Serious LGBTQ+

makes me all the more interested in what you would have to say or a fresh pov if you wanted to, but either way hi!
I guess its just hard for me because, since my only contact with non-brazilian lgbt stuff is the internet, theres probably a lot of gaps on my knowledge on what groups from these countries belive is best for them.

sure, i could come in and say, just a random example of course, that brazilian trans women usually hate being associated with blue, but it may be of little value if american trans women love the association and embrace it. who am I to say theyre wrong? I dont really want to step on toes with assumptions that probably arent correct, or arent very useful.

of course, if people are fine with it, I can discuss some differences in community, but i'll try to not impose stuff along the way.
and before i forget: hello :]
 
sure, i could come in and say, just a random example of course, that brazilian trans women usually hate being associated with blue, but it may be of little value if american trans women love the association and embrace it. who am I to say theyre wrong? I dont really want to step on toes with assumptions that probably arent correct, or arent very useful.
What's the reason that they don't like being associated with blue? Something with blue being a traditional color for baby boys or something?
 
What's the reason that they don't like being associated with blue? Something with blue being a traditional color for baby boys or something?
oh that was just a random thing i made up for the sake of argument. I dont think disliking blue is a big community thing, just a individual's
 
hey all, didn't know this was a thing and I'm ever so glad it is! just thought I'd introduce myself, I'm Dratios and I'm ace, took me a while to find out that it was something that existed and even longer to be comfortable identifying with it. when I did get to that point I really leaned into it though, to the point where I dyed my hair purple, partially because it looked cool but mostly because it matched the ace flag lol
 

Plague von Karma

mmm yes roingus
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So, I've been thinking this over the past night. Well, actually, that'd be a lie...this has been going on for years. But I think I'm approaching the light at the end of the tunnel.

I've always identified as Biromantic and transgender, but never really been sure about what my sexuality actually is. I kind of defaulted to bisexual considering my romantic orientation, but it doesn't seem to be the truth. To clarify, my sexuality hasn't played a role in my romantic orientation nor my gender identity. It's hard to explain, everyone has their own stories.

Ever since I experienced trauma at a young age I've never really...felt anything, sexually. Even with pornographic material, there's just nothing. All it does is drive me back into the rut. I've tried to get help for this, but mental health services in the UK are awful. Hell, they got the police involved when I first came out about it without my permission. I've since made leaps on my own in overcoming that trauma these past few years, but...

I've been beginning to think that this thing with my sexuality isn't just my trauma anymore. Surely there's something there? Am I asexual? Or is it my standards? Is the answer right in front of me?

I guess these aren't questions anyone but me can answer, considering how personal this is. Just needed to write this somewhere, I suppose? It's a weird situation and I'm not really sure where to go from here. I'll probably work it out as I go about my life, no need to force it.
 

Rosa

twist
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So, I've been thinking this over the past night. Well, actually, that'd be a lie...this has been going on for years. But I think I'm approaching the light at the end of the tunnel.

I've always identified as Biromantic and transgender, but never really been sure about what my sexuality actually is. I kind of defaulted to bisexual considering my romantic orientation, but it doesn't seem to be the truth. To clarify, my sexuality hasn't played a role in my romantic orientation nor my gender identity. It's hard to explain, everyone has their own stories.

Ever since I experienced trauma at a young age I've never really...felt anything, sexually. Even with pornographic material, there's just nothing. All it does is drive me back into the rut. I've tried to get help for this, but mental health services in the UK are awful. Hell, they got the police involved when I first came out about it without my permission. I've since made leaps on my own in overcoming that trauma these past few years, but...

I've been beginning to think that this thing with my sexuality isn't just my trauma anymore. Surely there's something there? Am I asexual? Or is it my standards? Is the answer right in front of me?

I guess these aren't questions anyone but me can answer, considering how personal this is. Just needed to write this somewhere, I suppose? It's a weird situation and I'm not really sure where to go from here. I'll probably work it out as I go about my life, no need to force it.
I resonate with many parts of this message since I was in a very similar position years ago. I think probably the most important thing to remember when it comes to matters of identity is that there never is any one specific thing that we "actually" are besides ourselves. The life experiences of each person is always vastly different from one another, such that it isn't really realistic to refer to ourselves with such rigidly defined terms as "straight", "gay", "bi", and what have you. Sexuality, romantic interest, and everything in between all operate as more of a sliding scale, rather than an on/off switch; not only that, they are also highly prone to shifting around, especially when we're still developing and looking inwards to try and put our feelings to terms. The way I generally like to go about describing it is as more of a ratio (M-F): things like 20-80, 40-60, 50-50, 1-99, 10-20, etc; I feel this does a better job of describing how I feel, as opposed to the more rigid terms. If you're not comfortable with something like that, it's also fine referring to yourself in ways like "bi but with a preference", "mostly straight", "prefer women but leaning asexual", etc. Exact labels generally just don't matter, since the way we feel can never be as exact.

When it comes to trauma, I can empathize with how you feel. I can only really offer my experiences on it since I don't really know what happened in your case nor how much it still impacts you up to now (not that that's something that can easily be put to terms anyhow), so take from it what you will. In my experience, I immediately turned towards being more of a lesbian since I was physically and mentally uncomfortable with the opposite gender for several years after being sexually assaulted. It wasn't until my brain developed to a point where I could be more self aware of how I came off to people around me before I could properly begin taking the steps to bring my feelings from my subconscious to the conscious to process them and reach some form of self-assured closure to what had happened and allow myself to dissociate all other men from one jerk who acted on impulse. Having roughly a year or so of isolation from non-family irl interactions in the period of time between finishing high school and starting college also very much helped so I could take things at my own pace and focus solely on developing myself. At this point, I can proudly say that I've made it past the 10 year anniversary without feeling bogged down by what happened!

Even though that trauma was a major push towards me being more of a lesbian for a long time, it's not like I wasn't already exhibiting gay traits long before what happened, having spent a majority of my childhood enveloped in the masculine culture of male-dominated elementary and middle schools. Odds are that even if I hadn't been assaulted I'd have still ended being gay, or at least some form of bisexual. It really just goes to show that the scars of trauma can only ever be a small part of the person who bears them, no matter how deep or painful the wound that caused them might have been. With that in mind, I'd say it's definitely worthwhile to take the time to process your feelings so that you can possibly come to a conclusion about what your values in a relationship are, regardless of the terminology you'd use to describe it. The odds of settling with one set of identity labels forever with no changes are astronomically low, so I wouldn't worry about getting too caught up on the details; with enough experimentation and open-minded consideration, anything is possible!
This probably became more of a stream of consciousness type post with how late it is, but I hope it helps!
 

Myzozoa

to find better ways to say what nobody says
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I'm really deeply sorry to read that these things happened to anyone and I hope you're healing. I just have to say that I do not agree with any suggestion that trauma and abuse change or influence your sexuality. I may have clashed with rosa a bit in past pages, but this is not really about that, and I would like to foreclose that reading of this post as much as possible. I just want to say for all the young folks questioning their sexuality: you are a lesbian even if you feel perfectly comfortable 'around' men, and you can be all manners of identities irrespective of your comfort levels around men. You can hate men and still be bisexual or straight or w.e, even while being a man yourself. While it is true that an individual's sexual identities are likely to change over time, it is also unfair to attribute anyone's sexuality to a traumatic experience, as though if that experience had not occured you would be straight. This is a typical conservative narrative of sexuality, which locates being gay as the pathological consequence of trauma, some type of flaw masking a person's innate heterosexuality.
 

Plague von Karma

mmm yes roingus
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I'm really deeply sorry to read that these things happened to anyone and I hope you're healing. I just have to say that I do not agree with any suggestion that trauma and abuse change or influence your sexuality. I may have clashed with rosa a bit in past pages, but this is not really about that, and I would like to foreclose that reading of this post as much as possible. I just want to say for all the young folks questioning their sexuality: you are a lesbian even if you feel perfectly comfortable 'around' men, and you can be all manners of identities irrespective of your comfort levels around men. You can hate men and still be bisexual or straight or w.e, even while being a man yourself. While it is true that an individual's sexual identities are likely to change over time, it is also unfair to attribute anyone's sexuality to a traumatic experience, as though if that experience had not occured you would be straight. This is a typical conservative narrative of sexuality, which locates being gay as the pathological consequence of trauma, some type of flaw masking a person's innate heterosexuality.
I'm not entirely sure if this was directed at me, but I value this perspective. I've struggled with my situation for years, and opening it up to more thoughts and viewpoints will be helpful for figuring myself out. I defaulted to my trauma being a contributing factor, but as you're implying, I could be too reductionist in thinking. Never did I want to imply that what became of me is any kind of flaw, but in hindsight, I think that's actually where I'm failing the most, like I did a few years ago with everything else. Hell, even writing that sentence, you can probably see that problematic thinking.

Thank you. I'll have a long think about this.
 
I'm really deeply sorry to read that these things happened to anyone and I hope you're healing. I just have to say that I do not agree with any suggestion that trauma and abuse change or influence your sexuality. I may have clashed with rosa a bit in past pages, but this is not really about that, and I would like to foreclose that reading of this post as much as possible. I just want to say for all the young folks questioning their sexuality: you are a lesbian even if you feel perfectly comfortable 'around' men, and you can be all manners of identities irrespective of your comfort levels around men. You can hate men and still be bisexual or straight or w.e, even while being a man yourself. While it is true that an individual's sexual identities are likely to change over time, it is also unfair to attribute anyone's sexuality to a traumatic experience, as though if that experience had not occured you would be straight. This is a typical conservative narrative of sexuality, which locates being gay as the pathological consequence of trauma, some type of flaw masking a person's innate heterosexuality.
I don't really think that karma was trying to say that abuse resulted in a change of sexuality. What I got from the post was more along the lines of karma being unsure whether responses and emotions experienced while experiencing things that should be arousing to bisexual people, or lack thereof, were because of actually being asexual or because the trauma was overriding what should normally be felt. You know, like when people can't get in a sexual mood because their mind is weighted down by feeling bad or remembering bad memories, but in this case it's the thing that's supposed to be arousing bringing bad memories. What seems to be the basis of the post is asking a question: are my reactions the reactions of an asexual person, or a defensive mechanism?

Also karma, I would really like to tell you to try to talk to a professional about this, or since you said you already did, to try to find others until you can find one that works for you. Everybody here wants to help you, as well as give advice and insight, but the vast majority of us users on a public forum are still not educated/experienced/knowledgeable/acquainted with your personal situation enough to give you surefire advice about such difficult topics. I would also like to wish you luck in figuring it all out, and wish you all the best when you do :blobuwu:
 

Plague von Karma

mmm yes roingus
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I don't really think that karma was trying to say that abuse resulted in a change of sexuality. What I got from the post was more along the lines of karma being unsure whether responses and emotions experienced while experiencing things that should be arousing to bisexual people, or lack thereof, were because of actually being asexual or because the trauma was overriding what should normally be felt. You know, like when people can't get in a sexual mood because their mind is weighted down by feeling bad or remembering bad memories, but in this case it's the thing that's supposed to be arousing bringing bad memories. What seems to be the basis of the post is asking a question: are my reactions the reactions of an asexual person, or a defensive mechanism?

Also karma, I would really like to tell you to try to talk to a professional about this, or since you said you already did, to try to find others until you can find one that works for you. Everybody here wants to help you, as well as give advice and insight, but the vast majority of us users on a public forum are still not educated/experienced/knowledgeable/acquainted with your personal situation enough to give you surefire advice about such difficult topics. I would also like to wish you luck in figuring it all out, and wish you all the best when you do :blobuwu:
I understand the sentiment and thank you for it, but this isn't what I was saying...I said already that I have made massive leaps in getting over my trauma on my own, which included seeing other professionals. COVID-19 made it difficult, but I'm getting by. I still get traumatic flashbacks from time to time; those will never go away on the basis that I cannot reverse what happened to me.

What I was saying is that I am not sure if my lack of sexual attraction is actually rooted in what happened to me. Myzozoa gave a sound response in that I may be thinking too reductionist when relating it to my trauma, and I believe that thinking without my trauma in mind will help me figure out if this is the case.
 
I understand the sentiment and thank you for it, but this isn't what I was saying...I said already that I have made massive leaps in getting over my trauma on my own, which included seeing other professionals. COVID-19 made it difficult, but I'm getting by. I still get traumatic flashbacks from time to time; those will never go away on the basis that I cannot reverse what happened to me.

What I was saying is that I am not sure if my lack of sexual attraction is actually rooted in what happened to me. Myzozoa gave a sound response in that I may be thinking too reductionist when relating it to my trauma, and I believe that thinking without my trauma in mind will help me figure out if this is the case.
Oh sorry, I did mean that maybe it would be wise to talk to a professional about the lack of sexual attraction, since they probably have experience talking about such things, and it might help to talk about such topics to people who have seen other people who are also were in a similar situation. It doesn't really have to be a long process, you can just go for a couple of sessions to bounce some ideas of off someone who is anonymous, educated on the topic, experienced and willing to give you the atmosphere to air your toughts on the subject and offer additional insight for some more introspection. Something like help for reaching the conclusion you would have probably reached by yourself, but easing the process along.
 

banks

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Preface: this post isn't a reply to the conversation above: this is just a topic that has been lingering on my mind for a while and now seems like an apt time to bring it up.

The implication that human experiences cannot influence sexuality seems reductive. I'm sure we've all heard and, at one point, used the 'born this way' mantra in effort for equality; it acts as damage control to conservatives, as if something is innate to a human, it is immoral to attack them for it. But as our understanding of sexuality advances, it's not a stretch to say that this ideology is harmful to LGBTQ individuals. Now obviously, I don't want people interpreting this as sexuality being a willful choice we pick and choose, like clothes and such, but rather a malleable facet of human identity that can gradually alter over time. Psychologists and cognitive scientists have articulated this better than I can, but it's not unreasonable to say that important or traumatic events in one's life can, subconsciously, shape our sexual preferences. And this shouldn't be viewed as harmful to LGBTQ identities. Predictably, bigots will misconstrue this as sexuality being a choice or just as something to fit into their regressive narrative.

As for asexuality, it isn't a subject I can speak on anecdotally or even through readings/research. Naturally, talking about trauma and the influence it holds over sexuality is a slippery slope: on one hand, to make a blanket statement that negative experiences determine you as a person--sexuality or not--is not productive or insightful to anyone; on the other hand, it is not necessary for LGBTQ individuals to justify their sexuality through excessively making a point of how it is innate to them, and how the person's experiences are irrelevant to it, despite this claim not being wholly accurate. Dr. Lisa Diamond makes three succinct points on why 'born this way' isn't actually useful for us:
1. 'It is not scientifically accurate'
2. 'It is not legally necessary'
3. (most important point): 'It is actually unjust'
The third point resonates most pertinently to this discussion and to the queer community as a whole. A lot of gender-non-conforming and/or queer individuals offer stories from when they were a child about how they used to dress up as the opposite gender and use that as a tool to 'normalise' or act as damage control to how weird it is to be queer. I used to do this too, but eventually just stopped; you do not need to justify your identity to cisheterosexual people. Also, the desperation to fit into a fixed label of sexuality is too a product of heteronormativity. It's not unusual or abnormal for same-sex attracted people to develop opposite-sex attraction later in life, and this doesn't make them confused or 'traitors', likewise with heterosexuals developing an attraction to other genders doesn't make them an ashamed closeted person.
 
I agree that "Born this way" could be phazed out even if it can be useful to explain at a very basic level how there isn't a choice in one sexuality as genetic code and life experiences are out of anyone control but how "it is actually unjust"?
 

Tenshi

Now known as Raihan Kibana
is a Live Chat Contributor
I agree that "Born this way" could be phazed out even if it can be useful to explain at a very basic level how there isn't a choice in one sexuality as genetic code and life experiences are out of anyone control but how "it is actually unjust"?
this is the video referenced in the post, unjust tldr iirc refers to how it justifies bierasure and sets a binary you are one thing and nothing else from the moment you're born when it isn't true because sexuality is fluid.
 

syzgy

Banned deucer.
re: early morning thoughts
I've been an openly bisexual female for a while now, I've been very open with my friends about it and they support me all the way, but I don't how to explain it to my parents. Does anyone have advice, I feel like my story isn't as severe as some of the stories I've been reading in this thread.
 

Milak

L'essenziale è invisibile agli occhi.
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re: early morning thoughts
I've been an openly bisexual female for a while now, I've been very open with my friends about it and they support me all the way, but I don't how to explain it to my parents. Does anyone have advice, I feel like my story isn't as severe as some of the stories I've been reading in this thread.
I feel like everyone has their own way of coming out, whether it be through a long and detailed speech, a simple joke made, or introducing your partner, so it all depends on your character, your nature, and how you think your family will react to you openly admitting you’re bisexual. I can only speak for my experience, which, just like yours, isn’t as severe as the others, but it’s still worth reading here. By the time I was ready to tell my friends, I was slowly realizing I didn’t have any problems with my family knowing about my homosexuality as well. This also happened because I already did know that they would’ve supported me. All I can say is: be as natural as possible, preparing a speech didn’t work for me, I wanted to be as relaxed as possible because otherwise I would’ve gotten into my head and ruined the moment. At the same time, I didn’t want it to be such a “solemn” moment, after all there’s nothing more natural and liberating than to come out, so I didn’t want to make it too dramatic when in reality it wasn’t at all! I can’t specifically tell you how you should tell your parents, only you know how to approach and have a serious conversation with them, but the best advice I can give you is to just stop listening to that little voice in your head and just let your heart speak for a moment. I hope this helped a bit, I hope that your parents will support you 100%, and I sincerely wish you all the luck in the world! Please, keep us posted on this!
 

Plague von Karma

mmm yes roingus
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re: early morning thoughts
I've been an openly bisexual female for a while now, I've been very open with my friends about it and they support me all the way, but I don't how to explain it to my parents. Does anyone have advice, I feel like my story isn't as severe as some of the stories I've been reading in this thread.
Don't worry about how bad your experiences are! Weighing them out against others can be really unhealthy for you in the long-run, so it's always more productive to get your problems solved in some way.

Anyway...it really depends on how your parents are towards LGBT people. Everyone is different, and parents are no exception. Oftentimes, you'll get the "purest" reaction from a parent when they find out the person they've been raising is LGBT. This is partly why many become afraid, but I see it as a necessary experience to go through. It's one of those "it'll happen sooner or later" things, it's like pulling off a plaster.

The way I went about it was sitting my mom down and just letting it out. I don't think this is the ideal way for most, especially considering I personally tend to just...do things once the idea is in my head. At the end of the day, "coming out" is a deeply personal thing for everyone. Ergo, there's no "true" way to do it, as every method is true in its own right. As Milank put it, it can be anything from a wise crack to a speech.

One way I can think of is just some kind of offhanded comment like "oh don't you think this girl's hot?" while watching TV. It's enough to get the idea across without really prompting any inherently negative response. Hell, maybe it'll get them to ask the question. But, as I prefaced, everyone's different, and I most certainly don't know your parents. Go with your gut! You've been raised by them for years, it's best to make it "your" coming out experience.
 

Yami

NO, IT'S NOT THE TANK FAULT IT'S THE HEALER!!!!
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I guess I should make an official public update rather than just keeping it to the few people I told on discord / saw my status. I been trying to figure out my gender identity for the longest time, I knew female didn't fit which was the gender I was born with, and that male was what I thought was the perfect fit. While I am comfortable with he/him, I feel like they/them non-binary is what I truly am. I feel more so as a gray line between female and male and see myself as neither gender. My sexuality is still strongly females, but open to males and non-binary people. I still feel like in the future I will be getting my breasts removed and still change my name to Zero.

So in short he/him is fine but I prefer they/them.
 

Eve

monki flip lol
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Thought I'd already posted this but turns out I posted it in my Sandbox. I should sleep

Happy New Year all! To those of you who struggle with family gatherings, I hope the ending of these yearly festivities brings you some room to breathe. I'm quite doubtful that 2021 will actually be a better year, but at least we're all a little more prepared by experience for whatever comes our way. Of course, my dms (and Pokepride) are always open for anyone who needs to vent.

Another year means another time to look back on the person I used to be and barely recognise them. Even as I continue to struggle with precisely determining my own identity, sexuality, and ambitions, and struggle with the aftermath of dropping out of university, I know that I'm so much more of a person than I was, and I can at least be happy about that. I'm going to make a conscious effort to make myself even better this year, and hopefully also start my social transitioning in the process. It might be slow progress at first, but that's better than nothing, right?


Guess I'll talk about my sexuality here, seeing as I haven't talked about that on this thread before.

I like women, like, a lot. That's not a surprise to anyone who knows me well. Ask me a year ago if I liked any guys, however, and I'd deny it with an "ew no". Turns out I'd be lying. By this point I've been attracted to a few too many guys to deny it, as much as I've wanted to (even if it doesn't apply to me anymore, I guess the effects of being mocked for being "gay" for having a tomboy girlfriend* as a kid really stuck with me). I really like women and my taste in guys is fairly specific so it's a really heavy preference (don't get your hopes up yet, nice guys), but that still makes me bi! So here I am coming out I guess. Maybe I'll change my mind, maybe I won't. Honestly, the label doesn't matter to me much. If I love someone, I love them, and that's just how it is.
*actually a trans guy btw! he's super cool


I planned to write more but tiredness has put a stop to that, so I'll leave it here. Thanks to all my friends who helped make 2020 at all bearable against all odds; you all mean the world to me. Hope you all have a good night!
 
Just before the new year passes and I start a new chapter of my life, I want to come out to all my smogon and pokemon friends as bi.

s/os to Le Creme Brule for being one of the first ppl ive opened up to about this and answering all my questions on the topic, Itchyfoot for having our dms be such a amazing dump for all my ideas on this topic, nolenot for talking to me abt bionicles, and a massive s/o to Ape711 for being a real g and explaining to me and teaching me abt gay relationships and really just for being amazing.

I am probably gonna go post this on some discords with my friends on them HI FRIENDS
 

emma

everything comes back to you
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Yesterday at 5:16 AM I texted my parents that I was coming out as transgender. The plan was for them to wake up, read it, and send me a nice message to read when I woke up. Unfortunately, it appears my text woke them up so they decided to come into my room and talk for two hours. If anyone wants to see the text for "inspiration" I'm glad to share, but I don't feel comfortable posting it publicly on the forums.

While coming out at a 5 AM message seems silly, I really believe it was the play. While having them come into my room unexpectedly was not something I was hoping for, I knew I was going to have to have these difficult conversations at some point. Sending that text message was extremely terrifying, and 5 AM is the only time I had enough confidence to do it. While the result might have been unspectacular, I do not regret coming out the way I did.

Their initial reaction was that I was coming out as gay. Despite the first line in my text being "I am coming out as transgender" they were shocked to actually hear I was transgender. While the conversation that would follow was pretty horrible, at least I find this moment hilarious.

Their reactions were not the worst, but also certainly not the best. They made it quite clear, at least to me, that they are adamantly opposed to me coming out as trans. They kept using their own experiences ("well there used to be guys I know who were only friends with girls") to push "alternatives" to being trans such as being Emma online while being "regular" me in real life or simply being a more feminine male. Of course, men can be more traditionally feminine, but that's not for me. Furthermore, I've been Emma online while pretending to be "regular" in real life since around Halloween, and I don't plan to continue now that I've told them I am trans.

Another sinking feeling I have is that they think I'm going through a depression saga again. Back in High School, I was diagnosed with clinical depression and it was a really tough time for the family, but I was able to eventually get through it. I believe their thought process is staying up until 5 AM to send the message --> bad sleep schedule (this part is true) --> depressed --> being trans is a way to cope (these two things are not true). They kept suggesting "solutions" such as quitting the football team (I did do this!), eating healthier, exercising more. etc. While these are all good suggestions and things I should be doing, I was really confused on how they related to the topic of me coming out as trans to them.

They also did not even try to call me Emma or use she / her today. Obviously it will take a long time to switch names and I know they are going to misname a large amount of times, but the fact that they just continued to refer to me as they always have was disheartening.

Overall, my parents do not want me to come out as transgender, despite telling me they "would do everything they can to support me". I hope this is a case of two boomer parents who grew up in a different time having no idea how to deal with their child coming out as trans at 5 AM on a random Monday morning. I think they are afraid of me coming out as trans and then realizing it's not for me, or that its "just a phase". They kept saying I should "wait" to come out which I am willing to accept. I plan to do the next school semester from home, so if I'm able to come out before I go back in the Fall, I will count that was a major win.

While this is not the response I wanted and it made me quite upset, I can work with this. I believe I have to be persistent and continue to tell them that I want to come out as trans (since I already am transgender). I also need to continually correct them when it comes to my new name, which sounds incredibly difficult and awkward, but such is the life of being trans. I hope with time for them to fully understand and dedication from me, I can eventually fully come out as transgender.

For anyone reading this that is in a similar position to me -- please do not take this as demotivation to come out as transgender. While this is not the response I wanted (and of course different people respond differently), it is not going to deter me. I have made it through much worse, and I refuse to let these two boomer clowns get in the way of expressing myself how I want to. Fear not my loves, I am not stopped this easily. Being transgender is unfortunately extremely hard, but it is also something that makes me incredibly happy so I am going to keep working towards it.

I am on discord at emma ❤#4133 if you want to talk :heart:
 
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Exeggutor

twist
is a Live Chat Contributor Alumnus
re: early morning thoughts
I've been an openly bisexual female for a while now, I've been very open with my friends about it and they support me all the way, but I don't how to explain it to my parents. Does anyone have advice, I feel like my story isn't as severe as some of the stories I've been reading in this thread.
I think it really depends on the type of people your parents are and what your relationship is like with them. I came out as bisexual to my mum at the ripe old age of 11 with a "formal" e-mail sent from a Barnes & Noble Nook at half past midnight.

Are they the type where they'd prefer a sit-down-and-talk type thing? Does something like an email work? A phone call? What are *you* most comfortable with, above all else? Your comfort with how you approach it matters before all else.
 

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