(Little) Things that annoy you in Pokémon

Regieleki not learning Discharge, Charge, or Charge Beam, moves most Electric-types learn.
Maybe they did not want to make it too centralizing with 200 Spd?
It's most likely due to its design.

It's essentially an electric charge restricted by ""magic""? contraptions that prevent it from going wild (sorta).

Due to the contraptions, it makes sense it's not able to release big discharges of energy, while at same time its wild nature doesn't prevent it to properly focus to charge itself.

...idk, I'm trying to make sense of the lore it's based on.
https://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Regieleki_(Pokémon)

But overally, if it's just a wild bunch of incontrollable energy, I can see the lack of Charge/Charge Beam making sense, less so Discharge but that might be indeed due to the restraints.
 
But on the other hand... "Haha, Electro Ball go brrrrr".

I can see why they don't want it spamming Discharge tho.
The only Pokemon who has ever made good use of Electro Ball is Cinderace, and that's only because it had no other Electric move.

Even on something as fast as Regieleki, Electro Ball is only useful against defensive mons without any speed investment. Even 252 Adamant Conkeldurr gets hit harder by Thunderbolt.
 
The only Pokemon who has ever made good use of Electro Ball is Cinderace, and that's only because it had no other Electric move.

Even on something as fast as Regieleki, Electro Ball is only useful against defensive mons without any speed investment. Even 252 Adamant Conkeldurr gets hit harder by Thunderbolt.
I did not realize how harsh the electroball calculations were. I knew it was in relation to speed but I thought the power distribution was way better than this.
 
I did not realize how harsh the electroball calculations were. I knew it was in relation to speed but I thought the power distribution was way better than this.
Yeah, against uninvested foes, Regieleki can go as high as base 73, but a normal fast mon (let's say base 120 speed) can only hit harder than Thunderbolt against base 44 or below. And that's without any investment from the target.

It's such a bad move.
 

Coronis

N'Cha!
is a Battle Simulator Moderator Alumnus
With all the mons readded to SwSh, somehow 4 of my all time favourites are still not in there :( I’ve got work off today so I was planning to do a complete restart of the game and run through the entire thing + DLC. Sadly no Infernape, Staraptor, Greninja or Ampharos. At least I have Toxtricity and I guess I can use Inteleon as a worse Greninja. Also my favourite mythical is still missing too! rip Darkrai.
 
The only Pokemon who has ever made good use of Electro Ball is Cinderace, and that's only because it had no other Electric move.

Even on something as fast as Regieleki, Electro Ball is only useful against defensive mons without any speed investment. Even 252 Adamant Conkeldurr gets hit harder by Thunderbolt.
Man, even Regieleki can't really make use of it?

GF should just make it a physical move with 90BP and no drawbacks already...

What? I'm sick of Wild Charge. :mehowth:
 
With all the mons readded to SwSh, somehow 4 of my all time favourites are still not in there :( I’ve got work off today so I was planning to do a complete restart of the game and run through the entire thing + DLC. Sadly no Infernape, Staraptor, Greninja or Ampharos. At least I have Toxtricity and I guess I can use Inteleon as a worse Greninja. Also my favourite mythical is still missing too! rip Darkrai.
I mean there's pretty much no Gen 4 Mythical Pokémon in SwSh, and I do not foresee any more DLC considering how much of a finale the Crown Tundra feels like. Darkrai's absence is notable as it is Cresselia's counterpart, and yet it is not in while Keldeo was already in the game, capturable in the Crown Tundra itself as well once you get the other three Sword of Justice members.

Related to Gen 4, there's also no Cranidos line or Sheldon line on sight when every other previous fossil Pokémon were available in the wild. It's not an annoyance more than a red flag that we might see those two lines again any time soon.
 

Coronis

N'Cha!
is a Battle Simulator Moderator Alumnus
I mean there's pretty much no Gen 4 Mythical Pokémon in SwSh, and I do not foresee any more DLC considering how much of a finale the Crown Tundra feels like. Darkrai's absence is notable as it is Cresselia's counterpart, and yet it is not in while Keldeo was already in the game, capturable in the Crown Tundra itself as well once you get the other three Sword of Justice members.

Related to Gen 4, there's also no Cranidos line or Sheldon line on sight when every other previous fossil Pokémon were available in the wild. It's not an annoyance more than a red flag that we might see those two lines again any time soon.
Surely we’re getting a remake and it would’ve just been too obvious if the normal legends were out? One can only hope....
 

Codraroll

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Still a really big problem there. I do like how IoA and CT limited the weather possible- made it so that it felt more cohesive, especially CT. But that still doesn't fix the Wild Area! The main offenders are Sandstorm and Snow/Blizzard. Just, why should a lake be covered in a sandstorm? Why should there be this tiny blizzard one second and the next it's sunny as all get-out? I think a better way to do this (lore-wise. Gameplay-wise it does give you variety, but...) is to have the weathers vary slightly- fully overcast days can have rain/thunder or fog in some areas, but not sun or sandstorm. A sunny day can't have rain, but it can have clear skies and sandstorm (for variety). A snowy day can have clear, overcast, snow, or blizzard. Make it so that out of the eight or nine weathers, only three or four can be found per day.
Somewhat related to this, I think it's time to discard the concept of a real-time clock in Pokémon altogether. Do like every other game with a day/night cycle and have each day last, say, 20 minutes or an hour or something, with the weather changing each in-game day instead of each real-world day. I really can't think of other games that follow the real-world clock as slavishly as Pokémon does, but it's easy to come up with a dozen examples that have day/night cycles rolling as you play. Some of them go all the way back to the days of the Nintendo 64.

There is so much potential with timed events in-game, from weather changes and NPC behaviour to changed encounter tables at night and certain roaming Pokémon following a set route every day (think something like the dragons in Breath of the Wild). Add lunar phases for extra goodies. Imagine seeing the Clefairy dance on new moon nights, or Tirtouga hatching on the beaches under the full moon? The aurora on clear, starry nights, or braving the stormy nights to catch legendary Pokémon? A natural environment that reacts to passing time feels a lot more alive than one that remains static. However, the Pokémon devs seem to be under the idea that to witness a time-based event taking place, you have to be playing at that specific time. Want to see the sunset over Kala'e Bay? Play at sunset, because it won't be there otherwise. Want to see the Clefairy dance at Mt. Moon? Play on Monday nights, tough luck if you happen to be busy. Want to see what the world is like at 5AM or on weekdays when you are at work? Better fiddle with the time settings of your console or something, because you're out of luck otherwise. I think I almost never saw the night sky when I played Pokémon Moon, because I only had time to play in the evening.

As a result, time-based events remain very impractical. The designers can't rely on the player being around to see the effects of the passage of time, so those effects remain largely cosmetic except for daily changes. Meanwhile, it is fully possible to cheat that system as well, changing the date on your console so you can experience a certain weather or grab multiple once-per-day bonuses in one sitting. It's a crappy system that can easily be bypassed, making me wonder why they insist on having that system to begin with. Just let time pass a lot faster, and do something with the passage of time, instead of this weird fixation with a day/night cycle that depends entirely on when you are available to play the game.
 
Doing IoA on a clear save and the level curve is a mess.

Apparently, you're supposed to go to Motostoke after you go to the Wild Area, Beat Team Yell at the Hotel, (iirc, you unlock Flying Taxis after the Gym Leader intro cutscene), fly to Wedgehurst and go to the IoA, Beat Klara and Mustard 1 (and get Exp. Charm), Fly back to Motostoke, beat Hop 3 and Bede 1, fly back to the IoA to beat Fastpokes and Klara 2, Fly back to Turffield and beat Milo, Hop 4 and Nessa, Go back to the IoA for the Final Trial/Klara 3 AND THEN you get Kubfu. (After that, max Happiness, beat Kabu, and then enter one of the Towers).

I'm sorry, who the fuck designed this? A drunk Malamar? :pikuh:


Speaking of DLC fumbles, it's such a wasted opportunity that the version-exclusive Leaders and Rivals don't show up at Champion Cup and the Star Tournament. Really wanted to see Gordie and Melony or Klara and Avery pairing up.
 

Yung Dramps

awesome gaming
One thing I've noticed in regards to the DLC (and keep in mind I haven't played nor do I intend to play either so take my words with a grain of salt) from discussions about it is that there seems to be a pretty significant "content imbalance" problem.

What do you get with IoA? A new island with returning mons, 1 brand new Legendary, 1 new Galarian form, 3 GMaxes, a new side-format in Restricted Sparring (which as far as I can tell really didn't catch on) and a 2 hour story.

Another new area with old mons, 5 brand new Legendaries, 4 new Galarian forms, Dynamax Adventures which incorporate every single past Legendary, a beefier storyline on the whole, the Galar Star Tournament filled with NPC fanservice and even a sidequest to catch Keldeo, a Mythical, with no event required.


Yeah uhh... Unless I'm missing something here, that's a pretty nasty ratio against IoA. Even before either of these were released there was this sensation from the very first reveal trailer all the way back in January that CT was the real deal and that IoA was just the test run. It... Really shouldn't be that way. If you're selling $30 DLC with two parts both should feel roughly worth 15 bucks each: As it is now it feels like IoA is $10 while CT is $20.

Is there nothing they could've done to offset this a little? Off the top of my head they could've perhaps split up Dynamax Adventures so IoA had Gen 1-4 legends while CT just had 5-7 + the Regis and Galarian birds. IoA also maybe could've had its own sidequest to catch a foreign legendary group in the overworld just like CT's Swords of Justice mission, like idk maybe the Gen 2 Beasts to tie in with the two towers giving off Johto vibes?
 
While I enjoyed CT's story more, I think IoA's story is pretty fine and not necessarily as beefless as CT. I think it mostly comes down to do you like the Klara/Avery storyline, with a side of goofy Mustard shenanigans or do you like Calyrex, with some goofy Peony shenanigans. The Galarian Bird & Regi quest are fun (make no mistake!) but they're also playing second fiddle. I just happened to really enjoy Calyrex so I put it above, but imo its a close race.


Incidentally I think the Keldeo quest requires you beat IoA anyway? I remember that being how it seemed from the IoA datamine, maybe someone on a save who hasn't finished IoA can confirm.
 
Incidentally I think the Keldeo quest requires you beat IoA anyway? I remember that being how it seemed from the IoA datamine, maybe someone on a save who hasn't finished IoA can confirm.
I think it requires beating the postgame story but not the other DLC. Sonia shows up in her "doctor" dress which wouldn't make sense if you havent finished the postgame questline.
 
I really think they should have just advertised it as a season pass with Crown Tundra being the big thing about it, like similar season passes Nintendo have put out fairly recently. Throw in a couple other things to flesh it out, move some stuff from Isle to Tundra and you've got a much more sensible pattern.
 
One thing I've noticed in regards to the DLC (and keep in mind I haven't played nor do I intend to play either so take my words with a grain of salt) from discussions about it is that there seems to be a pretty significant "content imbalance" problem.

What do you get with IoA? A new island with returning mons, 1 brand new Legendary, 1 new Galarian form, 3 GMaxes, a new side-format in Restricted Sparring (which as far as I can tell really didn't catch on) and a 2 hour story.

Another new area with old mons, 5 brand new Legendaries, 4 new Galarian forms, Dynamax Adventures which incorporate every single past Legendary, a beefier storyline on the whole, the Galar Star Tournament filled with NPC fanservice and even a sidequest to catch Keldeo, a Mythical, with no event required.


Yeah uhh... Unless I'm missing something here, that's a pretty nasty ratio against IoA. Even before either of these were released there was this sensation from the very first reveal trailer all the way back in January that CT was the real deal and that IoA was just the test run. It... Really shouldn't be that way. If you're selling $30 DLC with two parts both should feel roughly worth 15 bucks each: As it is now it feels like IoA is $10 while CT is $20.

Is there nothing they could've done to offset this a little? Off the top of my head they could've perhaps split up Dynamax Adventures so IoA had Gen 1-4 legends while CT just had 5-7 + the Regis and Galarian birds. IoA also maybe could've had its own sidequest to catch a foreign legendary group in the overworld just like CT's Swords of Justice mission, like idk maybe the Gen 2 Beasts to tie in with the two towers giving off Johto vibes?
I actually like IoA more.

Despite all its faults on that front, it's not a post-game DLC quest, you get a legendary that you can actually raise and use in-game, early Tutors, Nature Mints, some raid-less TRs and useful items...

Crown Tundra, despite it being accessible early-game, is more of a post-game thing and I'm not super thrilled about the legendary dumps.

Galarian Star Tournaments not working as a proper Multi Battle Facility is quite frankly a mistake. Not much of a point when you can put 6 mons with 20 Lv. advantage at worst to steamroll through it.

Both stories are cool though. I like the characters and Rex in particular is one of the best Legendaries lore-wise because instead of a Dex entry for some random legend crammed into a cave, it actually got some story.

I think we can all agree the DLC improve on the base game.
 
Somewhat related to this, I think it's time to discard the concept of a real-time clock in Pokémon altogether. Do like every other game with a day/night cycle and have each day last, say, 20 minutes or an hour or something, with the weather changing each in-game day instead of each real-world day. I really can't think of other games that follow the real-world clock as slavishly as Pokémon does, but it's easy to come up with a dozen examples that have day/night cycles rolling as you play. Some of them go all the way back to the days of the Nintendo 64.

There is so much potential with timed events in-game, from weather changes and NPC behaviour to changed encounter tables at night and certain roaming Pokémon following a set route every day (think something like the dragons in Breath of the Wild). Add lunar phases for extra goodies. Imagine seeing the Clefairy dance on new moon nights, or Tirtouga hatching on the beaches under the full moon? The aurora on clear, starry nights, or braving the stormy nights to catch legendary Pokémon? A natural environment that reacts to passing time feels a lot more alive than one that remains static. However, the Pokémon devs seem to be under the idea that to witness a time-based event taking place, you have to be playing at that specific time. Want to see the sunset over Kala'e Bay? Play at sunset, because it won't be there otherwise. Want to see the Clefairy dance at Mt. Moon? Play on Monday nights, tough luck if you happen to be busy. Want to see what the world is like at 5AM or on weekdays when you are at work? Better fiddle with the time settings of your console or something, because you're out of luck otherwise. I think I almost never saw the night sky when I played Pokémon Moon, because I only had time to play in the evening.

As a result, time-based events remain very impractical. The designers can't rely on the player being around to see the effects of the passage of time, so those effects remain largely cosmetic except for daily changes. Meanwhile, it is fully possible to cheat that system as well, changing the date on your console so you can experience a certain weather or grab multiple once-per-day bonuses in one sitting. It's a crappy system that can easily be bypassed, making me wonder why they insist on having that system to begin with. Just let time pass a lot faster, and do something with the passage of time, instead of this weird fixation with a day/night cycle that depends entirely on when you are available to play the game.
I can't endorse this strongly enough. I think it goes without saying that a playthrough that takes maybe a few days of real-world time represents a much longer period of time in the in-game world. Traveling across a region must take months, at least. Raising Pokemon from the lowest levels of experience to being some of the strongest in the region must be an arduous, extremely long process (regardless of how it has to be simplified in the way the game models it). Fixing game time to real-world time just makes no sense when it's clear for so many reasons that a day of real-world time is actually proportional to probably weeks of game time.

I was playing Gen V recently and the seasons are another great example. The concept is excellent and should have never been omitted from a game since, but making each season a month of real-world time made no sense (but on the other hand was a clear acknowledgment that real-world time to game-world time is not 1:1).

I actually like IoA more.

Despite all its faults on that front, it's not a post-game DLC quest, you get a legendary that you can actually raise and use in-game, early Tutors, Nature Mints, some raid-less TRs and useful items...

Crown Tundra, despite it being accessible early-game, is more of a post-game thing and I'm not super thrilled about the legendary dumps.

Galarian Star Tournaments not working as a proper Multi Battle Facility is quite frankly a mistake. Not much of a point when you can put 6 mons with 20 Lv. advantage at worst to steamroll through it.

Both stories are cool though. I like the characters and Rex in particular is one of the best Legendaries lore-wise because instead of a Dex entry for some random legend crammed into a cave, it actually got some story.

I think we can all agree the DLC improve on the base game.
Absolutely. But the fact that they don't improve what was already in the base game is a big problem, as has been mentioned here. Whereas everything that had been in Diamond/Pearl was subject to improvement in Platinum, all the DLC could do was add new stuff separate from what existed, when improvements throughout like in a "third version" would have been ideal. Personally, I hope they will stick with the DLC model but find a way to expand the scope to include what's already in the games. It would raise problems with compatibility, but maybe it's possible.
 
I can't endorse this strongly enough. I think it goes without saying that a playthrough that takes maybe a few days of real-world time represents a much longer period of time in the in-game world. Traveling across a region must take months, at least. Raising Pokemon from the lowest levels of experience to being some of the strongest in the region must be an arduous, extremely long process (regardless of how it has to be simplified in the way the game models it). Fixing game time to real-world time just makes no sense when it's clear for so many reasons that a day of real-world time is actually proportional to probably weeks of game time.
I was quite ready to disagree with Codra for a few reasons... but you saying this really made me realise why a lot of other RPGs do this and why it would fit Pokémon. Simulating a longer passage of time to compensate for the scaled down world makes a lot of sense.
 

Codraroll

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Continuing on a conversation initially sparked in the "Pokémon that disappointed you..." thread because it seems more appropriate here:

Haven't they already removed Mega Evolution and Z-Moves in Gen 8? The Mega Stones code of several Pokémon were there but not fully programmed, likely just item leftovers.

But keeping everything intact also means Pokémon who were bad stays bad, or overwhelmingly powerful Legendary Pokémon like Zacian to be untouched. This can be a bad sign for balance in the future, potentially resulting in even more crazier or asinine battle gimmicks or even more ridiculous power creep within Legendaries or even normal Pokémon. It would be awful for Gen 9 now that it would want to keep all of the underwhelming and overpowered stuff as is.

Look, I understand it is impossible to make a perfectly balanced Pokémon game, but it shouldn't kill anyone to give some crapmons at a time (per Generation) some much-needed buff and keeping the most powerful ones in check instead of constantly showering new battle gimmicks that end up being at the hand of the more popular ones. Z-Moves at least allows for variety, but the one-per-team does make it feels limited and lame.
I think Pokémon is way past due for a technical content overhaul of sorts. The amount of aggregated content from eight generations of a "put more on the pile" philosophy is starting to reach a point beyond the manageable (which in itself is a problem), while some of it really needs management. We're not just talking about some old Pokémon being hopelessly unviable in current gens either, but mechanical issues that are really holding the games back. Gen VIII took some baby steps towards culling some unneeded moves and re-balancing others, but there's so much of Pokémon's old content that could use more attention to be less of a hassle to players in the future. To elaborate:
  • I think we all have rolled our eyes at ridiculous evolution requirements over the years. Most notorious is perhaps the evolution levels of some Unova Pokémon. The prevailing philosophy seems to have been "well, players can only encounter it at level 45 and up, and we want them to use the base stage for a few levels before it evolves, so an evolution level of 52 seems reasonable" while the Pokémon has the same stats as ones that evolves at level 27 (literal example, by the way: compare Pawniard and Stufful). This is a good way to make the Pokémon the millstone of any player's team should it ever be found at earlier points in future games - USUM Noibat comes to mind, with the same BST as Starly yet it doesn't evolve until 10 levels after Starly has evolved twice. Dreepy promises to be a proper pain in the buttocks, learning almost no moves at all before it evolves at level 50. This will effectively make it completely useless in any appearance earlier than level 45 or so. Other examples include "worst use of a Moon Stone ever" Skitty, "I hope all future consoles include a gyroscope" Inkay, "literal coin toss" Wurmple, or ...
  • ... the seemingly endless parade of items that have no purpose other than evolving or changing the form of one single Pokémon. Roughly a third of those evolution items were included in Gen VIII alone. We're not talking about evolution stones either, which at least serve the purpose of evolving multiple Pokémon. Stuff like the Dragon Scale, Reaper Cloth, Up-Grade, Whipped Dream, or the seven different Milcery Sweets. Sure, the first time you find those they can be considered cool accessories to a Pokémon that holds center stage that generation, but in subsequent generations they are nothing but a hassle for both the player and the programmers. As if they will ever again make a set of four meadows with different types of Nectar just for the sake of Oricorio. Legendaries have it even worse. One generation sends you on a grand quest to retreive the DNA Splicers from a mad villain, or find the Red Orb on top of a remote mountain, and in the next generation a nameless NPC will just hand you the stuff. Immersion!
  • Shiny forms even experts can barely tell from the original, yet whose Pokémon's shiny form is seen as a Big Deal. Take Zapdos, for instance. You have to be really dang good to tell the normal and shiny versions apart, yet Shiny Zapdos is an incredibly rare legendary and sure to be the trophy of any shiny collection. It kind of baffles me that Niantic did nothing to fix this in Pokémon Go, but I suppose TPC didn't let them because of copyright. It then baffled me that TPC didn't let them sort that out anyway, given the relative ease of finding a new colour scheme and how much of a selling point it would be in Pokémon Go. Heck, wouldn't the transition to 3D models in Gen VI have been a perfect occasion to sort out the least noticeable shiny colours? At least for fan favourite designs such as Garchomp or Gengar?
  • A whole lot of Pokémon stuck in stiff and strange Sky Battle poses. Pokémon like Skarmory, Salamence, or Xatu have always held distinct poses standing on the ground, while now they are just hovering. All for the sake of being able to appear in a gimmicky battle style that was phased out after one single pair of games. Meanwhile, standing poses for the Pokémon do exist, but they appear only in the generational equivalent of Pokémon Amie.
  • Abilities in general: a Pokémon can only have two possible abilities + one Hidden Ability, and most Pokémon have had all three slots filled since Gen V or so. Yet more abilities keep being introduced, but very few of them can be assigned to old Pokémon because all their slots are long since filled. Contrast this with moves, where most Pokémon lack any restrictions on the size of their movepools, so new moves keep being added to the movepools of old Pokémon all the time. With moves, you can pick four out of dozens, but with abilities you can pick one out of only three. I guess regional forms partially address this, however.
  • Shenanigans with the Pokédex, such as cross-generation evolution families not being consistently placed next to each other, Nidoran's two genders still taking up two dex slots, alternate forms such as regional forms not getting separate Pokédex slots, stuff like that.
  • Old mechanics issues that somehow haven't been fixed. As it stands, Nidorina and Nidoqueen can't breed, for reasons I can't fathom. Deerling and Sawsbuck's form changes were tied to the abandoned Seasons mechanic, meaning that Deerling in games post Gen V are stuck in their form, and Deerling has only been re-introduced in Spring form since then. This means only Deerling transfered from Gen V can take other forms than Spring Form. Hidden Power could never take on the Fairy-type, although it has been removed altogether so I guess that point is moot. Fairy never got a type-boosting item other than the Pixie Plate, though. These are just quick examples off the top of my head, I think there are many more quirky cases out there. At least they fixed the Azurill gender issue.
  • IVs. Enough said.
  • Battles being clunky as heck, with that whole "First, A happens. Only after A finishes, B can happen. Then it's C's turn afterwards" thing. I'm not talking about the concept of turn-based battles, or how it's determined when each Pokémon gets to move, but the user interface experience: i.e. the popup for an ability first occurs in text, then the effect of the ability is applied (in case of Intimidate, for instance, attack is lowered on each opposite Pokémon in turn, each accompanied by a "Pokémon's Attack fell!" message), then Pokémon will attack, then the HP bar of the target Pokémon will be lowered, then the Pokémon faints, then there's a message saying the Pokémon fainted, then the XP bar goes up, etc. So much of this crud could have happened simultaneously, so many of the popups could have been optional, the battles could have happened so much faster and smoother. I got Camara on the OI Discord to time it for me: starting an encounter with a wild Pokémon, OHKO-ing it, ending the battle and being able to take another step takes a minimum of 16 seconds in Pokémon Shield. SadisticMystic reports times upwards of 20-25 seconds in the 3DS games - with move animations off. Around half a second of this is spent on actual gameplay (selecting a move, mashing A to move text along) and the rest is waiting for the game to chug along. Even turning off move animations doesn't do much, given how it's all the other stuff that takes time. This is needlessly clunky, but it's probably a consequence of ...
  • ... the code of the games still being partially based on a code framework written for Ruby and Sapphire. Much like Game Freak's design philosophy, it seems like their whole development strategy is based on the concept of piling new stuff on top of old, without taking time to overhaul anything. Never mind all the old dummied-out Key Items that still float around the code, probably because removing any of them could have unforeseen consequences. Take out the Red Chain, some pointers go haywire, and suddenly you need to trade Dusclops holding a Super Repel in order to evolve it, stuff like that.
In short, the Pokémon games retain a lot of content and mechanics that no longer work as originally intended, that have been left obsolete by new conventions, or that were never meant to be useful beyond that one time it looked really cool and now just hangs around being a hassle. I'm honestly not sure for how much longer they can keep it up like this. Rumours suggest Sword and Shield's development was severely hampered by the challenge of just getting all the old stuff to work. Dexit was apparently caused by the realization that this can't go on forever - yet it was followed up with the devs not changing course one bit, continuing to do the stuff that led to the problems Dexit tried to address in the first place.

And then there's the difficult part: The fact that more new content is being piled on top of old is one of the main draws of the Pokémon games, and why fans stick to it for several generations. As demonstrated by Dexit, fans will be furious if any content is cut. However, other fans will be jaded and quit if nothing changes either, and new players may find it difficult to get a grip on the vast extent of the content of these games. Nostalgia sells, but it doesn't sell by itself. New content has to be added, old content has to be acknowledged, the sum of the content is nearly overwhelming as it is ... there really is no way to please everyone here. Any approach - including doing nothing at all - will be met with vocal opposition from some substantial portion of their fan base. Something has to give, and now I'm curious to see what.

Game Freak is going at it like a restaurant that keeps adding dishes to its menu, despite their cooks being overworked, the guests not knowing what half the stuff on offer is or able to tell the dishes apart, storage space for ingredients being a concern, and half the dishes never being ordered by anybody but a few loud guests that will make a heck of a fuss were they ever taken off the menu. At some point they won't be able to keep all of it up any longer, and I wonder which bit they will compromise on first.
 
Getting rid of IVs would be the most outrageous thing they've ever done. Just make it much easier to Hyper Train and don't require things to be at level 100 for it.
 

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