic types that also resisted bug like Bronzong (Guaranteed 2HKO on sets -2, -3, and -4) and Delphox (50% OHKO). There are a surprising number of sets where Throat Chop will actually deal the most damage. And it also silences sound based moves, which is a very small bonus, but a bonus nonetheless. It can stop Uproar, Noble Roar, Hyper Voice and more. Two particularly important moves it stops are Sparkling Aria from Primarina and Sing from Altaria (take that Wally!). Try it out, I think you'll be pleasantly surprised.

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Metagross-Mega @ Metagrossite
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Ability: Clear Body ==> Tough Claws
Level: 50
IVs: 31/31/x/31/31/31 (Hyper-Trained)
EVs: 252 Atk / 4 SpD / 252 Spe
Adamant Nature
- Iron Head
- Zen Headbutt
- Ice Punch
- Stomping Tantrum
HP: 155
Attack: 205
Defense: 150
Sp. Atk: 103
Sp. Def: 111
Speed: 122

HP: 155
Attack: 216
Defense: 170
Sp. Atk: 112
Sp. Def: 131
Speed: 162

What can't Mega-Metagross do? Very solid in all categories. His typing is wonderful, with a Poison immunity to cover for Lele and 9(!) resists, including Rock and Flying to draw attacks away from Pheromosa, Steel from Lele, and most importantly a 4x resist to Psychic, which is crucial with Psychic Terrain up. A bulky behemoth without any investment, Metagross is a wonderful switch in for almost any situation.

His pre-mega ability Clear Body can't be overlooked, as you are often able to eat a move like Charm or an ability like Intimidate without worry. Sometimes it pays hold off on mega-evolving if you can get away with it, especially against teams that love to stack intimidate users. Tough Claws is a huge boost to his attacking power, adding a 1.3x multiplier to all 4 of his moves. For EVs, I decided to keep it simple and go with max Attack and Speed, with the bonus point in Sp. Def. I am sure that I would be able to sacrifice some Attack or Speed for bulk, but this was the first run with the team and it seemed to work out. Also, a Jolly nature brings him up to a very nice 178, but I was willing to let that go since my leads are so fast.

For moves, I started out with Iron Head and Zen Headbutt for STABs. I prefer Iron Head over Meteor Mash becuase the 30% flinch chance and 100% accuracy outweigh slightly more damage and a small chance of an Attack boost. Despite how much I hate inaccurate moves, Zen Headbutt was way too good to pass up. Good base power and a nice flinch chance, but with Psychic Terrain active things start to get out of hand. Think of the multipliers in play. 1.5x STAB, 1.5x Psychic Terrain, and 1.3x Tough Claws boost. That adds up to a multiplier of 2.925x. Coming off 216 Attack with a 80 base power move, you can imagine how easily it can rip through teams. I still wanted Ice coverage, so I picked up Ice Punch. I really would have liked to have Protect here, but the coverage provided by Stomping Tantrum in combination with his ability to take a hit made me okay with using 4 attacking move slots. Ground coverage gives a great answer to Fire types as long as you are careful to avoid getting hit first, and allows you to hit Steel types that you would otherwise struggle with.

I really think that Mega-Metagross should be considered a definite number 3 in most PheroLele teams. The synergy and coverage he provides is immense, and his base stats are high enough to let him do whatever you please.


Araquanid (F) @ Waterium Z

Ability: Water Bubble
Level: 50
IVs: 31/31/31/31/31/0
EVs: 252 HP / 252 Atk / 4 SpD
Brave Nature
- Liquidation
- Icy Wind
- Wide Guard
- Protect
HP: 175
Attack: 134
Defense: 112
Sp. Atk: 70
Sp. Def: 153
Speed: 42

Spider-Bro is the last member to join the team. Water Bubble is an excellent ability, giving Araquanid a Fire resist and essentially a free Choice Band on Water moves. This is pretty much the only way she can remain an offensive threat, but man that threat is surprisng. You really have one bullet loaded, but it packs a nasty punch. Using your Z-move Hydro Vortex, you get a68% OHKO on Reuniclus-4 and a guaranteed OHKO on Bronzong-2, -3, and -4 for example. EV spread was very simple, with as much Attack as possible, and max HP EVs to patch up an underwhelming base stat of 68. 0 speed IVs are used to function as well as possible in Trick Room. 42 speed is only faster than a handful of sets, which are dealt with by the fast attackers. The exception is Camerupt sets which are threatening to most of the team, but Araquanid salivates at that 4x Water weakness.

Liquidation is the highest base power Water move you can learn, which is crucial to boost Hydro Vortex as high as possible. After using your Z-move, Araquanid still fills its offensive role on the team as an answer to Fire types. As a small bonus, it also carries a 20% chance of a Defense drop, which the team always appreciates. Because this team already has a Bug attacker and without STAB Araquanid doesn't put out damage, I decided to go full support mode. Icy wind provides a little bit of speed control to counteract Scarf users and Dragon Dancers. It is also able to provide a little spread chip damage when needed to break sash or sturdy. I have grown to really love Wide Guard in the Battle Tree. Most mons with spread moves use them fairly predictably, which can give you a huge advantage. This can nullify Earthquake, essentially removing the Ground weakness from Metagross, as very few threatening Ground moves exist outside of Earthquake. Another move it blocks is Blizzard, which gets rid of the incredibly infuriating freeze hax. And lastly Protect is Protect. As two team members don't carry protect, I thought it was necessary to bring it here.

As is tradition, here are a couple battle videos.

Battle No. 74 vs. Youth Athlete Leena VKMW-WWWW-WWWH-KBZ8
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Fast team is always worrysome. I protect with Pheromosa in case it is Scarf Aerodactyl. I thought I could get away with using Psychic on Accelgor to bring it down to Focus Sash, then let Pheromosa kill Aerodactyl for the Attack boost. Instead Accelgor Encores my Protect and Aerodactyl uses Iron Head on Lele instead. I should have prepared for another Sky Drop into the Phero spot, but I sill brought in the backup bug. I try to get rid of Accelgor but it Protects. Things are not going well. Thankfully once Metagross gets in, he is able to use Iron Head to pretty much wipe the floor with everyone. Horrible, horrible match I probably should've lost.

Battle No. 95 vs. Sightseer Christian YRUW-WWWW-WWWH-KBZL
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I was stuck in a dilemma here. I couldn't really afford to switch out and let someone get hit by two Psychic moves. So I decided to try to trade Pheromosa for Alakazam, as the Mega would outspeed and bring her down to 1HP, but lunge would get him before he starts to snowball. Latios is only a guaranteed OHKO with Moonblast on sets -2, -3, and -4, but ya gotta risk it for the biscuit. Thankfully things went smoothly for me. I had to laugh because the next two she sent in were two of the most annoying hax creators in Tree in Glaceon and Magnezone. Fortunately they cooperated and we moved on the the next match.

Battle No. 105 vs. Madame Donny XAG-WWWW-WWWH-KBP6
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More Psy-spam. Sweet. Used Taunt on Cresselia since I could not afford Trick Room or evasion boosting. Lunge only OHKOs 2 Latias sets, so I hoped that either Cress would be Taunted and not attack, or I got a friendly set Pheromosa and grabbed the KO. Both went in my favor. Next she brought out Azelf, which Phero outspeeds and OHKOs. I had a no pressure switch out ready, so I swapped Lele for Metagross. Thankfully Azelf wasn't sashed, as Cresselia brough Pheromosa down to hers. Since Cresselia-4 is the only set with Trick Room, I knew I could take her out with a +2 lunge. The rest of the team cleaned up Latios.

Battle No. 166 vs. Veteran Placido TQ2G-WWWW-WWWH-KBR6
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This match had real nightmare potential. Heatran, Entei, and Terrakion all outspeed Lele with a Choice Scarf. Latias isn't a guaranteed OHKO with Moonblast, and Heatran could have a Focus Sash. I decided to see if I could get an OHKO with either of them, even one would be great. Nope. Yikes. Latias uses Calm Mind to begin setting up and Heatran uses Lava Plume, almost nabbing Latias and bringing Mosa to Sash. Thankfully, all 3 get burned, and it turns into a Pheromosa for Latias trade with Heatran at 1HP. Pretty great turn of events. Then Terrakion comes in and I am terrified of a Scarf EQ taking out Lele, but thankfully Lele goes first and takes it out with Moonblast. Then another horrible threat comes in with Eruption Entei. Once again, the threat doesn't materialize and I manage to take them out quickly and easily.

Battle No. 175 vs. Office Worker Savir 2GKG-WWWW-WWWH-KBRH
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Really one of the worst leads I can imagine. Pheromosa is brought to -1 so she won't be doing much. Taunt manages to stop Bronzong's Trick Room and Phero uses Lunge into Mega-Mawile to at least drop his Attack a stage. That turned out to make a huge difference as Lele barely survives a Play Rough. I swap out Lele for Araquanid and he swaps out Mawile for Escavalier. My Lunge now goes into Escavalier, as Rock Slide brings my Bugs to half HP. He switches again for some reason, bringing Skarmory into Escavalier's spot. Throat Chop and Liquidation take out Bronzong (I calced this and Liquidation does 55.1-65.5% against Bronzong-4 (which I know this is from Trick room and Rock Slide) and -1 Pheromosa does 33.3-39.6% and 35.6-42.5% with Low Kick and Throat Chop, respectively. So Liquidation and Low Kick does 88.4-105.1% , while Liquidation and Throat Chop does 90.7-108%. That small friendlier roll might have made all the difference. Throat Chop number 1) and Skarmory uses Brave Bird on my helpless Pheromosa. Mawile comes back out but I'm ready for it this time with Stomping Tantrum from Metagross. The rest deal with Skarmory and I barely squeak by.

Losing Battle No. 207 vs. Pokémon Center Lady Perri 896G-WWWW-WWWH-KBRS
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I hate seeing this trainer. It's always going to be a struggle. Luckily she didn't lead a Fairy in either slot, so I thought I was going to cruise through this. Psychic OHKOs Bewear, but Low Kick does nothing to Togedemaru, and Iron Barbs breaks her Sash. Togedemaru is holding a Red Card, so his Nuzzle paralyzes Araquanid instead. She brings in my arch-nemesis Slowbro and I start to panic, realizing this wasn't going to be an easy fight. I use Wide Guard with Araquanid to try to protect Lele from a potential Surf while she tries to KO Togedemaru with a good damage roll. Slowbro uses Calm Mind instead and Togedemaru survives. Lele gets paralyzed and I know I'm boned. I try to attack with Araquanid, hoping Slowbro uses another Amnesia. Lele tries to put some damage onto Slowbro while Togedemaru uses Zing Zap to bring Araquanid down to 1HP while knocking . Could this be the miracle?? No it could not. He surfs and takes out Araquanid. He brings out Musharna. I think I should have tried to double target it down with Psychic and Lunge, but I greed on that juicy Slowbro. I do no damage, Slowbro takes out my previously chipped Pheromosa, and he gets a Trick Room off. Not a great turn. Slowbro uses Slack Off and I realize there is no way I'm winning the fight. I'm sure this fight was littered with mistakes. But I was only aiming for 200, so no worries about this loss.

At the very least, I've achieved my goal of 200 wins. This team is pretty solid and I bet you could pull off a significantly longer streak with better play and similar luck. For now, I'm shelving the PheroLele teams. Hopefully I'll be back soon with another team to report. Thanks for reading everyone.

Cheers!
 

turskain

activated its Quick Claw!
is a Community Contributor
Minor idea: since Sun/US and Moon/UM have different special trainers as opposition - Kiawe, Plumeria, Sina exclusive to Sun, and Dexio, Guzma, Mallow exclusive to Moon, would it be useful to track the game version used on the leaderboards as well? It's a small difference, but possibly more relevant than the difference in opposing trainers/sets between vanilla SM and USUM, and on Discord I heard some players owning both games choosing which game to play on depending on their respective special trainer match-ups.
 
While what Tursk says is agreeable, I also don't think everyone reminds where every single leaderboard entry is on though....

Also, glad to see someone else appreciated how good Throat Chop is on phero :O
 

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