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5th Gen Move/Ability/Item Updates Project - Read Post #265

Discussion in 'Archives' started by bugmaniacbob, Jun 5, 2011.

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  1. Lady Salamence

    Lady Salamence is a three-dimensional retard.
    is a Forum Moderator Alumnusis a Smogon Media Contributor Alumnusis a Contributor Alumnus

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  2. Zystral

    Zystral めんどくさい、な~
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    As agreed with Lady Salamence I'll do the Choice Items really quickly before getting back to the rest of the abilities.

    Choice Band (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    An item to be held by a Pokémon. This headband ups Attack, but allows the use of only one of its moves.

    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>The user gains a 50% increase to Attack, but can only use the first move selected until it switches out or has its Choice Band removed. If the Choice Band is replaced with another Choice Item, then the user will not be locked into their original choice. If the user is locked into a non-attacking move and is Taunted, they will Struggle. If a Pokemon obtains a Choice Item after using an attack, they will be locked into that attack.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Choice Band has had a huge impact on the game - many threats are now suddenly more dangerous because of increased attack strength right off the bat, as opposed to taking a turn to set up. However, the drawback of being able to only choose one attack is a severe one - the wrong move allows an opponent to switch in easily. It can transform fast, nobodies into serious threats, or slow powerhouses into battering rams. Although the drawbacks are difficult to work around, Choice Band still remains a fierce item for an offensive Pokemon. Removing Choice Band removes the boost.</p>

    <h2>Location</h2>
    <p>Battle Subway, 48BP.</p>


    Choice Scarf (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    An item to be held by a Pokémon. This scarf boosts Speed, but allows the use of only one of its moves.

    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>The user gains a 50% increase to Speed, but can only use the first move selected until it switches out or has its Choice Band removed. If the Choice Scarf is replaced with another Choice Item, then the user will not be locked into their original choice. If the user is locked into a non-attacking move and is Taunted, they will Struggle. If a Pokemon obtains a Choice Item after using an attack, they will be locked into that attack. Removing Choice Scarf removes the boost.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>In a metagame dominated by speed and power, Choice Scarf stands out as one of the top items. Granting an instant boost, it turns many slow powerhouses such as Metagross and Tyranitar into devastating sweepers, and can be thrown onto Pokemon such as Terrakion and Ditto to create the best revenge killers possible. Even being locked into a single attack isn't much of a worry for a revenge killer whose job it is to switch in, attack once, and switch out again. Choice Scarf is a great item to combine with Trick - being able to go amazingly fast and use Trick first, then throwing an item which cripples the opponent is a serious hindrance to their gameplan.</p>

    <h2>Location</h2>
    <p>Battle Subway, 48BP.</p>


    Choice Specs (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    An item to be held by a Pokémon. These distinctive glasses boost Sp. Atk but allow the use of only one of its moves.

    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>The user gains a 50% increase to Special Attack, but can only use the first move selected until it switches out or has its Choice Band removed. If the Choice Specs is replaced with another Choice Item, then the user will not be locked into their original choice. If the user is locked into a non-attacking move and is Taunted, they will Struggle. If a Pokemon obtains a Choice Item after using an attack, they will be locked into that attack. Removing Choice Specs removes the boost.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>The lesser used Choice item, Choice Specs is still a powerful tool in the right hands. There are less hard-hitting Special Attackers, and even less candidates for an instant boost, but the few Pokemon that can make effective use of Choice Specs do so with fearsome power. Hydreigon, Galvantula, and Chandelure, to name a few, become horrific sweepers with the power of wreck teams when played correctly. Hydreigon in particular with its base 125 Special Attack, STAB Draco Meteor boosted by Choice Specs makes a powerful shoutback to SpecsMence of DP. Even in Ubers and UU, the choices are less than for a Choice Band, but a well places Choice Specs can make all the difference between an OHKO and a 2HKO.</p>

    <h2>Location</h2>
    <p>Battle Subway, 48BP.</p>
  3. jc104

    jc104 Humblest person ever
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    Zy, I think you should make it clear that if you use trick in gen 5, and recieve another choice item, you are not locked into trick. Not sure whether this means that you are not locked in if you are the one recieving the trick, but this is regardless an important mechanic change that you might want to explain.
  4. TheMantyke

    TheMantyke ᴵ ᶰᵉᵉᵈ ᵃ ᵐᵒᶰˢᵗᵉʳ ᵗᵒ ᶜᶫᵒᵇᵇᵉʳ ᵗʰᵃᵗ ᵗʰᵉʳᵉ ᴷᶦʳᵇʸ
    is a Forum Moderatoris a Community Contributoris a Smogon Media Contributoris a Contributor to Smogonis a Team Rater Alumnus
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    I would like to try writing up the first 5 B attacks (Barrage through Belly Drum).

    Edit: I finished off Barrage so I'll leave it here in case there's anything I've done incorrectly.

    Barrage (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    Hits 2-5 times in one turn.

    [LONG DESC]
    <h2> Description</h2>
    <p> Barrage hits the opponent 2-5 times. There is a 37.5% chance for the move to hit 2 times, a 37.5% chance for the move to strike 3 times, a 12.5% chance for the attack to strike 4 times, and a 12.5% percent chance the attack will strike 5 times. If a Focus Sash or the ability Sturdy is activated through one of the hits of Barrage, another hit from Barrage will KO the target. Each hit of Barrage will activate the ability Weak Armor. If Barrage breaks a substitute, the attack can still continue and hurt the target.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Barrage is very poor attack over all. Even if all five hits land, it is still no more powerful then a base power 75 normal type attack. This coupled with mediocre 85% accuracy and its limited distribution to Exeggcute and Exeggutor makes Barrage a horrible attack with little to no competitive merit.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Fury Attack is a variation of this attack not exclusive to the Exeggutor Family but makes contact with the opponent.</p>
    <p>Tail Slap is a slighty more powerful version of this attack exclusive to the Cincinno Family.</p>


    Edit: Barrier and Baton Pass are finished. I'm not sure if I exactly did Baton Pass justice in a single paragraph describing its usefulness. I examined the research thread and the only notice of Baton Pass was the fact trapping moves can no longer be passed, so I simply added in all of the moves featured on Baton Pass's fourth gen move analysis sans the trapping move.

    Barrier (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    Boosts user's Defense by 2 stages.

    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Description </h2>
    <p>This move raises the Defense stat of the user by two stages. No other effect. </p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Defensive boost from Barrier and moves like it are rarely helpful in alleviating the user of its common checks or counters. However, Barrier does have some utility in Baton Pass teams in the form of Mr. Mime and Mew. Mr. Mime is often relied upon in a Baton Pass team to prevent Perish Song from ending the stat boosting spree prematurely. Mr. Mime has the option of setting up a Barrier after it has switched in, but the ability to Baton Pass Calm Mind boosts with Mr. Mime in conjunction with another teammate to boost Defense is generally a better idea. Mew on the other hand can utilize barrier with any number of its other boosting attacks to fill in blind spots on a Baton Pass team. Mew’s pure Psychic typing which grants a weakness to Pursuit and U-turn interferes with the effectiveness of setting up defensive boosts greatly, so the use of another Defense passing Pokémon like Scizor is generally a better idea. Overall, Barrier has a small niche with its Defense boosting abilities, but a very small and situational niche at that.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Acid Armor is a Poison-type equivalent with 33% more PP.</p>
    <p>Iron Defense is a Steel-type equivalent with half as much PP.</p>


    Baton Pass (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    User switches, but passes on all stat changes and some special conditions.

    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Description </h2>
    <p>The user switches with another Pok&eacute;mon on its team and passes along all stat changes and some special conditions which are listed below.</p>

    <p>The following are the only things that are Baton Passed:</p>

    <ul>
    <li>Aqua Ring</li>
    <li>Confusion</li>
    <li>Curse (when used by a Ghost on the Baton Passer)</li>
    <li>Embargo</li>
    <li>Focus Energy/Lansat Berry</li>
    <li>Gastro Acid</li>
    <li>Ingrain</li>
    <li>Leech Seed</li>
    <li>Lock-On</li>
    <li>Magnet Rise</li>
    <li>Mind Reader</li>
    <li>Perish Song's Count</li>
    <li>Power Trick</li>
    <li>Substitute (keeps its HP)</li>
    <li>Stat boosts / drops</li>
    </ul>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Baton Pass can completely make or break a game in just one move. Passing a stat along to a sweeper who would normally lack the means to boost its stats can have deadly consequences. For the most part, offensive boosts are Baton Passed out on teams not centered around the attack. Gorebyss and Huntail are infamous for being the only two Pokémon in existence (bar Smeargle) to Baton Pass Shell Smash. A Shell Smash Baton Pass to a teammate like Garchomp virtually seals the opponent’s fate. Venomoth, an all around mediocre Pokémon on paper, is saved from obscurity with its ability to put opponents to sleep with Sleep Powder and quickly Baton Pass a Quiver Dance. Mew can Baton Pass boosts of nearly any variety and can come in and pass repeatedly with its 100 / 100 / 100 Defenses and access to Roost. Some teams even use Baton Pass as the center piece of their composition, constantly boosting and passing to other teammates until the final pass to a nasty sweeper at full power. </p>


    Edit #2: Beat Up and Belly Drum are completed. Forgive any mistakes in grammar or spelling I've overlooked!

    Beat Up (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    All healthy Pokemon aid in damaging the target.

    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Description </h2>
    <p>Beat Up attacks the target 1 to 6 times, depending on the number of active Pokémon. The Base Power of Beat Up is determined by the Base Attack of the user divided by 10, + 5. Each individual hit has a chance to land a critical hit. Beat Up deals Dark damage and all hits will receive STAB if the user of the attack is Dark, regardless of the other team member’s types. Beat Up will trigger certain abilities, such as Weak Armor and Justified, multiple times. </p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Although Beat Up is a horrible move choice in the standard metagame, Beat Up has a very distinct niche in the VGC 2011 metagame. Beat Up forms the basis of the “TeraCott” combo: a Whimsicott attacks its Terakion partner with Beat Up raising Terakion’s Attack four stages via Justified (assuming no team members have fainted) while Terakion decimates the opponent with its STAB Rock Slide. The strategy is effective, but it’s usually well prepared for by confident VGC Players. Still, Beat Up’s ability to indirectly wipe out two opponents on the first turn of a double battle is fantastic.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p></p>


    Belly Drum (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    User loses 50% max HP. Maximizes Attack.

    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Description </h2>
    <p>Belly Drum causes the user to lose 50% of their HP in exchange for a maximized Attack stat. Belly Drum will always raise the users Attack to +6, even if the user’s attack boosts prior to using the attack were negative. Belly Drum will fail if the target has less then 50% of its HP in tact.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Belly Drum is the definition of a high risk, high reward strategy. Setting the stage for a Belly Drum sweep is immensely difficult, but the sweep is quick and simple when all the right preperations are made. Common users of Belly Drum include Charizard, the fastest Belly Drum sweeper, and Linoone, the only Belly Drum sweeper with access to STAB priority. Charizard’s usefulness as a Belly Drum user has faded since the introduction of Stealth Rocks, but proper Rapid Spin support can still allow an effective sweep. Linoone is gifted with Extremespeed as an event move. This allows Linoone to rack up massive damage before the opponent can even attack. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p> </p>



    -----

    I'd also like to try my hand at Attract through Avalanche if that's okay as well.

    Edit: Cookies are done.

    Attract (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    Targets of the opposite gender are infatuated and have a 50% chance to do nothing.

    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p> Targets of the opposite gender are infatuated and have a 50% chance to do nothing. This move will fail on targets of the same gender or targets that possess no gender. If the user has no gender, the move will fail. If the target possess the ability Oblivious, the move will fail.
    </p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p> Attract can be an infuriating status condition, but it rarely sees competitive use thanks to its inconsistencies. Any Pokémon with Attract is easily dealt with by a genderless Pokémon or a Pokémon of the same gender. Basing a team or set on Attract is risky; the number of Pokémon you’ll be able to infatuate vary heavily from match to match which could result in your Pokémon having a wasted move slot. Even if you successfully Attract your target, a simple switch on either side’s part will rid your foe of his infatuation.</p>

    Aura Sphere (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    Ignores accuracy modifiers.

    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>This move damages the target and ignores any Evasion or Accuracy Modifiers. Aura Sphere can hit adjacent targets in Triple battles</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Aura Sphere is a moderately powerful and reliable fighting type attack with very limited distribution. The perfect accuracy is a nice bonus, but the real allure of the move comes from its use as reliable Special coverage. Where most Special sweepers have to resort to the annoyingly inaccurate Focus Blast or the underpowered Hidden Power Fighting, Pokémon with access to Aura Sphere can attack away with no accuracy issues and few power complaints. Lucario is the move’s signature user and welcomes Aura Sphere on any of his Specially based sets. Togekiss is granted near perfect coverage with a combination of Aura Sphere and Air Slash. In the Uber tier, Mewtwo often carries Aura Sphere for the excellent coverage between Aura Sphere and Psystrike.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Focus Blast is a similar Fighting-type coverage move with much greater power and much lower accuracy.</p>

    Aurora Beam (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    10% chance to lower opponent's Attack by 1 stage.

    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>This move deals damage and has a 10% chance to lower the opponent’s attack. No additional effects.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Aurora beam’s measly 10% chance to lower the opponent’s attack hardly justifies the drop in power from Ice Beam. Aurora Beam should never be seriously considered for a move slot.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Ice Beam is a similar Ice-type attack with 25 greater base power and a chance to freeze the opponent.</p>
    <p>Bubblebeam is a Water-type equivalent with a 10% chance to lower the target’s Speed.</p>
    <p>Sludge is a Poison-type equivilant with a 30% chance to poison the target.</p>
    <p>Spark is an Electric-type equivalent with a 30% chance to paralyze the target.</p>
    <p>Psybeam is a Psychic-type equivalent with a 10% chance to confuse the target.</p>

    Autotomize (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    Boost's user's Speed by 2 stages. Halves user's weight.

    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p> Boost's user's Speed by 2 stages. Halves user's weight. The change in weight caused by this move cannot be transferred through the move Baton Pass.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Autotomize is essentially a slightly better version of the move Rock Polish. All Pokémon that learn Autotomize appreciate the reduction in weight to help them withstand the occasional Low Kick or Grass Knot. Autotomize should be used over Rock Polish whenever the opportunity presents itself unless your Pokémon is using the move Heavy Slam (which will have its power reduced thanks to the weight reduction).</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Rock Polish is a Rock-type equivalent without the weight reducing effect.</p>
    <p>Agility is a Psychic-type equivalent without the weight reducing effect.</p>

    Avalanche (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    Doubles in power if user is damaged by opponent first.

    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>Doubles in power if user is damaged by opponent first. This attack has a priority of -4</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Avalanche is used primarily as a helpful coverage attack on tanks that care little about Speed. Users of Curse like Swampert, Tyranitar, or the occasional Rhyperior will be able to deal massive damage to the target after a Curse as they’re nearly guaranteed to move last. Beyond this niche however, Avalanche is rarely seen. The move has lost its TM status which greatly hinders its distribution. Avalanche’s -4 priority is also somewhat unwelcomed as this prevents fast but frail sweepers from utilizing the move in a similar way to Payback. Still, Avalanche can prove itself to be very helpful if you find yourself with a slow attacker and an open move slot.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Revenge is a Fighting-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Payback is a Dark-type equivalent with slightly less power that lacks negative priority.</p>
  5. LouisCyphre

    LouisCyphre heralds disaster.

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    Reserving Exp. Share and Lucky Egg, since they're both closely related.

    e: Done! Here they are.
    Exp. Share (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    Holder gets a share of experience points even if it did not battle.

    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>The holder of an Exp. Share gets a share of experience in battle as though it had participated. The points are first split into a half-share for Pokémon who <i>actually</i> participated, and a half-share for Exp. Share holders. These halves are then divided up normally. This results in a larger proportional share for Exp. Share holders who actually entered battle.</p>

    <p>Exp. Share holders also gain a full amount of EVs, as though they had battled.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Exp. Share is the hold item of choice for initially leveling up a Pokémon, after EV training is complete but before it can hold its own in a fight. The typical routine is to put an Exp. Share holder in the sixth slot of the party and fighting a series of high-level opponents, such as the Elite Four or the trainers in the sports stadiums, using Pokémon you've already trained. As the trainee reaches a level where it can fight for itself against these higher-level opponents, consider switching to a Lucky Egg in order to allow the trainee to take the entirety of the Exp. Points for these fights.</p>

    <h2>Location</h2>
    <p>An Exp. Share can be won from the Castelia City Battle Company; another one can be received as a gift from the Pokémon Fan Club Chairman.</p>

    Lucky Egg (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    Holder receives 50% more Exp. Points from a battle.

    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>When held by a Pokémon who participated in battle, the Exp. Points awarded to that Pokémon are multiplied by 1.5.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>A Lucky Egg is the item of choice for training Pokémon of higher levels, who can fight for themselves against opponents with high Exp. Point yields, such as trainers. Unlike the Exp. Share, the Lucky Egg doesn't require splitting of Exp. Point awards, and is therefore the preferred option for most cases. However, if a Pokémon faints frequently against most opponents or is otherwise outmatched, it's best to give it an Exp. Share and allow a stronger Pokémon to do the legwork.</p>

    <h2>Location</h2>
    <p>A Lucky Egg is given to you by Professor Juniper in Chargestone Cave during the main story. They can be found using the ability Pickup, and the Treasure Hunter on Route 13 will sometimes yield Lucky Eggs.</p>


    Um...
  6. Zystral

    Zystral めんどくさい、な~
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    Thanks for that, Louis. Fsr I always think hydreigon is base 147.... What am I thinking of?
  7. LouisCyphre

    LouisCyphre heralds disaster.

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    No problem(?)

    I think I'll take Leftovers, Lum Berry, and Life Orb since they haven't been taken for some reason.


    e:DONE
    Leftovers (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    Restores 1/16 (6.25%) of the holder's HP at the end of each turn.

    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>The holder recovers 1/16 of their maximum HP at the end of each turn, rounded down. This healing occurs after damage from Sandstorm or Hail, but before damage from Poison, Burn, Nightmare, or Leech Seed.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Leftovers is the standard against which passive healing and damage is judged. The healing amounts to 1/4 of the HP cost of Substitute - a fact readily abused by savvy battlers. Leftovers is most often found on Pokémon that are trained for bulk. Generally, if a Pokémon is 2HKO'd more often than not, it is unsuitable for Leftovers.</p>

    <p>Leftovers most often finds itself in the hands of Substitute users, walls, tanks, and other persuasions on stall Pokémon. Often, a form of passive damage (typically Toxic or Will-O-Wisp) finds its way onto such Pokémons' movesets, along with Protect to gain a "free" turn of Leftovers recovery and passive damage. Just as often, though, users of Leftovers use the healing to aid in taking blows while they set up boosts; or attempt to break down foes with repeated unboosted attacks. If your Pokémon draws fights out longer, whether through Protect and Substitute or by virtue of its defensive stats, consider Leftovers for its held item.</p>

    <p><b>Note:</b> For all of its virtues, Leftovers is sorely outclassed in very fast-paced metagames, such as VGC, the Battle Subway, or Little Cup. Each of these environments has their own preference over Leftovers. In VGC, the Multi Battle Train, and the Double Battle Train in particular it's best eschew healing items over survivability items such as Focus Sash or a type-resistance berry. Even the Single Battle train prefers Sitrus Berry, as Pokémon rarely live much longer than four turns. Little Cup prefers Oran Berry; with such low HP counts, Leftovers will only heal 1 HP per turn and will take 10 turns to achieve the same recovery as an Oran Berry. Leftovers is best used in Single or Rotation battles that allow a full team of six Pokémon; any less and the stress on the remaining Pokémon to survive all threats calls for faster measures.

    <h2>Location</h2>
    <p>One set of Leftovers can be found in Village Bridge in a hidden trash can underneath the Bridge itself, and another can be obtained by trading for Munchlax in Undella Town during the summer. They can also be found by a very high-level Pickup user (minimum level of Lv. 81).</p>

    Lum Berry (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    Heals any major status effect (Poison, Toxic, Paralysis, Burn, Freeze, Sleep, or Confusion) from the user, but only once.

    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>When the holder is afflicted with Poison, Toxic Poison, Paralysis, Burn, Sleep, Confusion, or is Frozen while holding this item, they will immediately consume their Lum Berry to cure themselves of all major status conditions. Natural Gift will consume a held Lum Berry to become a 60 BP Flying attack.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Lum Berry can provide an excellent buffer for Pokémon that attract status attacks. Fast, frail sweepers are ruined by Paralysis; most physical attackers are crippled by Burn; and many bulkier checks and walls don't appreciate Toxic Poison or Sleep. All of these Pokémon enjoy the protection of a Lum Berry; as it allows them to switch in to such things as Breloom, Gengar, or Jirachi with impunity at least once. Pokémon that can set up on the turn they soak a status are especially good users of Lum Berry - this item allows Metagross to Agility on a Thunder Wave, for example.</p>

    <p>Users of moves such as Substitute, which blocks status; or Pokémon with status-curing abilities like Natural Cure or Shed Skin, will find Lum Berry redundant and often appreciate a healing, protective, or boosting item more. Users of Heal Bell or Aromatherapy can cure their own status abnormalties and those of their teamates; eliminating the need for a Lum Berry. Users of Rest - which cures HP and status - will prefer either a healing item, to space out their uses of Rest; or Chesto Berry, which cures Sleep specifically and will never be prematurely consumed by Paralysis or Poison.</p>

    <h2>Location</h2>
    <p>Several Lum Berries are given to you over the course of the main story. Additional Lum Berries can be obtained via the Pokémon Dream World.</p>

    Life Orb (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    Strengthens all attacks by 30%, but at a price of 10% of the user's HP each hit.

    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>Whenever a Pokémon holding a Life Orb successfully uses a damaging attack, that attack deals 1.3 times its normal damage, and the attacker loses 1/10 of their maximum HP. If the attack fails, adjusts HP instead of dealing damage, or if the holder's ability is Magic Guard, or if the holder's ability is Sheer Force and the attack was boosted by Sheer Force, then the holder takes no damage from Life Orb.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Life Orb is the standard in damage-boosting items - all damage-dealing attacks, regardless of type or category, receive the boost in damage that Life Orb provides. In most cases, it outclasses the type-boosting items (x1.2 boost to their type only) and category-boosting items (x1.1 boost to physical or special moves, respectively).</p>

    <p>As a boosting item, Life Orb receives competition from two sets of items: Choice items and Gems.</p>

    <p>Choice items, consisting of Choice Band, Choice Specs, and Choice Scarf, provide a 50% to the holder's Attack, Special Attack, or Speed, respectively; but restrict the holder to a single move of their choosing each time they enter battle. While weaker than Band or Specs, and while providing no Speed increase, Life Orb does allow the holder to change moves without switching out and back in. If the holder has wide neutral coverage in one or two moves, or is meant to inflict massive amounts of damage to a single opponent, a Choice item is preferred. Choice Scarf, in particular, is most often seen on revenge killers; while Choice Band and Choice Specs are for wallbreakers. Life Orb, when compared to Choice items, is for late-game sweepers who clean up weakened teams, and need no boost in Speed.</p>

    <p>Gems, on the other hand, come in types instead of categories. Each Gem provides a 50% boost to the damage of an attack of their type, and is then consumed. For example, Fire Gem increases the holder's first Fire attack each game to 1.5 times its normal strength, and then vanishes. Lures - Pokémon tooled to draw out and defeat their usual counters and checks - often employ Gems to lend bite to their surprise attacks. A Tyranitar might, for example, surprise its usual counter Skarmory with an Electric Gem Thunderbolt. Pokémon that want to lose their item, such as those with the ability Unburden or the move Acrobat, also often employ Gems to get a significant boost and then enjoy the benefit of a lost item. Life Orb, when compared to Gems, is much more consistent than a Gem - it is neither consumed on the first attack, nor is it keyed to any one type. Life Orb is by far the more useful item in most situations - Gems are called for only with very specific builds.</p>

    <p>If you have a fast and reasonably strong sweeper on your team that needs some added damage to score certain 2HKOs or OHKOs, or simply wants to trade longevity for killing power, look no further than Life Orb.</p>

    <h2>Location</h2>
    <p>Life Orbs can be bought from the Battle Subway for 48 Battle Points.</p>
  8. jc104

    jc104 Humblest person ever
    is a Contributor to Smogon

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    1,780
    Bite (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    30% chance to flinch opponent.

    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>Deals damage, and should the user move before the target, has a 30% chance to cause the opponent to flinch and lose the chance to attack.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Bite is too weak to be considered competitively useful barring a few special cases. Generally, Crunch, Night Slash and Payback are superior, physical Dark-type attacks. However, there are a few Pokemon that learn no better Dark-type attack, such as Mamoswine, and some Pokemon that may consider using this move in conjunction with Technician; Persian, for instance, though not common, can hit with 90 Base Power, and has the excellent Speed required to abuse Bite's 30% flinch rate. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Crunch is an 80 Base Power, physical Dark-type attack with a 10% chance to lower Defense.</p>
    <p>Night Slash is a 70 Base Power, physical Dark-type attack with a high critical hit rate.</p>

    Blast Burn (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    User cannot move next turn.

    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>This move deals damage. Provided the move hits, the user must recharge the following turn, and may not attack or switch.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Blast Burn has little by way of competitive merit. Though it may be the most powerful special Fire-type move available, tied with full-health Eruption, this move is outdamaged over two turns by other moves such as Flamethrower, Lava Plume, and Fire Blast. Most crucially, though, the recharge turn leaves the opponent to do whatever they wish, making the move a serious liability.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Hydro Cannon is a Water-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Hyper Beam is a Normal-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Frenzy Plant is a Grass-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Giga Impact is a physical, Normal-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Roar of Time is a Dragon-type equivalent.</p>

    Blaze Kick (open)

    [SHORT DESC] Has a high critical hit rate. 10% chance to burn the target.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>Deals damage, has a 10% chance to burn the target, and has a 12.5% chance for a critical hit instead of the usual 6.25%.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Blaze Kick is not exactly a bad move competitively, and yet is quite rarely seen. This is largely due to its poor distribution and imperfect accuracy. All of the fully evolved Pokemon that learn this move, Infernape, Blaziken, Lucario and Hitmonlee, can use it to reasonable effect, but mostly have better things to do. Blaziken and Infernape usually prefer to use the more powerful Flare Blitz, or attack on the special side with Fire Blast, and Lucario and Hitmonlee can find better coverage options, lacking STAB on the move. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Fire Punch is similar, but it has 75 Base Power and 100% accuracy, as well as a normal critical hit rate.</p>
    <p>Flare Blitz is similar, but it has 120 Base Power, 100% accuracy, and 1/3 recoil, as well as a normal critical hit rate.</p>

    Blizzard (open)

    [SHORT DESC] 10% chance to freeze opponent.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>Deals damage, and has a 10% chance to freeze the target. Accuracy is increased to 100% in hail.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Though Ice is an excellent attacking type, Blizzard is normally overlooked in favor of the far more accurate Ice Beam competitively. Blizzard should only really be used on a team featuring hail, since its accuracy is increased to 100%. Attackers such as Abomasnow and Kyurem can put a large dent in nearly anything with their STAB Blizzards; in fact there are some teams that are entirely based around spamming the move in hail, especially in doubles. One other Pokemon of note is Rotom-F, in that it is capable of learning Blizzard and not Ice Beam – though Rotom-F may have poor defensive typing, it receives excellent power and coverage from Blizzard, provided that it hits. Any other use of Blizzard outside of hail is not recommended. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Ice Beam is similar, but has 95 Base Power and is 100% accurate. </p>
    <p>Thunder is somewhat similar in that it has 120 Base Power, and 70% accuracy. However, it is an Electric-type move and instead its accuracy is raised in the rain.</p>
    <p>Hurricane is similar to Thunder, but is a Flying-type move.</p>



    Edit: thanks LouisCyphre for that correction regarding hurricane.

    Here are a few more.
  9. LouisCyphre

    LouisCyphre heralds disaster.

    Joined:
    May 10, 2010
    Messages:
    2,618
    Blizzard should mention relation to Hurricane, not Gale.

    I might do some more of these; ASB and offline things ate my time for a bit.

    e: oh hey bcb addressed me.

    No problem; I don't particularly mind losing the analysis sections on the training items, since it saves me the trouble of doing those if and when I get to the Power items.
  10. Lady Salamence

    Lady Salamence is a three-dimensional retard.
    is a Forum Moderator Alumnusis a Smogon Media Contributor Alumnusis a Contributor Alumnus

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2010
    Messages:
    3,781
    I'm going to have to unreserve whatever i reserved. Sorry.
  11. barry4ever

    barry4ever
    is a Forum Moderator Alumnusis a Contributor Alumnusis a Battle Server Moderator Alumnus

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2009
    Messages:
    877
    Doing all the 150 BP recharge turn moves, Bullshit moves for the win !

    Hydro Cannon (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    User cannot move next turn.

    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>Deals damage. Unless the move misses, the user cannot move or switch the subsequent turn after using Hydro Cannon.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Although, Hydro Cannon is incredibly powerful, it is usually passed over in favour of Surf or Hydro Pump due to the subsequent recharge turn which allows the opponent to do whatever they wish to such as setting up their favourite sweeper to KO. Since all the Pokemon which can learn Hydro Cannon can also learn Surf or Waterfall, it is not recommended to run Hydro Cannon in a competitive environment.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Blast Burn is a Fire-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Hyper Beam is a Normal-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Frenzy Plant is a Grass-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Giga Impact is a physical, Normal-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Roar of Time is a Dragon-type equivalent.</p>


    Hyper Beam (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    User cannot move next turn.

    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>The move deals damage. If it hits the foe, the user is prevented from moving or switching out the following turn.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Tying with Giga Impact as the third most powerful Normal-type move, Hyper Beam is mostly worthless in competitive battles. Firstly, the Normal-type has poor coverage in most tiers and secondly the recharge turn after using Hyper Beam leaves the user set up bait to every Pokemon out there. Hyper Beam is mostly a liability and should never be used for competitive battling.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Hydro Cannon is a Water-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Blast Burn is a Fire-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Frenzy Plant is a Grass-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Giga Impact is a physical, Normal-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Roar of Time is a Dragon-type equivalent.</p>


    Roar of Time (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    User cannot move next turn.

    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>Deals damage. If the move hits, then the user is unable to attack or switch out the next turn.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Roar of Time, though it sounds really cool and is the most powerful Dragon-type move in the game, has zero competitive value. The only Pokemon capable of learning Roar of Time is Dialga who has access to far better Dragon-type moves such Dragon Pulse and Draco Meteor. Unless you want to see the cool ingame animation or want to troll your opponent, Roar of Time should never be used.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Hydro Cannon is a Water-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Blast Burn is a Fire-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Frenzy Plant is a Grass-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Giga Impact is a physical, Normal-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Hyper Beam is a Normal-type equivalent.</p>


    Frenzy Plant (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    User cannot move next turn.

    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>Deals damage to the foe. Provided the move hits, the user is left incapable of moving or switching the next turn.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Frenzy Plant might be the strongest Grass-type move available but it is near useless for competitive battling. Grass has relatively shallow type coverage and the subsequent set up turn is a massive liability for any Pokemon using Frenzy Plant. As long as better offensive options such as Giga Drain, Leaf Storm and Energy Ball exist, Frenzy Plant will continue to remain a move with little competitive merit.</p>

    <h2>Related Abilities</h2>
    <p>Hydro Cannon is a Water-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Blast Burn is a Fire-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Roar of Time is a Dragon-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Giga Impact is a physical, Normal-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Hyper Beam is a Normal-type equivalent.</p>


    Giga Impact (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    User cannot move next turn.

    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>This move deals damage and leaves the user unable to move the following turn, provided the move hits.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Don't let the claim of being one of the most powerful physically based Normal-type move fool you, Giga Impact is a move never to be used in competitive battles. Other physical Normal-type moves such as Return and Body Slam easily outdamage Giga Impact over two turns and lack the crippling recharge turn. To sum it up, Giga Impact is crap competitively, don't use it.</p>

    <h2>Related Abilities</h2>
    <p>Hydro Cannon is a special Water-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Blast Burn is a special Fire-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Roar of Time is a special Dragon-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Frenzy Plant is a special Grass-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Hyper Beam is a special Normal-type equivalent.</p>
  12. kc4444

    kc4444

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2010
    Messages:
    94
    @Barry4ever
    Giga Impact and Hyperbeam are equal 3rd strongest normal-type attack. Self Destruct and Explosion are 2nd and 1st, respectively. And they are stronger physical attacks.
  13. jc104

    jc104 Humblest person ever
    is a Contributor to Smogon

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2009
    Messages:
    1,780
    Block (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    The target cannot switch out.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>Prevents the opponent from switching out, apart from through the use of Volt Switch, U-turn, and Baton Pass. This effect ends when either the user or the target faints, or the user switches out. Note that if the user then uses Baton Pass, the effect will now end.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Block is not a frequently seen move competitively. It can, however be effective in some cases, especially if combined with sleep moves. For example, Gastrodon can use Block + Yawn + Memento to give a completely free turn to a dangerous setup sweeper. This move could also see some use, for example, in Toxic stalling. Unfortunately, though this move can potentially offer free setup, this move can no longer be effectively used alongside Baton Pass. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Spider Web and Mean Look are identical.</p>

    Blue Flare (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    20% chance to burn opponent.

    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>Deals damage and has a 20% chance to burn the opponent.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>This move is almost certainly the best special Fire-type attack in the game, with excellent power, passable accuracy and no obvious drawback besides. Unfortunately, this move is restricted to Reshiram and Smeargle, and only the former is likely to cause significant damage with it. In combination with its Dragon-type STAB moves, Reshiram receives perfect neutral coverage with Blue Flare, and thanks to its excellent base 150 Special Attack, can leave a large dent in almost anything.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Fire Blast is similar, but has 120 Base Power and only a 10% burn chance.</p>
    <p>Flamethrower has 95 Base Power and a 10% burn chance, but also has 100% accuracy.</p>

    Body Slam (open)
    [SHORT DESC]

    [LONG DESC]
    30% chance to paralyze opponent.
    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p> Deals damage and has a 30% chance to paralyze opponent.</p>
    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Though an excellent move, Body Slam faces some competition from Return and Frustration competitively, as they have a superior Base Power and distribution. Where Body Slam is used, it will be for its useful paralysis rate. Most notably, Serene Grace Pokemon such as Jirachi and Togekiss can use this move to spread paralysis in a somewhat reliable manner, without having to watch out for Taunt, Substitute, or Pokemon immune to Thunder Wave. This then allows them to flinch the opponent to death with Iron Head or Air Slash. Slower, more defensive Pokemon such as Snorlax may also choose to use this over Return or Frustration, as the damage output is likely to be less critical than the chance for paralysis. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Return has 102 Base Power when the user is at maximum happiness, and no paralysis chance. Frustration is the same, but has 102 Base Power at minimum happiness.</p>

    Bolt Strike (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    20% chance to paralyze opponent.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>Deals damage and has a 20% chance to paralyze the opponent.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Bolt Strike is easily the best and most powerful physical Electric-type attack in the game. However, only Zekrom is capable of using it to any effect. Bolt Strike can do huge damage coming from Zekrom's 150 base Attack, and has excellent coverage with Zekrom's STAB Dragon-type attacks. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Weaker and more accurate physical Electric-type attacks include Volt Tackle, Wild Charge and ThunderPunch. None of these is a consideration for Zekrom.</p>

    Bone Club (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    10% chance to flinch opponent
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>Deals damage and has a 10% chance to flinch the target, should the user move first.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>This move should never be used competitively, due to its poor Base Power, low flinch chance and poor distribution; the move is learnt only by Cubone, Smeargle and Marowak, which, as well as being rare sights, would both prefer to use the more powerful Earthquake or Bonemerang.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Earthquake is a 100 Base Power, 100% accurate move with no added effect.</p>
    <p>Bonemerang hits twice with 50 Base Power, giving an effective 100 Base Power, but with the ability to break through Substitutes, Sturdy, and Focus Sash. This move has 90% accuracy.</p>

    Bone Rush (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    Hits 2-5 times in one turn
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>Has a 33.3% chance for the move to hit either 2 or 3 times, and a 16.6% chance to hit either 4 or 5 times. If a Focus Sash or the ability Sturdy is activated through one of the hits, another hit will KO the target. Each hit is treated as a separate attack, and thus abilities such as Weak Armor will activate for every hit taken, and every hit has a separate flinch rate if used with King's Rock or Stench, and a separate critical hit chance. Color Change will only activate on the last hit of the move. However, the items Life Orb and Metronome treat all the hits as a single attack. If this move breaks a Substitute, the attack can still continue and hurt the target. If the opponent holds a type-resistance Berry item, it will only affect the first hit of this move </p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Bone Rush should generally not be considered due to its poor Base Power and distribution. Even should this move hit 5 times it will be weaker than Earthquake and Bonemerang, which is the preferred move for hitting through Substitute as far as Marowak is concerned. The other two fully evolved Pokemon that learn the move, Lucario and Mandibuzz, can usually find better coverage options, though Mandibuzz does lack a better Ground-type attack.
    </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p> Earthquake is a 100 Base Power, 100% accurate move with no added effect.</p>

    Bonemerang (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    Hits 2 times in one turn
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>Deals damage and always hits twice unless the opponent is KOed by the first hit. Each hit is treated as a separate attack, and thus abilities such as Weak Armor will activate twice, and this move can KO through Focus Sash and Sturdy. If the first hit breaks a Substitute, the attack will continue to damage the target. Each hit has a separate flinch rate if used with King's Rock or Stench, and a separate critical hit chance. If the opponent holds a type-resistance Berry item, it will only affect the first hit of this move. However, the items Life Orb and Metronome treat both hits as a single attack, and colour change will only activate on the second hit of the move. </p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Bonemerang is a very decent move, though it is almost never seen as it is only learnt by Smeargle and the rare Marowak. Even then, Earthquake is generally preferred due to its superior accuracy, though Bonemerang is certainly useful for breaking through Substitutes, as well as Focus Sash and Sturdy.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p> Earthquake is a 100 Base Power, 100% accurate move with no added effect.</p>


    Bounce (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    User is made invulnerable for one turn, then hits the next turn. 30% chance to paralyze opponent.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>The user bounces up on the first turn, which makes it invulnerable to all attacks until its next move. The only exceptions to this are Thunder, Gust, and Twister, which hit with doubled power against foes in the air; Sky Uppercut; and any move following Lock-On or Mind Reader or involving the ability No Guard. On the second turn, this move does damage, and has a 30% chance to paralyse the target. This move can hit all opponents in triples.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>As with all two turn moves, this move is competitively risky; the move's poor accuracy does not help in this respect either, though the move does pack reasonable power and an excellent secondary effect. Generally this move should be used by only one Pokemon: Gyarados. Backed by STAB and Gyarados's excellent Attack stat, this move can do tremendous damage and has fantastic neutral coverage alongside Waterfall. Just remember, however, that should the opponent see Bounce coming, they can obtain a free switch or free setup with the user forced to stay in. Also, it should be remembered that Pokemon with Protect can easily take advantage of Bounce, though Gyarados can often deal with this through the use of Taunt.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Fly is similar, but with 90 Base Power, 95% accuracy and no paralysis chance.</p>

    Brave Bird (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    Has 1/3 recoil damage
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>This move does damage, and the user receives recoil damage equal to 1/3 of the damage dealt, rounded down.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Brave Bird is probably the best physical flying-type move in the game, with truly excellent Base Power and perfect accuracy. Flying-type moves also have fairly good neutral coverage across all metagames. This allows attackers such as Staraptor to hit incredibly hard, boosted by STAB and Reckless. Though the recoil may take its toll rather quickly, Brave Bird, in combination with Close Combat, may by that time have left huge holes in the opposing team. Other notable users include Skarmory, and Ho-Oh in Ubers.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Drill Peck has 80 Base Power and no added effect</p>
    <p>Acrobatics has a rather poor 55 Base Power, but this is increased to 110 when the user carries no item. Since this includes the turn when a Flying Gem is used, this move can compete with Brave Bird in terms of power, at least on the first turn that it is used. </p>

    Brick Break (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    Destroys Light Screen and Reflect, then hits. Does not break screens if target is immune.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>This move deals damage, and permanently moves the effects of Reflect and Light Screen unless the target is immune. This occurs before the damaged is done, so the move will not be weakened by Reflect.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Brick Break has suffered considerably in the fifth generation, as it is no longer the most powerful drawback-free physical Fighting-type move in the game. Drain Punch is now generally superior, as it has equal power but a far better secondary effect, and more powerful attacks such as Close Combat and Superpower are still more commonly seen. Brick Break may see some use, however, on Pokemon which do not learn a better Fighting-type move, such as Salamence, and on teams which greatly fear dual screens, particularly when combined with Baton Pass.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Drain Punch is similar, but instead of breaking through screens, the user recovers 50% of the damage dealt.</p>
    <p>Close Combat and Superpower have 120 Base Power, but have a serious drawback in that they lower two of the user's stats by one stage.</p>
    <p>Hammer Arm has 100 Base Power and 90% accuracy, but lowers the user's Speed by one stage.</p>
    <p>Hi-Jump Kick has 130 Base Power and 90% accuracy, but the user loses 50% of its health should the move not be successful.</p>



    Brine (open)
    [SHORT DESC]

    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>Deals damage, and has its base power doubled if the target's health is at 50% or less.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Brine may be exceedingly powerful when the opponent has less than 50% health, but generally the move will have a lower damage output than Surf and Hydro Pump. When the opponent is at less than 50% health, one of these moves would often KO, and should the opponent switch to a healthy Pokemon, Brine would likely do pathetic damage. However, there is certainly scope for its use on an inventive set; for example, a Walrein in Hail could use Super Fang in combination with Brine to take down opponents with a swift one-two punch, with no need for any attacking investment. However, it is recommended that you stick to more reliable moves.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Surf is similar, but with a consistent 95 Base Power. </p>
    <p>Hydro Pump has 120 Base Power and 80% accuracy.</p>

    Bubble (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    10% chance to lower opponent's Speed by 1 stage.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>Deals damage and has a 10% chance to lower the opponent's Speed stat by one stage.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Bubble is much too weak to be worthy of competitive use. Bubblebeam is 100% superior, barring PP, and even then almost everything would prefer to use Surf or Hydro Pump due to their superior power.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Bubblebeam is similar, but with 65 Base Power.</p>
    <p>Surf has 95 Base Power and no added effect.</p>
    <p>Hydro Pump has 120 Base Power, 80% accuracy and no secondary effect.</p>

    Bubblebeam (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    10% chance to lower opponent's Speed by 1 stage.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>Deals damage and has a 10% chance to lower the opponent's Speed stat by one stage.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Bubblebeam should generally not be used competitively, as its Base Power is much lower than those of Surf and Hydro Pump, and its secondary effect is neither likely nor especially useful.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Surf has 95 Base Power and no added effect.</p>
    <p>Hydro Pump has 120 Base Power, 80% accuracy and no secondary effect.</p>

    Bug Bite (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    User steals the effect of the foe's Berry.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>Deals damage. Should the opponent be holding a Berry, the user steals this and immediately consumes it; if applicable, the user will experience the Berry's effect, for instance, recovering itself from status with a Lum Berry. </p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Bug Bite may not appear an especially useful move at first, but this move certainly finds it niche. Most notably, when boosted by Technician, this is Scizor's most powerful Bug-type attack, and hence finds its way onto most Swords Dance sets. Additionally, this move is useful in Little Cup, as even though Oran Berry usage has decreased this generation, Berries are still highly common, and so this move's secondary effect becomes crucial. Otherwise, this move is entirely outclassed by X-Scissor and Megahorn. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>X-Scissor has 80 Base Power and no added effect.</p>
    <p>Megahorn has 120 Base Power, 85% accuracy and no secondary effect.</p>


    Bug Buzz (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    10% chance to lower opponent's Special Defense by 1 stage.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>Deals damage and has a 10% chance to lower the target's Special Defense by on stage.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Bug Buzz is the premier special Bug-type move in the game; otherwise, only Signal Beam is seen, and this is merely on Pokemon who do not learn the move. Though its Base Power is not exceptional, the move is powerful enough with STAB to allow special attackers such as Yanmega and Volcarona to wreak havoc. Notably, Yanmega and Venomoth can use the move alongside Tinted Lens, giving the move excellent coverage on its own. Altogether, though most of the Pokemon which learn Bug Buzz are weak, every single one gets STAB on the move, and as such Bug Buzz will be frequently seen on any with a passable Special Attack stat.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Signal Beam has 75 Base Power, and a 10% chance to confuse the opponent.</p>

    Bulk Up (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    Boosts user's Attack and Defense by 1 stage
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>Boosts user's Attack and Defense stats by one stage.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Bulk Up has become increasingly common this generation, and this is largely because of the arrival of excellent new abusers, as well as the buff to Drain Punch. Generally, the idea is to boost the weaker defensive stat, making your Pokemon very bulky on both sides, but also providing an offensive presence, rather than merely waiting for the opponent to get a critical hit. Any Fighting-type Pokemon with decent Special Defense can become very difficult to take down after having used Bulk Up, especially with Drain Punch for recovery and priority moves for faster, frailer, and more powerful opponents. Examples include Conkeldurr, Scrafty, Gallade and Toxicroak. Though there is no particular reason to suppose that Fighting-types are automatically the best users of the move other than STAB on Drain Punch, Bulk Up is distributed largely among Fighting-types, and at current there are few other viable users outside of Ubers, where Bulk Up Dialga and Palkia are occasionally seen. Indeed, there are certainly viable users of Curse, a move which should be seen as generally inferior.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Curse is similar, but also lowers Speed by one stage, making it generally inferior.</p>
    <p>Coil is similar, but also raises accuracy by one stage, making it absolutely superior.</p>
    <p>Calm Mind boosts Special Attack and Special Defense, but can work in an altogether similar manner.</p>
    <p>Swords Dance provides a more offensive option, boosting attack by two stages.</p>

    Bulldoze (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    Lowers target's Speed by one stage.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>Deals damage, and, should it connect, will always lower the target's Speed by one stage.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Bulldoze is generally too weak to be considered for competitive use, with Earthquake, a well-distributed more, providing a much more powerful alternative. However, there is the odd Pokemon which does not learn Earthquake and struggles against Pokemon with a 4x Ground-type weakness, for example Ferrothorn, which can use the move to hit Heatran and Magnezone. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Low Sweep is a Fighting-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Glaciate is a special Ice-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Mud Shot is a weaker, special equivalent.</p>
    <p>Rock Tomb is a weaker, less accurate Rock-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Icy Wind is a weaker, special Ice-type equivalent.</p>

    Bullet Punch (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    The user always attacks first.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>Deals damage and has +1 priority.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Though Bullet Punch may be relatively weak and may have fairly poor coverage, but it is one of the most common priority moves in the game. Largely, this is due to Scizor, which packs an excellent Attack stat, Technician and STAB on the move. With a Choice Band equipped, Scizor can easily revenge kill Pokemon weak to the move, as well as opponents that have been sufficiently worn down. Threatening with Bullet Punch, Scizor can often steal the momentum with a powerful U-turn. Scizor can also use the move to sweep with a Swords Dance set. Otherwise, Bullet punch is generally a weak move, only Metagross and perhaps Hitmontop achieving any notable power with it, but may be considered on Pokemon like Machamp and Hariyama, to pick off heavily weakened foes such as those which have hung on with a Focus Sash.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Quick Attack is a Normal-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Mach Punch is a Fighting-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Ice Shard is an Ice-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Aqua Jet is a Water-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Shadow Sneak is a Ghost-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Vacuum Wave is a special Fighting-type equivalent.</p>

    Bullet Seed (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    Hits 2-5 times in one turn
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>Has a 1/3 chance to hit either 2 or 3 times, and a 1/6 chance to hit either 4 or 5 times. Generally, each hit is considered a separate attack; each hit has its own critical hit rate, each hit will separately activate abilities like Weak Armor, and each hit has its own flinch rate with King's Rock or Stench. Similarly, if one hit from the move breaks a Substitute or leads to the consumption of a type-resist berry, damage will continue to be dealt to the opponent as normal. This move can KO through Focus Sash and Sturdy. However, it should be noted that Colour Change and the items Life Orb and Metronome treat this as a single attack.</p>
    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>With a considerable power buff this generation, Bullet Seed may eventually see some competitive use. Though it is on average weaker than Seed Bomb, Power Whip, and Leaf Blade the abilities Technician and Skill link change this, making it the primary choice. However, the only user with either of these abilities released is Cinccino, which has access to Skill Link along with several other multi-hit moves. Dream World Cinccino and Breloom, which have Technician, are unreleased, but Breloom would certainly be a major force with this move. Otherwise, this move has a niche use in hitting through Substitutes and Focus Sashes, but is otherwise not especially useful. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Icicle Spear is an Ice-type equivalent</p>
    <p>Rock Blast is a 90% accurate Rock-type equivalent</p>
    <p>Bone Rush is a 90% accurate Ground-type equivalent</p>
    <p>Tail Slap is an 85% accurate Normal-type equivalent</p>


    Calm Mind (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    Boosts user's Special Attack and Special Defense by 1 stage.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>Boosts user's Special Attack and Special Defense by one stage each.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Calm Mind is a move that is frequently seen competitively; this is largely because it is the best well-distributed move with which to boost Special Attack, Nasty Plot and Quiver Dance being somewhat poorly distributed. Calm Mind's defensive boosts offer an opportunity to set up on a plethora of special attackers, and can make a Pokemon with heavy investment in physical Defense very hard to take down. Reuniclus, Latias, Latios and Virizion are examples of Calm Mind users; Reuniclus and Latias are generally more defensive, while Latios generally uses the offensive boost to hit hard rather than trying to set up numerous Calm Minds. Notably, Calm Mind is seen often enough that one can often find oneself in a "Calm Mind war;" usually the Pokemon to win will be that which gets a critical hit first, though one can certainly tip the odds in one's favour through the use of Psyshock or Roar. Overall, Calm Mind users can be extremely dangerous, especially if they are the last Pokemon on the team and as such cannot be phazed. Every team that is somewhat defensively inclined must find a way of dealing with them. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Quiver Dance is similar, but also boosts Speed, making it superior.</p>
    <p>Nasty Plot boosts Special Attack by two stages.</p>
    <p>Tail Glow boosts Special Attack by three stages.</p>
    <p>Bulk Up boosts Attack and Defense instead, but can work in a similar manner to Calm Mind.</p>


    Camouflage (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    Changes user's type based on terrain.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>The user changes its typing to one of the following pure types, according to the terrain as following. Note that in Wifi Camouflage will change the user into a Ground-type.</p>
    <ul>
    <li><b>Building/Path: </b> Normal</li>
    <li><b>Sand: </b> Ground</li>
    <li><b>Grass: </b> Grass</li>
    <li><b>Cave/Rock: </b> Rock</li>
    <li><b>Snow/Ice: </b> Ice</li>
    <li><b>Water:</b> Water</li>
    <li><b>Puddles: </b> Ground </li>
    </ul>
    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Competitively, Camouflage will always convert the user to the Ground-type. This may have some advantages, for example Starmie avoiding an Electric-type attack, but generally there are better ways to spend a turn setting up. After all, you could just use a Ground-type to begin with. Additionally, this move is very poorly distributed; none of the Pokemon that learn this move are especially bulky and none gain any real attacking prowess through changing to the Ground-type. Therefore, though this move may have just a little bit of potential, it should definitely not see any use competitively. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Conversion changes the user's type to that of one of its moves</p>
    <p>Conversion2 changes the user's type to a random type which resists the last move used by the target.</p>
    <p>Reflect Type changes the user's type to that of the target.</p>


    I'm completely clueless when it comes to this html business, so someone may want to check I did the list right for Camouflage.

    Captivate (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    Lowers an opposite gender foe's Special Attack by 2 stages.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>If the target is of the opposite gender to the user, the target's Special Attack stat is lowered by 2 stages. Will fail if either Pokemon is genderless, or if the target has the ability Oblivious.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Using Captivate competitively is certainly not recommended; the attack is neither reliable nor rewarding. Though the majority of Pokemon used on simulators are male, and as such Captivate may succeed more often than not when used by a female Pokemon, the move will still fail against the common genderless Pokemon, as well as opponents who take care to use female Pokemon. Also, as previously mentioned, this attack is not especially effective even when it succeeds, since the opponent can simply switch out, negating the Special Attack drops.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Attract is similar in that it affects foes of the opposite gender, but instead prevents them from attacking 50% of the time.</p>

    Charge (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    Doubles power of an Electric-type move used next turn. Boosts user's Special Defense by 1 stage.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>Boosts the users Special Defense stat by one stage. If the user uses a damaging Electric-type attack next turn, the damage will be doubled.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Generally, Charge is not an especially effective move. Though the Special Defense boost may be somewhat useful, an Electric-type attack on the following turn will be telegraphed and can be easily dealt with in a variety of ways. Generally, if applicable, it is best to use a move such as Calm Mind to boost both offensively and defensively, rather than restricting the offensive boost to one attacking type on one turn.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Calm mind seems an obvious alternative, boosting both Special Defense and Special Attack by one stage.</p>
    <p>Amnesia boosts Special Defense by two stages.</p>


    Charge Beam (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    [LONG DESC]
    70% chance to boost user's Special Attack by 1 stage.
    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>Deals damage, and provided the move hits, there is a 70% that the users Special Attack will be boosted by one stage.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Charge Beam is not an especially reliable way of boosting Special Attack, and is not likely to do significant damage in most circumstances, but this move is seen on occasion. Notably, this move can be used on Pokemon with no better way of boosting Special Attack, such as Magnezone, which can easily Substitute and Charge Beam up on a hapless Steel-type. Also, it can be used on Pokemon such as Jolteon as something of a filler move, to finish off heavily weakened opponents while boosting Special Attack. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Work Up, Calm Mind, Nasty Plot, Tail Glow, Quiver Dance and Growth are more reliable moves for boosting Special Attack, though none does damage.</p>
    <p>Flame Charge is somewhat similar, but is a physical Fire-type move with 100% accuracy, raising Speed 100% of the time.</p>

    Charm (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    Lowers target's Attack by 2 stages.
    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p> Lowers target's Attack by 2 stages.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Competitively, lowering the opponent's stats has never been an effective strategy, as the opponent can freely switch out to negate all of your work. Therefore, Charm is a very rare sight, and should only be used on a Pokemon with recovery, decent Special Defense and significant entry hazard support; Charm can be effective in forcing switches. Generally, though, it is a better idea if possible to boost your Pokemon's Defense stat, since this cannot be easily negated by the opponent switching.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Bulk Up, Barrier, Iron Defense, Cosmic Power, Stockpile, Coil, and Reflect are good moves with which to lower the damage done to your Pokemon by physical attacks. .</p>
    <p>Featherdance is an equivalent with lower PP.</p>

    Chatter (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    Confuses the target.
    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>The player may record a sound using the microphone, which will play during the attack. Deals damage, and, depending on the recording, has a 1%, 11% or 31% chance to confuse the opponent, provided the user of the move is Chatot. Can hit all opponents in triple battles.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Being truly exclusive to Chatot, a Pokemon with generally poor stats, this move is very rarely seen. Also, the move itself is not particularly powerful, and though its secondary effect is useful, it is hardly game-breaking. Therefore, even if you have an irresistible urge to use Chatot for some reason, it is probably best that you decline to use Chatter, and instead opt for the more powerful Hyper Voice alongside coverage moves such as Heat Wave and Hidden Power.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Hurricane has 120 Base Power and its confusion rate is fixed at 30%. It has 70% accuracy except for in the rain where its accuracy is perfect. </p>

    BMB I think you are going to need to split your posts a bit more lol.
  14. Romeert

    Romeert

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2011
    Messages:
    368
    I'd like to reserve Chip Away to Close Combat, please!
    Chip Away (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    Not affected by opponent's stat changes.

    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p> This move is unaffected by the opponent’s Defense and Evasion boosts. It does not bypass Reflect.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p> Since Defense boosting moves are not that common, and Evasion boosts are banned, Return is usually a better option, as it’s more powerful. It can be used for more damage against Bulk Up and Curse users, however, such as Conkeldurr. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p> Return is a more powerful option, but it doesn't ignore Defense or Evasion boosts.</p>
    <p> Frustration is a more powerful option, but it doesn't ignore Defense or Evasion boosts.</p>
    Circle Throw (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    Forces the target to switch to a random Pokémon.

    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p> This move deals damage and then forces the target out, dragging out another random Pokemon on the opponent's team. This effect will not work if the opponent's Pokemon is the last one on their team. Circle Throw has a move priority of -6. </p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Circle Throw acts like Roar and a damaging move mixed together. Its main advantage over other phazing move is that it is able to work even under Taunt. It's a good option for mono-attacking sets, to avoid being phazed out. Keep in mind, however, that has negative priority like Roar and Whirlwind.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Dragon Tail is a Dragon-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Roar is a Normal-type equivalent, but does not deal damage.</p>
    <p>Whirlwind is a Normal-type equivalent, but does not deal damage.</p>
    Clamp (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    Traps and damages over multiple turns.

    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p> This move traps the opponent for 4-5 turns, dealing 1/16 of the target’s health at the end of each of those turns and preventing the target from switching If the user is holding a Grip Claw, it traps the opponent for 5 turns all the time. If a trapped Pokémon uses Rapid Spin, it will be freed. </p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p> It can be used with Toxic to slowly stall opponents, and to keep them from switching and resetting the Toxic damage, although the Pokémon that learn it are much better offensively than defensively. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p> Sand Tomb is a Ground –type equivalent </p>
    <p> Whirlpool is a Special equivalent </p>
    <p> Fire Spin is a Special Fire-type equivalent </p>
    Clear Smog (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    Eliminates all stat changes.

    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p> This move resets all stat changes to 0. This effect will not work if the target is unaffected by the attack or if the opponent is behind a Substitute.
    </p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p> This move can be very useful at stopping Baton Pass Chains, since it cannot be taunted, unlike Haze or Taunt. It can’t, however, go through Substitutes, which should be taken into consideration. Another thing is that it doesn’t affect Poison or Steel types. That isn’t a big deal for the most part, but it stops you from getting rid of Scizor’s Swords Dance boosts. Clear Smog also helps against Conkeldurrs and Reunicluses that try to boost their stats. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p> Haze is a non-damage dealing, Ice-type equivalent. </p>
    Close Combat (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    Lowers user's Defense and Special Defense by 1 stage.

    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p> This move lowers the user’s Defense and Special Defense by one Stage. </p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p> Close Combat is used quite a bit, since it has a very powerful 120 base attack and it's amazing Fighting type coverage. It does lower both of the user’s defense stats by one stage, but most users of it are frail anyway, along with being fast. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p> Super Power is an equivalent move that lowers the users Attack instead of the user’s Special Defense. </p>


    If anything has to be changed, please let me know!
  15. Oglemi

    Oglemi it's me heysup's gay friend, the legendary gaysup
    is a Tournament Directoris a member of the Site Staffis a Super Moderatoris a Community Contributoris a Pokemon Researcheris a Smogon Media Contributoris a Contributor to Smogonis a Tiering Contributor Alumnus
    C&C Leader

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2009
    Messages:
    8,243
    Hey bmb, so I was working on uploading the HGSS items to the DP item list, and I noticed that some of the items had a <h2>Description</h2> tag and some didn't. So me and few of the mods were talking irc, and we decided that that looked better than leaving it blank. We also decided that instead of calling it Overview, we'd call it Competitive Use. So basically for Items the list should look like

    [SHORT DESC]

    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Description</h2>

    <h2>Competitive Use</h2>

    Sorry for any inconvenience bmb, but we felt this looked better. I'm going to be going through all the items to make sure they use this format, so anybody who has a badge can help me in this endeavor.
  16. AccidentalGreed

    AccidentalGreed HOMERUN, CABRONES
    is a Forum Moderatoris a Contributor to Smogon
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2009
    Messages:
    2,620
    I'll play.

    Fire Blast (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    10% chance to burn opponent.

    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>This move deals damage and has a 10% chance to burn the target. No other effect.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Fire Blast is a reasonably strong offensive option for Pokemon requiring power and good coverage in one move. It is often seen competitively because of its utility and widespread distribution amongst many Pokemon outside of Fire-types, mainly most Dragon-types and some odd choices like Slowbro. Unlike other moves with a base power of 120, all of which have even lower accuracy, Fire Blast also has an adequate 85% chance of hitting the opponent, which is a fair trade off considering Flamethrower, another similar move, has perfect accuracy, yet less power. Its use is most effective on offensive and defensive Pokemon needing a way to dispose of Grass- and Steel-type Pokemon not named Heatran, the main targets today being Ferrothorn and Scizor.</p>

    <p>When choosing a Fire-type attack, consider that there are other attacks outside of Fire Blast that have their own uses, mainly Flamethrower's perfect accuracy or Overheat's immediately more useful base power. Choose which will fit your Pokemon's role on the team.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Lava Plume is less powerful than Fire Blast, but it has a higher chance to burn the target.</p>
    <p>Flamethrower is a less powerful, yet more accurate version of Fire Blast; it also has fewer PP.</p>
    <p>Overheat is even more powerful, but it decreases the user's Special Attack by two stages after use.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Thunder is an Electric-type equivalent, but with a chance to paralyze and less accuracy.</p>
    <p>Blizzard is an Ice-type equivalent, but with a chance to freeze and less accuracy.</p>
    <p>Focus Blast a Fighting-type equivalent, but with a chance to lower the opponent's Special Defense and less accuracy.</p>
    <p>Hydro Pump is a Water-type equivalent, but does not have an effect.</p>
    <p>Gunk Shot is a Poison-type equivalent, though physical and less accurate.</p>
    <p>Hurricane is a Flying-type equivalent, but with a chance of inducing confusion and less accuracy.</p>
  17. black_cotton

    black_cotton

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2010
    Messages:
    460
    So, considering Lady Salamence unreserved her entry I would like to take the rest of HM's and do it myself.
    This are their descriptions as a move, the description of the actual item can ( will) be done later probably on my next post.

    Since bmb let me I decided to make a few nitpicks and expand some of her previous descriptions and some formatting, general lines her ideas are still there.
    If someone don't agree with them or have any doubt you can look her original entry, anyhow, I'll credit her for doing the first four like a co-author: post

    Cut
    Show Hide

    [SHORT DESC]
    No additional effect.
    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>It simply deals damage. It also has a overworld effect that makes you
    able to cut down small trees, as long as one of your Pokemon knows Cut.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Not your first choice for a move. While this move is very prominent on the real game, it is almost never seen in competitive battles. Aside from that 1 guy laddering with a Raticate that knows Cut, do not expect anybody to be 2HKOing your bog Physical wall with Cut.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>A lot of the Normal-type moves outclass this, the most obvious being Return/Frustration. And the sad fact is, if a Pokemon can learn Cut, it can also learn a Normal-type move that outclasses it.</p>
    <p>Depending the levels of happiness Return or Frustration are excellent alternatives.<p>


    Fly
    Show Hide

    [SHORT DESC]
    User is made invulnerable for one turn, then hits the next turn.
    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>User enters "Fly" status for the round it is used, becoming invincible to basically everything.The next turn, the user flies down, hitting the opponent. Note that is still hitted by Sky Uppercut, Thunder, Gust and Twister. The latter having the double Base power when the target is on the fly turn, the others retain their normal Base Power and accuracy. It will still take Sandstorm and Hail damage on the fly turn. Finally, Whirlwind still works while the opponent is flying up high. Has an overworld effect that lets the user fly to any PokeCenter already visited.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    One of the more under-appreciated moves. It's basically Protect for the first round, and then attacks on the second. The main downfall of the move is the protecting part. Because if you try to use it against something weak to it, nothing stops your opponent for simply switching out to a resist or an counter safely.
    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Brave Bird is a slightly more powerful move, with recoil.
    <p>Aerial Ace is a perfectly accurate move with less power.<p>
    <p>Bounce is a equivalent and albeit it has less power and accuracy, it comes with a 30% chance of paralysis.</p>


    Surf is already done.

    Strength
    Show Hide
    [SHORT DESC]
    No additional effect.
    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>It simply deals damage. It also has a overworld effect that makes you
    able to move big boulders, as long as one of your Pokemon knows Strength.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Just like Cut, this move should not be your first choice on a competitive team. A lot of moves outclass Strength, and should be considered before it. Once more, there is no real reason to not use Return or Frustration in that slot since they have considerable more power.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>There are too many similar moves to say, but some moves with the same power and accuracy are Hyper Fang, Razor Wind and Tri Attack.</p>
    <p>Depending the levels of happiness Return or Frustration are excellent alternatives.<p>


    From now on, my descriptions will start from the scratch.
    Waterfall (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    20% chance to flinch the opponent.
    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>This move does damage and has a 20% chance to flinch the target. It also has an overworld effect that makes you climb waterfalls.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Waterfall falls into very selective category: it's a Physical Water-type move. Being one of the best of it, thanks to the healthy 80 Base Power, flawless accuracy and large distribution, is worth noting the 20% Flinch chance isn't bad at all. For that reasons it has been a staple for Physical Water Pokemon like Gyarados, Kingdra, Kabutops and Azumarill since the D/P era. Is mostly used on offensive sets that can't afford that unlucky miss on most crucial times. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Aqua Tail is a slighty more powerful option that comes with a imperfect 90% accuracy.</p>
    <p>Crabhammer also a little more powerful alternative, but with a bad accuracy (85%) and poor distribution.</p>


    Dive (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    User is made invunerable for one turn, then hits the next.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>User dives underwater on the first turn, where it dodges every move except Surf and Whirlpool, which will do double damage, and attacks on the next turn. It will also take damage if it was previously locked by Mind Reader or Lock-on. It's worth saying that the user does not take Sandstorm or Hail damage while underwater. It also has an overworld effect that lets you dive on black patched water parts.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>The two turn moves are almost unhearded of for a simply reason, in a competitive enviromment they give the opponent enough time to switch out to a Pokemon that either resist the move or is even immune to it, in other words, you gave him a free turn. In this fast and everyday more offensive metagame that's exactly what you don't want to. It also has fairly decent Base Power, and no outstanding effect that would make it usable, like it is for Shadow Force's case. When choosing Water-type moves, there is far more reliable options. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Waterfall is a valid alternative, with the same Base Power, perfect accuracy, a 20% flinch chance and does not require two turns.</p>
    <p>Aqua Tail is a option too, more powerful, with 90% accuracy and also does not need two turns to take effect<p>
    <p>Dig is a Ground-type equivalent, however it makes the user vulnerable to Earthquake and Magnitude, when underground those two moves will deal double damage.<p>


    Everything is done.

    Edit 1: Reserving Coil, Comet Punch, Confuse Ray, Confusion.
    Coil (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    Boosts user's Attack, Defense and Accuracy by 1 stage.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>This move Boost Attack, Defense and Accuracy by 1 stage. No other additional effect.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>One of the new boosting moves introduced in Gen. V, Coil raises three differents stats in the same turn. It works similar to Bulk Up, so has a more defensive approach, the difference being that since it raises Accuracy as well makes possible for the user to use hard hitting moves, which would have normally bad Accuracy, with more success. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Bulk Up is a equivalent Fighting-type move, however it does not raise Accuracy.</p>
    <p>Hone claws is a Dark-type equivalent, but doesn't raise Defense.<p>


    Comet Punch (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    Hits 2-5 times in one turn.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>Hits 2-5 times in one turn. There is a 37.5% chance to hit either 2 or 3 times, and a 12.5% chance to hit either 4 or 5 times. No other effect.</p> (*Copy pasted from on-site page cause there isn't anything else to say really*)

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>One of the inumerous multi hit moves. However, there isn't much competitive value for it at all, considering it has a bad Base Power, less then desirable accuracy and shallow distribution. Only five fully evolved Pokemons can use it: Hitmonchan, Kangaskhan, Ledian, Smeargle and Conkeldurr. All of them have better options for a moveslot, though.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p> There are lots of them but some examples are Barrage, Doubleslap, Fury Swipes, Fury Attack with different distributions.</p>


    Confuse Ray (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    Confuses the target.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>It's a 100% Accuracy move that may induce confusion. No other effect.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>The best non-damaging confusion move of the game. Confuse Ray is a 100% Accuracy move that induces confusion to any pokemon, unless they have the Ability Own Tempo or are protected by Safeguard. It has fallen in usage, since it's not appealing to trainers to bet in a 50% chance to the target not attack. In this fast and offensive metagame there is simply not enough time to set it up, is preferably to use something like Machamp's DynamicPunch, that not only does damage but also keep offensive mommentum.
    Anyhow, is still used on bulky Pokemons in conjuction with a paralyzing move to create the annoying "Parafusion" condition, in that situation the target only attacks 25% of time, on average. A user of that technique in Regigigas when stalling turns before Slow Start take effect. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Supersonic is a equivalent move with less Accuracy.</p>


    Confusion (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    10% chance to confuse opponent.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>It deals damage and has a 10% chance to confuse the target. No other effects.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Confusion is the most weaker special Psychic-type move available, with the existance of Psychic as a more powerful version and available as a TM, and because of that having a great distribution, there is literaly no reason to use Confusion on a competitive enviroment.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Psychic is a better alternative, with perfect Accuracy and a good 90 Base power while reducing Special Defense by 1 stage 10% of time.</p>

    Done again.
  18. Zystral

    Zystral めんどくさい、な~
    is a Smogon Media Contributor Alumnusis a Contributor Alumnus

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2009
    Messages:
    1,610
    Bad Dreams (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    Deals 12.5% damage to sleeping opponents per turn.

    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>At the end of the turn, during the phase Leftovers and weather damage is calculated, if the opponent is asleep, they will lose 12.5% of their max HP. This will apply to any sleep condition, and will trigger each turn the opponent is asleep.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Darkrai may be the only Pokemon to obtain this ability, but even something as frail as Darkrai can put it to good use. Darkrai is well known for being extremely fast, and so very capable of putting a threat on the opponent's team to sleep. This will result in at least one turn of Bad Dreams activating. However, it is more likely than not that a sleeping Pokemon will switch away from Darkrai, not only out of fear of Bad Dreams, but out of fear of either a powerful switch-in, or Darkrai's powerful special attacks. Decent for doing small damage, making KOs easier, but Darkrai usually will not be trapping, then stalling foes to death with it.</p>

    <h2>Related Abilities</h2>
    <p>No related abilities.</p>


    Blaze (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    Boosts power of Fire-type moves 50% when at 1/3 HP or less.

    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>When the wielder's HP is equal to 1/3 of its max HP or less, all of its Fire-type moves will gain an increase of 50% Base Power. This bonus is calculated in similar to STAB.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Blaze is usually exclusive only to the Fire-type starter Pokemon, and is their only ability. However, the advent of Dream World has brought some more usable options, such as Blaziken's Speed Boost, or Emboar's Reckless. However, there are times when Blaze can be effective. Whereas the high prevalence of priority attacks and Sandstorm has made it a less effective option, using Substitute to bring a Pokemon's HP into the range of Blaze and a Pinch Berry was an option at one point. Nowadays, however, Blaze is simply a last-ditch attempt to deal some damage before the Pokemon goes down.</p>

    <h2>Related Abilities</h2>
    <p>Overgrow, Torrent, and Swarm are Grass-, Water-, and Bug-type equivalents, respectively.</p>


    Chlorophyll (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    Speed doubles in sun.

    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>When the weather is sunny, the wielder's Speed stat is doubled. This is not equivalent to a stat boost, and cannot be Baton Passed on. Moves such as Gyro Ball and Electro Ball will be affected. If the weather condition is changed, the wielder's Speed stat will return to normal.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Chlorophyll is an extremely powerful tool for sun-based teams. Most Grass-type attackers may pack a punch, but they are usually terribly slow. Pokemon such as Victreebel and Sunflora have trouble launching one of their ground-shattering attacks, due to being outsped and taken out. However, many Grass-type abusers of the sun still face the same problem in that their own weather condition makes their weakness to Fire greater. Chlorophyll is an amazing ability in its own right, turning Pokemon such as Leafeon and Venusaur into dangerous attacks. However, the fundamental problem still lies with using the weather condition as a core for a team.</p>

    <h2>Related Abilities</h2>
    <p>Swift Swim and Sand Rush are equivalents for rain and sandstorm, respectively.</p>


    Clear Body (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    Prevents the enemy from lowering this Pokemon's stats.

    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>The wielder is unaffected by stat-lowering effects from the opponent, such as Screech and Intimidate. The wielder can still be affected by stat-raising moves, such as Flatter or Swagger, however. Clear Body does not prevent the stat drops inflicted through status, such as the speed reduction from paralysis. Self-inflicted stat drops, such as Hammer Arm and Close Combat are not prevented either. Brightpowder will still lower the wielder's accuracy.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Clear Body may seem unimpressive at first, but can actually prove to be extremely effective under certain conditions. Metagross is a powerful physical attacker, but Gyarados and Salamence can often Intimidate a physical attacker, reducing its usefulness. Metagross does not have to worry about this, and as a result, is undaunted by any attempts the opponent makes to cut its sweep short, bar status or KO (it should be noted that unless it carries ThunderPunch, Metagross is still helpless against Gyarados). Some of the other Pokemon to obtain Clear Body have better options, but sometimes it can be effective, depending on the conditions and what that Pokemon is doing.</p>

    <h2>Related Abilities</h2>
    <p>White Smoke is an identical equivalent with different distribution.</p>


    Show Hide
    [SHORT DESC]


    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p></p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p></p>

    <h2>Related Abilities</h2>
    <p></p>


    Cloud Nine (open)
    [SHORT DESC]
    Blocks the effects of weather.

    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>All battle effects provided by any prevailing weather conditions are blocked. This includes any ability-related effects, power increase of certain attack types, and any residual damage from sandstorm and hail. The weather condition will continue to prevail until it fades or is replaced, but the battle will act as if there is no weather condition in play. Weather-related forms, such as Cherrim and Castform, will still change and take effect.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>In a metagame dominated by weather, where sandstorm and rain are never too far away, Cloud Nine can be an incredibly useful tool, capable of stopping teams in their tracks. Although its distribution has a lot to be desired, Altaria and Golduck are by no means poor when it comes to stopping rain teams or sandstorm teams. There may be more effective checks for certain weather conditions, but Cloud Nine is more than sufficient as a temporary stop to any weather abuser's sweep.</p>

    <h2>Related Abilities</h2>
    <p>Air Lock is an identical equivalent with different distribution.</p>
  19. black_cotton

    black_cotton

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2010
    Messages:
    460
    I did those, I tried to proofread but some mistakes may have passed so please check and I will correct if necessary.

    Constrict (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    10% to lower opponent's Speed by 1 stage.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>This moves deals damage and has a 10% chance to lower opponent's Speed by 1 stage. No other effect.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>There is not much competitive value for this, it's outclassed by virtually every other Normal-type move in the game, thanks to the horrible Base Power and it's only side effect has a very low chance of happening.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>No related moves.</p>


    Conversion (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    Changes user in a new type based on the user's moves.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>This move changes the user's type to match with one of the types of his own moves, it's chosen randomly with the same probability to each of them.Wheather ball and Hidden power are considered Normal-Types. Differently from past generations Curse now can be selected as a Ghost-type move.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Conversion is one of the exclusive moves of Porygon line. It isn't used in competitive matchs because is really difficult to make it work. Nothing stops you opponent to simply switch to a type that is more effective against the new type that the user's converted.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Conversion 2 is a move that works similar but changes to a type that is either immune or resist the last move that damaged the user.</p>


    Conversion2 (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    Changes user into a new type that resists the last attack to hit the user.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>This move changes the user type to a new one that either resist or is immune to the last damaging move that hits the user. If the user is already a type that resist the move it will still change, as a side note only if the user is Steel and is hit by a Dragon attack that this move will fail.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Conversion is one of the exclusive moves of Porygon line. It isn't used in competitive matchs because is really difficult to make it work. Nothing stops you opponent to simply switch to a type that is more effective against the new type that the user's converted, the ramdomness also doesn't help.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Conversion is a move that works similar but changes to a type of one of the user's moves.</p>

    Copycat (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    Uses the last move used in the battle.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>Copies the last successfully executed move used in the battle.It doesn't matter if was the own Copycat's user move or the opponent's move. It will also allow the Pokémon to use a move that is disabled if called by Copycat.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>This move is a rarely seen in competitive battles, bacause is too situational to work. Even though it would be cool to uses some moves back to the original user it would require very specific situations and almost flawless predictions to actually make any good.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Mimic is also a move that can copy opponent moves.</p>

    Cosmic Power (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    Boost user's Defense and Special Defense by 1 stage.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>Boost user's Defense and Special Defense by 1 stage.No other effect. </p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Cosmic power is a Psychic-type move that boost both defenses at the same time, so it's more used on defensive inclined sets. One of the best users is Sigilyph, thanks to a combination of Magic Guard, Psycho Shift, Roost and Stored Power that can bypass some of his counters. Other niche users are Jirachi, and some specific Arceus forms like Bug, Steel and Poison.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Defend Order is the same move with an different distribution</p>

    Cotton Guard (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    Boosts user's Defense by 3 stages.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>This move boosts user's Defense by 3 stages.No added effect.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>One of the new boosting moves introduced in Generation V. Cotton Guard can transform in a single turn any Pokemon into a bulky one on the physical side. However, it has a fairly poor distribution, with only six fully evolved Pokemons able to use it. The most prominent user is Altaria thanks to decent Base Stats and good typing.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Iron Defense and Acid Armor also raises Defense, but are a 2 stages boost. </p>

    Cotton Spore (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    Lowers target's Speed by 2 stages.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p> This move lowers target's Speed by 2 stages.No additional effect</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Not a very used move. Even though the benefits are good, most users are Grass-types that are better using other moves like Stun Spore or Sleep Powder which gives bigger benefits in the end. Note that Cotton Spore got it's Acurracy increased to 100% this Generation. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>No related moves.</p>

    Counter (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    If hit by a Physical attack, returns double damage.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>If the user is hit by a Physical contact move it will do double the damage that it suffered. This move has a negative priority and doesn't affect Ghosts, but hits everything else regardless types advantages. In other words, it still will do double damage on Psychic-types despite the resistance.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Counter is an niche move, it's a attack that most times makes the user goes last and if hit by a Physical move it will retaliate the target back with the double damage that was dealt. So, it requires some degree of prediction and the surprise-value to work on most situations. Nevertheless the best user is definately Wobbuffet, thanks to a trapping ability, in conjuction of Encore and great Defensive stats it can Counter to the fulle extend. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Mirror Coat is a Psychic-type equivalent that works on special attacks as opposed to physical attacks. It does not affect Dark-types.</p>
    <p>Metal Burst is Steel-type equivalent which will reflect either Physical or Special moves, but only with a 1.5 increase.<p>

    Covet (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    Steals target's item.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>This move deals damage and steals the target's item, unless they have the Sticky Hold or Multitype ability. In this cases it will only do damage with no added effect.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Even though taking the opponent's item is indeed a great thing, Covet is outclassed by other moves for the simply fact that it needs that the user don't hold any item himself for it to work. Which is pretty big. For this fact alone it's outclassed by Knock Off, that even though works a bit differently and has less power comes with the option of keeping your own held item.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Thief is a Dark-type equivalent.</p>

    Crabhammer (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    Has a high critical hit ratio.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>This move deals damage, with a increased chance to land a critical hit. </p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Crabhammer is a semi-exclusive move for Kingler and Crawdaunt lines. It's a more powerful alternative to Waterfall, with a bit bigger Base Power and increased ability to land a critical hit at the cost of less Accuracy. Since it's semi-exclusive the only users are those already cited.
    Is most of the time outclassed by Waterfall's consistency, thanks to the flawless accuracy, flinch chance and basically same Base Power. There shouldn't be any reasons to use Crabhammer at all, unless you want to play with the high critical chance or are using Kingler, which is imcompatible with Waterfall.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Waterfall is a slighty less powerful version with perfect Accuracy and the added 20% flinch effect.</p>
    <p>Aqua tail is a alternative as well, same Base Power, 90% Accuracy and no other effect.</p>

    Cross Chop (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    Has a high critical hit ratio.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>This move deals damage, with a increased chance to land a critical hit.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Cross Chop is a powerful Fighting-type move with a increased chance to land a critical hit.The Accuracy, however, is less then desirable which can be troublesome sometimes. Also, the majority of Fighting-types Pokemons that get this move also have access to Close Combat, that even though lower both defenses 1 stage after usage have a 100% accuracy. However, is still a good choice on Fighting types that don't have access to any other powerful moves or in specific wall-breaking sets. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Close Combat is an more powerful alternative that lowers both Defenses 1 stage after use.</p>

    Cross Poison (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    Has a high critical hit ratio. 10% chance to poison the foe.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>This move deals damage, with a increased chance to land a critical hit. Can also poison the target 10% of the time.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>Cross Poison is a great STAB move to any Poison-type that has access to it. Even though Poison isn't a great offensive type on it's own, it still hits a lot of things for at least neutral damage and can be paired with a coverage move with great success. The best user is definately Drapion thanks to an usable Attack and Speed stat, good typing and access to Sniper an ability that let's him abuse the increased critical hit chance.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Poison Jab is a more powerful alternative with a 30% chance to poison the foe and does not come the increased chance to land a critical hit. </p>

    Crunch (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    20% chance to lower opponent's Defense by 1 stage.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>This moves deals damage and has a 20% chance to lower target's Defense 1 stage. No other effect.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>One of the best Dark-type moves available. It has great Base Power, good distribution and a excellent side effect, can be used as a main Stab option or even as a coverage move. Note that if paired with a Fighting-type move it gains almost perfect neutral coverage only resisted by Heracross and Toxicroak. Best user is Tyranitar thanks to a amazing Attack stat, outrageous Special Defense on sandstorm and STAB on Dark moves.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Sucker Punch has the same Base Power and +1 Priority, but the opponent needs to select a damaging move for it to work.</p>

    Crush Claw (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    50% chance to lower opponent's Defense 1 stage.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>This moves deals damage and has a 50% chance to lower target's Defense 1 stage. No other effect.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>On paper this seems like a good move, usable Base Power and a 50% chance to lower opponent's Defense, great news for a physical move. However, a more in deep analysis shows that it's outclassed by Return or Frustration, if fulfilled the requisites they deal more damage right from the start and even if the defense is lowered it still outdamages Crush Claw in two turns. Finally, even though minimal it has a 5% chance to not hit and Return/Frustration are still 100% Accuracy moves.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Return or Frustration are more powerful and with more Accuracy alternatives. With no other effect.</p>

    Crush Grip (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    Base Power depends on the foe's remaining HP.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>This move Base Power varies between 1 and 120.The formula is 1 + floor(120 * Foe's Current HP / Foe's Max HP). No additional effect.</p> (Copy pasted from on-page because that's only it, really.)

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>The signature move from Regigigas. As the sole user, since smergle isn't using this at all, it needs to get rid of the Slow Start effects first to use it at full, the problem lies here, there is literally no time to stall 05 turns when in a competitive realm.
    Also, keep im mind that the game is full of passive damage so not every Pokemon will start at full health, making this move less and less appealing, counting everything there is probably better options for a moveslot.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Wring Out is a equivalent move.</p>

    Curse (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    Does 1/4 damage per turn at the cost of half the user's max HP if the user is a Ghost. Boost user's Attack and Defense and lowers Speed 1 stage otherwise.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>A move that works differently for Ghosts. If the user is a Ghost-type it will put a curse on the target damaging 1/4 of foe max HP at the cost of half the user max HP. If the target has the ability Magic Guard it's inaffected by this.
    When used by a non-Ghost Pokemon it will boost Attack and Defense 1 stage and lowers the user's Speed 1 stage. If used by a Ghost type with Magic Guard this last effect also applies.</p>

    <h2>Analysis</h2>
    <p>This move has different analysis depending of what type uses it, it's generally not good if used by a Ghost-type, since the target can simple switch out negating the effects completely. On the other hand, it's useful on full stall teams that have problems dealing with that last Pokemon that is immune to Toxic, it creates a "win condition" considering that the foe can't switch out destroying the effects, and apart from Magic Guard users nothing is immune to it. A good user of this technique is Spiritomb.
    From a non-Ghost point of view is a boosting move that trades Speed for more Attack and Defense, good candidates are bulky Pokemons that simply doesn't care about Speed and invest fully in HP and Special Defense, letting Curse boost the rest. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Bulk Up is an Fighting-type move that boost Attack and Defense 1 stage without lowering Speed.</p>




    Reserving to do next:
    Dark Pulse, Dark Void, Defend Order, Defense Curl, Defog, Destiny Bond, Detect,Dig, Disable, Discharge, Dizzy Punch, Doom Desire, Double Hit, Double Kick, Double Team, Double-Edge, DoubleSlap.
  20. Descaraffe

    Descaraffe

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2011
    Messages:
    6
    A small nitpick, in gen 5, Crabhammer's accuracy was changed to 90%.
    With a high crit rate, it's a better aqua tail, although only smeargle gets access to both (and really shouldn't run either). Still, Crawdaunt and Kingler prefer waterfall since they like to raise their speed and enjoy the flinch rate, and cannot afford to miss.
  21. bugmaniacbob

    bugmaniacbob Floats like a Butterfree, stings like a Metapod
    is a Smogon Media Contributoris a Contributor to Smogonis an Artist Alumnusis a CAP Contributor Alumnus

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2008
    Messages:
    2,276
    OK this thing is finally up to date

    Thanks to Oglemi for splitting the posts and thus allowing me to edit the OP

    If you're wondering where your posts have gone, they have been swallowed by the OP for the greater good

    Also please try to spellcheck your work, or at least C+P the thing into MS Word and press the spell checker button, it can't be that hard.

    To all those contributing, many thanks, all efforts are appreciated.
  22. black_cotton

    black_cotton

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2010
    Messages:
    460
    Before we start; bmb, on the Brave Bird related move’s part, it’s saying that Brave Bird is an equivalent move of itself. ;)

    Dark Pulse (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    20% chance to flinch the opponent.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>This move deals damage and has a 20% chance to flinch the target. No other effect.</p>

    <h2>Competitive Use</h2>
    <p>One of the best special Dark moves available, with good Base Power, perfect accuracy, 20% chance to flinch and great distribution. It's the main option for many special inclined Dark Pokemon, and thanks to the great distribution is used as a coverage move on lots of other ones. Note that if paired with a Fighting-type move, most times Focus Blast, it gains almost perfect neutral coverage only resisted by Heracross and Toxicroak. In last generation, it was used in mono attacking Spiritomb’s set since nothing is immune to Dark moves, however is right now, a lesser option thanks to the new introduced ability Justified, and more powerful Fighting-types. Still, it's worth using on most special inclined Pokemon that enjoy the good neutral coverage that it provides like in Zoroark’s and Nasty Plot Lucario’s case.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Night Daze is an more powerful alternative, however it has 95% accuracy, while lowering opponent's accuracy one stage 40% of time. </p>



    Dark Void (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    Induces sleep to the opponent.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>This move induces sleep to the opponent. In a double battle it will hit both opposing Pokemon with 80% accuracy each. In triples it will only hit adjacent Pokemon. </p>

    <h2>Competitive Use</h2>
    <p>The second best Sleep inducing move, accuracy wise. However it has fairly low distribution with only two users, Darkrai and Smeargle. For that reason in singles Darkrai is the best user, since it possesses all the tools to abuse it: great Speed, excellent Special Attack, good boosting move and the right offensive movepool. </p>
    </p>As for Smeargle there isn't any reason to not use Spore, with the perfect accuracy, except in double or triples battles, where Dark Void serves a specific purpose, putting adjacent Pokemon to sleep at the same turn.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Spore is a Sleep inducing move with 100% accuracy.</p>
    <p>Sleep Powder and Lovely Kiss are Sleep inducing moves with 75% accuracy each.<p>



    Defend Order (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    Boost user's Defense and Special Defense by 1 stage.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>This move boost user's Defense and Special Defense by 1 stage. No other effect. </p>

    <h2>Competitive Use</h2>
    <p>One of the Vespiqueen's line signature move. For that reason only two Pokemon are able to execute it. As for Vespiqueen she usually doesn’t have either the type to abuse it, or the time to gather enough boosts in most competitive battles. Theoretically, even if she could gather enough boosts she would still miss the power to force her way against most bulky walls, regardless. As for Smeargle, it can be useful on Baton Pass teams if you, flavour wise, aren't using Cosmic Power, which does the exactly same thing. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Cosmic Power is an equivalent with different distribution. </p>
    </p>Stockpile has the same effect; however it counts your Stockpile’s to a maximum of 03. </p>



    Defense Curl (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    Boost user's Defense by 1 stage.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>This move Boost user's Defense by 1 stage. No other effect. </p>

    <h2>Competitive Use</h2>
    <p>There is not much competitive value for this. It's outclassed by other moves that raise the Defense stat faster like Acid Armor or Iron Defense. Could be used on Baton Pass teams, but there are better options for a moveslot. In short, there is literally no situation to use this move. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Acid Armor or Iron Defense are superior moves that raise the Defense stat 2 stages in a single turn. </p>



    Defog (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    Lowers target's evasion 1 stage. Removes various field effects.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>This move lowers target's evasion 1 stage. It will also remove Reflect, Light Screen, Safeguard, and Mist set up on the user's field and will remove Spikes, Stealth Rock, and Toxic Spikes on the target's field. Has an overworld effect that clears deep fog from an area. </p>

    <h2>Competitive Use</h2>
    <p>Defog is a really interesting move that works similar to Rapid Spin removing several field effects. However it's application on singles in undesirable, since if used it will remove your own entry hazard from your opponent's side, while at the same time getting rid of screens that you may have set up. By that reasons it's often forgotten as a move. </p>
    </p>In theory, it could be used in doubles and triples battles where it’s possible to target your own Pokemon, but entry hazards aren’t used much in that competitive scene, and removing them from your own field would be the major reason to use this move.
    </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>No related moves.</p>



    Destiny Bond (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    If the user faints, the foe faints.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>If the user faints before the user makes a different move, the foe that fainted the user will also faint. If the damage occurs in the end of the turn by hail, sandstorm, Leech Seed, status, Doom Desire, or Future Sight, Destiny Bond won't work. If a Pokemon uses Destiny Bond, switches next turn, and faints to Pursuit as it switches, the Pursuit user faints as well. It will also work if the target is behind Substitute. It will bypass Focus Sash and Sturdy. </p> (copied the pursuit part from on-page)

    </p>In a double battle both opponents are targeted, but only the one that was responsible for knocking out the user is affected. In a triple battle if the opponent uses a move that hit non-adjacent Pokemon and that move is responsible for knocking out the user it will faint as well.</p>

    <h2>Competitive Use</h2>
    <p>Destiny Bond is a move that will faint the user that deal the last damage, the one responsible for fainting the user. It's a hard move to use in competitive battles since it needs good prediction and the surprise value to work. Regardless, is a good move that may score a surprise KO if played right. Good users are Mismagius and Gengar, thanks to useful immunities and a high Speed stat, they will outspeed most Pokemon and KO them if predicted right. Wobbuffet is also a infamous user that goes the opposite way, it’s terrifically bulky, slow and has a trapping ability, when it can no longer abuse the “Countercoat” strategy, but still retain some bulk it can use the Destiny Bond to KO walls, that usually don’t hit that hard. <p>
    <p>Finally, Banette is a noteworthy user, she is frail and slow, but if used in the lead position, with Trick Room and Focus Sash, she can survive one hit and set up Trick Room, making her move first in most cases, since she will probably be at slow health she can use the now “faster” Destiny Bond to KO the opponent while sacrificing herself at the same time and supporting the rest of the team with the field effect. This strategy is easily stopped by Taunt or a priority user, though. <p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Grudge also involves the user fainting. </p>



    Detect (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    Prevents most moves from working on the user that turn.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>This move prevents most moves from working on the user that turn. It will fail to 50% chance if used consecutively. Some moves bypass Detect protection and deal damage anyways, like in Feint's and Shadow Force's case. It won't protect the user from status like Poison, Burn or the Curse damage if it was previously afflicted, as well from weather damage. The user cannot protect itself if Lock-on, Mind Reader or No guard are in effect. However, OHKO moves will never work if Detect was used, even if Lock-on, Mind reader or No Guard are in effect. Thunder has a 30% chance to hit in the rain, same for Blizzard in hail.

    Detect does not protect the user from:
    · Acupressure
    · Curse (used by a Ghost-type)
    · Doom Desire
    · Future Sight
    · Imprison
    · Perish Song
    · Psych Up
    · Role Play
    · Transform </p> (copy list from on-page)
    <h2>Competitive Use</h2>
    <p>Detect is a stalling and more defensive inclined move. Like Protect, should be used on defensive Pokemon, as a scouting move or for a free turn to gather leftovers recover. However is outclassed by Protect which has a superior distribution and much more PP. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Protect is an equivalent move with different distribution. </p>



    Dig (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    User is made invulnerable for one turn, then hits the next turn.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>User digs underground on the first turn, where it dodges every move except Earthquake and Magnitude, which will do double damage, and attacks on the next turn. Even on the charge-up turn, it won't work if the user is immune to Ground-type moves. It will also take damage if it was previously locked by Mind Reader or Lock-on. It's worth saying that the user does not take Sandstorm or Hail damage while underground. It also has an overworld effect that lets you transport to the entrance of caves that you are in.</p>

    <h2>Competitive Use</h2>
    <p>Dig is a two turn move that is not seen in competitive scene for several reasons; first is Earthquake existence, a 100 Base Power move with perfect accuracy and no drawbacks. Combined this with the fact that Dig, as already said, takes two turns to work. While on the charge-up turn, nothing stops your opponent to simply switch out to a Pokemon that either resist the move or is even immune to it, on a competitive environment giving your opponent free turns should be avoided at all costs. For everything stated, there are better options for a Ground-type moveslot. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Earthquake is a more powerful Ground move with perfect accuracy. </p>
    <p>Earth Power is a special type alternative. <p>



    Disable (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    Prevents the last move used from being used again for 4-7 turns.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>This move will prevent the last successfully move that hit the user from being used again for 4-7 turns. No other effect. </p>

    <h2>Competitive Use</h2>
    <p>Disable is a very interesting move that few Pokemon can use well. It will disable the last move that successfully hit. It also got a good boost in this Generation where his accuracy was raised to 100%, making it much more reliable. Since the introduction of Choice items, a lot of Pokemon are stuck with one move as soon as they enter in the field, if Disable hit said Pokemon they will have no other alternative than Struggle in that turn and switch out on the next, giving the user a free turn. </p>
    </p>The most notable user is definitely Gengar thanks to some distinct factors: the high speed, good offensive movepool and very useful immunities against common types make him shine as a prominent user. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>No related moves.</p>



    Discharge (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    30% chance to paralyze the opponent.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>This move deals damage and has a 30% chance to paralyze the opponent. In double and triple battles it will hit all adjacent Pokemon having a 30% chance to paralyze each one of them. No other effect.</p>

    <h2>Competitive Use</h2>
    <p>Discharge is, along those with 100% accuracy, the Electric damaging move with the bigger chance to induce paralyzes, so is better used on more bulky sets that benefits with the increased chance to do it, defensive Zapdos and Porygon2 being perfect examples. Since it's also a TM, it has a great distribution and can be used on lots of different Pokemon that also benefits with the increased paralyzes chance, serving as a coverage move option for them as well. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Thunderbolt is a more powerful alternative, with less chance to paralyze.</p>
    <p>Thunder is an even more powerful alternative, that also paralyzes 30% of time, on the other hand it has 70% accuracy in normal conditions.<p>



    Dizzy Punch (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    20% chance to confuse opponent.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>This move deals damage and has a 20% chance to confuse the target. No other effect.</p>

    <h2>Competitive Use</h2>
    <p>Even though is a good move on it's own and with a fairly decent chance for the added effect to happen, it's not used on a competitive scene cause it's outclassed by other more powerful Normal-type moves, namely Return/Frustration that simply do more damage right from the start. So, there is no recommended situation where this move would be a better option. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Return or Frustration are more powerful alternatives. With no additional effect. </p>



    Doom Desire (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    Hits two turns after being used. Uses the Special Defense of the opponent when the move was used in calculation.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>This move deals damage at the end of the turn after three turns. Since it hits at the end of the turn it's not blocked by Protect or Detect, won't bypass the Focus Sash or Sturdy protection. Differently from previous Generations it’s no longer technically typeless, so it not only does get STAB but the weakness and resistances chart are applied on the Pokemon it hits. Can be boosted by Gems which activate the turn Doom Desire does damage. Life Orb boost Doom Desire's damage now, and the user does receive recoil damage. Also, it was boosted to 140 Base Power and gained perfect accuracy in Gen V. Since it's a Steel-type move it no longer hits through Wonder Guard. <p>

    <p>Finally, the damage is calculated based on the Special Defense of the hit Pokemon and no longer from the one that was originally targeted. The damage is based on the Special Attack and Special Defense at the time of striking, not at the time it was used on the original target. This means that if you use Doom Desire on a Pokémon with 100 Special Defense, and then your opponent switches to a Pokémon with 300 Special Defense, the damage calculations will be done as though the target has 300 Special Defense. Both Doom Desire and Future Sight can't be active at the same time. </p> (last paragraph taken from analysis on-site, I just rearrange it to this Generation differences)

    <h2>Competitive Use</h2>
    <p>The signature move for Jirachi, for that reason only two Pokemon are able to use it. That said none of them would have any reason to do so, even though it's the most powerful Steel-type move in the game, the mechanics just make it an undesirable option. Hitting three turns later, while at the same time giving the opponent enough room to simply switch to a resist or a Pokemon with higher Special Defense, which thanks to the new mechanics is now calculated at the time it strikes, makes Doom Desire less appealing. Finally, the Steel type isn't very prominent offensively speaking and the existence of Flash Cannon make Doom Desire a useless option from a competitive point of view. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Future Sight is a Psychic-type equivalent. </p>



    Double Hit (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    Hits two times in one turn.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>This move hits two times on the same turn, no other effect. As for contact abilities every hit has an individual chance to active it, the same happens with the critical hit chance. The first hit will activate the foe Focus Sash, Focus Band or Sturdy and the subsequent hit may KO the target. </p>

    <h2>Competitive Use</h2>
    <p>Double hit is a move that hits twice on the same turn, for that reason is good for breaking substitutes, however it still has fairly weak Base Power, so it is a good option only for Ambipom, thanks to the Normal-type STAB and Technician ability. The 90% accuracy and the fact that dangerous Ghosts like Gengar and Mismagius often run Substitutes make it less appealing for a moveslot.</p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Double Kick is a Fighting-type equivalent.<p>




    Double Kick (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    Hits two times in one turn.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>This move hits two times on the same turn, no other effect. As for contact abilities every hit has an individual chance to active it, the same happens with the critical hit chance. The first hit will activate the foe Focus Sash, Focus Band or Sturdy and the subsequent hit may KO the target. </p>

    <h2>Competitive Use</h2>
    <p> Double Kick is a move that hits twice on the same turn. Theoretically it would be useful for breaking substitutes, but differently from Double Hit, a Normal-type clone, it has no real abusers like it is Ambipom for the Normal counterpart. Thus it’s never seen on competitive battles and there is no recommended situation to use it. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Double Hit is a Normal-type equivalent with 90% accuracy. </p>



    Double Team (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    Boosts user’s evasion one stage.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>This move boosts the target evasion one stage per use. Note that the “one stage” from evasion boost works differently from the normal stats boost (like Attack, Speed, etc), the first will raise your evasion 33% after one turn, while the latter will raise 50% after usage. </p>

    <h2>Competitive Use</h2>
    <p>Double Team is a banned move from the competitive scene. It breaks the Evasion clause that is generically applied to all Smogon battles. It was considered unhealthy for a skill based metagame, since it rewards luck instead of skill, while taking the battle from both players control and making the game (even more) luck based. It often created situations where the crucial miss changed the outcome of a match. For that reasons it is never seen in this competitive environment. </p>
    </p>Nevertheless, it can still be used on Random-matchups, where the Evasion clause is not applied. There, you can use something like Sand Veil Gliscor, with Brightpowder, in a sandstorm and try to annoy your opponent to death. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Minimize is an alternative move, that raises evasion two stages instead of one, but has much poorer distribution. </p>



    Double-Edge (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    Has 1/3 recoil.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>This move deals damage, the user will also receive a 1/3 recoil of the damage dealt, rounded down. The recoil is negated if the user has the ability Rock Head or Magic Guard. If the user has the ability Reckless it will boost the damage dealt by 20 %.</p>

    <h2>Competitive Use</h2>
    <p>Double-Edge is one of the most powerful Normal-type moves, it has a great distribution being a Tutor Move on Gen.III and a bred move for several other Pokemon. However, thanks to the mechanics (and the clearly offensive nature of the move) only few Pokemon can use it to the fullest. Staraptor is probably the best among all others, thanks to some distinct factors: namely STAB, excellent Attack and Speed stats, just the right complimenting coverage moves and more importantly the Reckless ability. Counting all that the bird becomes a monster that easily breaks defensive cores all by himself. </p>
    <p>Rock Head users also can make good use of this move; unfortunately none of them gets the STAB bonus. Anyhow, within the Rock Head users Marowak deserves the mention thanks to the exclusive Thick Club, a personal item of his line that boost its attacks to a Choice Band equivalent levels while letting him switch moves. Double-Edge serves the purpose of hitting Pokemon immune to Ground-type moves since the Rock moves available for him have poor accuracy which can be troublesome.<p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Brave Bird is a Flying-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Flare Blitz is a Fire-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Volt Tackle is an Electric-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Wood Hammer is a Grass-type equivalent.</p>
    <p>Head Charge is a Normal-type variant that deals less recoil damage to the user.</p>



    DoubleSlap (open)

    [SHORT DESC]
    Hits 2-5 times in one turn.
    [LONG DESC]

    <h2>Description</h2>
    <p>This moves deals damage hitting 2-5 times in one turn. There is a 37.5% chance to hit either 2 or 3 times, and a 12.5% chance to hit either 4 or 5 times. If one hit activate the foe Focus Sash, Focus Band or Sturdy the subsequent hit will KO the target. Each hit has an individual chance to land a critical hit and for contact abilities each hit of this move is counted separately for it to activate.</p>

    <h2>Competitive Use</h2>
    <p>Another of the numerous multi-hit moves. There isn’t much competitive value for it all, considering the weak Base Power and low accuracy. As a matter of fact, considering the average number of hits it has an effective 45 Base Power, and no Pokemon that have access to this move have any reason whatsoever to use it. If you are looking for a Normal-type move there is far more reliable options. </p>

    <h2>Related Moves</h2>
    <p>Tail Slap is a slightly more powerful alternative, albeit with fewer PP. </p>
    </p>Return/Frustration has bigger Base Power and perfect accuracy, making them a much more reliable option. </p>
  23. jiggz16

    jiggz16

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2011
    Messages:
    52
    Quick nitpick. On the Double Team description is has Minimize as an equivalent. As of Gen V, Minimize raises Evasion by two stages instead of one, but has much poorer distribution.
  24. firecape

    firecape This is the end...
    is a Forum Moderator Alumnusis a Contributor Alumnus

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2010
    Messages:
    1,048
    Hi the dex it up and we could really use help with this!!
  25. AJC

    AJC

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2005
    Messages:
    2,262
    Done enough for now for Reckless. feel free to check


    Reckless (open)


    [SHORT DESC]
    Increases power of Recoil causing moves and Jump Kick and Hi Jump Kick by 20%.

    [LONG DESC]
    <h2>Detailed Effects.</h2>
    <p>The moves Double-edge,Take Down,Volt Tackle,Flare blitz,Wild Charge Head Charge,Head Smash,Hi Jump Kick,Jump Kick,Wood hammer,Submission have their power boosted by 20% and due to the increased damage caused by the boosted moves the recoil is also boosted indirectly except for the jump kick moves which still do 50% of the users HP on failing to hit. Struggle although technically a recoil move isn't boosted by this ability. The item Life Orb has no effect on this ability.</p>

    <h2>Competitive Usage</h2>
    <p>Limited in distribution with only 7 fully evolved pokemon getting this ability it's usefulness is actually good with a few pokemon like Staraptor benefiting greatly from the devastating power of stab double-edge and brave bird becoming 216 Base after the boost of this ability while the increased recoil from the boosted moves cuts down on their lifespans greatly most of the holders are frail already and wouldn't live long anyways and would greatly appreciate the boost to their moves, a oddity of this ability is that it boosts the jump kick moves by 20% but doesn't increase the damage they cause to the user on miss while it does turn hi jump kick into a obscenely powerful 234 Base power move for Hitmonlee and Mienshao they generally have better options in ability's that don't involve being a one trick pony.</p>

    <h2>Related Ability</h2>
    <p>Rock Head also involves interaction with recoil causing moves but instead of boosting the moves it blocks out the recoil damage they would cause.</p>
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