Pokémon Movepool Oddities & Explanations

Imagine getting kicked in the skull by a horse. You wouldn't call that a fighting skill in the martial arts pokémon sense. It's just an animal kicking you, no real skill or mastery there. But because the horse's leg is built like a fucking truck you'll at least break your jaw or something.

This whole approach is the fundamental distinction of mega punch/kick vs the other moves and normal vs fighting. Sure, the descriptions are simple, but could a monkey cross chop you? not really, but it might be able to just deck you out with a punch. is a kangaroo going to high jump kick you? probably not, but it might just kick you normally and break half of your bones.
But going by that logic, shouldn't Mach Punch be Normal-type too? Hitting really fast isn't necessarily a martial arts thing either, there are animals that can hit super fast (the mantis shrimp IIRC can punch so fast they produce heat comparable to that of a star, if only briefly).

Tbh a Fighting-type kangaroo Pokemon could be dope. Tekken has a Fighting kangaroo that Pokemon can take notes from.
 
But going by that logic, shouldn't Mach Punch be Normal-type too? Hitting really fast isn't necessarily a martial arts thing either, there are animals that can hit super fast (the mantis shrimp IIRC can punch so fast they produce heat comparable to that of a star, if only briefly).
Probably yeah, it's one of the more generic fighting moves, and the only way you know it was meant to be a martial arts thing is because it was the signature of hitmonchan.
 
If we really want to be nitty gritty about this mach punch is a trained fast punch. That is to say, the pracitioner actively trained their punch to come out that fast. Contrast with Comet ("Consecutive" Punch) which is meant to be throwing out a bunch of weak punches willy nilly (see also: probably why it had 85% accuracy).
 

ScraftyIsTheBest

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High Jump Kick and Jump Kick also have accuracy issues. I don't think there's anything saying inaccuracy and martial arts or fighting skill are connected.
For what it's worth, I think their Fighting-type status stems from the fact that their Japanese names being based on dedicated martial arts/sports techniques.

High Jump Kick's Japanese name translates to "Jumping Knee Kick". This is a very particular technique used in certain martial arts (also known as the flying knee), basically you jump up and hit the opponent with an upwards knee strike.

Jump Kick's Japanese name translates to "Dropkick". This is a wrestling technique where the person jumps and kicks the opponent with both feet. Both of these are trained techniques used in either martial arts or other form of intensive physical sport.

To compare a few punch moves...

Dynamicpunch: ''The foe is punched with the user’s full, concentrated power. It confuses the foe if it hits.''

Mach Punch: ''The user throws a punch at blinding speed. It is certain to strike first.''

Mega Punch: ''The foe is slugged by a punch thrown with muscle-packed power.''
I can't say much about Dynamic Punch (other than that its JP name is Exploding Punch) but considering it's employing the user's full, concentrated power, I do think it involves heightened mental focus and full body training to employ its use. Martial arts techniques often employ heightened amount of mental focus to bring out even greater power, hence what makes Dynamic Punch stand out. I believe Focus Punch employs something like this as well, where the user focuses its mental energy to deliver a maximum power punch.

The other punching moves that are Fighting-type probably employ something similar based on descriptions. Hammer Arm involves the user slamming its fist into the opponent with immense force, Sky Uppercut involves an upwards uppercut with enough strength to send one flying, and Power-Up Punch involves trained punches that harden the fists. Drain Punch in particular seems to employ the concept of chi, or vital life energy, and involves the user potentially stealing one's vital life energy, or chi. Perhaps other punching moves like Focus Punch, Dynamic Punch, and vice versa involve similar use of chi to employ their power.
 
The other punching moves that are Fighting-type probably employ something similar based on descriptions. Hammer Arm involves the user slamming its fist into the opponent with immense force
But how is that any different from Mega Punch?

And what about Mach Punch? I get all your other examples and agree, hence me not quoting them.
 

Pikachu315111

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But how is that any different from Mega Punch?
Because GF said so.

GF wanted there to be a Normal-type "punch" move so made Mega Punch.
GF wanted there to be a Fighting-type "punch" move so made Dynamic Punch.

Looking for hard reasoning isn't going to turn up much, what we said is the best you're going to get. Mega Punch is from a cranky Snorlax you woke up from its nap and so swings around at you with its fist and its weight behind it. Dynamic Punch is a pi**sed off Pangoro who saw a bully push down a kid so tells that bully to "come here", that bully not knowing Pangoro is prepping a punch in the bully's vital spot and applying his weight into it for maximum damage.
 
Because GF said so.

GF wanted there to be a Normal-type "punch" move so made Mega Punch.
GF wanted there to be a Fighting-type "punch" move so made Dynamic Punch.

Looking for hard reasoning isn't going to turn up much, what we said is the best you're going to get. Mega Punch is from a cranky Snorlax you woke up from its nap and so swings around at you with its fist and its weight behind it. Dynamic Punch is a pi**sed off Pangoro who saw a bully push down a kid so tells that bully to "come here", that bully not knowing Pangoro is prepping a punch in the bully's vital spot and applying his weight into it for maximum damage.
Thanks, now in my head I can't unsee mommy Pangoro telling to her son "Come here, I'm not going to do anything to you" after he did something stupid.
 
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Why do so many pokemon based on marine life get Close Combat? It makes sense for Poliwrath and Grapploct etc, they are part-Fighting type, but these three?
:ss/(Barraskewda): :ss/(Crawdaunt): :ss/(Sharpedo):

When was the last time you got beaten up by a fish?

(Also kinda funny that the otherwise regal, composed Xerneas gets it)
These Pokemon are violent by nature and often attack in melee, so this is why they got this move I guess.
 

Low-Key

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Why do so many pokemon based on marine life get Close Combat? It makes sense for Poliwrath and Grapploct etc, they are part-Fighting type, but these three?
:ss/(Barraskewda): :ss/(Crawdaunt): :ss/(Sharpedo):

When was the last time you got beaten up by a fish?
Crawdaunt is actually a red swamp crayfish according to Bulbapedia, and according to google they are actually highly aggressive and they tend to kill their own species using their claws. I'm pretty sure that's why Crawdaunt gets Close Combat, I could be wrong.
 

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Why do so many pokemon based on marine life get Close Combat? It makes sense for Poliwrath and Grapploct etc, they are part-Fighting type, but these three?
:ss/(Barraskewda): :ss/(Crawdaunt): :ss/(Sharpedo):

When was the last time you got beaten up by a fish?

(Also kinda funny that the otherwise regal, composed Xerneas gets it)
Crawdaunt could beat you up with its pincers, but Barraskewda and Sharpedo might simply ram non-stop, and Xerneas tramples you.
 
Barracudas are supposed to be fairly ferocious

Granted, a lto of fish are actually pretty violent, but for one reason or another barracudas get put into the "notably violent" bin.


Sharpedo, regardless of real sharks, is noted as being brutal. It's the "bully" of the sea, is the brutal pokemon, and presumably close combat's meant to reflect the behaviors.
 

Pikachu315111

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Also, we gonna keep in mind the Japanese name of moves which is what GF uses to base if a Pokemon gets it or not. So in this case, Close Combat's Japanese name is "Infight". Also here is its description which I think would be the same for both English and Japanese: "The user fights the target up close without guarding itself. This also lowers the user's Defense and Sp. Def stats".

However, I can understand the confusion if you more remember Close Combat's animation before the 3D transition. Gen V and before (as well as side games), Close Combat was represented by many fists images appearing on the target which gives you the impression its a punching move. Not helping matters is that when introduced all Pokemon that learned the move either from Level-up or Egg Move had arms/limbs (the only "odd ones" were Zangoose as it was more of a slasher and Staraptor cause it was a bird). Gen V added the Swords of Justice but it was probably something easily overlooked at they were all Fighting-types (though Growlithe got it as an Egg Move).

Gen VI changed the animation from a barrage of fists to just the user ramming into the target, thus getting rid of that ambiguity. Still, the list of Pokemon that got it was kept quite small, Xerneas the only Gen VI mon to get it and Gen VII's additions all had limbs and generally were punchers (though Mudbray got it as an Egg Move). Gen VIII when it became a TR was when the REALLY expanded the list of Pokemon who could learn it (also note, Close Combat was never a Tutor Move, who knows if more Pokemon would have gotten it if it was). Notably Tauros, Sharpedo, Escavalier, Bouffalant, Honedge family, Tyrantrum, Lycanroc, Solgaleo, Arrokuda family, Perrserker, & Glastrier; Mons which either don't have non-leg limbs or prefer a different physical form of battling aside for punching.
 
Also, we gonna keep in mind the Japanese name of moves which is what GF uses to base if a Pokemon gets it or not. So in this case, Close Combat's Japanese name is "Infight". Also here is its description which I think would be the same for both English and Japanese: "The user fights the target up close without guarding itself. This also lowers the user's Defense and Sp. Def stats".

However, I can understand the confusion if you more remember Close Combat's animation before the 3D transition. Gen V and before (as well as side games), Close Combat was represented by many fists images appearing on the target which gives you the impression its a punching move. Not helping matters is that when introduced all Pokemon that learned the move either from Level-up or Egg Move had arms/limbs (the only "odd ones" were Zangoose as it was more of a slasher and Staraptor cause it was a bird). Gen V added the Swords of Justice but it was probably something easily overlooked at they were all Fighting-types (though Growlithe got it as an Egg Move).

Gen VI changed the animation from a barrage of fists to just the user ramming into the target, thus getting rid of that ambiguity. Still, the list of Pokemon that got it was kept quite small, Xerneas the only Gen VI mon to get it and Gen VII's additions all had limbs and generally were punchers (though Mudbray got it as an Egg Move). Gen VIII when it became a TR was when the REALLY expanded the list of Pokemon who could learn it (also note, Close Combat was never a Tutor Move, who knows if more Pokemon would have gotten it if it was). Notably Tauros, Sharpedo, Escavalier, Bouffalant, Honedge family, Tyrantrum, Lycanroc, Solgaleo, Arrokuda family, Perrserker, & Glastrier; Mons which either don't have non-leg limbs or prefer a different physical form of battling aside for punching.
Not that the logic is necessarily wrong but "close combat" is just as descriptive as "infight" for the purposes of move distribution: you are getting up close (in) and fighting (combat).

They probably didn't use "infight" in localization because there's a greater connotation to that meaning fighting amongst others of your group in English ie: the band has a lot of infighting over what songs they do
 
I'm going to be honest and say this is mostly wish listing, but Corsola can't learn Charm. It's easy to assume it does because it's a cute pink Pokemeon, but it's not not cute and pink the same way Clefairy or Jigglypuff are. It'd probably raise more questions if Corsola learned Charm because Galaran Corsola got every TM Johto Corsola gets and I can't see a coral bleached ghost being able to learn Charm . It'd still make more sense than Charm Tyrantrum though. (I know Tyrantrum makes sense if you read Tyrunt's Pokedex entries.)

Why do so many pokemon based on marine life get Close Combat? It makes sense for Poliwrath and Grapploct etc, they are part-Fighting type, but these three?
:ss/(Barraskewda): :ss/(Crawdaunt): :ss/(Sharpedo):

When was the last time you got beaten up by a fish?

(Also kinda funny that the otherwise regal, composed Xerneas gets it)
Never played Dwarf Fortress? :P

There was a feature/glitch where anyone would get stronger from exercise by swimming. Anyone, including fish, and after a lifetime of swimming... The game's dev summed it up when he said, "I think I made the fish too hardcore."
 
Solar Beam, along with Ice Beam, Thunderbolt, and to a lesser extent Flamethrower, are what I like to call "yeah sure whatever" moves. All of them just kinda get slapped onto Pokemon without much rhyme or reason.
This was especially bad in the first gen, with oddities like Thunderbolt Raticate or Flamethrower Machamp. It has gotten better over the generations, but some strange cases happen from time to time (like Flamethrower Slurpuff).
 

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