Battle Tree Discussion and Records

Greninja + Focus Sash + Mat Block is a tried and solid lead for doubles :)

Generally with Ice Beam, Dark Pulse and Grass Knot as offensive moves.
I made some changes, so by the moment this is what I have:


Metagross-Mega @ Metagrossite
Ability: Tough Claws
EVs: 4 HP / 252 Atk / 252 Spe
Adamant Nature
- Zen Headbutt
- Stomping Tantrum
- Iron Head
- Protect

Greninja @ Focus Sash
Ability: Protean
EVs: 4 HP / 252 SpA / 252 Spe
Modest Nature
IVs: 0 Atk
- Mat Block
- Scald
- Dark Pulse
- Ice Beam

I must say that I feel better with this leads, anyway I keep with no idea about the 2 left to cover them. I guess i would need something tanky... Maybe koko and garchomp, as I would get some attacks that can hit both enemies (dazzing gleam, discharge, rock slide, earthquake).
 
Consider spread attacks have reduced power in doubles AND force you to use protect on your other mon often (+ issue of several being inaccurate).

Use strong single target accurate moves , it's usually better unless you specifically build the team around being immune to your own spreads.
 
Speaking of inaccurate spread moves... I need help with a doubles mon.

Not help improving it, though - I need your help to make me stop using it.

Rotom-Heat @ Wide Lens
Ability: Levitate
Nature: -Atk, +Def or + SpD
EVs: 252 HP / some kind of Def + SpD, maybe a dash of spA

-Electroweb
-Overheat
-Hidden Power: Ice
-Protect

Usually partnered with Life Orb Kartana, with Calm Mind Tapu Fini and a random fourth like Curse A-Muk in the wings. This build is so weak, but I just can't seem to get over its strong points.
I never really cared about Rotom in general, until I sat down and discovered that the vast majority of the teams I ever tried to brew up would benefit from a fire type an electric type. I had completely forgotten there existed one that was both, and with Levitate, to boot. I had always been turned off by Rotom’s non-electric STAB inaccuracy, but now that he has access to Electroweb, I decided to try out a Wide Lens set.

Electroweb is a weird speed control. It’s pretty ghetto at speed control itself, but it happens to halve most offensive flying types, break sashes, and generally soften everything up. However, it flops against speedy ground threats, electric-absorbent Jolteon and Electvire, and backfires horribly against Defiant-type abilities. Icy Wind definitely seems better for a wide variety of reasons, but getting STAB on that would mean you'd have significantly fewer resistances than Rotom-Heat. All things considered, the majority of the time, Electroweb + Protect usually sets up for a good opening, and I think Electroweb + Fake Out could be similarly stationed. Also, AI note: almost every turn where an AI Dragon Dances or Quiver Dances and is Electrowebbed, they will continue boosting so long as you keep dropping their speed, even to the points where a Salamance went to +3, a Rhibombee went to +4, and a Volcanroa went to +5, all still unsatisfied.

Overheat, even with stone zero SpA investment, seems pretty good. It does a surprisingly passable job at chunking problematic ice, steel, and grass types, often killing after an Electroweb. This Rotom doesn’t even care much about being -2, as its Electroweb's utility is still intact. I’ve tried a Firium-Z set with Will-O-Wisp, but base Overheat usually does enough damage, and none of my teams have taken enough advantage of Wisp for it to be worth a slot.

HP Ice is kind of underwhelming, but sadly kind of necessary. Losing momentum against ground mons is dangerous, especially because Levitate tends to give you the safe opportunity to stay in against them. Overheat can handle squishy ground mons well, but those aren't usually the ones you're worried about. It is nice being able to hit dragons, though.

I used to run Toxic in the Protect slot, but I’ve become less and less enamored with Toxic the more I play, especially in doubles. I’m just not sure what else I would run on this Wide Lens set. I've found Thunderbolt and Volt Switch to be a bit useless, but I think that might just be a result of this build being bad, and/or me just being dumb. Pain Split tends to net me very little survivability, Will-O-Wisp tends to backfire about as often as it does me good, and screens tend to not be a winning strategy. Ally Swap is incredibly fun, especially alongside Calm Mind Tapu Fini, but that requires Rotom to have some kind of recovery, and a single missed read is really bad.

Rotom-H takes Hydro Pumps and Stone Edges poorly. Other than that, not too many things bother attacking him. His defensive typing is quite unique, and it often seems to give him a free pass versus many offensive types. The AI only targets him with SE or strong neutral hits when he's at full health, although once he falls to half HP, he starts to look tasty, even to resisted attackers.

His typing often makes prediction and switching easier, especially with the right teammates. When alongside Kartana, you can usually safely bet that only poison, rock, water, and the occasional dragon attacks are pointed at Rotom (although my specially defensive Rotom-H takes every Fake Out ever, for whatever reason). Unfortunately, when that assumption fails, it tends to fail hard, because Rotom's bulk isn't good enough to take a second strong unresisted hit.

Switch-ins are where Rotom-H really shines. Switching him into attacks was never the best, since his bulk is so poor - but the tree AI has so much respect for his resistances that you can usually swap any teammate into his slot unmolested. Even if they do attack him, you can usually narrow it down to the only move they would choose - although the occasional wacky choice can be devastating.

Offensive
Obviously, with no investment, Rotom-H isn't sweeping anytime soon. However, Electroweb often does enough chip damage vs non-specially-defensive enemies to ensure his teammate a turn 2 KO (especially if Rotom also gets to move first). It also happens to halve a lot of offensive flying types, even through the doubles dispersion. HP Ice gives him a few cheap shots vs 4x targets, and Overheat against the right types is surprisingly potent.

That being said, he easily finds himself lost against any moderately bulky foes who aren't done in by speed drops. Toxic was my go-to for these situations, but residual damage isn't really where you want to be in doubles, and residual damage on a recovery-less set isn't really where you want to be, ever.

He seems untouchable, until he gets touched - but he gets touched so infrequently it can fool you into thinking his bulk is real. His utility is great, but there are enough holes in this Wide Lens gameplan that it is unlikely to hold water over hundreds of battles, let alone thousands.

Thus, I believe this Rotom is likely too passive and slightly too fragile to be a reasonable choice.


However, I can't stop trying. HELP
 
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turskain

activated its Quick Claw!
is a Community Contributor
Speaking of inaccurate spread moves... I need help with a doubles mon.

Not help improving it, though - I need your help to make me stop using it.

Rotom-Heat @ Wide Lens
Ability: Levitate
Nature: -Atk, +Def or + SpD
EVs: 252 HP / some kind of Def + SpD, maybe a dash of spA

-Electroweb
-Overheat
-Hidden Power: Ice
-Protect

Usually partnered with Life Orb Kartana, with Calm Mind Tapu Fini and a random fourth like Curse A-Muk in the wings. This build is so weak, but I just can't seem to get over its strong points.
I never really cared about Rotom in general, until I sat down and discovered that the vast majority of the teams I ever tried to brew up would benefit from a fire type an electric type. I had completely forgotten there existed one that was both, and with Levitate, to boot. I had always been turned off by Rotom’s non-electric STAB inaccuracy, but now that he has access to Electroweb, I decided to try out a Wide Lens set.

Electroweb is a weird speed control. It’s pretty ghetto at speed control itself, but it happens to halve most offensive flying types, break sashes, and generally soften everything up. However, it flops against speedy ground threats, electric-absorbent Jolteon and Electvire, and backfires horribly against Defiant-type abilities. Icy Wind definitely seems better for a wide variety of reasons, but getting STAB on that would mean you'd have significantly fewer resistances than Rotom-Heat. All things considered, the majority of the time, Electroweb + Protect usually sets up for a good opening, and I think Electroweb + Fake Out could be similarly stationed. Also, AI note: almost every turn where an AI Dragon Dances or Quiver Dances and is Electrowebbed, they will continue boosting so long as you keep dropping their speed, even to the points where a Salamance went to +3, a Rhibombee went to +4, and a Volcanroa went to +5, all still unsatisfied.

Overheat, even with stone zero SpA investment, seems pretty good. It does a surprisingly passable job at chunking problematic ice, steel, and grass types, often killing after an Electroweb. This Rotom doesn’t even care much about being -2, as its Electroweb's utility is still intact. I’ve tried a Firium-Z set with Will-O-Wisp, but base Overheat usually does enough damage, and none of my teams have taken enough advantage of Wisp for it to be worth a slot.

HP Ice is kind of underwhelming, but sadly kind of necessary. Losing momentum against ground mons is dangerous, especially because Levitate tends to give you the safe opportunity to stay in against them. Overheat can handle squishy ground mons well, but those aren't usually the ones you're worried about. It is nice being able to hit dragons, though.

I used to run Toxic in the Protect slot, but I’ve become less and less enamored with Toxic the more I play, especially in doubles. I’m just not sure what else I would run on this Wide Lens set. I've found Thunderbolt and Volt Switch to be a bit useless, but I think that might just be a result of this build being bad, and/or me just being dumb. Pain Split tends to net me very little survivability, Will-O-Wisp tends to backfire about as often as it does me good, and screens tend to not be a winning strategy. Ally Swap is incredibly fun, especially alongside Calm Mind Tapu Fini, but that requires Rotom to have some kind of recovery, and a single missed read is really bad.

Rotom-H takes Hydro Pumps and Stone Edges poorly. Other than that, not too many things bother attacking him. His defensive typing is quite unique, and it often seems to give him a free pass versus many offensive types. The AI only targets him with SE or strong neutral hits when he's at full health, although once he falls to half HP, he starts to look tasty, even to resisted attackers.

His typing often makes prediction and switching easier, especially with the right teammates. When alongside Kartana, you can usually safely bet that only poison, rock, water, and the occasional dragon attacks are pointed at Rotom (although my specially defensive Rotom-H takes every Fake Out ever, for whatever reason). Unfortunately, when that assumption fails, it tends to fail hard, because Rotom's bulk isn't good enough to take a second strong unresisted hit.

Switch-ins are where Rotom-H really shines. Switching him into attacks was never the best, since his bulk is so poor - but the tree AI has so much respect for his resistances that you can usually swap any teammate into his slot unmolested. Even if they do attack him, you can usually narrow it down to the only move they would choose - although the occasional wacky choice can be devastating.

Offensive
Obviously, with no investment, Rotom-H isn't sweeping anytime soon. However, Electroweb often does enough chip damage vs non-specially-defensive enemies to ensure his teammate a turn 2 KO (especially if Rotom also gets to move first). It also happens to halve a lot of offensive flying types, even through the doubles dispersion. HP Ice gives him a few cheap shots vs 4x targets, and Overheat against the right types is surprisingly potent.

That being said, he easily finds himself lost against any moderately bulky foes who aren't done in by speed drops. Toxic was my go-to for these situations, but residual damage isn't really where you want to be in doubles, and residual damage on a recovery-less set isn't really where you want to be, ever.

He seems untouchable, until he gets touched - but he gets touched so infrequently it can fool you into thinking his bulk is real. His utility is great, but there are enough holes in this Wide Lens gameplan that it is unlikely to hold water over hundreds of battles, let alone thousands.

Thus, I believe this Rotom is likely too passive and slightly too fragile to be a reasonable choice.


However, I can't stop trying. HELP
Ditch Wide Lens, I think 90% Overheat and 95% Electroweb are both a lesser evil for a defensive Pokémon than losing out on useful items. Have you considered Ally Switch? This move could actively rotate Kartana out of special attacks, letting Rotom take one for the team. If Wide Lens is ditched, you could have Sitrus Berry or a 50% recovery berry, or even an Assault Vest set (Volt Switch over Protect?) to assist the bulk somewhat. I think STAB Thunderbolt could also be worth a slot, in addition to Electroweb for occasions where reliable damage is more desirable - Ally Switch to replace Protect, and experimenting with different options for HP Ice and the held item would be my suggestions. Or a different team, that uses Rotom-Wash, the Rotom with good defensive typing without the Fire weaknesses.

I used a Rotom with Assault Vest and some offensive investment in the Maison - I don't feel like it was that great but if wanting to cut passivity a bit and have some bulk at the same time a tweaked spread with a Modest nature could give more value than investing in bulk, but ending up lacking in that department anyway.
 
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Hello! I am back again reporting a team of 59 wins on doubles battle tree. I am still working on this team and want to reach 100+ with it eventually.

I

When I first thinking of this team, I was thinking of Speed Swap Pheromosa onto something really slow to make it very effective. My first thought was Mega Garchomp, but then I realized that if it got too cold outside, I'd be giving up Pheromosa's speed and a mega, then my next thought went to Mega Slowbro, and it seemed like the perfect candidate. Shell Armor, bulky, and can set up.

I have tried this strategy before with a Mega Aggron but it didn't go too well

So here is the team started looking like this

Slowbro @ Slowbronite
Ability: Oblivious
Level: 50
EVs: 4 HP / 44 Def / 236 SpA / 220 SpD / 4 Spe
Calm Nature
IVs: 0 Atk
- Calm Mind
- Slack Off
- Scald
- Psychic

This spread probably is not optimal, I maybe it bulky enough to live mega Gengar shadow ball (didn't see throughout this run) but it was still doing what it was meant to do. Setup, not die, and sweep.


Pheromosa @ Focus Sash
Ability: Beast Boost
Level: 50
Shiny: Yes
EVs: 4 Atk / 252 SpA / 252 Spe
Mild Nature
IVs: 1 Def
- Speed Swap
- Low Kick
- Ice Beam
- Protect

This is my shiny Pheromosa I hunted a while ago. I know this isn't the optimal Pheromosa, I was planning on hunting one for battle tree if this one went well. This at first had high jump kick, but ever since my consecutive 3 battles where I double missed high jump kick, I switched to low kick immediately.

After I had the core of the team, I wanted to build off of Slowbro, making him even harder to knock out, and also have mons that cover his weaknesses. At first I was thinking about Clefairy, but since I already knew the inevitable Charizard Y would pop up, I decided for a weather Pokemon. My mind went to Alolan Ninetales


Ninetales-Alola @ Light Clay
Ability: Snow Warning
Level: 50
EVs: 252 SpA / 4 SpD / 252 Spe
Timid Nature
IVs: 0 Atk
- Aurora Veil
- Blizzard
- Freeze-Dry
- Protect

Standard Aurora Veil Ninetales set. Nothing much to say here, was thinking of Moonblast but decided against it.

Next, I wanted a Pokemon that can deal with strong Electric/Grass types that would threaten Slowbro, so I went with heatran.


Heatran @ Leftovers
Ability: Flash Fire
Level: 50
EVs: 212 HP / 4 Def / 252 SpA / 36 SpD / 4 Spe
Modest Nature
IVs: 10 Atk
- Heat Wave
- Earth Power
- Substitute
- Protect

This is Heatran set I have used a lot in doubles, this spread isn't anything specifically for tree, just a sub leftovers Pokemon.


The Team:

When I first used the team, I started to realize that Speed Swap wasn't the definitive strategy of this team, in fact, it was only an alternative/last move Pheromosa gets off before it faints. there were instances where I knew Pheromosa was going to be knocked down to sash so I used Speed Swap and used Protect to pseudo redirect attacks away from Slowbro.

I am currently thinking of changing out Alolan Ninetales but I don't know what to, my initial thought was a lightning rod user, but I am torn between Togedemaru or Raichu
 
Reporting a 202 and going streak at doubles battle tree using this team:

"Darjeeling" Sceptile @ Sceptilite
Overgrow
Timid 252 SAtk/ 252 Spd/4 SDef
Detect
Energy Ball
Dragon Pulse
Nature Power

Tapu Koko @ Life Orb
Electric Surge
Timid 252 SAtk/ 252 Spd/4 SDef
Protect
Discharge
Dazzling Gleam
Taunt

"Pumbaa" Mamoswine @ Groundium Z
Thick Fat
Adamant 4 HP/ 252 Atk/ 252 Spd
Protect
Icicle Crash
Earthquake
Ice Shard

"Enterprise" Celesteela @ Electric Seed
Beast Boost
Adamant 100 HP/156 Atk/252 SDef
Acrobatics
Heavy Slam
Leech Seed
Wide Guard

Strategy is simple. Start with Sceptile and Koko and attack whatever you can kill or is a bigger threat. The other two are for clean up or the things the leads have trouble with.

Sceptile's set is just aiming at maximum coverage. Nature Power helps a lot with Electric terrain, turning into Thunderbolt and having pseudo-stab. Even Tri attack occasionally comes in handy against grass types. I started the streak with a modest Sceptile to abuse Timid Koko buffing it before it gets a hit off but the combo was too vulnerable to Crobats. Timid Sceptile can kill Crobats with Nature Power before they can become an issue.

Tapu Koko is the standard fare. Discharge is great because it cleans up what Sceptile leaves behind, dents whatever else is on the field and buffs Sceptile's Sp Attack all at once. Plus, with a 30% chance to paralyze, occasional paralysis hax is appreciated too. Taunt is mainly for preventing Trick Room but it's not used much since the most common setters I encountered were Slowbro/king or Carbink and they are mercilessly destroyed by the lead pair.

Mamoswine picks off most speed boosters that somehow survive the first two and provides a solid non-freezable ice resist. It's also immune to Discharge which is handy. Groundium because Koko is already using Life Orb and because having a super powerful Earthquake that doesn't require Koko to protect is always nice. I started off with Icium but encountered way too many situations where Earthquake+Discharge would have been more favorable and a lot of bulky waters in general. I initially chose Mamoswine to counter opposing Mega Sceptile and it's gone above and beyond that duty.

Celesteela rounds out the team with its Fairy resistance. There's that one veteran and the Pokemon Center ladies who like to use Fairies who give my other members problems. Celesteela demolishes them with Heavy Slam while taking pittance in damage in return. Aside from fairies, Grass types also rain on my parade so I gave it Acrobatics with the Electric Seed since Air Slash is meh at best. The bulk is unreal, though, I've only needed to soak up three hits at most. Celesteela is also untouchable by the Toxic/Double Team Tauros/Cresselia and Minimize Blissey and also has more PP than them, allowing my other members to deal with more immediate threats with the security of knowing that they cannot win against me. In fact, Heavy Slam destroys Blissey after minimize. Wide Guard protects my other team members from Earthquakes, Blizzards, Eruptions and Surfs while also ensuring Celesteela doesn't get hit by Discharge, although if it really has to, it's tanked a Discharge once or twice. Leech Seed was barely used. IDK what else to put there though. The EVs are mainly to ensure Heavy Slam 2HKOs uninvested Garchomp.

The biggest threat to the lead are Scarfchomp since they can KO either one and I don't know who they'll target. When the opponent leads with a Chomp, I double protect and let them play their hand first. If it Earthquakes, I switch Koko out for Celesteela. If Outrage, Celesteela goes in for Sceptile. Aside from that, Faries are a headache since they have generally good Special bulk and take Sceptile out easily. I generally switch Sceptile out for Celesteela until it's gone. Bulky Grass types were also a concern, especially Megasaur. If Sceptile has a few boosts under its belt, it's easily dealt with but otherwise, Celesteela comes in and uses Acrobatics on it either 2HKOing it or setting it up for a future KO. Whimsicott is the worst thing for this team to face since it will take at least two turns to get Swine or Steela in to KO it and Koko and Sceptile can't generally KO them without a lot of boosts. They're also fairly unpredicatable with the Twinkle Tackle one killing Sceptile and severely denting Koko and Mamoswine. This one's easily dealt with by Celesteela but there's one set that has Tailwind that ruins this team's day. This team is generally all about going first and Tailwind makes it so that they get outsped by a lot of things. Luckily, it's only four turns to stall out and quite a few times, Sceptile and Koko still outspeed anyway. Nidoking/Queen are an annoyance but I've dealt with them by Protecting with one of my leads, switching the other with Mamoswine and KOing them with Tectonic Rage/Icicle Crash. Rotom Heat resists all my major attacks but is easily worn down and Overheat weakens it the longer it stays around. I've also had trouble with that one Latios set with Brightpowder but that's just hax and Gleam + Ice Shard revenge kills nicely.

Overall, it's a fun team to play and I look forward to seeing how far it can go.
 

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Eisenherz

50% Berry enthusiast
is a Top Smogon Social Media Contributor
\o/ Submitting an ongoing streak of 1000 in Ultra Sun Super Doubles, with the same team originally reported here, QR code version available here. \o/

Battle 1000 vs. Colress: XQ7G-WWWW-WWWR-BGQL


Since I already have a team report for it, I won't be going too much into the team as I usually would; everything I wrote in my previous streak report still applies, and the USUM changes didn't affect much (the team has a pretty good matchup against Kukui generally). However, having another long streak with it, I noticed a lot of things that I hadn't the first time around, and also probably got a bit better overall at handling the team, so I still have quite a lot to write about in this post!

I started the streak back in June. After my MimiLax streak ended, I took that opportunity to try out a lot of different fun teams, which I had been craving (Team LC being the only one of them to actually reach the leaderboard, lol), but I came to a point where I wanted to have a serious attempt at reaching 1000. I hesitated for a while between this team and MimiLax, since I firmly believed both could achieve it, but I went the rain route since I hadn't used it in a long time. Getting back into it was weird, even though I had hundreds of battles with it, it didn't feel that intuitive anymore. I constantly wondered what I used to do in this or that situation, and looking back at it, my first ~100 battles or so, I was playing pretty poorly!

The team takes experience; it’s straightforward, but about every turn offers multiple good choices, many of which could work out, and the best one isn’t always obvious (with experience, it becomes easier to pick the play - it took me about 250 battles this time to be fully comfortable with my patterns of play). Knowing when it’s ok to sacrifice, to let go of the sash, when to rather preserve and switch, when to bait... Pelipper can really make use of any of its 4 moves on turn 1... or switch! It's easy to form habits and forget about the other possibilities that exist, and I'm sure I can still gain more helpful experience with the team even now.

What I really love about the team is its nice mix of offence with the skill required, which keeps it from getting boring. Playing straightforward with the team can get you far, but not 1000-far. As soon as one starts making use of all the tools it offers, I think it becomes an extremely solid team, offering flexibility and second chances.

The team:

@ Focus Sash

Modest | Drizzle
IVs: 31/0/31/31/31/31
EVs: 4 HP / 252 SpAtk / 252 Spe
Tailwind / Hurricane / Brine / Protect


Nothing has changed about Pelipper... except I now have it in a Dive Ball over a Quick Ball. Can't underestimate how optimal aesthetics affect your gameplay! The droplets of water when Pelipper comes out of the Ball are just perfect, a foreshadowing of the upcoming deluge on the field!

I already explained my choice of Brine in the previous report and my points still stand - however, I have seen some people raising doubts about the necessity of having Tailwind, sometimes seen as somewhat of a filler, since on a rain team, rain itself is your speed control... right? I can see how this line of thought makes sense if you haven't used the team much, but I can assure that Tailwind is extremely important, so this time, instead of making Brine's plea, I will make Tailwind's plea:

- Pelipper's own speed. While Koko is very fast and outspeeds almost everything turn 1, Pelipper has a middling speed. If Pelipper is going to move after the opponent anyway, Tailwind is a no-drawback option, since next turn it will attack first, and be set up to attack first on the following turns as well, no matter whether the incoming Pokémon naturally outspeed it or not. This is the most basic line of thought of Tailwind, but Pelipper in particular gets a lot of mileage out of it, since it does have a pretty big offensive presence, and is the team's main way of dealing with Grass-types. When Serperior or Sceptile is in the opponent's backline, having Tailwind up already saves a lot of headaches.

- Opposing Tailwind. While Prankster Whimsicott is the main culprit, a handful of opposing Pokémon can set up Tailwind (including opposing Pelipper in rain matchups), and the opponent having Tailwind up while you don't can be fatal. While Trick Room tends to be managable to stall out thanks to Celesteela and Swampert's matchup against it, the trainers that carry Tailwind tend to have very threatening Pokémon that may make it difficult, if not impossible to stall out the turns. Speed is this team's main asset and losing that advantage is bad.

- Opposing rain. If I had to pick the most important reason, it would be this one. Opposing rain trainers may only be a rare case in a while, but depending on whether they roll Swift Swim as their ability, the trouble can be instant. For example, Kingdra can immediately OHKO Tapu Koko with a rain-boosted Hydro Pump, and there is no switch-in; incidentally, losing Koko is losing your best way of dealing with Kingdra, which is OHKOd by Thunder. The same can be said of Beartic4, which can OHKO Koko with Subzero Slammer (it will usually prefer Rock Slide, but that can be equally bad with flinches). With Koko gone, rain teams have immense offensive pressure since Swampert is not a resist and Celesteela can be overwhelmed quickly because of the rain boost. The answer to this madness is Tailwind, every time. It neuters the opposing Swift Swim, and gives Koko/Swampert their advantage back. With its sash, Pelipper is perfect here, because Tailwind is pretty much guaranteed, the only decision to make is whether to risk Tapu Koko turn 1 or not.

- Opposing weather. Weather is extremely common in the Tree (that's common knowledge), and I've seen several Tailwind detractors suggest Rain Dance in its place to deal with opposing weather. In the long run, this is a lousy plan, as Pelipper's speed doesn't allow it to Rain Dance reliably without being KOd. Against sun teams, the common Charizard Y is likely to target it, whether with Solar Beam or Heat Wave, and its partner will often outspeed as well, making it unsafe to Rain Dance even with sash. In the case the AI sets up Sunny Day manually, the same is often the case, especially since sun teams have several Chlorophyll users. Sand is not a big deal for the team, as Swampert and Celesteela don't mind being in sand or facing most sand users, so resetting weather is not a priority there, especially since Pelipper doesn't want to stay in on these Rock-types. If the AI manually sets up Hail, the sash gets broken on that turn (let's assume turn 1 since it's the most common), in which case Rain Dancing turn 2 is at the cost of Pelipper's life. And sacrificing Pelipper to set up the rain is asking for trouble, because weather teams usually have several setters, and there could easily be another lurking in the back, in which case losing Pelipper means the weather war is already lost (and losing the weather war against sun is usually fatal, even if you start as a 3v2). Against opposing weather in general, preserving Pelipper is key, and sacrificing it for one Rain Dance is not worth the trade. On the other hand, Tailwind offers about the same benefits as Rain Dance does, if not more against opposing weather. It will gives Swampert 2x speed just as Rain Dance would have, but since the entire rest of the team benefits from that speed boost, it's arguably more beneficial overall. You don't get the double Waterfall damage, but in weather matchups, this is usually not the most relevant factor, speed control is. Obviously, there are occasions where Rain Dance may help more than Tailwind, but Tailwind does a big part of the job Rain Dance does, but with a ton more benefit in other situations. I will confidently say that Tailwind and the possibility of resetting weather through switches is more helpful, for this team in particular at least.

- Free turns. It's not that uncommon for Swampert to score a double-KO through Earthquake (or Koko do the same with Dazzling Gleam) with Pelipper by its side. Pelipper can contribute nothing to that turn, and switching to Celesteela rarely provides anything. A free Tailwind in these occasions is extremely valuable for the long run.

- Speed boosters. Charizard X, Mega Latios, Volcarona... speed boosters can be a huge threat if you allow them to set up for enough turns. Tailwind has been lifesaver in several occasions for me against these boosters, since it's not always possible to target them early, and you sometimes have to let them setup. The sash + Tailwind combinations allows to build safe winning conditions against these.

Replay showcasing the importance of Tailwind: MREG-WWWW-WWWR-BJKS

@ Choice Specs

Timid | Electric Surge
IVs: 31/4/31/30(HT)/31/30(HT)
EVs: 4 Def / 252 SpAtk / 252 Spe
Thunder / Dazzling Gleam / Hidden Power Fire / Volt Switch


Still the same trusty HP Fire Tapu Koko! I already explained HP Fire in the previous post and the reasons remain the same, and they remain relevant (it saved my streak twice in these 1000 battles, including a pretty epic one at 882 (replay: QPXW-WWWW-WWWR-BGRB). You may think "only twice in 1000? That's not worth a moveslot, surely there are better ways of dealing with Ferrothorn!", to which I would object that these two times are two times where the streak would have otherwise ended and therefore not reached 1000! There are only other ways to deal with Ferrothorn if I can freely attack it with Hurricane and Thunder (Earthquake quickly becomes worthless if it Curses even twice). As soon as its partner puts Pelipper and Koko under pressure, Ferrothorn becomes free to sit there and Curse up. Celesteela walls it, but doesn't 1v1 it, so an offensive answer is necessary in the back. And no, dropping Wide Guard from Celesteela for Flamethrower is not an option, because Wide Guard is a very important part of the team and has saved a lot more than 2 battles for me on its own. I know you were thinking it!! >:( In any case, there aren't better options for the 4th slot, so it's absolutely a no-drawback inclusion on the moveset!

@ Swampertite

Adamant | Damp -> Swift Swim
IVs: 31/31/31/31/31/31
EVs: 252 Atk / 4 SpDef / 252 Spe
Waterfall / Earthquake / Ice Punch / Protect


New Swampert! I mean, it's pretty much the same, but it has Damp now...! and it's in a nice Dive Ball
I will say, I am myself surprised at how many times Damp was actually useful (9, I counted!). Sometimes through some luck - I didn't think the AI would explode, but it happened to try it on my switch - and other times I predicted the Explosion and switched (common Exploders like Metagross and Golem become fairly predictable after a while...!). A nice thing to note, the AI seems to completely ignore the fact it got stopped by Damp and will keep trying anyway on the following turns. Though stopping the explosion is not always preferable; if you can double-protect while the Explosion happens, it's even better! :P

Otherwise, nothing has changed because the moveset is optimal. In my previous report, I mentioned tweaking EVs to add some bulk, so I looked into doing that, and realized how important maximum speed actually is. The intuitive thought when looking at speed tiers for Swampert is to make sure it outspeeds things in rain, since this is a rain team, but in my opinion, this is actually secondary; the tough matchups where the use of these EVs will matter are the ones where rain isn't up for a reason or another, and they will happen. At 122 speed, Swampert outspeeds Landorus-I1 and 4, Gogoat4 (need to be able to finish it off with an Ice Punch after inflicting prior damage!), Tentacruel3, Zapdos2 and 4, and more. Since Swampert doesn't have any bulk problems without investment, I see no need to remove such crucial speed EVs. The nail in the coffin, however, is Ludicolo4, which Swampert speed ties with in rain. You obviously never want rely on winning that speed tie, but having the possibility of it can give you 50% odds of winning a game that may otherwise have been lost.

@ Leftovers

IVs: 31/30(HT)/31/30(HT)/31/31
Careful | Beast Boost
EVs: 244 HP / 28 Atk / 108 Def / 124 SpDef / 4 Spe
Heavy Slam / Leech Seed / Wide Guard / Protect


Same Celesteela, new EV spread! Truth be told, last time, I only grabbed the VGC Celesteela I had in my box and rolled with it, and since it was working great, I saw no reason to change the spread along the way.

So obviously, being a meticulous builder, this time around I..... pretty much decided to do the same. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
The main difference is that this is a new VGC season, and I EVed my Celesteela to take on the new metagame. In the end, it's just a solid mix of bulk, and Celesteela's role means it will usually tanks several hits, and heal a lot in between them, so having very specific calcs for the Tree doesn't feel as important to me, as long as the one I have works as intended, and this one surely did. It may not be designed for the Tree, but I would not hesitate to recommend this EV spread for a defensive Celesteela, it worked out really well.


Other than that, my feelings about Celesteela are the same as last time. It's a wonderful switch-in to Grass, it does solid damage all-around with Heavy Slam despite the lack of investment, and has definitely won some games on its own with Leech Seed stall, even a grim-looking 1v3 once! But Wide Guard is still its best move (shoutout to Worldie Guard)! :D

As I went along on this new streak, I took a lot of notes, both general things about the team and very specific matchup notes that I wanted to remember, so here they are for anyone interesting in using the team - in no specific order...!

- WATCH OUT FOR ALOLAN-RAICHU! It's a very rare sight, but it outspeeds everything on the team (thanks, Koko!) and can't even be taken down in a single hit because of the sash! With Grass Knot in its arsenal, Swampert is not a check by any means - neither is Celesteela, obviously... taking it down involves Koko, usually sacrificing Pelipper's sash for a Tailwind, and using Protect smartly. Probably the one Pokémon I fear the most now.

- Xenophon, a Grass-type Veteran trainer, can be really bad to deal with. One of the very few trainers where it's a pretty safe call to lock Koko into Dazzling Gleam. Pelipper and Celesteela are key against him.

- Opposing rain is the second worst team matchup after sun. I already talk about Swift Swim Kingdra and Beartic4 in my Tailwind section up above. Prioritize setting up Tailwind and bank on smart Protects to get through rain trainers. Most of the time, they won't have enough of the right abilities to take full advantage of your rain, but the worst-case scenarios are bad. Dolly and Joaquin are the names to remember here.

- Even if Heatran could be scarfed and OHKO Koko with Earth Power, when it can also have Sunny Day, it needs to be targeted with Thunder + Brine, preventing sun is more important than preserving Koko. Always double down Heatran.

- Celesteela's speed tier comes in clutch against Primarina, whew! Tapu Koko is the only way to OHKO it, and it puts on a lot of offensive pressure.

- Quick Claw Uxie is a THREAT! It can quick claw Energy Ball Swampert (which tanks it when Mega, but barely), and quick claw Thunder Pelipper and Celesteela. It's also difficult to predict if it has the choice between the 2 moves. Needs to be dealt with as quickly as possible.

- Wide Guard is soooooo good against Jellicent3 and Bronzong34!!

- Slaking4 is always OHKOd by Thunder, but Slaking3 is a 62% roll. I find that it's worth taking a shot, it will work out most of the time, just make sure you're fine with losing Koko to Giga Impact if it doesn't.

- Volcarona can be ignored when it has a more threatening partner, just make sure to Tailwind as soon as possible (either turn 1 or 2) so Swampert can always revenge.

- In front of Raikou, don't bait the electric attack with Protect on Pelipper, just switch to Swampert instantly, because it could be Electrium Z. In the case of Jolteon, Goodra, Regice, most of the Lake Trio, etc. though, Protecting turn 1 is usually the better play, it's a free Thunder from Koko.

- Sometimes, it's worth testing for Lightning Rod/Storm Drain, you need to assess the risk vs. reward depending on the situation. For example, Alolan Marowak can be Brined, in which case it would only block 1 Thunder before going down - before even attacking. In the case of Rhyperior, though, usually it's *not* worth the risk. The Cradily set without Giga Drain can easily be tested for Storm Drain. There's always a chance they don't have the ability, and trying it out is sometimes relatively safe, so why not; much to gain, little to lose.

- For the longest time, I ignored Politoed and only targeted it with Thunder if I had nothing better to do. Now, I Thunder it on sight. Politoed3 is not really a threat, but Politoed4 is VERY dangerous. It does immense damage with Hydro Pump in the rain, it can freeze stuff with Blizzard, it can put Celesteela and Pelipper to sleep, and the worst part is that its move choices are extremely unpredictable. Get rid of it asap!

- Zapdos is OHKOd by Thunder unless it's set2, which Swampert walls.

- Ninetales-A12 has a slight chance to survive Thunder, so it's sometimes smarter to Protect Pelipper in front of it.

- Rotom-W is one of the biggest threats to the team, not only does it have offensive pressure, but it also walls the entire team except for Koko. Thunder it quickly (it's an OHKO).

- It might seem unintuitive at first, but Rotom-Frost is KOed by a double up on turn 1 (Thunder + Brine) - it's worth doing, otherwise dealing with it is asking for freezes!

- Charizard X outspeeds Swampert in rain after only 1 Dragon Dance. TAILWIND ASAP!

- Never lock yourself into Dazzling Gleam against a sun trainer, even if they lead with 2 Grass-types. Next thing you know, Arcanine or Heatran comes out, sets up the sun, and the nightmare begins.

At the start of the streak, we had a small discussion on Discord relating our experiences in the Tree with facing Megas; I felt like I faced Kangaskhan the most, while ReptoAbysmal vouched for Mawile being the most common, and Coeur7 had gathered data on his Singles streak showing Garchomp as the most common. Clearly, this depends on the version played, since the "boss" trainers are different and feature different Mega evolutions, but I thought it would be fun to take note of every mega I saw during my Ultra Sun streak. For anyone interested, here are the results!



Kangaskhan is a lot more common for me than Ultra Moon players because of Kiawe, same with Abomasnow because of Sina.

Just like last time with MimiLax, I also kept track of every boss battle I had. We already know the odds are the exact same for all of them except for Anabel (from datamining), but this is still a fun exercise to do!

10 - Sina
20 - Cynthia
30 - Kukui
40 - Colress
50 - Blue
60 - Kiawe
70 - Plumeria
80 - Cynthia
90 - Kiawe
100 - Wally
110 - Cynthia
120 - Wally
130 - Cynthia
140 - Kukui
150 - Colress
160 - Wally
170 - Sina
180 - Kiawe
190 - Colress
200 - Kiawe
210 - Grimsley
220 - Grimsley
230 - Kiawe
240 - Grimsley
250 - Wally
260 - Wally
270 - Wally
280 - Kukui
290 - Grimsley
300 - Cynthia
310 - Colress
320 - Anabel
330 - Sina
340 - Wally
350 - Kiawe
360 - Plumeria
370 - Wally
380 - Grimsley
390 - Plumeria
400 - Sina
410 - Wally
420 - Grimsley
430 - Kiawe
440 - Kukui
450 - Colress
460 - Grimsley
470 - Wally
480 - Kiawe
490 - Kiawe
500 - Wally
510 - Grimsley
520 - Sina
530 - Wally
540 - Wally
550 - Sina
560 - Kukui
570 - Kukui
580 - Kukui
590 - Kukui
600 - Kiawe
610 - Kukui
620 - Sina
630 - Colress
640 - Cynthia
650 - Colress
660 - Plumeria
670 - Plumeria
680 - Sina
690 - Cynthia
700 - Grimsley
710 - Sina
720 - Colress
730 - Colress
740 - Kukui
750 - Kukui
760 - Cynthia
770 - Colress
780 - Grimsley
790 - Colress
800 - Kiawe
810 - Plumeria
820 - Kukui
830 - Grimsley
840 - Grimsley
850 - Sina
860 - Kukui
870 - Colress
880 - Plumeria
890 - Anabel
900 - Kiawe
910 - Kiawe
920 - Wally
930 - Kukui
940 - Sina
950 - Kukui
960 - Cynthia
970 - Kukui
980 - Kiawe
990 - Wally
1000 - Colress


I rather spontaneously decided to do a live stream on Twitch of the final 25 battles of this streak (the VOD is available on my Twitch channel), and it was pretty fun despite my setup being really bad with no capture card :(. If I can find a way to get a setup of higher quality, I think I may stream most of the rest of this streak, whatever heights it may reach in the future!

For now, I will take a short break from the team and concentrate on an ongoing Singles streak I have, as well as various fun meme teams in Doubles on my Ultra Moon cartridge.

As usual, big shoutouts to all the good people on the Tree Discord server: Team Ezra (turskain, ReptoAbysmal, Smuckem, paperquagsire, Worldie), Coeur7, Level 51, Josh C., PikaCuber, wadusher, SadisticMystic and everybody else who makes the server a fun place to hang around! \o/

Thank you for reading! :heart:
 
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At the start of the streak, we had a small discussion on Discord relating our experiences in the Tree with facing Megas; I felt like I faced Kangaskhan the most, while ReptoAbysmal vouched for Mawile being the most common, and Coeur7 had gathered data on his Singles streak showing Garchomp as the most common. Clearly, this depends on the version played, since the "boss" trainers are different and feature different Mega evolutions, but I thought it would be fun to take note of every mega I saw during my Ultra Sun streak. For anyone interested, here are the results!



Kangaskhan is a lot more common for me than Ultra Moon players because of Kiawe, same with Abomasnow because of Sina.
Over a streak of 1000 double battles on Ultra Sun, these are the expected figures for encounters with each mega (though the observed numbers will inevitably trend lower than these, because a trainer might have multiple megas on their team, only one can use the opportunity, and the rest might get mowed down without giving you a chance to identify their set--particularly notable on Wally's team, such as Gallade or Garchomp):
Garchomp 21.34 (observed 17 / -4.34)
Kangaskhan 17.05 (Moon: 6.24; observed 16 / -1.05)
Mawile 15.66 (observed 17 / +1.34)
Metagross 15.36 (observed 16 / +0.64)
Salamence 14.55 (observed 8 / -6.55)
Latios 13.76 (observed 15 / +1.24)
Tyranitar 13.33 (observed 13 / -0.33)
Gallade 12.62 (observed 5 / -7.62)
Gengar 11.57 (Moon: 6.71; observed 12 / +0.43)
Alakazam 11.19 (observed 10 / -1.19)
Steelix 11.08 (observed 9 / -2.08)
Gyarados 10.76 (observed 9 / -1.76)
Charizard Y 10.73 (observed 17 / +6.27)
Latias 10.34 (observed 14 / +3.66)
Slowbro 10.15 (Moon: 13.89; observed 9 / -1.15)
Gardevoir 9.80 (observed 12 / +2.20)
Venusaur 9.57 (observed 7 / -2.57)
Aggron 9.30 (observed 2 / -7.30)
Houndoom 9.23 (observed 10 / +0.77)
Sceptile 9.08 (Moon: 12.55; observed 5 / -4.08)
Charizard X 8.98 (observed 10 / +1.02)
Aerodactyl 8.77 (observed 3 / -5.77)
Swampert 8.40 (observed 3 / -5.40)
Camerupt 8.34 (observed 8 / -0.34)
Manectric 7.42 (observed 4 / -3.42)
Altaria 6.95 (observed 8 / +1.05)
Blaziken 6.91 (observed 5 / -1.91)
Ampharos 6.13 (observed 2 / -4.13)
Medicham 5.75 (observed 5 / -0.75)
Abomasnow 5.59 (Moon: 1.85; observed 6 / +0.41)
Absol 5.51 (observed 1 / -4.51)
Beedrill 5.45 (observed 5 / -0.45)
Scizor 5.24 (observed 4 / -1.24)
Lopunny 3.77 (observed 5 / +1.23)
Audino 3.69 (observed 3 / -0.69)
Lucario 3.53 (observed 3 / -0.53)
Glalie 3.44 (observed 2 / -1.44)
Heracross 3.23 (observed 2 / -1.23)
Pidgeot 3.19 (observed 2 / -1.19)
Sharpedo 2.70 (observed 5 / +2.30)
Banette 1.93 (observed 0 / -1.93)
Pinsir 1.61 (Moon: 5.08; observed 2 / +0.39)
Sableye 0.96 (observed 0 / -0.96)
Blastoise 0.19 (observed 0 / -0.19)
overall 364.15 (observed 311 / -53.15)
 
Here is my team(and first post) for super singles after some suggestions in the discord.It has 11 wins so far(will edit this when my streak of 90 is done(for leaderboards)...
lead: blaziken...
evs: 252 attack/252 speed
speed boost
wide lens
nature: adamant
moves: thunder punch(for fliers and waters), flare blitz(ohkos stuff and is the best fire stab for this man), sub(suggested by Coeur(props to another frenchman), says goodbye to status and i think debuffs) and high jump kick(main move i click(gotta be careful of protect mons) and accuracy isnt a problem due to the lens.
opinion and thoughts: really good suicide lead that has SOLO'ED entire teams on its own.
garchomp
evs: 252 atk, 252 speed
choice scarf
Jolly
moves: rock slide(was unsure), confide(suggested in the discord. haven't used it yet but it can apparently help the last member set up), outrage(i dont fear locking in it because of not only of the last member, but also of garchomp's role) and ofc EQ

role: cleans up what blaziken can't. rarely have to use this dude because of how good my lead is so far.

hilarious note: i somehow hatched my first shiny(that i hatched), which was a gible while trying to get the stuff for this set.

scizor:
evs: 252 hp, 252 atk
@megastone
moves: roost, swords dance, u-turn and bullet punch.
notes: generic mega scizor. second one i bred because the first got traded to someone in the gts because i do not have a second ds.

threats: TR(if scizor is down, haven't run in that yet) and Char X(hope to fucking god that it doesn't appear and/or doesnt decide to dragon dance and sweep)
 
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took a break at 20 as i will go hang out with buds.Will continue as soon as i come back
edit; a like from the Legend himself, GG Unit? I am speechless
 
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i thank turskain and Coeur from discord(idk your name on here, sorry about that) for not only answering questions about my team in discord, but also about stuff such as enemy sets and the like.I am deeply grateful from the bottom of my heart
Edit: as such... i am ready to give away some breedjects (ha mareanie, gibles, scythers and torchic's) with guaranteed HA and least 5 ivs(natures can be decided by you). i will also have some pheromosa's ready(cause ik how much the community loves those). The breeding may take time, but idrc as it will be worth it.
 
Team LC:

@ Eviolite

Relaxed | Aroma Veil
IVs: 31/0/31/31/31/0
EVs: 188 HP / 188 Def / 132 SpDef
Trick Room / Moonblast / Odor Sleuth / Helping Hand


I wasn't too fond of Spritzee's design when I first saw it in Gen 6, but seeing it on field, floating around, flapping its tiny wings, Spritzee has certainly won me over. Or it might be the fact it was tanking many hits surprisingly well, even surviving between 1-10 HP in a few clutch situations to set up Trick Room. More than for any other team I ran in the past, Trick Room was an absolute necessity here if I wanted to have any hope of winning, which is why Aroma Veil was so important to prevent Taunt - as uncommon as the move is, a single one would have meant the end. Thanks to Spritzee, Trick Room reliably went up for 120 games in a row without fail, which I find to be an impressive record. Surely, the fact a level 1 Aron was baiting attacks by its side was instrumental in its long-term success, but it still sometimes got double-targeted.

Moonblast is primarily meant to KO foes that have been brought down to 1-12 HP by Aron (or 25% more if they had a Sitrus Berry) before they can move. The extra power (vs. Dazzling Gleam) allows it to still KO Sitrus Berry Archeops, Thundurus and Rampardos, as well as deal very decent damage when super effective (many 2HKOs, as well as this blessed calc: 0 SpA Spritzee Moonblast vs. 0 HP / 0 SpD Hydreigon: 168-196 (100.5 - 117.3%) -- guaranteed OHKO).

Odor Sleuth plays the same role Foresight does on Dusclops FEAR teams; it allows Aron to Endeavor Ghost-types. In addition, it prevents Minimize from ever being an issue (I would have lost to +6 evasion Muk-Alola without it!).

Finally, Helping Hand turns both Clamperl and Mudbray into extremely powerful attackers that can OHKO a wide array of threats, even with neutral attacks. The extra power is much needed, as many of the calcs show them doing damage in the 80% range.

The EV spread is meant to live a Mega Gengar Sludge Bomb 100% of the time (and it did happen - Spritzee lived on 6 HP!) and a Mega Beedrill3 Poison Jab 100% of the time as well. Big bonus, Mega Metagross' Meteor Mash only has a 12% chance to OHKO (it usually opts to Bullet Punch or Brick Break Aron, in any case)!

@ Berry Juice

Brave | Sturdy | Level 1
IVs: 31/31/31/31/31/0
EVs: -
Endeavor / Toxic / Rain Dance / Protect


Aron has been a staple in so many Tree teams of the past that I probably don't need to explain much. It Protects on turn 1 while Spritzee sets up Trick Room, drawing a majority of attacks into its slot, then in the following turns, combos with Spritzee to Endeavor + Moonblast as many foes as possible before going down. Sometimes, this combo simply sweeps the opposing team, but in most cases, one of the sweepers from the back has to come in and clean up.

The other moves are not particularly important and they will only rarely be used. Toxic is useful when facing Ghost-types that you don't have the luxury of Odor Sleuthing, or to finish off low-HP foes. Rain Dance is usually used right before going down, when an additional Endeavor wouldn't benefit the team or isn't possible. Clamperl is already very powerful, so boosting it with rain (and potentially Helping Hand) makes for some ridiculous damage output. I also used it a few times against Fire teams to weaken their output damage. Like Toxic, it's very situational, but still helpful at times!

@ Deep Sea Tooth

Quiet | Shell Armor
IVs: 31/0/31/30/31/0 (Hyper trained to 31/0/31/31/31/0)
EVs: 252 HP / 252 SpAtk / 4 SpDef
Scald / Ice Beam / Hidden Power Grass / Protect


And now, the powerhouse! With the Deep Sea Tooth, Clamperl's Special Attack stat is doubled and reaches a whopping 276! As a comparison, Modest Mega Alakazam hits 249 at most, Modest Xurkitree hits 247 at most, and Modest Kyurem-White hits 244 at most. Clamperl is stronger than all of these, and by quite a bit!

Now, imagine boosting this monstrous Special Attack stat even further with Helping Hand support, and even boosting Scald one more stage with rain... needless to say, Clamperl can score OHKOs even with neutral attacks!

Clamperl's coverage options are pretty lacking, but Water, Ice and Grass is excellent coverage, so I didn't find it to be an issue. Scald is the strongest Water STAB that's guaranteed to hit (since Surf is much weakened by spread damage - I wouldn't want to hit my ally anyway). Ice Beam is used to deal with Grass-types, which are very threatening to the backline of the team. Helping Hand + Ice Beam can OHKO about any of them (I didn't take the time to run all of the calcs, but I have yet to see one survive). HP Grass prevents Water-types from walling Clamperl, and even the very bulky ones such as Jellicent and Milotic are 2HKOd. Mega Swampert has a 69% chance to be OHKOd without Helping Hand. Seriously, the Clamp does not mess around with its damage output!

Thanks to a (very generic) 252 HP investment, it could usually tank a hit, but just one (and not a super effective one, lol). But Clamperl is not meant to be used defensively at all, so it doesn't matter; if anything, tanking one hit was more than I even expected from it, so it was always a nice surprise!

@ Groundium Z

Brave | Stamina
IVs: 31/31/31/31/31/0
EVs: 252 HP / 252 Atk / 4 Def
High Horsepower / Close Combat / Rock Slide / Protect


Mudbray's typing and coverage compliment Clamperl's really well, and with one being special and the other physical, they created a near-ideal backline. It rocks one of the highest attack stats of LC Pokémon (base 100, same as Trapinch), and some actual decent bulk (70 base Defense and HP, plus Stamina). What it offers over Trapinch, however, is not just bulk, but also High Horsepower, a powerful single-target Ground move that trumps Earthquake big time (with how frail my team is, hitting my own teammates is the last thing I needed!).

Close Combat is one of the best Fighting-moves, and since the Tree is bursting with Normal-types, it was vital in several circumstances. With Helping Hand, it's guaranteed to OHKO Mega Kangaskhan; it also deals with Ice-types that heavily threaten it.

Rock Slide was added for lack of better options, and I ended up using it quite a lot. Missing is always scary, but a few risks need to be taken to win with a LC team! It's most useful when one of the opposing Pokémon is low on HP, and can deal some actual good damage on Pokémon that are weak to it, especially when Helping Hand-boosting it. Most importantly, it's Mudbray's only way to hit Flying-types, and since this team can never switch around (into Clamperl if I want to Ice Beam, for example), being able to hit almost everything for decent damage is really important.

There really weren't many items that Mudbray could have benefited from, so Groundium Z was a pretty obvious pick. In the end, I used Tectonic Rage about every single game in which Mudbray hit the field; having a Z-move nuke to score a OHKO is incredibly valuable for a team that cannot tank hits well; things need to go down fast!
I am curious how this team would hypothetically work if you removed the LC restriction but otherwise kept it the same. Clamperl obviously has to run as-is. Mudsdale looks like a straight upgrade over Mudbray, even losing speed for better TR use. Aromatisse is the questionable one. You'd gain HP and SpA (does this matter?), but you'd lose bulk due to no Eviolite, though now you can run an item. Better or worse overall? And for Aron, I know that Togedemaru is popular now, so would you switch? You'd just lose access to Rain Dance, which you said had some marginal use.
 

Eisenherz

50% Berry enthusiast
is a Top Smogon Social Media Contributor
I am curious how this team would hypothetically work if you removed the LC restriction but otherwise kept it the same. Clamperl obviously has to run as-is. Mudsdale looks like a straight upgrade over Mudbray, even losing speed for better TR use. Aromatisse is the questionable one. You'd gain HP and SpA (does this matter?), but you'd lose bulk due to no Eviolite, though now you can run an item. Better or worse overall? And for Aron, I know that Togedemaru is popular now, so would you switch? You'd just lose access to Rain Dance, which you said had some marginal use.
ReptoAbysmal would be able to best assess how usable the team would be as a regular non-LC Trick Room team, since he has the most experience using TR in the Tree, but I agree that it could very well work!

Mudsdale would definitely be an excellent upgrade from Mudbray, and I would give it Heavy Slam over Rock Slide. Mudsdale is almost as heavy as Celesteela (2nd heaviest Pokémon of the entire dex!), so Heavy Slam is very often at max power! Poor lil' Mudbray can't make much use of that move since it's nowhere as heavy (110kg vs 920kg lol).

I would use Aromatisse over Spritzee since the bulk is about the same, but it can make use of a Lum Berry as well for more safety setting up TR, and Moonblast would do a lot more damage. Maybe a different setter could work too, such as Musharna (I would have said Dusclops as well, but I feel like Helping Hand was so crucial to the team that losing it would throw it off), but Aromatisse would be a fine choice in any case!

And I fully agree, Togedemaru is a much superior version of Aron, so I would replace it to a lvl. 1 Togedemaru in a heartbeat, Rain Dance isn't a big loss!

I'm not sure if you were thinking about trying this out, but if so, I do encourage you to! If the LC version can get to 120 so quickly, I have no doubts the grown-up version would go further!
 
I've got 1950 in a row in Super Singles and am about to stream for a couple hours (hopefully). It'll be on this here YouTube channel.

Did through 1970 in the stream, and now you can watch it at a higher speed multiplier so you don't have to relive the fast-paced thrills of a battle where I'm at -5 accuracy 40 turns in in real time.


Saved a couple battles from the stream

#1951: BF5G-WWWW-WWWR-EQH3

Specs Latios OHKOs Durant so I have to count PP while setting up. Glalie doesn't have the greatest boosts when Life Orb Entei switches in but is able to continue setting up on it and ultiately KO it from behind a Sub.

#1962: 9L8G-WWWW-WWWR-EQLZ

Wild one where Scizor-3 U-Turns out of Durant the first chance it gets both times, QC Bronzong gets the QC OHKO on Mimikyu and then explodes against Glalie the first chance it gets. Saved by the AI sending in non-mega Aggron rather than Scizor (Earthquake has more BP than Bullet Punch of course), but it still took a while due to awful accuracy boost luck, which was a persistent theme throughout the stream.
 
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ReptoAbysmal would be able to best assess how usable the team would be as a regular non-LC Trick Room team, since he has the most experience using TR in the Tree, but I agree that it could very well work!

Mudsdale would definitely be an excellent upgrade from Mudbray, and I would give it Heavy Slam over Rock Slide. Mudsdale is almost as heavy as Celesteela (2nd heaviest Pokémon of the entire dex!), so Heavy Slam is very often at max power! Poor lil' Mudbray can't make much use of that move since it's nowhere as heavy (110kg vs 920kg lol).

I would use Aromatisse over Spritzee since the bulk is about the same, but it can make use of a Lum Berry as well for more safety setting up TR, and Moonblast would do a lot more damage. Maybe a different setter could work too, such as Musharna (I would have said Dusclops as well, but I feel like Helping Hand was so crucial to the team that losing it would throw it off), but Aromatisse would be a fine choice in any case!

And I fully agree, Togedemaru is a much superior version of Aron, so I would replace it to a lvl. 1 Togedemaru in a heartbeat, Rain Dance isn't a big loss!

I'm not sure if you were thinking about trying this out, but if so, I do encourage you to! If the LC version can get to 120 so quickly, I have no doubts the grown-up version would go further!
Fake Out and Helping Hand would be tremendously useful. My own Aromatisse/Toge leads taught me beyond a doubt that FEAR sets can and will survive the entirety of many battles, making their ability to ensure tidy cleanup kills a major boon. Especially since you’ve got a poke like Clamperl and muscle like the horsie, don’t sleep on the benefits of HH. It’s for more than backline ghosts; you also assist in killing contact ability threats without wasting Sturdy, and can do something useful on a turn you anticipate dying to +1 priority (though I learned to never take this for granted!)
 
And here I am thinking that this Doubles streak would never raise, and yet, it did. Weavile. Naganadel. Mega Metagross. And Primarina.

Up to 251 wins is where the team got me. Right under a team that also used Weavile. Planning on using this team again, to see if I can get another higher streak with this team.

Also, here's the Battle Video right now: SVBW - WWWW - WWWR - EVY4

I honestly don't know what I did wrong here. If anyone can find the mistakes that I did, then please do.
I also surprisingly found myself, surprisingly not too mad with this loss, because no hax, no crits were involved, (or so if I recall), Weavile is a terrifying monster, and I really wanted to see Primarina on the board, which now it definitely is. :)

Stinger (Naganadel) @ Dragonium Z
Ability: Beast Boost
Level: 50
Shiny: Yes
EVs: 80 HP / 252 SpA / 172 Spe
Timid Nature
- Draco Meteor
- Sludge Bomb
- Flamethrower
- Protect

Ok, first off. Spread shamelessly stolen by Worldie. (In fact, the entire set) I brought this along with Weavile so Naganadel can use this one Nuke off, that being Devastating Drake. Draco Meteor is still very powerful after a Beast Boost, Sludge Bomb has amazing neutral coverage alongside it and has a good chance to poison the opponent. Flamethrower hits Ice- and Steel-types that Draco Meteor and Sludge Bomb cannot hit. Protect is there because it's basic.

Silver (Weavile) @ Focus Sash
Ability: Pressure
Level: 50
EVs: 252 Atk / 4 SpD / 252 Spe
Jolly Nature
- Fake Out
- Knock Off
- Ice Punch
- Protect

Fake Out support is great with Naganadel out as leads. Knock Off can instantly reveal sets of opposing Pokemon, it's notable to realize that aside from Mega Lopunny, Weavile is the fastest Fake Out user in the Tree, so it can speed-tie with other Weavile using Fake Out. (If knocking off a Choice Scarf off of Garchomp, then Garchomp3, if nothing is knocked off, then it's Garchomp4, well because it's gonna Mega Evo turn one unless something already Mega Evolved.) Ice Punch hits Dragons and Grass- and Ground-types like Latias, Salamence, (Mega Salamence notably) Torterra, and Flygon. Protect again, because basic stuff.

Sea Creature (Primarina) @ Choice Specs
Ability: Liquid Voice
EVs: 252 HP / 252 SpA / 4 SpD
Quiet Nature
IVs: 0 Atk / 0 Spe
- Hyper Voice
- Moonblast
- Energy Ball
- Hidden Power [Fire]

Trick Room is annoying. I honestly hate Trick Room, whether I'm using it or going against it. Primarina is here just for any Trick Room team. Hyper Voice boosted by Liquid Voice and its natural high Special Attack stacked with Choice Specs is one hell of a hit. Moonblast is good STAB alongside LV-Hyper Voice. Energy Ball has good coverage with dealing with other bulky Water-types. The last moveslot is where I thought there were multiple options so I gave the moveslot to HP Fire. However, I'm starting to use Shadow Ball in this slot more often, as Moonblast and Hyper Voice still hit like trucks, and I can grind down Psychic-types and Ghost-types.

Gigabyte (Metagross-Mega) @ Metagrossite
Ability: Tough Claws
Level: 50
Shiny: Yes
EVs: 252 Atk / 4 SpD / 252 Spe
Jolly Nature
- Iron Head
- Thunder Punch
- Ice Punch
- Protect

Lastly, Mega Metagross. An Iron Head boosted from a Tough Claws hurts like no one else. Thunder Punch and Ice Punch are good coverage moves alongside Iron Head and Protect because Doubles. Something notable about Mega Metagross is that first it completes the D / S / F core, with Naganadel and Primarina. It can also take One Earthquake from either Garchomp3 or Salamence4 and hit back hard with an Ice Punch. It finds itself walled by Heatran though, unless it uses Stomping Tantrum.

Some counters that I found while grinding this team up:

Weavile: Other opposing Weavile can break up the usual routine that I usually perform, either Fake Out something on my team if it wins the speed tie, or straight up Ice Punch Naganadel, which OHKOs Naganadel. The best switch is Primarina, easily taking any hit Weavile wants to go for. Oh man, if opposing Weavile carried Poison Jab, not even Primarina would be a good switch.

Tyranitar3 + 4: Ok, first, shameless plug, these were my #1 threats on my opinion on my Top 10 of hardest Pokemon to beat in the Battle Tree. Second, Dragon Dance is scary when going up against a Tyranitar. And one cannot reliably stay in on anything. The best bet is Mega Metagross, Iron Head can kill Tyranitar3. But Tyranitar4 is another story. No switch becomes safe. The best thing I can do is sack off something, usually Weavile if Fake Out was already used and then go to Mega Metagross or Primarina to kill.

Garchomp3: Outrage is no problem. But Earthquake can hit anything on my team hard. Mega Metagross can eat one Earthquake but then can't take another. Other than Earthquake from Scarfchomp, nothing from this moveset is particular scary.

Salamence4 (If Weavile and Mega-Metagross are down): I basically lose if this thing appears before me. Because Double-Edge hits Primarina WAY too hard, and Naganadel doesn't outspeed Mega Salamence, or at least the spread that I use doesn't outspeed it. Now remember, Mega Metagross can eat up one Earthquake from this thing and hit back with an Ice Punch, and Weavile can straight up Ice Punch it to oblivion. But not oblivion like Yveltal can. Anyways, Salamence4 would be an even bigger threat if it had Dragon Dance. But it doesn't, making it so much less terrifying.

Now for Singles, I've been using the Aegimence Core with Chansey.
So far, I have surpassed 250 wins, but I'm gonna wait until I lose to post the, well, team.

Anyways, that's it. Have a good day. :)
 
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I am proud of you brandonplaysstuff , I knew that Naga set had potential, thanks for giving it glory :D

As note, you should have tried Pickpocket Weavile. It's nearly always useless, occasionally though can steal a berry or choice item ..... or Toxic Orb. That time i was just laughing at it :D
 
There's just one Alolatales team on the leaderboard, wherefore each of its teammates features on 100% of Aurora Veil teams; that said, if you're looking to make your own, the greatest value from Veil, I'd imagine, arises from buying turns for a powerful set-up move.

You'll want to make sure to have (all sets of) opposing potential weather setters addressed; more generally, double-targets from two faster leads and the usual disruption (Fake Out, faster Taunt...) should be planned for (which paperquagsire's team addresses with its own lead Fake Out). Since opposing Blizzard will always hit you, having at least one team member that can resist Ice and auto-defrost (or Tapu Fini, which incidentally learns Psych Up and merely overlaps a Poison weakness with A-Tales, which is one of the least worrisome offensive types in the Tree imo) should also help you.
 
Did #1970-1985 this morning.


Some highlights: at 40 minutes I faced the Intimidate specialist Etta who had Arcanine OHKO Durant and then a backup QC Incinerorar, the Dexio fight at 1:06 that was pretty unorthodox, featuring a rare use of X Scissor and Red Card eventually bringing in Prankster Sub Whimsicott under Trick Room, and at 1:22:30 is a seemingly boring battle where my EV choices paid off to make the battle easier (+5 Glalie gets a guaranteed 2HKO on Mega Metagross, which cuts down on the need to try stalling for a miss).

The next stream I do (hopefully tomorrow evening, I'm GMT -7) I'll go for 2000, and after that I'll probably get back to battling at my own pace.

edit: parts of the video are gonna be muted because of YouTube copyright police lol sorry
 
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For a Veil team, you need something with Fake Out so you can safely set it turn one. You also need a way of dealing with weather as you can't set Veil in Sun/Rain/Sand. I used Mega Blastoise since it could use Fake Out while also dealing with Sand teams with Water Pulse and Aura Sphere in addition to having amazing bulk under Veil, but other Pokemon might be able to do that as well. For the backline, I would go with pokemon that can deal with all types of opposing weather, as they are the biggest threat to the team. I would also suggest running Freeze Dry on Ninetales since it can take out threatening sweepers on rain teams such as Ludicolo, Kingdra, or Swampert.
 
There's just one Alolatales team on the leaderboard, wherefore each of its teammates features on 100% of Aurora Veil teams; that said, if you're looking to make your own, the greatest value from Veil, I'd imagine, arises from buying turns for a powerful set-up move.

You'll want to make sure to have (all sets of) opposing potential weather setters addressed; more generally, double-targets from two faster leads and the usual disruption (Fake Out, faster Taunt...) should be planned for (which paperquagsire's team addresses with its own lead Fake Out). Since opposing Blizzard will always hit you, having at least one team member that can resist Ice and auto-defrost (or Tapu Fini, which incidentally learns Psych Up and merely overlaps a Poison weakness with A-Tales, which is one of the least worrisome offensive types in the Tree imo) should also help you.
I'm talking about singles, but thanks, I appreciate your help!
 
I'm talking about singles, but thanks, I appreciate your help!
I'd be quite wary of Aurora Veil in Singles, simply because there's only so many turns you can take advantage of the defense boosts. A Focus Sash can help ensure that Aurora Veil goes up, but then you only have 3 turns at most to take advantage of it. On the contrary, if you have Light Clay to extend the amount of time you have Aurora Veil, you run the risk of not even having it go up due to any quick, strong attack, and leaving your backline to struggle, if they are reliant on Aurora Veil. But, it would give you up to 7 turns of Aurora Veil, best case scenario.

I mean, I haven't tried it, so maybe you can show me better. But the problem I see with this strategy is that Ninetales-A isn't the strongest thing in the world, offensively or defensively. Attack typings are pretty good, and stuff like Blizzard will dent things, but it doesn't have the greatest stats to help back up such strong moves.
 
It is quite difficult to make A-ninetales usable for singles. On its own it's not a strong poke, it has strong stabs but low BPs to work with, it's fast but not *super* fast as well as hugely vulnerable to Bullet Punch, and even just to set up A-veil and swap you're needing 2 turns (plus exposing your swap in to potential crits or status), and A-ninetales doesn't have Explosion or similar to force a swap without having your backline take a hit.

All in all, not recommending it,
 

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