Resource Simple Questions, Simple Answers Thread

Hi everyone! Just a quick question: I'm building a Team and for various reasons I would like to have a Future Sight user in it. Specifically one of the Slowbrothers.

Now I see a lot of people suggesting both Slowbro and Slowking but what's the biggest difference between the two? How do I chose one over the other for my team?
 

Zneon

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Hi everyone! Just a quick question: I'm building a Team and for various reasons I would like to have a Future Sight user in it. Specifically one of the Slowbrothers.

Now I see a lot of people suggesting both Slowbro and Slowking but what's the biggest difference between the two? How do I chose one over the other for my team?
Slowbro has great physical bulk while Slowking has great special bulk, they don't really differentiate that much when it comes to roles, so you can choose either depending on the team and if you are in need of a physical wall or special wall that can give Future Sight support.

With Landorus-I banned however, Slowbro is better than Slowking most of the time since the Pokemon it checks well are pretty prominent, such as Landorus-T, Garchomp, Blaziken, Melmetal and even Zygarde. Slowking is able to check stuff like Latios and Tapu Lele pretty well and previously it was able to check Landorus-I, however with that banned its lost a bit of effectiveness. Though again it really all depends on what you want to keep in check.

Hope this helped! :blobthumbsup:
 
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The usage threshold for pokemon to stay in a tier was raised at the start of this generation, which is understandable due to the lower amount of pokemon necessitating relatively smaller tiers. However, the threshold is still just as high, despite us having far more available pokemon. Is there a secondary reason for the higher threshold that I'm not realizing, or is this just a change in smogon's policy that will be permanent from now on?
 
What is the functional difference between banning Power Construct vs Gorilla Tactics (or Libero) from a tiering perspective?
Power Construct is just a conduit to allow a whole new Pokemon (Perfect Zygarde) into the meta. Gorilla Tactics and Libero are just good abilities. It's basically the same thing as Mega Evolutions. If the mega is better than the base form, and is thus either banned or placed in a higher tier, then the stone is banned from the lower tiers because it grants access to the higher-tiered Pokemon. On the other hand, if the mega is worse and lacks the usage to stay in a tier, it doesn't drop because doing so would necessitate the usage of the regular form (this is what happened to Zen Mode).
 
What is the functional difference between banning Power Construct vs Gorilla Tactics (or Libero) from a tiering perspective?
On Gorilla Tactics - Gorilla Tactics on its own didn't make Darminatan-Galar busted, but it was the combination of Darmanitan-Galar's already monstrous attack, movepool, and decent speed coupled with the ability that I presume led to the decision of ban of Darmanitan-Galar. On its own, Gorilla Tactics isn't a busted ability as it is outrightly a worse version of Pure Power and Huge Power (as those abilities double the user's attack and do not give its user a detriment). These factors deemed that Darmanitan-Galar was unhealthy, rather than the ability Gorilla Tactics.

Libero is just a strong ability and the combination of Cinderace's attack, speed, movepool, and the ability to tear through a lot of team archetypes in DLC 1 is what led to Cinderace being banned. Libero contributes towards the viability of Raboot in PU and it did not make Raboot busted in it. Overall, to put it, Libero on its own is not an unhealthy ability, rather the Pokemon as a whole was unhealthy for the metagame. I believe DrPumpkinz has covered Power Construct well enough.
 
Power Construct is just a conduit to allow a whole new Pokemon (Perfect Zygarde) into the meta. Gorilla Tactics and Libero are just good abilities. It's basically the same thing as Mega Evolutions. If the mega is better than the base form, and is thus either banned or placed in a higher tier, then the stone is banned from the lower tiers because it grants access to the higher-tiered Pokemon. On the other hand, if the mega is worse and lacks the usage to stay in a tier, it doesn't drop because doing so would necessitate the usage of the regular form (this is what happened to Zen Mode).
Imo it's just not consistent. Libero Ace is part of the mon. Gorilla Tactics Darm is part of the mon. So is power construct with Zygarde. It's not even analogous to Ash Greninja because Zyg can freely change between Power Construct and Aura Break, unlike battle bond which is it's own thing. Go reread the Ace suspect where people say ad nauseum "we tier mons, not parts of mons"... power construct seems to be an exception.
 
Imo it's just not consistent. Libero Ace is part of the mon. Gorilla Tactics Darm is part of the mon. So is power construct with Zygarde. It's not even analogous to Ash Greninja because Zyg can freely change between Power Construct and Aura Break, unlike battle bond which is it's own thing. Go reread the Ace suspect where people say ad nauseum "we tier mons, not parts of mons"... power construct seems to be an exception.
Consistent or not, that is the actual reason. The decision to tier megas separately back in Gen 6 set the precedent for in-battle form changes.
 
Imo it's just not consistent. Libero Ace is part of the mon. Gorilla Tactics Darm is part of the mon. So is power construct with Zygarde. It's not even analogous to Ash Greninja because Zyg can freely change between Power Construct and Aura Break, unlike battle bond which is it's own thing. Go reread the Ace suspect where people say ad nauseum "we tier mons, not parts of mons"... power construct seems to be an exception.
Look- Libero isn’t busted on Raboot down in PU, so we don’t ban that. Gorilla Tactics is directly worse than Huge/Pure Power- yet Azumarill and Diggersby aren’t banned because they aren’t busted in OU. But Smogon tries to stay away from complex bans- so they will not just ban the combos of Libero+Cinderace, GTactics+Darm. Zyg-C, on the other hand, is not only an entirely separate form, but one that is directly superior to the base form. Banning Power Construct is essentially banning Zygarde-Complete, a Pokémon of its own, while allowing Zen Darm or Blaze Ace down in OU is banning a part of the Pokémon- a part that isn’t broken (eg Raboot and Azumarill.) I can see where you’re coming from— but think of Power Construct as like a mega evo if it helps. It gets a new ability and better stats just like one, and those get tiered separate from their base forms.
 
How much speed should you at least hit on TankChomp? I wanna run a more defensive set, but I know you at least need some speed, but not sure what's best
 
How much speed should you at least hit on TankChomp? I wanna run a more defensive set, but I know you at least need some speed, but not sure what's best
I recommend running enough EVs to hit 254 speed, which is enough to outrun modest max speed Heatran.
 
I haven't touched competitive Pokemon in 2 generations, but now with DLC2, this generation looks interesting enough to get back into. I've always been a fan of Rain teams, and they seem pretty viable now after just glancing at some of the new Pokemon and moves like Barraskewda, Urshifu-Water, and Flip Turn.

Is there a basic template or sample for Rain teams post-DLC2, or is the meta still being worked out? I'd assume Pelipper, Barraskewda, and some Electric immune/resist like Thunderus-I or Ferro are essential, but outside of that, I know nothing. Crawdaunt looks viable, but I'm also extremely biased towards that guy.
 

Katy

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Is there a basic template or sample for Rain teams post-DLC2, or is the meta still being worked out?
Hello,

we don't have a Sample Team for Rain, but there clearly mons which fit together.
First of all:
:Pelipper: can summon the rain and has Damp Rock to further the rain turns from 5 to 8, which is pretty helpful.
:ferrothorn: can help with spreading entry hazards like Spikes / Stealth Rocks, is also a great answer to opposing rain mons and can check electric-types pretty well.
:barraskewda: with the Choice Band-Set with moves like Liquidation, Flip Turn, Crunch, Close Combat, Psychic Fang can work well as a very fast physical breaker.
:seismitoad: is a great Swift Swim abuser currently with moves like Sludge Wave, Focus Blast, Scald / Hydro Pump, and Earth Power. Which makes it a nice all-out-attacker.
:kingdra: with Choice Specs-Set and moves like Draco Meteor, Hydro Pump, Hurricane and Flip Turn offers a lot for rain teams, it is a very good special breaker.
:zapdos: Zapdos has access to Hurricane and Weather Ball now, can run therefore a set like Thunder, Hurricane, Weather Ball and Roost, with Heavy-Duty Boots as an item.
:Azumarill: albeit a niche mon, but after a Belly Drum and Priority in Aqua Jet can dish out a lot of damage to anything, which doesn't resist water well, It also has Knock Off and Play Rough in its Set.
:Swampert: can help as a true electric-immunity and can also spread entry hazards like Stealth Rock and can abuse Flip Turn as a slower way to give Momentum.
:Tapu koko: & :hawlucha: niche combination, but with Electric Seed, Hawlucha can profit from Tapu Koko + Tapu Koko can offer Momentum with U-Turn and is a great secondary Defog-Option, in case you run Pelipper with a Choice Specs-Set, rather than the Damp Rock-Set.
:Tornadus-therian: Gains Nasty Plot this Gen, which means, it can dent holes in opposing teams with an even stronger STAB-Hurricane, other move-options are Focus Blast to hit Heatran and Tyranitar for super effective damage. Furthermore Regenerator guarantees that it has some longevity to do its job throughout the game.

They could be used on Rain-Teams and also :Crawdaunt:, which you have already stated above.
Hope that helped.
 
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I haven't touched competitive Pokemon in 2 generations, but now with DLC2, this generation looks interesting enough to get back into. I've always been a fan of Rain teams, and they seem pretty viable now after just glancing at some of the new Pokemon and moves like Barraskewda, Urshifu-Water, and Flip Turn.

Is there a basic template or sample for Rain teams post-DLC2, or is the meta still being worked out? I'd assume Pelipper, Barraskewda, and some Electric immune/resist like Thunderus-I or Ferro are essential, but outside of that, I know nothing. Crawdaunt looks viable, but I'm also extremely biased towards that guy.
In addition to what Katy said, rain gained some new options in DLC2 with the return of Kabutops and Omastar. The latter is especially fun because it can run its normal Shell Smash set but with Power Herb + Meteor Beam to hit obscenely hard. Rapid Strike Urshifu is another solid option.

I think using Zapdos and/or Torn-T is important for every rain team because they help deal with Rillaboom, Tapu Bulu, and Kartana. Strongly recommend them.
 
Hey guys! Coming back since gen7, and didnt play any pre-dlc2 meta, so, I am not very familiarized with the current metagame.
Im always been fan of sand, so, I would like to know if there is some resources, templates or something to watch out when building a competitive sand team for this metagame?

Thank you :blobthumbsup:
 

ausma

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Hey guys! Coming back since gen7, and didnt play any pre-dlc2 meta, so, I am not very familiarized with the current metagame.
Im always been fan of sand, so, I would like to know if there is some resources, templates or something to watch out when building a competitive sand team for this metagame?

Thank you :blobthumbsup:
Hey, glad to have you here! The metagame's definitely shaken up quite a bit, especially with how different things are mechanically compared to Gen 7.

Sand cores have had a couple of noteworthy changes. I'll try to do my best to address everything as far as Sand goes to fill you in!

--
Setters


Hippowdon has taken the throne as the superior Sand setter. There are notable reasons for this, the primary ones of which being its physical bulk in tandem with its pure Ground typing, and incredible longevity with Slack Off. This allows for it to perform as a phenomenal physical wall, which puts a decent stop against many physical wallbreakers, such as Galarian Zapdos, Garchomp, Cinderace, Zygarde, and Melmetal (kind of?). It is a great Stealth Rock setter as well, since its bulk forces out many of these Pokemon, and it has access to moves such as Toxic and Whirlwind to avoid being treated as set up fodder. Hippowdon is also such an effective wall by itself in the metagame that it has facilitated Semi-Sand cores with Excadrill, which alone can be extremely devastating for offensively oriented teams. Hippowdon is definitely the better of the two in my eyes, and my go-to as far as Sand goes.


Tyranitar lost Pursuit coming into Gen 8, which has caused for its role to change somewhat into becoming more of a specially defensive Stealth Rock setter for Sand teams. Although it isn't as reliable as Hippowdon, it has a bit of a niche in this metagame still due to its typing, which augments its specially defensive attributes to take on Pokemon such as Heatran, Dragapult, and Non-Aura Sphere Latis while providing a Dark/Ghost-type resistance; consequently, it also makes a pretty good Stealth Rock setter. I also see its Ice-type neutrality to be fairly helpful as well as a failsafe against Kyurem Black, which Hippowdon doesn't fancy taking on. Tyranitar has a much harder time than it did in past generations, though, and in my eyes, it isn't as consistent as the other Sand setting option.

--
Abusers


Excadrill is as amazing of a Sand abuser as it's always been, and is an incredible win-con. It often runs Leftovers with Swords Dance / Earthquake / Iron Head / Rock Slide on Sand cores, sometimes slotting out Rock Slide for Rapid Spin due to the Speed buff and providing hazard removal. Excadrill, however, is hard walled by Physically Defensive Corviknight and Skarmory, which are able to either freely heal in front of it, pressure it with Body Press, clear hazards, and in Skarmory's case set a free hazard. Mandibuzz is also fairly annoying for it, but it can more feasibly be brute forced with boosted Iron Heads and Rock Slides, but Foul Play will blow Excadrill away if Mandibuzz is not already chipped. Excadrill, though, should not be underestimated, as it and Hippowdon alone form an amazing semi-Sand duo that pries apart many offensive archetypes.


Dracozolt is a very new, yet very welcome advent to Sand cores; the primary reason of which being its Electric-type STAB in the form of Bolt Beak, which can beat down almost every non-resist/immunity in the game with the speed boost allotted. It works fantastically with Excadrill since, unlike Excadrill, instead of being scared out by the aforementioned Flying-types, it preys upon them. However, Bolt Beak is more readily stopped by opposing Hippowdon, other Ground-types, and Ferrothorn, which has caused the development of a mixed LO set making use of Draco Meteor and special Fire-type coverage to break past these Pokemon. Although it's more readily checked than Excadrill, Dracozolt is a super fearsome cleaner that does work in this metagame if you're not prepared for it.

--
Glues


Mandibuzz works really well with Hippowdon Sand cores, providing a useful Ghost- and Dark-type resistance, reliable hazard removal, and a useful defensive pivot. Overcoat allows for it to avoid taking residual damage from Sandstorm, which can force it to Roost considerably less in the long term, which is important for maintaining momentum.


Amoonguss is pretty cool on Sand teams, spreading Spores, status, and annoying Water-type wallbreakers. It works a bit better with Tyranitar than Hippowdon due to weakness synergy, but it certainly works.


As far as Fairies go, I like Clefable the best on Sand teams, since it is impervious to Sandstorm chip damage, and it is able to provide Wishport support to Tyranitar and chipped wallbreakers that want as many breaking opportunities as possible. It also has cool utility, such as Knock Off and Thunder Wave, that's good at disrupting the opposition.

Anyway, I hope that helps! Sand is in a bit of an interesting place right now, but it's certainly viable, and I implore you to give it a shot. Thanks for asking!
 
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what's the best set for hex dragapult rn? I feel like the utility of dragon darts is diminished and a +speed full SpAtk set with draco is probably better than mild right?
 

ausma

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what's the best set for hex dragapult rn? I feel like the utility of dragon darts is diminished and a +speed full SpAtk set with draco is probably better than mild right?
Yep! I definitely quite like Special Dragapult a lot more in this metagame. Dragon Darts's main merit right now is cleaving past Substitute (namely from Zygarde) and Dragonite's Multiscale, but Draco Meteor hits a lot harder a lot more immediately, and since it hits on the Special side, it busts past the wider range of physically bulkier targets such as Hippowdon and Zygarde. Due to the induction of Spectrier and Tapu Koko into the metagame, Dragapult wants a positive nature again as well since its speed with a neutral nature doesn't cut it anymore, hitting 383 versus their 394.

Dragapult @ Heavy-Duty Boots / Leftovers / Spell Tag
Ability: Infiltrator
EVs: 252 SpA / 4 SpD / 252 Spe
Timid Nature
- Draco Meteor
- Hex
- Will-O-Wisp / Thunder Wave
- U-turn

Although I like Choice Specs better in this metagame for the immediate damage, this variant of Hex is probably what I would recommend the most. Depending on whether you want to pivot more, switch into attacks more, or deal more Hex damage, you have 3 primary item options between HDB, Leftovers, and Spell Tag respectively, and you are able to speed tie with opposing Dragapults that want a positive nature for the same reason. Depending on your need, you can run either Wisp or Thunder Wave, but I mostly recommend Will-O-Wisp, since you can punish most of the offense in the tier with it, and are able to punish Electric- and Ground-type targets without giving them a free switch-in on your status move. And, of course, U-turn is as helpful as ever for pivoting and getting momentum on Fairy-types such as Clefable and Magearna that check and switch-in freely on Dragapult.
 
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What specially defensive options are there right now? It seems like most bulky pokemon want to run a physically defensive set because of the abundance of physical threats. Right?
 
What specially defensive options are there right now? It seems like most bulky pokemon want to run a physically defensive set because of the abundance of physical threats. Right?
Well, Slowking is your go-to specially bulky water at the moment. Blissey of course is always a thing as well, and Ttar can do the deed as well. There are of course others, but those are the best.
 

ScalchopFren

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Aight so ya boi still hasn't touched ladder very much since the Crown Tundra drop but I'm curious: does anyone think it's worth running status on banded Melmetal as a last move? My thought was something like Bash (duh), Tpunch, any of Ice Punch/Superpower/EQ, and then either Toxic or Twave. The former would be to catch the occasional Hippo, while the latter would cripple any non-Drill Steels that try to swap in (i.e. Tran). I know banded Melm is generally more of the unga bunga only-clicks-bash type of mon, but it was just a thought I had. Might also just be better to run two of the moves I suggested in slot 3 idk
 

ScalchopFren

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Looking for the optimal spread on sand rush dracovolt mixed or purely physical.

Thanks in advance
Dracozolt @ Life Orb
Ability: Sand Rush
EVs: 108 Atk / 148 SpA / 252 Spe
Lonely Nature
- Bolt Beak
- Draco Meteor
- Fire Blast
- Earthquake

Ruft10/30/2020
The zolt SpA investment OHKOs Ferro with fire blast, KyuB with draco and 2HKOs Lando with subsesuent dracos
Offensive Lando that is
And physdef Ferro

If you're going pure physical there's probably no reason to not go max max
 

ausma

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Aight so ya boi still hasn't touched ladder very much since the Crown Tundra drop but I'm curious: does anyone think it's worth running status on banded Melmetal as a last move? My thought was something like Bash (duh), Tpunch, any of Ice Punch/Superpower/EQ, and then either Toxic or Twave. The former would be to catch the occasional Hippo, while the latter would cripple any non-Drill Steels that try to swap in (i.e. Tran). I know banded Melm is generally more of the unga bunga only-clicks-bash type of mon, but it was just a thought I had. Might also just be better to run two of the moves I suggested in slot 3 idk
I personally think that whenever Banded Melmetal is on the field, that it's going to want to take as many opportunities to attack as possible. I feel that you will want Superpower and Ice Punch slotted, especially since both let Melmetal perform much more consistently. The latter move is a necessity, as being able to have the ability to hit Zapdos harder and proc status less, Zygarde, and Garchomp while minimizing Rough Skin recoil is fairly important. Superpower or Earthquake I feel are both fine options in the last slot, but I think Superpower is preferable since it is able to pry apart Ferrothorn, which is a very promising switch-in due to Iron Barbs and being readily able to shrug off Melmetal's other options. The other problem is that any possible Toxic/TWave switch-ins are battered by Melmetal's other offensive options anyway, and the few Pokemon that can switch consistently into Melmetal are either immune to Toxic or can shrug off TWave to an extent.

While the idea is cool, I think Melmetal needs all of its moveslots to cover as many offensive bases as possible, and minimize potential switch-ins.
 
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The usage threshold for pokemon to stay in a tier was raised at the start of this generation, which is understandable due to the lower amount of pokemon necessitating relatively smaller tiers. However, the threshold is still just as high, despite us having far more available pokemon. Is there a secondary reason for the higher threshold that I'm not realizing, or is this just a change in smogon's policy that will be permanent from now on?
Bumping this question since it went unanswered and I am also curious.
 

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