Battle Tree Discussion and Records

So that streak looks fishy to me, for a couple of reasons.

-No status protection
I'm not necessarily talking about just t wave, wisp, and toxic, but also 10% or 30% effects from attacks, such as thunderbolt, ice beam, and flamethrower. In particular, Latios and Ferro will be taking a bunch of Thunderbolts, and sooner or later one of them is going to get paralyzed and that's not fun to deal with.

-No setup moves
So you got a favorable matchup against the foe's lead. Great, now you have to get favorable matchups against their backups as well. Running setup moves means that if you get a good matchup against their lead, it doesn't matter if they have quick claw incineroar or moody glalie in the back - you can just mow through their team knowing you'll outspeed and ohko pretty much everything at +6. Your team doesn't even get put into an advantageous state if their lead is harmless. While setup isn't mandatory for a decently large streak, it heavily evens the odds.

-Heavy reliance on inaccurate and/or unreliable moves
No, I'm not talking about regular draco meteor here. I mean Ferrothorn's Power Whip and Leech Seed. Your Ferro set is so reliant on these moves hitting that it doesn't seem to be a good fit for your team at all.

-Unfamiliarity with tree sets
You don't use a set lookup or trainer cheat sheet of any kind, which is already a red flag, seeing as a lot of the tree's sets are horrendous for unprepared teams to face. Also legendaries are capable of being all four of their sets post-40, and some have sets straight out of left field like Zapdos3 (mixed rain dance + light screen).
You mention about how volcarona "isn't a big deal" for your team to face, but if you'd ever faced one you'd have realized that:
a) both post-40 sets run HP/Defense Bold and thus easily survive a flare blitz (252+ Atk Blaziken-Mega Flare Blitz vs. 252 HP / 252+ Def Volcarona: 124-147 (64.5 - 76.5%) -- guaranteed 2HKO after Leftovers recovery)
b) Neither post-40 set OHKOes Latios at +0 with bug buzz and obviously is outsped by Latios, so they're much more likely to go for a Quiver Dance if they come out against lati. 0 SpA Volcarona Bug Buzz vs. 0 HP / 0 SpD Latios: 122-146 (78.7 - 94.1%) -- guaranteed 2HKO
c) one of the volcarona sets runs hurricane, which can ohko non-mega blaze and thus it is likely to go for that against a blaze that either hasn't mega'd or has taken some chip damage (say, from flare blitz recoil) 0 SpA Volcarona Hurricane vs. 0 SpA Volcarona Hurricane vs. 0 HP / 4 SpD Blaziken: 142-168 (91.6 - 108.3%) -- 50% chance to OHKO

-No backup plan

Alright, what happens when Salamence4 crits ferrothorn with double edge? What about when Walrein4 dodges Superpower with lax incense? Or when Double Team Tornadus gets a free substitute? Or when Noivern4 confuses Latios with Hurricane on the switch and you self-hit?
Your team doesn't need that much hax to lose, and is especially vulnerable to double threats. Picture this: You get a grass-type lead, say Venusaur. Blaziken OHKOes with flare blitz. Volcarona comes next. Either you sac Latios to it (which, by the way, risks confusion) or you sac Blaziken. Now, you're screwed if the last mon is something like Chandelure, which has a clean OHKO on Latios and Ferrothorn and takes nothing from Blaziken (who is already weakened). You need a contingency plan to deal with stuff in case your team is already weakened. You don't appear to have one aside from PP stalling, and your team can't even PP stall effectively.

All of these points make me believe that you backed up your save file at the start of every session you played, so that you could reload it if you lost, and only chose to keep the loss once you got to 400.
 
So that streak looks fishy to me, for a couple of reasons.

-No status protection
I'm not necessarily talking about just t wave, wisp, and toxic, but also 10% or 30% effects from attacks, such as thunderbolt, ice beam, and flamethrower. In particular, Latios and Ferro will be taking a bunch of Thunderbolts, and sooner or later one of them is going to get paralyzed and that's not fun to deal with.

-No setup moves
So you got a favorable matchup against the foe's lead. Great, now you have to get favorable matchups against their backups as well. Running setup moves means that if you get a good matchup against their lead, it doesn't matter if they have quick claw incineroar or moody glalie in the back - you can just mow through their team knowing you'll outspeed and ohko pretty much everything at +6. Your team doesn't even get put into an advantageous state if their lead is harmless. While setup isn't mandatory for a decently large streak, it heavily evens the odds.

-Heavy reliance on inaccurate and/or unreliable moves
No, I'm not talking about regular draco meteor here. I mean Ferrothorn's Power Whip and Leech Seed. Your Ferro set is so reliant on these moves hitting that it doesn't seem to be a good fit for your team at all.

-Unfamiliarity with tree sets
You don't use a set lookup or trainer cheat sheet of any kind, which is already a red flag, seeing as a lot of the tree's sets are horrendous for unprepared teams to face. Also legendaries are capable of being all four of their sets post-40, and some have sets straight out of left field like Zapdos3 (mixed rain dance + light screen).
You mention about how volcarona "isn't a big deal" for your team to face, but if you'd ever faced one you'd have realized that:
a) both post-40 sets run HP/Defense Bold and thus easily survive a flare blitz (252+ Atk Blaziken-Mega Flare Blitz vs. 252 HP / 252+ Def Volcarona: 124-147 (64.5 - 76.5%) -- guaranteed 2HKO after Leftovers recovery)
b) Neither post-40 set OHKOes Latios at +0 with bug buzz and obviously is outsped by Latios, so they're much more likely to go for a Quiver Dance if they come out against lati. 0 SpA Volcarona Bug Buzz vs. 0 HP / 0 SpD Latios: 122-146 (78.7 - 94.1%) -- guaranteed 2HKO
c) one of the volcarona sets runs hurricane, which can ohko non-mega blaze and thus it is likely to go for that against a blaze that either hasn't mega'd or has taken some chip damage (say, from flare blitz recoil) 0 SpA Volcarona Hurricane vs. 0 SpA Volcarona Hurricane vs. 0 HP / 4 SpD Blaziken: 142-168 (91.6 - 108.3%) -- 50% chance to OHKO

-No backup plan

Alright, what happens when Salamence4 crits ferrothorn with double edge? What about when Walrein4 dodges Superpower with lax incense? Or when Double Team Tornadus gets a free substitute? Or when Noivern4 confuses Latios with Hurricane on the switch and you self-hit?
Your team doesn't need that much hax to lose, and is especially vulnerable to double threats. Picture this: You get a grass-type lead, say Venusaur. Blaziken OHKOes with flare blitz. Volcarona comes next. Either you sac Latios to it (which, by the way, risks confusion) or you sac Blaziken. Now, you're screwed if the last mon is something like Chandelure, which has a clean OHKO on Latios and Ferrothorn and takes nothing from Blaziken (who is already weakened). You need a contingency plan to deal with stuff in case your team is already weakened. You don't appear to have one aside from PP stalling, and your team can't even PP stall effectively.

All of these points make me believe that you backed up your save file at the start of every session you played, so that you could reload it if you lost, and only chose to keep the loss once you got to 400.
Thank you for pointing out my team's weak points, but I wish you wouldn't accuse me of cheating out of nowhere. I already explained how I used this team in detail. Of course it's not perfect and there are hypothetical situations in which it is vulnerable to a specific team or bad luck, otherwise I would never have had any chance of losing. If you don't want to believe me, that is your choice. I know that I played fair and square, and I only came here to share my final streak and my team I'm proud of. It's disappointing to me that you would react like this...
 
I'm not only accusing you of cheating, I'm waiting for you to provide tips and anecdotes on how you played your team. I, as well as most of the people who have made such accusations, have wanted you to give us some idea of how you dealt with those threats when switch stalling threatening moves isn't an option. You have failed to do so, and your threatlist is very incomplete. Compare your writeup to other writeups of teams that have achieved similar streak length (like this 407 win streak with cloyser), and you should understand why we're pressing you so hard. For instance, exactly what does Ferrothorn's unorthodox EV spread achieve, compared to a more standard specially defensive ferrothorn?
 
I'm not only accusing you of cheating, I'm waiting for you to provide tips and anecdotes on how you played your team. I, as well as most of the people who have made such accusations, have wanted you to give us some idea of how you dealt with those threats when switch stalling threatening moves isn't an option. You have failed to do so, and your threatlist is very incomplete. Compare your writeup to other writeups of teams that have achieved similar streak length (like this 407 win streak with cloyser), and you should understand why we're pressing you so hard. For instance, exactly what does Ferrothorn's unorthodox EV spread achieve, compared to a more standard specially defensive ferrothorn?
If I'm required to write up an entire essay on a team of three Pokémon in order to not be labeled a cheater on this website, then I would rather not have anything to do with it at all. There are many more valuable ways I can spend my time. Goodbye.
 
wait but whats the ferro ev spread do though now i'm curious
I found a couple of interesting calcs when mass calcing the spread:

124+ Atk Ferrothorn Gyro Ball (90 BP) vs. 0 HP / 0 Def Sylveon: 170-204 (100 - 120%) -- guaranteed OHKO
252+ SpA Noivern Flamethrower vs. 252 HP / 92 SpD Ferrothorn: 152-180 (83.9 - 99.4%) -- guaranteed 2HKO

I also checked the lead mega alakazam matchup, which would involve ferro switching into a psychic, protecting to get 2 turns of lefties recovery, and ending up with this if its a max roll - 252 SpA Alakazam-Mega Focus Blast vs. 252 HP / 92 SpD Ferrothorn: 138-164 (76.2 - 90.6%) -- 25% chance to OHKO (assuming no spdef drop of course). The physdef might just be leftover since I can't find any matchup that's affected by it.
 

Eisenherz

50% Berry enthusiast
is a Smogon Social Media Contributor
I found a couple of interesting calcs when mass calcing the spread:

124+ Atk Ferrothorn Gyro Ball (90 BP) vs. 0 HP / 0 Def Sylveon: 170-204 (100 - 120%) -- guaranteed OHKO
252+ SpA Noivern Flamethrower vs. 252 HP / 92 SpD Ferrothorn: 152-180 (83.9 - 99.4%) -- guaranteed 2HKO

I also checked the lead mega alakazam matchup, which would involve ferro switching into a psychic, protecting to get 2 turns of lefties recovery, and ending up with this if its a max roll - 252 SpA Alakazam-Mega Focus Blast vs. 252 HP / 92 SpD Ferrothorn: 138-164 (76.2 - 90.6%) -- 25% chance to OHKO (assuming no spdef drop of course). The physdef might just be leftover since I can't find any matchup that's affected by it.
It's worth noting that 124+ Atk hits a jump point, so that's likely the reason for that specific number. Considering Touko told us they didn't know about the different Tree sets being predetermined, I think it's safe to assume whatever the rest of the EVs do, they were not built to take on specific Tree sets and any "blessed calc" is accidental (from experience with the mass calc, with the sheer number of total sets, you're bound to find a bunch of blessed calcs with about every imaginable random EV spread). Maybe the EVs came from another format? I would also love to hear Touko explain them, since investing in 4 stats wastes 4 EVs, so I'd assume somewhere there was an important reason for that split?

That aside, I don't have a strong opinion on the team yet, the criticism toward it has been mostly fair, and I'd also be interested in hearing more about the streak (an essay is definitely not required, the example given was pretty extreme, but surely 400+ battles must have generated a bunch of interesting memories? it's no small feat in singles!), but I also think the team synergy is pretty solid and this has been a bit overlooked by all the criticism.
As a matter of fact, I'm currently testing the team since I had these 3 Pokémon ready in my boxes and only needed to retrain them. As I write this, I'm at battle 83 and have been very impressed, I was skeptical, but it's been working better than I thought. M-Blaziken is probably underrated as a hyper-offensive option for singles, and Ferrothorn has been an absolute monster, the glue and true MVP of the team so far! I was skeptical of the 2 inaccurate moves, but misses are very rarely a big deal. Latios, on the other hand, has been handy for its resists, but feels like the weak link, both offensively and defensively. With no bulk investment, it can't repeatedly tank resisted hits, and usually finds no time to Roost, while the Z-move barely misses out on many KOs.
I have also noticed some of the criticism come into action: Ferro is indeed the go-to switch in for water-types and inevitably receives a lot of Ice Beams and Blizzards, so I can see a loss to freeze coming at some point in the future. Also, the "no backup plan" point mentioned rings very true, as sacrificing Blaziken or Latios is sometimes a necessity without knowing the last Pokémon and whether you will need them or not. But the typing synergy has been making up for it thus far, since it's often possible to find a good switch-in and preserve.

My (preliminary) opinion from these battles would be that the team would need quite a large amount of luck to reach 400, especially if movesets aren't being looked up. But there's no denying the team is pretty good (and fun!).

If anyone else is interested in a similar exercise, I made a QR code, the EVs are exactly as instructed by Touko: https://3ds.pokemon-gl.com/rentalteam/usum/BT-4AE1-8D7E

I'll report back once my streak with this team ends with any additional thoughts I will have gathered about it!
 
If I'm required to write up an entire essay on a team of three Pokémon in order to not be labeled a cheater on this website, then I would rather not have anything to do with it at all. There are many more valuable ways I can spend my time. Goodbye.
It’s disappointing that you place no value in your own credibility, because it’s easily interpreted as abandoning the farce. Not everyone enjoys writing lengthy writeups but there’s at least a minimum of detail and evidence come to be expected from any lengthy streak.

If everything were taken at face value, honest players would be mislead into believing that certain teams could succeed for even half the lengths that are claimed. They detract from genuine teams and encourage oneupmanship from other cheaters who seek attention as well.

And frankly, as amusing as it may be to some, it takes some nerve (and a shitload of naiveté) to try to deceive an audience without knowing them.

No one (on this particular thread) is willing to just freely give the benefit of the doubt to someone who raises as many red flags as you have; but to your credit you realised that a lot sooner than most. Goodbye indeed.
 
I've got a new streak, using the interesting Landorus-I and Tapu Koko, with Aegislash and Mega Gyarados in the back?
I was originally gonna wait until 300 because Smucks (my nickname for Smuckem) said that 300 should be my new goal before posting anything, but I decided, ehh why not. I'm just gonna post the team and streak right now.

Alrighty, let's break down this hyper offensive team that somehow hit 276 battles.
lando.PNG

OVERVIEW:
Landorus is in the front with its Sheer Force of power. But now in comes a very unpopular opinion. I like using Landorus-I MUCH more than Landorus-T. Sure, he might not have the great ability of Intimidate, but Sheer Force still does work. It's got great power alongside its Life Orb and Sheer Force-boosted Attacks such as, most notably, Earth Power. But it's hurt by quite a bit of stuff. It can't even take neutral damage all that well because of its absolute frailty. Its Speed tier, while amazing is still outsped by Garchomp, Mega Manectric and Mega Salamence, however, all of these threats have to be careful about switching in.

LandMaster (Landorus) @ Life Orb
Ability: Sheer Force
Level: 50
EVs: 252 SpA / 4 SpD / 252 Spe
Timid Nature
IVs: 0 Atk / 30 Def
- Earth Power
- Sludge Bomb
- Hidden Power [Ice]
- Protect

SET DETAILS:
Landorus' Earth Power is the best move for him to spam because of the Life Orb + Sheer Force-boosted modifier. It hits a TON of Pokemon for a TON of damage. Excadrill, Tyranitar, and Mega Metagross to name a few. Sludge Bomb is its best way to touch Grass- and Fairy-types, such as Whimsicott, Florges, and Lilligant. Hidden Power Ice is the only way for my lead Pokemon (Landorus and Tapu Koko) to OHKO most Dragons, such as non-Multiscale Dragonite, Choice Scarf Garchomp, Flygon, and Mega Salamence. Other Landorus have to be wary of Hidden Power Ice that my Landorus has as well as they do not have access to it. Protect is used to scout moves and let Tapu Koko take out an opponent while Landorus sees what's going on.

HOW I USED IT:
Landorus was used as a lead Pokemon. Tapu Koko and Landorus have a ton of synergy together. It's fantastic that instead of using Earthquake, Landorus uses the, what would've been inferior Earth Power, which takes out Steel-types and Rock-types that Tapu Koko can't do much to (aside from Grass Knot some of those Rock-types) Sludge Bomb's coverage allows Landorus to hit Grass-types that Tapu Koko cannot usually OHKO with Dazzling Gleam. Hidden Power Ice's dominant coverage is a great choice against Dragon-types, Flying-types and most notably, Ground-types that Tapu Koko cannot touch. Landorus' typing itself allows it to avoid Ground-type moves like Earthquake, notably from Garchomp.

OTHER OPTIONS:
This list is quite small, since Landorus is so frail and its moveset is already good already.
However, Landorus can afford to run Psychic over Hidden Power Ice, although not only will you not be able to OHKO most notably Dragons, Earth Power hits it just as hard, unless they avoid it like Crobat or take neutral damage like Mega Venusaur.
Substitute can be ran but Landorus does not have the space in its moveset to run it.
A Yache Berry can be used to eat one Ice-type move but not only would you give up a Life Orb boost, you're itemless once hit by one.

COUNTERS:
Ice-types: Speaking of Ice-types, that was by far its biggest problem. Pokemon like Glaceon, Mega Abomasnow and Regice can use Blizzard or Ice Beam to OHKO Landorus, forcing it to Protect more often. Regice, especially, is a problem due to it being a Specially Defensive tank. Rotom-Frost doesn't help much either.

Water-types: Mega Swampert, though taken care of by Tapu Koko's Grass Knot can become a huge problem for Landorus, setting up a Rain Dance and proceeding to Waterfall on Landorus since it would easily outspeed Landorus. Suicune can also be a problem, however that's a little less of an issue thanks to Tapu Koko taking care of it.

Speed Control: GOD, do I despise Trick Room, it never works for me but works for other people. Tailwind doesn't help much either. Thanks to Landorus being naturally fast, it's not gonna like being outspeed by slower Pokemon.

Mega Alakazam (Alakazam-3): DO NOT stay in on an Alakazam with the possibility of it being Set 3. Tracing Sheer Force might just be the end of your streak. Psychic OHKOes Tapu Koko and Landorus (~37% of the time), dent Aegislash with Shadow Ball and outspeed Mega Gyarados even after a Dragon Dance and OHKO with a Focus Blast.

Mega Tyranitar (Tyranitar-4): Though killed by a barrage of Dazzling Gleams and Earth Powers, Tyranitar can proceed to beat Landorus by using Ice Fang. And unless Intimidated, it will always OHKO Landorus.
koko.PNG

OVERVIEW:
Ahh, Tapu Koko. One of my favorite Pokemon in the seventh generation and easily my favorite Island Deity in the game. (Tapu Lele being a close second) It's been super reliable to get most of my streaks. With its fantastic ability in Electric Surge, Thunderbolt and Volt Switch are its best moves to use. Its typing itself is also fantastic and when that's the case, its coverage is amazing. It also has a fantastic Speed stat, which outspeeds some of the Choice Scarf users in the Battle Tree like Rampardos and Braviary. However, not all is good for the Electric Deity here, as it is HEAVILY reliant on Electric Terrain to deal damage with its STAB Electric-type attacks. Its Special Attack is much lower than its physical Attack stat. 95 Special Attack is quite low for it but it works, especially when you run Choice Spectacles to remedy that.

Event [Choice Specs] (Tapu Koko) @ Choice Specs
Ability: Electric Surge
Level: 50
Shiny: Yes
EVs: 4 Def / 252 SpA / 252 Spe
Timid Nature
IVs: 0 Atk
- Thunderbolt
- Volt Switch
- Dazzling Gleam
- Grass Knot

SET DETAILS:
Electric Surge is the reason for Tapu Koko's success. Thunderbolt is used in conjunction with the Electric Terrain to OHKO most threats such as Salamence (albeit 93.8% of the time), Jellicent, Mega Charizard Y, Greninja, Tornadus, and Porygon-Z. Volt Switch allows it to gain momentum by switching out. And honestly, I've said this before, but Volt Switch from a Choice Specs Tapu Koko under Electric Terrain FREAKING HURTS. Dazzling Gleam is its second STAB Option to hit Dragon- and Dark-types more easily such as Hydreigon, Weavile and Kingdra. Grass Knot is its best option against Rock and Ground-types like Rhyperior, Mega Swampert, and Hippowdon.

HOW I USED IT:
Tapu Koko was, alongside Landorus, a lead Pokemon. Tapu Koko's barrage of attacks can overwhelm the opponent, such as how Thunderbolt OHKOes a huge fraction of the Battle Tree Pokemon, such as Moltres, Articuno, Azelf, Tornadus, Thundurus, Mega Gyarados, Slowbro, Slowking, Skarmory (assuming not Sturdy), and Mega Alakazam.

OTHER OPTIONS:
Tapu Koko has a ton of other options. Though they are most of the time inferior to the Choice Specs set, a dedicated player can somehow make it work.
One can afford to run a Life Orb set, which is what I used to do until I realized the potential of Choice Specs.
Grass Knot can be replaced with Hidden Power Ice to hit Dragons more easily, however then you give up the ability to hit Ground-types like Mamoswine.
Taunt can be used to shut down Tailwind or Trick Room users such as Oranguru and Mega Pidgeot.
Assault Vest can be used to live more hits, however you then give up the excellent power that Tapu Koko has.
Electrium Z gives Tapu Koko one big nuke that can OHKO a portion of the Battle Tree, however this is done better by other Pokemon.

COUNTERS:
Electric Resistant Pokemon: Excadrill can outspeed Tapu Koko if under Sand Rush and OHKO with Earthquake. Choice Scarf Garchomp can also outspeed Tapu Koko as well. Tyranitar can set up a Dragon Dance and outspeed using Earthquake to beat Tapu Koko. Mega Tyranitar, though slower still has access to Earthquake, and so much still be wary for that.

Trick Room and Tailwind: Here's another Pokemon who hates Speed Control. Although this time Tapu Koko hates it even more than Landorus does. Slow Pokemon like Hippowdon can OHKO with Earthquake, however, would you really stay in on Trick Room with Tapu Koko?

Mega Gengar (Gengar-4): Mega Gengar becomes a problem especially when Landorus is gone as no one can safely take a hit from it. Tapu Koko can't even switch out unless it switches out RIGHT when Gengar Mega Evolves, and uses Sludge Bomb on Aegislash. However, if Landorus is still on the field, it is dealt with very easily.

Blissey: A specially defensive wall can beat out Tapu Koko and Landorus albeit under very hax measures. Either using Minimize and Mud Bomb, or using Calm Mind with Thunderbolt and Ice Beam. Oh, and both have access to Soft-Boiled. Of course they do.
aegislash (2).png

OVERVIEW:
Aegislash is a fantastic Pokemon to use in Singles and Doubles. Access to great STABs and protection moves in King's Shield and Wide Guard help the team out a lot, considering most of the moves that the Pokemon in this team are weak to, tend to be spread moves such as Blizzard, Rock Slide, and most notably Earthquake and Heat Wave. However, Stance Change is both a blessing and a curse. Blessing? The fact that Aegislash is slow as hell and changes at the last turn and its offensive stats become insane. The curse? Aegislash HAS to rely on King's Shield to change forms. But Aegislash is one of those Pokemon where even after its flaws. It's Uber for a reason.

Deception (Aegislash) @ Leftovers
Ability: Stance Change
Level: 50
EVs: 252 HP / 4 Def / 252 SpA
Quiet Nature
IVs: 0 Atk
- Flash Cannon
- Shadow Ball
- Wide Guard
- King's Shield

SET DETAILS:
Aegislash's STABs in Flash Cannon and Shadow Ball are both the same base power, though I see myself spamming Shadow Ball more often because it hits more types. Flash Cannon hits Rock-types, Ice-types and Fairy-types super hard, such as Regirock, Articuno and Florges. Shadow Ball hits Gengar, Gallade, and Gardevoir. Wide Guard blocks incoming spread moves like Earthquake, Heat Wave and Rock Slide. King's Shield is the reason Aegislash is Ubers in the first place. Leftovers provides it a way to get a tad bit of HP back every turn.

HOW I USED IT:
Aegislash is a fantastic utility Pokemon. Wide Guard is great to block those spread moves and let my other Pokemon either strike moves or set up.
Tapu Koko is assisted by blocking Earthquake, Landorus is assisted by blocking Blizzard or Heat Wave, and Gyarados is assisted by blocking Rock Slide. Also, its bulk in Shield Forme is fantastic. Honestly, I struggled with typing stuff on how I used it other than it being just a simple utility Pokemon.

OTHER OPTIONS:
Aegislash has very little options to use.
Aegislash can afford to run Ghostium Z over Leftovers or if you really want to be that guy, you can use Weakness Policy over it.
Shadow Sneak can also be used alongside the Weakness Policy to get powerful priority off.
Sacred Sword can also be used over Flash Cannon to better face off against Dark-types.
Substitute can be used over one of its moves, however Aegislash does not have the moveslot to use it.

COUNTERS:
Dark-types: Most Dark-types are specially defensive. Drapion, Weavile, and Incineroar can break Aegislash down very easily. However Drapion takes significant damage from Flash Cannon and Weavile is super frail. Unless Aegislash runs Sacred Sword, Incineroar fully beats Aegislash one-on-one. Scrafty is another bulky Pokemon that can easily take on Aegislash. Mega Gyarados and Tyranitar can set up a Dragon Dance and try hitting it with Crunch.

Fire-types: Mega Charizard X is one of the best counters to Aegislash. It can set up Dragon Dance and hit Aegislash with Flare Blitz. Darmanitan with a Choice Scarf is also a problem. Entei with Sacred Fire is one of the biggest problems for Aegislash to beat as Sacred Fire isn't affected by King's Shield. Entei with a Choice Scarf using Eruption, however, can easily be dealt with using Wide Guard.

gyarados (2).png

OVERVIEW:
Ahh.. Mega Gyarados. This is a VERY underrated Pokemon to use in Doubles in my opinion. Expect a lot of love for this one. Remember when you found that red Gyarados in the water in the Lake of Rage? Or any other game you could've possibly found a Shiny Gyarados? It's here to put in work against the Battle Tree. Mega Gyarados is one of the most terrifying Pokemon I've ever used. Low risk for setting up Dragon Dance and high rewards for beating down opponents. A useful ability in Intimidate lowers Attack, which is great, since Gyarados doesn't have the best physical bulk, however, it does have better bulk upon Mega Evolving. The AI can also get fooled by Gyarados Mega Evolving as well, especially with Psychic-type moves directed on Gyarados. However, it has a huge weakness to Electric-type moves especially when Gyarados is not Mega Evolved yet. Before it sets up is when it is at its weakest. So, nevertheless, Mega Gyarados is a fantastic addition to the team and is not something to mess around with.

Rampage [Doubles] (Gyarados-Mega) @ Gyaradosite
Ability: Intimidate
Level: 50
Shiny: Yes
EVs: 252 Atk / 4 Def / 252 Spe
Jolly Nature
- Dragon Dance
- Crunch
- Waterfall
- Protect

SET DETAILS:
Mega Gyarados is very capable of setting up a Dragon Dance on opponents that it easily walls. In general, it's also used because Gyarados is kind of slow before. Waterfall and Crunch are its chosen STAB moves to use, with Waterfall, while hitting Moltres and Landorus very hard, also has a great chance to flinch opponents, while Crunch hits Mega Metagross, Uxie, Dusknoir, and Jellicent. Protect is used to protect against certain moves aimed at Mega Gyarados, such as Thunderbolt, Close Combat and Moonblast.

HOW I USED IT:
Because Mega Gyarados is one of my favorite Mega Pokemon, I am exceptionally biased for using this Pokemon in the Battle Tree. Gyarados is kept in the back as Intimidate support. Mold Breaker is situational to say the least, it prevents Waterfall from being drawn in by Storm Drain and prevents effectiveness against Dry Skin Pokemon like Toxicroak.

OTHER OPTIONS:
Mega Gyarados has a surprising amount of options.
Though not bad, regular Gyarados can function in this team, however then the Electric weakness becomes more prominent and can be hit by Psychic-type Attacks. Using Flyinium Z alongside Dragon Dance and Bounce can be a huge surprise against Tangrowth and Mega Venusaur, however like said before, it usually isn't recommended to run regular Gyarados.
Earthquake can be ran to hit the Rotom Appliances and Mega Mawile more easily but then this left me hitting Tapu Koko and Aegislash. If I were to run Earthquake on Gyarados, then I would either have to swap into Landorus to not hit a teammate or spam Wide Guard with Aegislash.
Ice Fang can be used to hit the Dragons that threaten the many Pokemon on my team like Goodra and Mega Salamence.
Iron Head gives it a way to hit Fairy-types such as Ribombee, Togekiss, Sylveon, Mega Gardevoir, and Alolan Ninetales. Alolan Ninetales is a key threat to take down due to access to Freeze-Dry. Mimikyu's Disguise, because of Mold Breaker will be negated and then Mega Gyarados can easily OHKO Mimikyu by using Iron Head. Taunt can be used to negate Trick Room, Tailwind, or setup sweepers of their usefulness. Like said before, however, these moves are very niche to use and are only useful in select situations.

COUNTERS:
Electric-types: Zapdos, Thundurus, and Raikou can easily deal with Mega Gyarados with their STAB super-effective Electric-type moves.

Fairy-types: Unless running the niche Iron Head or Earthquake, Florges, Mega Mawile, and Mega Altaria can easily deal with Mega Gyarados with super-effective Fairy-type moves. Protecting against the Fairy-type move might not be bad, but Mega Mawile has a ton of power to go with that and might go for Mega Gyarados' teammate instead of it.

Fighting-types: Fighting-types such as Mega Heracross, Mega Medicham and Hawlucha can either take one hit from Mega Gyarados or outspeed it in general and hit it with a Close Combat or High Jump Kick. Remember, before it sets up is when it is at its weakest, and Protecting against the Fighting-type move (notably High Jump Kick) can dent through it.

Revenge Killer: Mega Alakazam is very hard to deal with using Mega Gyarados, it has to set up TWO Dragon Dances to outspeed and kill Mega Alakazam. Choice Scarf Garchomp can outspeed and use Earthquake to revenge kill Mega Gyarados if weakened. Tsareena can outspeed and use its multiple moves against Mega Gyarados, mainly Trop Kick to lower its Attack stat.

LOSS VIDEO: NS2W - WWWW - WWXW - 6ZHQ


WOW. That was a lot. Gonna go now.
See you guys in the next post.
 
Is there any place where I can check which tree sets appear after battle 40? I never really spent a lot of time checking the sets out, but just reached 100 victories on super double and would like to get as high as possible, so I figured out that'd be essential. The spreadsheet with the sets has all of them, but I don't know which ones only appear until battle 39.
 
Felt like I was overdue to make another one of these compilations, so here it is.

What do you do when Mence or Cune goes down and you're too scared to take their mon head-on? It's time for Plan G!

This compilation seriously drained me. I haven't even got half way through the commentary yet, and I'm already getting lazy with it. There is around 2.5x as much raw footage in this as in Sleeping at the Wheel. And this isn't even my final compilation...
 
Once I get it on YouTube I will post the video using the media option on here(don't know how to upload battle videos)
This is how I beat Red on my single battle tree run (Shout out to Max. Optimizer and Inkblot since the Pokemon I used during most of the run come from their games)
EDIT here it is
Again shout out to Max. Optimizer and Inkblot for the Pokemon that helped me get through the run
 
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To upload battle videos in-game, go to the castle in Festival Plaza, and check the PC near the entrance. You will be given the option to search for battle videos or make them public.

As for the team itself, sorry to say this, but your shiny Naganadel won't quite cut it in Supers, the main reason being it'll be downlevelled to 50. Additionally, Draco Meteor and Fire Blast are not consistent and are liable to miss at the worst possible times. Naganadel also lacks the power to break through some of the Tree's scariest threats (Draco Meteor does about 2/3 to the Mega Kangas, which are common if you're playing on (ultra) Sun, while Fire Blast fails to OHKO Mega Metagross, which destroys you in return with a STAB move and is extremely scary to face as a last mon if you're down a poke)
Mega Alakazam traces Beast Boost and proceeds to mow through your team without so much as batting its moustache.

But of course, we'd be able to give you better advice if you posted your team in Showdown's teambuilder format. (Just recreate your Pokemon's stats by fiddling with the sliders if you haven't used Showdown's teambuilder before)
 
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The easiest teams to play that have been successful involve a Dragon-Steel-Water core, and both of them are available by QR code.

They are: a Dragonite-Aegi-Fini team by me made for pre-bank (SuMo QR here and USUM QR here) a Garchomp-Scizor-Fini team that has so many variations of it, but I like this one the best.
Can you please use the image upload feature to post the USUM QR code for the team you made because that page won't load on my phone (crappy cheap phone)
EDIT it finally loaded but can you still post it as the QR code won't show up if I m not logged in (and the phone won't log in (already tried before on my moms))
EDIT okay so it won't log in on my moms but it will on mine lNeveind it says it generates a custom code for each game so only my logged in game can use the on it gave me
Neve
 
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Link to screenshot with battle video code:
I got my longest streak in any battle facility ever, with a (admittedly somewhat disappointing, personally) 180 Wins in Super Doubles.

I found this team to be fairly consistent, only really struggling with things that were faster than Raichu using Fake Out turn 1, and having a bit of an issue with Ghost-types (particularly Mega Gengar, who outpaces the entire team and threatens huge damage on everyone). I really wanted to hit 200 to get the Starf Berry, but this will have to do for now. If anyone has any suggestions to improve, I'm all ears. In particular, I've considered dropping Feint on Raichu for something more consistently useful, like Volt Switch or Protect (or maybe Nuzzle if I were to replace Fini). I've also thought of replacing Lando with something that might synergize a little better, rather than doubling up on Ice weaknesses.


Raichu @ Focus Sash
Nature: Timid
Ability: Lightning Rod
EVs: 4 Def / 252 SpA / 252 Spe
- Fake Out
- Feint
- Encore
- Thunderbolt

Part one of the lead pair, pretty much always immobilizing one of the opponents turn 1. Encore on a speedy mon is great when the foes go for non-attacking moves, and is pretty much why I chose Raichu over Togedemaru (yes toge learns Encore, but Raichu is much faster). Sash to survive any one hit, tbolt for actual damage (very nice with a Lightning Rod boost). Lightning Rod is also great to take Electric moves targeting Fini, as well as Twaves aimed at Mence. As I've already said, Feint was kind of just filler, might be better replaced by something else.


Salamence @ Salamencite
Nature: Hasty
Ability: Intimidate
EVs: 60 Atk / 196 SpA / 252 Spe
- Hyper Voice
- Double-Edge
- Flamethrower
- Protect

The other half of the lead pair, Mence provides immediate Intimidate, and threatens anything not Rock, Electric, or Steel immediately with either of it's great STAB Aerilate moves. Hyper Voice is very spammable, and Double-Edge provides a stronger single-target hit. Flamethrower helps deal with Steels (particularly Ferrothorn, which my team does not like). Not much else to say, Mence is good.


Tapu Fini @ Wiki Berry
Nature: Modest
Ability: Misty Surge
EVs: 236 HP / 108 Def / 132 SpA / 28 SpD / 4 Spe
- Muddy Water
- Moonblast
- Icy Wind
- Protect

Fini's type and bulk are always useful, and speed control with Icy Wind is extremely valuable. Muddy Water accuracy drops and Moonblast SpA drops often helped swing games back into my favor. Berry obviously keeps it around for much longer, Protect is obvious, Misty Terrain keeps it and Raichu safe from status. Pairing it with Raichu against any Electric is also a very easy way to get an Encore off, and render one opponent helpless.


Landorus-Therian @ Groundium Z
Nature: Jolly
Ability: Intimidate
EVs: 4 HP / 252 Atk / 252 Spe
- Earthquake
- Rock Slide
- Superpower
- Protect

Probably the team member who was least pivotal, but it was still very useful. Cycling Intimidates with it and Mence could shut down many physical attackers, and Rock Slide flinches can often seal the deal on a game. Max speed Jolly let it outpace the plethora of neutral speed nature base 100s. Superpower was originally U-Turn, but I found myself rarely using it, and Superpower offered a strong hit on things like Porygon2 and Blissey without having to pop my Z-move. Speaking of which, Groundium allowed me to still use a ground move while Raichu was alongside Lando (as well as Fini if Fini didn't Protect), and it provided great insurance against the likes of Minimize Muk and Double Team Blissey/Regigigas.

I'll probably aim for that 200 win streak again sometime soon. Coming so close only to lose to some unfortunate RNG is just a bad feel.
 
yeah that makes sense, but then: why is togedemaru so seldom used? wait.. there are actually way more togedemarus on the leaderboard than i thought^^
(i like raichu more because it can actually make use of its boosts)
 
yeah that makes sense, but then: why is togedemaru so seldom used? wait.. there are actually way more togedemarus on the leaderboard than i thought^^
(i like raichu more because it can actually make use of its boosts)
Togedemaru suffers from the mediocre speed tier and being 4x weak to spread moves, so while it is indeed very strong, it does require some sort of support or to function well in the team. It's very great if you need the insane role compression it provides (Fake Out, L-rod, Nuzzle, double flinch stabs, immune to poison and sand, strong defensive type, even gets access to Endeavor for FEAR), but if you only need one of those, there's better options. Hitmontop Scrafty and Incineroar definitely challenge the Fake Out spot by having stronger offensive presence and Intimidate, for example, and obviously teams running Tapu Lele can't run Fake out either.
 

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